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Thread: There's method in China's peace push

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    There's method in China's peace push

    Greater China
    Dec 21, 2007


    There's method in China's peace push


    By Rebecca Jackson

    Last month, Chinese peacekeepers started arriving in the troubled Darfur region of Sudan as part of the long-debated, long-awaited United Nations and African Union hybrid mission. China now contributes over 7,000 peacekeepers to 21 missions across the world, more than the rest of the UN Security Council's permanent five members combined. Overall, China is the thirteenth-largest contributor of peacekeeping troops.

    Claiming that China was complicit in the conflict through oil and weapons trade with Khartoum, rebels in the area immediately called for the withdrawal of Chinese troops. Nevertheless, the troops have stayed put. Their presence in the country illustrates how far China has come in its involvement in peacekeeping efforts.

    Despite all this, China-watchers have tended to neglect peacekeeping as an expanding arena of involvement in international relations. Such is the case in Africa, China's showcase for peacekeeping. The continent hosts the majority of ongoing missions, but troops committed by industrialized countries now account for just 6% of all troops.

    In the early years after joining the UN, in the 1970s, China avoided supporting peacekeeping missions - both financially and with contributions of troops - saying that they infringed upon the sovereignty of the states involved. But after two decades of reform and opening up, China has now started to reassess its approach to peacekeeping missions.

    In 1981, China participated in its first peacekeeping vote, and in 1990 dispatched its first peacekeepers to the Middle East. Since then, the country has contributed peacekeepers to missions across the globe - beyond Africa, in Cambodia, Bosnia/Kosovo, East Timor, Afghanistan, Haiti and Lebanon.

    As China expert Bates Gill, director of Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, points out, in real terms, China's contribution to UN peacekeeping is comparatively small. "China contributes less than 1% of both the overall UN budget and the UN peacekeeping budget." And the financial contributions of rest of the permanent five are still significantly higher than China's.

    Viewed over time, however, China's peacekeeping activities today demonstrate a significant shift.

    China's participation in peacekeeping missions now also extends beyond those with a Chapter VI mandate, in which countries should first seek their own resolution to disputes, to those with a Chapter VII mandate, permitting the use of military force in order to achieve peace.

    China has traditionally favored conflict-ridden countries to resolve their own disputes, as the sovereignty of states is of utmost importance.
    But some flexibility is now evident on the issue of non-interference, as seen most recently in China's vote in favor of the UNAMID mission in Darfur.

    China has also demonstrated increased flexibility on the extent to which force can be used in missions. The International Force in East Timor (INTERFET) was permitted to "take all necessary measures" to restore peace and security to the area. As with the mission in Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone and the Democratic Republic of Congo, they demonstrate that China will participate in operations using military force marking a move into peace enforcement activities.

    The country's participation in INTERFET also shows that, where necessary, China will participate in missions that do not primarily use UN troops. The East Timor mission was led by Australia. Similarly, the peace operations in Somalia in the early 1990s demonstrate that even where the pivotal country is the US, China will not necessary block resolutions from being passed.

    However, host state acquiescence remains an important cornerstone of China's acceptance of peacekeeping missions and was a pre-conditional to China's involvement in UNAMID in Darfur. In 1999, following mass bloodshed in East Timor, China voted in favor of a resolution to bring peace and security to the region, but only after the invitation of the government there.

    INTERFET also demonstrated the utmost importance of Security Council authorization in peace keeping and peace enforcement missions.

    So what has motivated China to become more involved in UN peacekeeping efforts?

    Maintaining a stable and secure international environment is important for China's "rise".
    Appearing to be a responsible player is seen as an important way for China to achieve this, and involvement in international peacekeeping plays an integral role in projecting this image.

    As Major General Zhang Qinsheng, deputy chief of General Staff for China's People's Liberation Army (PLA) put it, "Chinese peacekeeping activities demonstrate our country's image as a responsible superpower ... and in the course of peacekeeping activities under the UN Charter, China sets a glorious example."

    China has long supported multilateralism in international relations. Increasingly China sees its own security and well-being as intricately interlinked with that of other countries. The UN is seen as an effective platform for collective action to deal with the threats, and the best venue to exercise a multilateralist policy. As Yin He, associate professor at the China Peacekeeping Training Center, has said, greater involvement in peacekeeping can yield valuable political currency to promote its multilateral agenda.

    China's involvement in peacekeeping can help strengthen the UN's authority and serve to balance against an increase in unilateral behavior, especially by the US. What's more, as Bates Gill points out, following the NATO bombing of Kosovo, greater involvement in peacekeeping is a way for Beijing to ensure that they are involved in the design of international intervention efforts more in line with their policies.

    Doubts have been raised about China's real interest in undertaking peacekeeping missions for humanitarian reasons. Indeed, it is doubtful whether an absolute "normative shift" has occurred in Beijing's thinking on peacekeeping. But China isn't alone on that count.

    Regardless of the real reasons behind China's increased participation, there have been real humanitarian benefits from it - not only outside China, but also inside, where involvement in peacekeeping has arguably opened China up to international influence on human rights norms.

    Where next for China?

    There may be limits to China's participation over the coming years. In theory, China sees multilateralism as the best way to ensure security for all. But when their vital interests, including Taiwan, are thought to be at risk, officials in Beijing will resort to viewing their country's security and that of the rest of the world as two separate coins rather than two sides of the same coin.

    For example, although China has publicly reprimanded Myanmar recently over its crackdown on protests, it has consistently blocked action against the country, arguing that sanctions could further destabilize the country and concerned about repercussions at home. It is highly unlikely that in the near future China will agree to action in a part of the world so close to home.

    The Myanmar case illustrates that in some circumstances, China does not have an interest in encouraging intervention in other countries for fear of leaving itself open to external meddling in its own affairs.

    China is also likely to continue to be cautious on Security Council resolutions that permit the use of force. And host state acceptance along with Security Council authorization will remain essential elements of future peacekeeping and enforcement activities.

    With the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing fast approaching, China is likely to find itself back in the spotlight after attention moved west following September 11, 2001. Already, international condemnation over Darfur has poured cold water on China's Olympic zeal. Depending on how attention mounts, China may choose to keep a lower profile over the next few years on peacekeeping activities - traditionally one of the most high-profile dimensions of UN operations.

    In a similar vein, it is unlikely in the near future that China will contribute PLA troops to peacekeeping missions around the world. Already, US perceptions of China as a threat have hindered cooperation, with the US restricting Chinese access to information and technological data.

    However, China supports UN reform with respect to peacekeeping missions. In response to the Lakhdar Brahimi Report on UN peacekeeping reform, China said it "supports the enhancement of the UN's peacekeeping capacity and welcomes the secretary general's proposal on the establishment of strategic reserves and civilian police standby capacity".

    And unless vital interests are threatened or the world's renewed attention takes a particularly hostile turn, peacekeeping will remain a useful and important way for China to be seen as a responsible player in international affairs.

    Rebecca Jackson is an independent consultant on China, currently working on a China-EU Energy and Climate security project at Chatham House (Royal Institute of International Affairs) in London.

    Asia Times Online :: China News, China Business News, Taiwan and Hong Kong News and Business.


    A very novel move by China to keep a check on the pulse as also project itself international as a power that is humanitarian and freedom loving! )


    "Some have learnt many Tricks of sly Evasion, Instead of Truth they use Equivocation, And eke it out with mental Reservation, Which is to good Men an Abomination."

    I don't have to attend every argument I'm invited to.

    HAKUNA MATATA

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    he New Republic
    Partners in Genocide

    by Eric Reeves
    A comprehensive guide to China's role in Darfur.


    Two weeks ago, Britain introduced a toughly worded Presidential Statement at the U.N. Security Council, demanding that Khartoum's National Islamic Front regime turn over two génocidaires to the International Criminal Court. The first, Ahmed Haroun, who, in a grotesque bit of irony, now serves as Sudan's minister of humanitarian affairs, is accused of having directly orchestrated many of the vicious crimes documented by the U.N. and independent human rights organizations in Darfur. Similarly, Ali Kushayb, a Janjaweed militia leader, is deeply implicated in the most egregious violations of international law--targeted ethnic slaughter and the use of rape as a weapon of war among them.

    The Presidential Statement should've easily passed: The evidence against both men is strong, and because of U.N. Security Council Resolution 1593, the ICC has jurisdiction over the matter. What ended up happening, though, was hardly a surprise to anyone who has watched Darfur closely over the last five years. China threatened to veto the non-binding declaration unless its language was essentially gutted, and rather than force the issue, Britain, France, and the U.S.--as well as the other Security Council members--quietly decided to drop the matter. As a result, not only will Haroun and Kushayb remain free, but the government in Khartoum will feel as if it can block the extradition of those subsequently accused by the Court. The ICC just lost its teeth.

    This under-reported development provides yet another example of China's enabling role in the Darfur genocide. The crimes that China has abetted in Sudan are almost certainly too numerous to detail in any one place, but, here, for easy documentation, is a précis of how the country has come to have the blood of more than 400,000 Darfuris on its hands.

    INVESTING IN OIL. First things first: We have to settle the question of why China has made itself such a willing accomplice. One needn't go much further than the oil fields in the southern part of Sudan to find the answer. Over the last decade, with its economy booming and its need for cheap fossil fuels climbing at a fantastic clip, China has been Khartoum's primary partner in oil development projects. Of the 500,000 barrels of oil Sudan produces every day, China imports roughly two thirds. That would translate into more than $7 billion a year in costs, if the oil were purchased on the open market. But because China dominates the two major oil production consortia in southern Sudan, Beijing's petroleum bill was only slightly more than half that. It's no wonder the Chinese have been so keen on funneling money--some $10 billion--into Sudanese oil infrastructure projects like pipeline construction, all-weather road building, and exploration rigs. Don't expect the relationship to change any time soon either: China's petroleum import bill has risen by more than 10% per year for more than a decade and shows no signs of slowing.

    LUBRICATING A GENOCIDAL ECONOMY. In addition to its massive investment in oil development, Beijing has provided more than $6 billion dollars in other commercial and capital investments. Much of the money has been poured into huge dam projects, including the environmentally irresponsible Merowe and Kajbar dams in the northern reaches of the country. Civilian displacement and violent repression of protests in the Nubia region--a direct result of these dam projects--have done nothing to dissuade further investment.

    China has also put significant money into Khartoum's rail line, port capacity, and the civilian road system that surrounds Khartoum. These investments, some apparently positive, have provided a critical financial bridge for an economy that is plagued by massive external debt--currently more than $25 billion, making Sudan's economy, on a per capita basis, one of the most indebted in the world. In fact, it is misleading to speak of a "Sudanese economy": foreign investment benefits almost exclusively Khartoum and its immediate environs. (The electricity generated by the dams mentioned above, for example, will benefit the areas only in and around Khartoum.) The rest of Sudan, Africa's largest country, sees almost nothing of the economic development that is so conspicuous in Khartoum itself. What's more, the Sudanese companies that benefit most from Chinese investments are controlled, either directly or indirectly, by members of the National Islamic Front, further strengthening the regime's stranglehold on Sudanese national wealth and power.

    SUPPLYING WEAPONS. Since 1996, Beijing has been Khartoum's primary supplier of weapons, military supplies, and weapons technology. Using Chinese-generated oil revenues (and anticipated oil revenues), Khartoum has purchased large quantities of military aircraft, heavy artillery, tanks, armored personnel carriers, and much else that fills the deadly arsenal destined for Darfur. China also helped to improve the regime's production capacity, with the effect that Khartoum is now largely self-sufficient in building small- and medium-sized weapons.

    Both China and Russia were cited in a May 2007 Amnesty International report on Darfur that highlighted irresponsible weapons transfers. The group discovered that both countries had shipped air-to-ground fighter aircraft and helicopter gunships to Sudan, despite a U.N. weapons embargo. And a June 2007 Amnesty report on China's international arms transfers, drawing on the work of the UN Panel of Experts on Darfur, highlighted the shipment to Khartoum of Dong Feng military trucks, the very sort implicated in some of the worst mass executions of ethnic African tribal groups in Darfur.

    When asked about these vast weapons shipments, China's Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu replied, "In conducting arms sales to African, we carefully consider the local area's situation and development model and stick to the spirit of protecting local peace and stability." By "protecting local peace and stability," she no doubt was referring to Darfur's millions of displaced persons and hundreds of thousands of war dead.

    FLEXING ITS DIPLOMATIC MUSCLE AT THE UN. For the past five years, China has played lead blocker for the National Islamic Front regime at the U.N. This semi-official blessing from a permanent member of the Security Council has allowed Khartoum to defy a host of U.N. demands and continue with its genocide. Take a look at this rundown of failed U.N. attempts at peace:

    . Resolution 1556 (July 2004) "demanded" that Khartoum disarm the deadly Janjaweed militia and bring its leaders to justice. China abstained on the resolution, and Khartoum subsequently ignored it, surmising correctly that the international community would have no stomach to back up this "demand" with threats or action.

    . Resolution 1591 (March 2005) imposed an arms embargo on Darfur. China abstained in the vote and Khartoum continues to bring huge quantities of weapons and military supplies into Darfur. China has also opposed any effort to sanction Khartoum for violating the U.N. resolution.

    . Resolution 1593 (March 2005) referred "crimes against humanity" reported by a U.N. panel to the International Criminal Court. China abstained, and Khartoum has subsequently shown nothing but contempt for the ICC.

    . Resolution 1706 (August 2006) authorized more than 20,000 U.N. peacekeepers and civilian police to protect civilians and humanitarian workers in Darfur. China abstained, and would have vetoed the measure had language not been inserted that "invited" the consent of the Khartoum regime. The National Islamic Front declined the "invitation" and refused to accept the U.N. peacekeeping force. China supported Khartoum's defiance by declaring its belief in "non-interference" in the domestic matters of sovereign nations.

    . Resolution 1769 (July 2007) was a weakened substitute for 1706. The idea was to authorize a "hybrid" U.N./African Union force of some 26,000 troops and civilian police to protect civilians and humanitarians. China eventually voted for the resolution, but only after stripping it of a mandate to disarm combatants. China also refused to approve any sanctions measure in the inevitable event of Khartoum's non-compliance with the terms of 1769.

    U.N. sources tell me that since the passage of Resolution 1769, China has become more, not less, supportive of Khartoum's broad defiance of the international community. This stance has brought deployment of U.N.-authorized forces to a standstill, and continues to impede humanitarian aid delivery. Indeed, there is a real danger that the entire U.N./African Union mission will be aborted, precipitating a collapse in security throughout Darfur. As Jean-Marie Guéhenno, head of U.N. peacekeeping, recently asked, "Do we move ahead with the deployment of a force that will not make a difference, that will not have the capability to defend itself, and that carries the risk of humiliation of the Security Council and the United Nations, and tragic failure for the people of Darfur?"

    Once again, it appears as if China will have quietly strong-armed the U.N. into getting exactly what it wants.


    It takes great confidence to engage in long-term genocide before the world's eyes. China--diplomatically, economically, militarily--has done much to provide Khartoum with that confidence. If the world community wants the genocide to end, the Chinese government must be made to understand that it will lose more by helping to perpetuate the horror in Darfur than it will gain by supporting Khartoum.

    ERIC REEVES is a professor of English Language and Literature at Smith College and has written extensively on Sudan.

    http://www.tnr.com/politics/story.ht...f-57ae85d66b70
    Contradictory, what?


    "Some have learnt many Tricks of sly Evasion, Instead of Truth they use Equivocation, And eke it out with mental Reservation, Which is to good Men an Abomination."

    I don't have to attend every argument I'm invited to.

    HAKUNA MATATA

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    Sir,

    I dont know much about other Chinese deployments under the UN Flag. But in case of Sudan, they have made sure they are there to protect their investments.
    Which is good for the Indians. Read Link
    Global oil hunt: India, China join hands
    Last edited by Adux; 20 Dec 07, at 19:12.

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    African continental investments, are were Asians countries looking at India, China, Malayasia, Energy hungry, they have decided not step toes of locals, as long as they get their money's worth. Chinese having UN Presence helps their investments even further, which is quite substantial at 10 billion.
    India's ONGC eyes two Sudan oil exploration blocks | Markets | Reuters

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    Chinese whispers

    That the biggest names on Wall Street are staying afloat thanks to huge injections of cash from China reveals how hard the credit crunch has hit
    Jill Treanor


    December 20, 2007 10:30 PM | Printable version

    The idea of China rushing to the rescue of the capitalist world seems so unlikely as to be unbelievable.

    Except that it is happening. The China Investment Corporation - a newly-formed fund which helps control £100bn of China's foreign exchange reserves - yesterday ploughed $5bn into Morgan Stanley, the Wall Street firm. It has also taken stakes in US private equity firm Blackstone - owner in the UK of Cafe Rouge restaurants, Madame Tussauds and Center Parcs. Closer to home, the Chinese Development Bank, controlled by the Chinese state, owns 3% of Barclays.

    The Chinese involvement in Wall Street is even more surprising given the protectionist stance of the Americans towards their own businesses until recently. When Dubai Ports World took over strategically important US ports last year, it caused a political furore. It was not enough to stop the deal, but it did require the bidder to sell off the US ports.

    Until recently, it has been more common for Wall Street firms to take stakes in Chinese banks, in a search for exposure to the fast-growing economy and the burgeoning wealth of the Chinese population.

    How times change, though. The involvement of the Chinese and other so-called sovereign wealth funds in US banks could well prove to be critical to their survival in the short term. Wall Street is suffering a painful hangover from the excesses of easy credit. The subprime mortgage crisis is causing huge dents in the financial sector's profits. The size of the problem is awesome. One bad bet by a group of traders caused Morgan Stanley to drop $8bn, and left the bank with a $3.6bn loss in the fourth quarter of the year.

    Such holes are difficult to fill; hence Morgan Stanley welcomed the $5bn in cash from CIC with open arms. In return, it is handing over an estimated 9.9% stake to the Chinese investor. The deal comes hot the heels of the move by Citigroup to sell a £3.5bn stake to the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority, and a step by Bear Stearns also to take investments off the Chinese from Citic Securities, another state-owned investment fund.

    These are unlikely to be the last investments in a big US business, given that China has the world's biggest foreign exchange reserves, worth $1.3trillion and growing by $1m a minute. And neither should it be. When shares trade freely on stock markets, anyone is allowed to buy them - whatever their politics and whatever their nationality.

    While its economy continues to remain unscathed by the current credit crisis, the Chinese may well take the chance to flash their cash and extend their influence. Wall Street may not like it, but it seems to be in no position to shut it out.

    Comment is free: Chinese whispers
    And here is the usual novel way to ensure a foot in the international economy scene so as to be able to manipulate it, as and when the time omes.

    China's sure-footed pursuit to global domination is indeed spectacularly successful!


    "Some have learnt many Tricks of sly Evasion, Instead of Truth they use Equivocation, And eke it out with mental Reservation, Which is to good Men an Abomination."

    I don't have to attend every argument I'm invited to.

    HAKUNA MATATA

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    hi everybody
    i am back (for a shoooooooort time) , happy new year!
    one year ago , i debate with many of you here and often got angry^_^
    now i work in a stock market company and earned a lot this year, thanks to the bull market!
    china is moving fast , you can go to youtube and find many videos about china cities .not only bejing,shanghai,but also any others,like chongqing,nanjing,hangzhou,suzhuou,dalian,qingdao. ......and so on.
    i personaly suggest india friends concern more about your economy but not problems like"su 30 mki beats mkk","a new super power" ,"teach pak a lesson"and so on.look at bombay and new dehli,i can't believe they are the biggest cities of india.
    i give my best wishes to your moon plans 2008,be succesful this time,don't remain in papers.
    pakstain brothers,happy new year!

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    wangrui961, its interesting to hear you work in a stock company. I've been reading about the situation with the chinese stock markets from the economist, businessweek and some chinese publications.

    I would however if you can like to hear about your perspective of what's going on there? I generally like to hear from people who's experiencing things first hand.
    Those who can't change become extinct.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wkllaw View Post
    wangrui961, its interesting to hear you work in a stock company. I've been reading about the situation with the chinese stock markets from the economist, businessweek and some chinese publications.

    I would however if you can like to hear about your perspective of what's going on there? I generally like to hear from people who's experiencing things first hand.
    well , it's hard to give you discreption of the stock market in china now for my poor english.
    Stock Index Futures is coming in 2008, more money and more new guys will enter the financial market,also some will out with bankruptcy.
    the market is a big casino , one die here and more come in .

    The foreign institutions want to make money here and investment a lot , but China is not japan,not india or the southeast Asia ,you come in with money and go out with more. The capital in china is very huge and strong , the only winner is the funds in mainland and hongkong (under the goverment's acquiescence ).
    The Shanghai Stock Index once got to 6100,but now down to 5261, some experts said it will be 8000 or more before August 2008.
    China has 155 Central enterprises ,but only 20 of them are Listed .the goverment is planning to let them all enter the stock market.
    Now here are full with opportunities and risks, if you are self-confidence and rich enough ,you can come in and have a try.
    In china ,nothing is important except money,no technical analysis ,no fundamental analysis, money makes money, more money ,more opportunities to make money.
    China has 5 of "top ten market value companies". China Petroleum's market value was once above 1 trillion US dollars,twice of the word second ExxonMobil.
    In China ,people do what they want to do , nothing is impossible.

    Luckily, I have never investment in the market. I only provide services and suggestions to customers , i still made a lot of money. I had some clients who withdraw in two months after they enter, but there will be more people to come to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wangrui961 View Post
    i personaly suggest india friends concern more about your economy but not problems like"su 30 mki beats mkk","a new super power" ,"teach pak a lesson"and so on.look at bombay and new dehli,i can't believe they are the biggest cities of india.
    Those are the least of our worries, its for the mere sake of debate, nothing else. As I had stated on another thread:
    Quote Originally Posted by Tronic View Post
    Don't know about China, but India has other very serious issues to take care of rather then just Pakistan before it can even start dreaming of itself as a superpower. The biggest hurdles India faces are for one, a huge slow bureacratic choked system, second, lack of proper infrastucture to support growth, third, ranting political system which only has a bark but no bite.
    i give my best wishes to your moon plans 2008,be succesful this time,don't remain in papers.
    This time? I have always had reservations about you when you take shots like that, but maybe here you can explain when was the last time we failed?
    The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands but seeing with new eyes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wkllaw View Post
    wangrui961, its interesting to hear you work in a stock company. I've been reading about the situation with the chinese stock markets from the economist, businessweek and some chinese publications.

    I would however if you can like to hear about your perspective of what's going on there? I generally like to hear from people who's experiencing things first hand.
    看了你的资料,原来你是海南人,天涯海角阿。美国很好,很伟大,但是你的身体里有中国的血,无论你的祖国多 么不民主,多么不自由,毕竟是你的祖国。
    你在纽约做什么?也是证券市场?华尔街可是全球金融的标志。
    国内的股市很奇妙,很刺激。这里没有西方一些自以为是的金融家,他们在西方和日本的一套拿到中国来是行不通 的。前一阵子某些外资想操纵股市,结果很惨。中投公司的成立,央企整合准备整体上市,出台文件完善期货市场 ,丰富金融期货........这些都表明国家已经决心做强做大金融市场。
    前几年才1000点的股市一下子涨到五六千点,很多西方所谓投资大师都预言股市崩溃,某些不干净的甚至想操 纵中国股市,很快他们认识到自己的几百亿美金在中国不过是小意思,不会再像以前一样兴风作浪了。这几年期货 市场也成倍增长,国家把金融市场调控得很好。中国的股民和期民也开始理智,起码愿赌服输了,虽然知道机构在 圈钱,但还是无所畏惧。
    美国人靠货币战争窃取他人劳动成果的时代已经过去了,中国不是日本,只能无条件接受美国的强奸。中国的汇率 只要控制好,过不了几年,美国就要知道中国的反击是什么滋味了。
    你以为我真的那么幼稚,在这里大放厥词?只是锻炼一下英语,放松一下心情而已。国家极度缺乏高级金融人才, 你要是真的不错就回国吧,国内有的是机会,给的工资绝对不比美国少。我这样做市场的一个月起码收两三万,还 是在西部,上海的市场经理月薪百万的都有。上次一个不怎么出名的分析师到成都和重庆做了两场报告会,我们公 司竟然出了10多万给他。

    从我们这一代,中国就要真正崛起。在国外好多论坛上转悠,确实发现西方国家的一些优势。但是相比他们,我们 中国85一代智力上无疑大大胜出。印度人一直引以为豪的无非是软件,现在中国在软件产值上早已超越印度,大 部分是国内消费。我这样一个做证券的可以随便编写一个网站,随便写个俄罗斯方块。西方国家容易出诺贝尔奖, 但是诺贝尔奖能说明什么?英国得过很多次,仅次于美国,国家不过那样。

    我不是什么共产主义者,但是今年去北京,走到天安门前,看着平时很不喜欢的毛泽东的画像,竟肃然起敬。想到 历经百年屈辱的祖国即将复兴,心情久久不能平静。每天那么多人到天安门看升旗,没有几个是共产党,大家并不 介意平时有多少的不公平,有多少牢骚,一面国旗就能让我忘记心中种种不快。
    元旦快乐!

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    Quote Originally Posted by wangrui961 View Post
    看了你的资料,原来你是海南人,天涯海角阿。美国很好,很伟大,但是你的身体里有中国的血,无论你的祖国多 么不民主,多么不自由,毕竟是你的祖国。
    你在纽约做什么?也是证券市场?华尔街可是全球金融的标志。
    国内的股市很奇妙,很刺激。这里没有西方一些自以为是的金融家,他们在西方和日本的一套拿到中国来是行不通 的。前一阵子某些外资想操纵股市,结果很惨。中投公司的成立,央企整合准备整体上市,出台文件完善期货市场 ,丰富金融期货........这些都表明国家已经决心做强做大金融市场。
    前几年才1000点的股市一下子涨到五六千点,很多西方所谓投资大师都预言股市崩溃,某些不干净的甚至想操 纵中国股市,很快他们认识到自己的几百亿美金在中国不过是小意思,不会再像以前一样兴风作浪了。这几年期货 市场也成倍增长,国家把金融市场调控得很好。中国的股民和期民也开始理智,起码愿赌服输了,虽然知道机构在 圈钱,但还是无所畏惧。
    美国人靠货币战争窃取他人劳动成果的时代已经过去了,中国不是日本,只能无条件接受美国的强奸。中国的汇率 只要控制好,过不了几年,美国就要知道中国的反击是什么滋味了。
    你以为我真的那么幼稚,在这里大放厥词?只是锻炼一下英语,放松一下心情而已。国家极度缺乏高级金融人才, 你要是真的不错就回国吧,国内有的是机会,给的工资绝对不比美国少。我这样做市场的一个月起码收两三万,还 是在西部,上海的市场经理月薪百万的都有。上次一个不怎么出名的分析师到成都和重庆做了两场报告会,我们公 司竟然出了10多万给他。

    从我们这一代,中国就要真正崛起。在国外好多论坛上转悠,确实发现西方国家的一些优势。但是相比他们,我们 中国85一代智力上无疑大大胜出。印度人一直引以为豪的无非是软件,现在中国在软件产值上早已超越印度,大 部分是国内消费。我这样一个做证券的可以随便编写一个网站,随便写个俄罗斯方块。西方国家容易出诺贝尔奖, 但是诺贝尔奖能说明什么?英国得过很多次,仅次于美国,国家不过那样。

    我不是什么共产主义者,但是今年去北京,走到天安门前,看着平时很不喜欢的毛泽东的画像,竟肃然起敬。想到 历经百年屈辱的祖国即将复兴,心情久久不能平静。每天那么多人到天安门看升旗,没有几个是共产党,大家并不 介意平时有多少的不公平,有多少牢骚,一面国旗就能让我忘记心中种种不快。
    元旦快乐!
    Unfortunately I don't know how to type chinese on my computer. I'm not a computer expert and I'll eventually ask a friend about typing chinese or maybe I'll buy one of those things where you write it and it shows up on the computer, once again I'm no computer expert so I have no clue what its called, and yes I am a disgrace when it comes to computers comapred to people my age.

    The U.S is a great country and I particularly love New York City. I was born in China and I'm a chinese citizen no matter what.

    I'm actually only a student though. I'd like to work in wallstreet though I'm not sure if I can stay once my education's done due to limited work visas, but I would really enjoy seeing China, espiecially Hainan again.

    I completely agree with you about most things, except the nobel prize, America won the nobel prize more than the british espiecially in the past few years. I think the nobel prize really shows a vibrant innovation system.

    Anyway, have a happy New Year as well.
    Those who can't change become extinct.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wkllaw View Post
    Unfortunately I don't know how to type chinese on my computer. I'm not a computer expert and I'll eventually ask a friend about typing chinese or maybe I'll buy one of those things where you write it and it shows up on the computer, once again I'm no computer expert so I have no clue what its called, and yes I am a disgrace when it comes to computers comapred to people my age.

    The U.S is a great country and I particularly love New York City. I was born in China and I'm a chinese citizen no matter what.

    I'm actually only a student though. I'd like to work in wallstreet though I'm not sure if I can stay once my education's done due to limited work visas, but I would really enjoy seeing China, espiecially Hainan again.

    I completely agree with you about most things, except the nobel prize, America won the nobel prize more than the british espiecially in the past few years. I think the nobel prize really shows a vibrant innovation system.

    Anyway, have a happy New Year as well.
    我的英语不怎么好,虽然可以看得懂大部分,但是要写的时候就要借助谷歌翻译。
    可以的话你加我,qq 785771350,或者写邮件到785771350@qq.com,我看到了会给你邮寄输入法,你想要的 程序告诉我,我会给你一些工具,教你怎么在英文操作系统上使用汉语和汉语程序,其实这些很简单。这qq是我 专门用来和外国朋友聊天的,工作不忙就上来看。我姐姐在香港,以前她在英国留学几年,我很理解在国外留学生 的处境。
    中国被很多人妖魔化,不过这样也好,都夜郎自大,我们机会就来了。
    我赚够房子和车就离开金融市场,把计算机重新捡起来。现在中国已经有商业化的CPU,性能很不错,但是由于 和Intel以及AMD相比相差很远,所以一直不能大规模使用。只有政府和军队在特殊场合采用。我梦想有一 天,中国的电脑里能装中国自己的CPU,GPU,RAM,能用自己的操作系统。我相信那一天终 究会来到。
    09年要举行盛大阅兵,别忘记回北京看看。

    独在异乡为异客,每逢佳节倍思亲。遥知兄弟登高处,遍插茱萸少一人。

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