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oneman28
01 Jan 06,, 21:32
Start this from the first day of 2006.


China's tax revenue hits record 3 trillion yuan in 2005

http://english.people.com.cn/200601/01/eng20060101_232225.html


China's total tax revenues reached a record high of 3.0866 trillion yuan (385.8 billion US dollars) in 2005, an increase of 20 percent, or 514.8 billion yuan, year-on-year.

The figure, excluding Customs duties and agricultural tax, was revealed by a report posted on the website of the State Administration of Taxation (SAT) on Sunday.

This is the first time that the nation's tax revenues exceeded 3 trillion yuan, the report said.

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
01 Jan 06,, 21:34
http://www.forbes.com/markets/feeds/afx/2005/12/29/afx2420145.html


BEIJING (AFX) - Shanghai port is expected to handle 443 mln tons of cargo this year, ranking it first in the world, the International Finance News reported.

That compares with 382 mln tons handled at the port in 2004.

The report quoted a source at the Shanghai Port Administration Bureau as saying that container throughput at the port will be 18.1 mln twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in 2005, up from 14.55 mln last year.

Shanghai will remain the world's third-busiest port in terms of container traffic for 2005, behind Hong Kong and Singapore, the report added.

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 07:14
http://english.people.com.cn/200512/27/eng20051227_231171.html


The 126.68 km-long Zunyi-Chongxihe section in Guizhou Province has been completed and opened to traffic on Monday. By far, the 1,314 km-long expressway leading to sea for Southwest China has been put into operation, which connects Chongqing municipality, Guizhou Province and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, reports the overseas edition of People's Daily on Tuesday.

From Chongqing in the north to Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province in the south, the highway is one of the five vertical lines of the planned national highway project of the "five vertical and seven horizontal road network" and also a key project for the traffic infrastructure of the country's West Development.

After the completion of the highway, it will take about 15 hours for autos to travel from Chongqing to Zhanjiang. Before this, the 440 km-long journey from Chongqing to Guiyang would take one to two days for autos.

By People's Daily Online

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:36
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/02/content_3999775.htm


TIANJIN, Jan. 2 (Xinhuanet) -- Tianjin port in north China handled 240 million tons of goods and 4.8 million TEUs (containers of twenty feet equivalent units) in the past year, maintaining its position of the largest port in north China.

The container handling capacity of the port increased by 1 million TEUs last year alone, according to the latest statistics of the port administration.

The port now handles 60 ships daily and operates more than 90 routes for container ships, which travel between the port and major cities in Asia, Europe, Africa, Australia and America. Enditem

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:38
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2005-12/12/content_3911687.htm


SHENZHEN, Dec. 12 (Xinhuanet) -- Shenzhen port, in south China's Guangdong Province, handled 14.78 million TEUs in the first 11 months of this year, up 19.21 percent over to the same period of last year, according to sources with the port.

If the port keeps its work pace, it is expected to handle 16 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) by the end of this year.

Shenzhen Port has seen the fastest growth in the past five years, with container handling capability rising from 3.99 million TEUs in 2000 to anticipated 16 million.

As one of the leading container ports in the world, Shenzhen has opened160 shipping routes linking all parts of the world. To expand its container handling capacity, the port built two container docks at Chachanwan and Yantian this year.

When the two projects completes in 2010, Dachanwan port is capable of handling 10 million TEUs, and Yantian project will have five additional container berths, bringing the TEU handling capacity of Yantian project to 9.5 million annually. Enditem

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:39
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2005-12/09/content_3900738.htm


JINAN, Dec. 9 (Xinhuanet) -- Qingdao port, China's third largest port in terms of handling capacity, has joined hands with Weihai, another Chinese port city close to Japan and the Korean Peninsula,in speeding up coastal port development.

The two ports agreed on Thursday to create a new company, Qingwei Container Port Co. Ltd, which will jointly run the two container berths and try to raise the container handling capacity to 800,000 TEUs within three years.

The initial investment, injected from the Qingdao Port Group and the Weihai Port Group, topped 140 million yuan (16.9 million US dollars).

The Qingdao company holds 51 percent of the shares.

Qingdao port, located in Qingdao city of eastern Shandong Province, ranked third in handling capacity on the Chinese mainland last year. It was estimated to handle 6 million TEUs this year, according to sources with Qingdao Port Group.

Chang Dechuan, executive of the group, said the Qingdao port will make full use of the ideal location of Weihai to shorten the distance with Japan and the Korean Peninsular, and the industrial belt around Bohai Bay and the heavy industries in northeast China.

Weihai is about a two-hour's drive north of Qingdao in ShandongPeninsular.

Shandong has planned to invest 53 billion yuan (6.44 billion USdollars) for port construction in the next five years, aiming at upgrading a line of its coastal ports into a major transportation center in northeastern Asia.

By 2010, the annual handling capacity of all Shandong's ports is expected to hit 620 million tons, including 13.5 million TEU for containers, according to the provincial government. Enditem

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:41
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/855/2005/12/26/262@38923.htm


HANGZHOU- The container thruput of east China's Ningbo Port is reported to surpass 5 million as of Monday, up 20 percent over last year.
The port's average growth rate of container thruput amounted to 42 percent during the past five years, ranking first in China, said Li Linghong, president of Ningbo Port Group.

This year, the port played host to 1,300 ships with each carrying 4,000 TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent units) at a time.

A ship of the Mediterranean Shipping Company, laden with 9,200 TEUs, anchored at the Ningbo Port last July, making it possible for Ningbo to become one of the world largest container port.

The port carved out 40 new sea routes this year, bringing the total number of sea routes to 147, including 69 oceangoing routes, which travel to Europe, North America and Middle East.

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:42
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/855/2005/12/21/262@37812.htm


China's two ports in the east Zhejiang merged to forge the third biggest port in the world.

(Photo: Ningbo Port in Zhejiang Province. Photo: www.nbdaj.gov.cn)


(Photo/Zhoushan Port in Zhejiang Province. Photo: blog.n-ku.com)

China's two deep-water ports, Ningbo Port and Zhoushan Port in the east Zhejiang Province, officially merged into one on Tuesday in a bid to forge the third biggest port in the world.

The new port will be named "Ningbo-Zhoushan Port" and start formal operation on Jan. 1 of 2006, according to Wang Yongming, vice governor of Zhejiang province.

"The ports integration in Zhejiang will accelerate China's endeavor of building into a strong country in the field of sea shipping," said Xu Zuyuan, vice minister of communications.

According to statistics from the provincial ports and shipping bureau, the cargo handling capacity of Ningbo Port is expected to exceed 270 million tons in 2005, ranking second in China, and Zhoushan Port is expected to handle over 80 million tons of cargo.

However, the two ports, though located in the same sea area and sharing a navigation channel, have been operated under different administrations, which has resulted in separation of planning and greatly undermined their competitiveness.

It is estimated that over 100 billion yuan (about 12.6 billion US dollars) will be injected into the project, which is expected to produce the third largest port in the world by 2010.

Currently, the biggest three ports in the world are Shanghai, Singapore and Rotterdam.

Ningbo-Zhoushan Port is located on the converging point of China's eastern coastline and the mouth of the Yangtze River. There were 591 berths as of the end of 2004, of which, 53 are over 10,000 tons.

After completion, the new port will be an integral part of the Shanghai International Shipping Center, as well as an important logistic and industrial base, said Lu Zushan, governor of Zhejiang Province.

According to Xu, the cargo and container handling capacity of China have both been listed as the top in the world for three years. In 2005, 10 Chinese ports were registered as world-class, with handling capacity over 100 million tons.

The latest statistics show that China's ports is expected to handle 5 billion tons of cargo in 2005, 19.9 percent higher than that of last year, and 75 million TEU containers, up 21.3 percent from the previous year.

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:46
http://english.eastday.com/eastday/englishedition/nation/userobject1ai1758184.html30/12/2005 11:28



China's electricity shortage would ease up next year and a small surplus in supply is expected for 2007, said the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) on its website on Thursday.

The Commission made the prediction while announcing that the country's electricity generation capacity has made a breakthrough to top 500 million kilowatts as of Dec. 27, with the operation of a new power plant in east China's Zhejiang Province.

China has launched power projects with an overall generating capacity of more than 100 million kilowatts this year, and those completed projects are now generating over 60 million kilowatts of power, effectively easing the power strain of the country, said the NDRC.

Electricity shortage has become a bottleneck of the country's economic growth in recent years, especially in the coastal areas where the economy has been growing at a two-digit rate in the past 10 years.

However, experts and industry insiders now believe that the country is being relieved of power shortage this year.

The Development Research Center under the State Council recently published a report, attributing the easing of power shortage to a slower growth in electricity demand, a rapid increase in electricity generation capacity, and improved efficiency in electricity transmission.

Sufficient supply of water and coal for hydro and thermo power plants also contributed to the ease of power shortage, according to the report.
China's overall electricity generation capacity would reach 587 million kilowatts by the end of 2006, the Center predicted.

However, experts have warned of possible supply shortage in certain areas despite the general supply-demand balance in the country.

Meanwhile, they also suggest investment in the energy sector be curbed to avoid the problem of over-capacity which might emerge in the coal mining and electricity generation sectors in 2007.

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:47
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2005-12/28/content_3981256.htm
www.chinaview.cn 2005-12-28 19:47:30



NANNING, Dec. 28 (Xinhuanet) -- The first expressway between China and ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) opened to traffic on Wednesday.

The 179.2-kilometer-long expressway starts from Nanning, capital of south China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and leads to Vietnam's Friendship Pass. It is an important part of China's national highway network, said Guo Shengkun, vice-chairmanof Guangxi regional government.

With an investment of 3.7 billion yuan (456 million U.S. dollars), the eight-lane expressway is currently the most convenient overland passage linking China with the ASEAN.

The expressway shortens the traveling time between Nanning and the Sino-Vietnamese border to less than two hours, half of what isrequired in the past, and it also takes five hours from Nanning toHanoi, the official said.

The expressway will be conducive to expanding the trade scale between China and ASEAN countries and promoting the formation of the China-ASEAN Free Trade Area. Enditem

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:48
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2005-12/28/content_3980290.htm

www.chinaview.cn 2005-12-28 15:52:33



NANJING, Dec. 28 (Xinhuanet) -- The expansion project of the expressway linking two major cities in east China is scheduled to open to traffic on the New Year's Day in 2006.

The expressway linking Shanghai, China's largest metropolis, with Nanjing, capital of Jiangsu Province, began expanding in November 2003, costing an investment of 8.9 billion yuan (about 1.09 billion US dollars) by November 2005.

The principal part of the project was completed ahead of schedule and the traffic ban on trucks will be lifted when the broadened expressway is put into use, said Xie Jiaquan, general manager of the Nanjing-Shanghai Expressway Co. Ltd. at a press conference held Tuesday in Nanjing.

With an extended mileage of 248 km, the eight-lane expressway is expected to help ease traffic jam between Shanghai and Nanjing.

According to Xie, with a speed of 120 km per hour, it will takea two-hour drive from Nanjing to Shanghai. Enditem

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:53
SW China province invests heavily in road construction

http://english.people.com.cn/200512/30/eng20051230_231845.html


Southwest China's Yunnan Province invested 22.55 billion yuan (about 2.8 billion U.S. dollars) in road construction from January to November, a source with the provincial communications department said here Friday.

Compared with the 14.54 billion yuan (some 1.8 billion U.S. dollars) investment in 2004, the government input this year has been up 54.77 percent.

Approximately 16.14 billion yuan (some 2 billion U.S. dollars) was spent on building major highways in Yunnan, a year-on-year growth of 154.63 percent.

By the end of 2004, the mileage of roads in Yunnan had reached 167,050 kilometers including 1421 km expressway, ranking China's first.

A massive road network has taken shape in the province, said the department.

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:55
http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/-yangtze-river-delta-saw-another-expressway-open-traffic-/2005/dec/1244172.htm


(SinoCast)ZHEJIANG, Dec 28, 2005 (SinoCast via COMTEX) --On December 26, the first phase project of Hangzhou-Qiandaohu expressway, which connects the city of Hangzhou and Jiande in eastern China's Zhejiang Province, officially opened for traffic.

From the day on, it will take just 60 minutes to drive from Hangzhou to Jiande, nearly half time less than before.

As the major part of Hangzhou-Xin'anjiang-Jingdezhen expressway, the Hangzhou-Qiandaohu expressway (Hangqian expressway) will be 191 kilometers long and is planned to be invested in totally CNY 12.1 billion.

And it will be the largest ever traffic project for the city of Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang Province.

The entire road of Hangqian expressway will have five super-large bridges, over one hundred big or small bridges, 18 tunnels, 14 crossovers and two service areas.

The planned driving speed on the expressway is 120 kilometers per hour.

The whole project will be carried out in two phases.

The beginning-mentioned first phase project, with a total length of 108 kilometers, started from March 2003, while the second phase is expected to open for traffic by the end of next year.

From www.nbd.com.cn, Page 1, Tuesday, December 27, 2005
info@SinoCast.Com

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:56
http://english.people.com.cn/200512/23/eng20051223_230386.html


The expressway connecting economically dynamic Shanghai with Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang Province, reopened to traffic Thursday following construction to widen the highway.

The widening project, started at the end of July, has been expanded from four lanes to eight lanes. The speed limit has been increased from 110 km per hour to 120 km.

The completion of construction is expected to ease traffic which is considered to be heaviest in the country.

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 08:59
http://english.people.com.cn/200512/30/eng20051230_231921.html


Construction of three railroads will be commenced in vast Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region in northwest China, a regional government official announced in Urumqi this week.

The double-track railway line between Urumqi, the regional capital, and Jinghe will be built in 2006 and become operational in 2007, while the Turpan-Korla double-track and Kuytun-Karamay single-track line are scheduled to be completed in 2008, Wang Lequan, secretary of the Xinjiang regional committee of the Communist Party of China, said at a local celebration held on Wednesday.

Construction of the three railway lines will not only alleviate tight transport but also help develop rich natural resources in the region, Wang said.

An improved railway network in Xinjiang also plays an important role in collocating resources in western China where energy resource distribution is badly unbalanced.

Xinjiang possesses 25 percent of China's total oil and natural gas reserves. Its coal reserve makes up 40 percent of the national total. Nearly 80 percent of above-said resources are shipped to various parts of China by rail.

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 09:00
http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/-yangtze-river-delta-have-inter-city-railway-network-/2005/dec/1246211.htm



SinoCast Via Thomson Dialog NewsEdge)HANGZHOU, Dec 29, 2005 (SinoCast via COMTEX) --Sources from forum on communication of Yangtze River Delta Area said Hangzhou-Ningbo high-speed railway will be built up before 2020.

Besides, China will also build up Shanghai-Hangzhou and Shanghai-Nanjing inter-city high-speed railways before 2010. Then, improved communication network will help to prople integration of Yangtze River Delta.

Yangtze River Delta area is the one of the most energetic areas in China, and the regional planning covers 16 cities around Shanghai within 300 square kilometers.

Experts said the inter-city railways with the speed of over 200 and 300 kilometers per hour will greatly expand the area of integration and city agglomeration.

However, the length of road per 10,000 people in the delta area have is 40.8% of the average level of the whole country, and per 10,000 people in the area just have 0.16 kilometer of railway, at the moment.

From www.sina.com, Page 1, Wednesday, December 28, 2005
info@SinoCast.Com

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 09:04
http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsstory.cfm/newsid/34230/story.htm

CHINA : December 28, 2005



BEIJING - China restarted construction on Monday on its second-largest hydropower project, which will have 12.6 gigawatts of installed capacity when up and running, state media said.


Total investment would surpass 50 billion yuan ($6.2 billion) by the time the Xiluodu power station was completed in 2015, when it would annually generate 57.1 billion to 64 billion kilowatt hours of electricity, Xinhua news agency said.
The dam would cross the Jinsha river section of the Yangtze in 2007 and its first generator would be installed in 2012, Xinhua said.

At the beginning of the year, China's environmental watchdog ordered the state-owned Yangtze River Three Gorges Project Development Corp. to halt unapproved construction of three hydropower projects, including the Xiluodu dam.

Beijing generally encourages development of hydropower stations, which account for around a quarter of China's installed capacity, as renewable, relatively clean alternatives to thermal plants.

But some environmentalists do not believe large hydropower projects should be grouped with renewable energy technologies like solar power and wind turbines because of their impact on river systems.

Xinhua said the Three Gorges Corp. had turned over the necessary environmental impact assessment on the Xiluodu dam to the State Environmental Protection Administration, but did not say when the watchdog gave the green light for work to resume.

The Xiluodu dam would be one of four new projects along the Jinsha river that would have a total installed capacity of 38 gigawatts, Xinhua said, more than the projected 22.4 gigawatts at the Three Gorges Dam, the world's largest hydropower project.

When completed, the four new projects could generate 174 billion kilowatt hours of electricity annually, the report said.

The Xiluodu project is part of China's West-East power transmission project, which aims to take electricity from poor areas suited to dams to the booming but power-strapped coastal regions.

(US $1 = 8.073 Yuan)

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 09:10
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/855/2005/12/29/501@39792.htm


2005-12-29 15:00:03 CRIENGLISH.com


GUIYANG - Construction on the largest railway hub in southwest China started in Guiyang, capital of Guizhou Province, on Dec. 28.
The project, one of the state key construction projects, involves an investment of 3 billion yuan (US$371.7 million), jointly funded by the Ministry of Railways and Guizhou Province.

Lu Chunfang, vice-minister of Railways, noted that the construction of the project will improve railway transport conditions and enhance the flexibility of the railway network in southwest China.

The hub project based on the Guiyang Southern Station will link with the railway lines between Guiyang and other cities in Sichuan, Hunan and Yunnan provinces and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Regions.

Guiyang Southern Station has a designed daily marshalling capacity of 7,800 rail wagons and at present handles some 10,000 wagons daily. Station director Zhang Jiqing said the station has been a bottleneck of railway transportation and has curbed transport capacity of railway lines in southwest China.

Once the project is completed in 30 months, the station will have a daily marshalling capacity of 20,000 wagons with a daily freight volume of more than 400,000 tons.

(Source: Asia Pulse)

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 09:11
http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/-shenzhen-starts-building-no-3-subway-line-/2005/dec/1244174.htm



(SinoCast)SHENZHEN, Dec 28, 2005 (SinoCast via COMTEX) --The southern China's Shenzhen City in Guangdong Province has started building its No. 3 Subway Line on December 26.

The No. 3 Line, with a total length of 32.895 kilometers, connects the Luohu District in the inner part of Shenzhen Special Economic Zone and Longgang District in the outer Zone.

The subway's section in the inner Zone will be running underground for 8.533 kilometers and the other section in the outer Zone, excluding a transitional section, will all travel above elevated bridges, that means, two thirds of the No. 3 Subway Line will run on the ground.

Totally 21 stationshe will be set up along the full range of No. 3 Line, which will enable it to get connected with the city's No. 1 Subway Line and No. 5 Light Railway.

After finish, the No. 3 Line will well link Shenzhen city's three new satellite cities including Buji, Henggang and Longgang.

With a total investment of CNY 10.987 billion, the No. 3 Line is expected to complete and open for traffic by 2009.

From www.nbd.com.cn, Page 1, Tuesday, December 27, 2005
info@SinoCast.Com

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 09:14
http://english.people.com.cn/200512/30/eng20051230_231741.html



The No. 1 subway expansion project in Tianjin, the largest port city in north China, which was completed on Wednesday, will begin trial operation on March 28, 2006.

A test run was conducted on the newly completed subway tracks on Wednesday, sources from Tianjin Subway Corporation said.

Tianjin is China's second city built with a subway system. But because of low construction standards, the old subway failed to play a key role in diverting passenger flows after it was put into traffic in 1984.

The expansion project, which began in November 2002, was carried out on the basis of the outdated 7.4 km subway section. With a budget of 7.8 billion yuan (about 962 million U.S. dollars), the expanded subway is 26.2 km long and is built with 22 stops, including eight elevated open-air stops and one ground stop. Each stop is installed with automatic ticket vending machines.

A corporate spokesman predicted the expanded subway system, which connects six administrative districts from north to south, would haul 48,100 journeys an hour at most.

According to him, Tianjin will plan to build six new tracked routes in the years to come and by the year of 2050, the city will have a tracked transport network with its length totaling 154 km.

At present, the city's second and third subway projects, with a combined budget of 20 billion yuan (2.47 billion U.S. dollars), are under preparation.

Subway service is now available in Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing, capital of east China's Jiangsu Province, as well as Guangzhou and Shenzhen, both in south China's Guangdong Province.

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
02 Jan 06,, 09:17
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/855/2006/01/02/262@40397.htm

2006-01-02 11:41:33 Shanghai Daily


China's retail sales were expected to close out 2005 with a 13 percent gain as the government moved to spur domestic spending and the country's economic development put more money in consumers' pockets.

Sales were forecast to exceed 6.1 trillion yuan (US$753.09 billion) compared with 5.4 trillion yuan in 2004, according to the Ministry of Commerce.

China currently ranks third in the world in retail sales after the United States and Japan and is followed by the United Kingdom and France.

Among its efforts to boost the sector, the country is encouraging the service industry by lowering the threshold for market entry.

Major retailers in China are generating competitive strength through acquisitions and consolidations. For the first time, sales of the top 100 retailers accounted for more than 10 percent of the nation's total, up 1 percentage point from 2004.

Analysts said the development is a matter of the survival of the fittest, as retailers that failed to earn a profit either closed down or were bought by bigger companies.

"The retail market has experienced too much competition in the past few years as companies poured into the business," said Lin Li, an analyst at Xiangcai Securities Co.

"The increasing amount of sales by major retailers means that the market is getting healthier by sweeping out unnecessary competition."

Lianhua Supermarket Holdings Co, under Shanghai Brilliance (Group) Co Ltd, paid about 100 million yuan in October to buy a 58 percent stake in Century Lianhua — its hypermarket operator.

Shanghai Brilliance (Group) Co Ltd now operates six supermarket brands.

The group said it will finish the consolidation of its two main brands, Hualian and Lianhua, in three years to avoid internal competition and reduce operating costs.

oneman28
03 Jan 06,, 08:20
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20060102-083737-6490r



BEIJING, Jan. 2 (UPI) -- China's economy may be growing faster than expected.

A senior Chinese official says China's economy grew an estimated 9.8 percent in 2005, much faster than expected, the BBC reported.

Ou Xingqian, a senior member of the National Development and Reform Commission, made the remarks at a meeting of the economic planning body.

The BBC said the figure, if confirmed, means China's economy grew faster in 2005 than in the two previous years. It would also prove that the government's efforts to cool down sectors of the economy in danger of overheating have proved largely unsuccessful.

Previous forecasts have suggested China's economy would grow 9.4 percent in 2005, in line with the 9.5 percent growth seen in both 2003 and 2004.

The BBC said official estimates for 2005 growth will be published later this month.

oneman28
03 Jan 06,, 08:21
http://www.chinaknowledge.com/news_detail.asp?cat=general&ID=1715



3 January 2006 (CHINA KNOWLEDGE PRESS)


Jan. 3, 2006 (China Knowledge) – China’s export of farm produce in 2005 is expected to reach a record high of US$26.5 billion, according to the country’s Ministry of Commerce.

From January to November 2005, China exported US$24.37 billion worth of farm produce, an increase of 19.3% year-on-year. During the period, the country’s trade deficit in farm produce narrowed by 71.6% over the same period last year to US$1.53 billion.

Export of China’s farm produce to the E. U. and South Korea increased by 40% and 41% respectively from January to October 2005.

The ministry has adopted five major strategies this year, namely improving the policies on farm produce export, providing public information service and training, continuing to promote export credit insurance of farm products, supporting companies in developing international markets and being proactive in responding to epidemics.

Neo
03 Jan 06,, 19:49
SHANGHAI: China’s economy grew 9.8 percent in 2005, a senior Chinese official was quoted as saying Monday, faster-than-expected after a major revision upwards last month of the size of the economy in 2004.

Ou Xinqian, vice minister of the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), said the final year figure would be up 0.4 percentage points from the organisation’s previous forecast of 9.4 percent.

“This figure was adjusted according to the newly revised 2004 GDP,” Xinhua quoted Ou as saying, referring to last month’s revision of China’s gross domestic product (GDP) data.

That revision showed the total value of China’s economy at the end of 2004 was in reality 16.8 percent, or 284 billion dollars, more than previously estimated.

The miscalculation, mainly in the service sector, meant China hopped over Italy to become the world’s sixth largest economy with total GDP of more than 1.97 trillion dollars.

The revised 2005 growth figure of 9.8 percent from Ou is not the final official number. afp

oneman28
05 Jan 06,, 04:48
http://www.sciencedaily.com/upi/?feed=TopNews&article=UPI-1-20060103-13380600-bc-china-newcities.xml




BEIJING, Jan. 3 (UPI) -- China plans to build 11 satellite cities around its capital, Beijing, each with fast tracks connecting to downtown, Tuesday's the Beijing News reported.

"We have finished the planning of three satellite cities in the east part of Beijing so far," Chen Gang, the director of the Beijing's Municipal Commission of Urban Planning, was quoted as saying.

The cities are expected to hold 5.7 million people, mostly from Beijing, which has a population of 11.5 million.

Housing will be cheaper than in downtown areas, and each city will have at least one good-quality hospital, a primary and a middle school and a scaled supermarket.

The Municipal Commission of Urban Planning said Beijing plans to build more government-subsidized housing in outlying districts along the subway lines.

The decision to build the satellite cities reflects Beijing's general urban plan for 2004-20, which was approved last January. The plan requires city authorities to develop policies to decrease the population density and improve living conditions in old Beijing.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International. All Rights Reserved

oneman28
05 Jan 06,, 04:50
http://www.forbes.com/business/feeds/afx/2006/01/04/afx2428229.html




01.04.2006, 09:35 PM
BEIJING (AFX) - China's largest oil refiner Sinopec has received approval from the State Council to build a 3.1 bln usd petrochemical complex in the northern municipality of Tianjin, the China Daily reported.

The plant, which is scheduled for completion in 2008, includes a one mln ton per year ethylene cracker, a refinery able to process 12.5 mln tons of crude oil a year, and other facilities to produce petrochemical products such as polyethylene and polypropylene, the newspaper said.

Citing a Sinopec official who declined to be named, the newspaper said the State Council approved the project, which will be wholly owned by Sinopec, on Dec 21.

Construction of the new complex will start in the first half of this year, the newspaper said, adding that Sinopec officials did not provide any more details.

Tianjin port handled 240 mln tons of commodities last year, ranking among the world's top 10 ports, the newspaper said.

Sinopec rival PetroChina is also looking to build a similar sized petrochemical complex in Tianjin to tap the huge potential of China's petrochemical market, the newspaper said.

China consumed 16 mln tons of ethylene in 2004, but only 6.27 mln tons of the product was produced domestically that year, the newspaper added.

'The current ethylene production facilities under construction are far from enough to meet demand,' the newspaper quoted Hou Jixiong, an oil and gas analyst with Guotai Jun'an Securities Co Ltd, as saying.

oneman28
05 Jan 06,, 05:02
http://today.reuters.com/investing/financeArticle.aspx?type=marketsNews&storyID=2006-01-05T030844Z_01_SHA54499_RTRIDST_0_AUTOS-CHINA-VOLKSWAGEN-URGENT.XML





Wed Jan 4, 2006 10:08 PM ET
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SHANGHAI, Jan 5 (Reuters) - Sales at Volkswagen A.G.'s (VOWG.DE: Quote, Profile, Research) car-making joint ventures in China fell 13.8 percent to 564,300 units in 2005, the second consecutive year of declining sales, executives at the two businesses said on Thursday.

The German company's flagship joint venture in Shanghai sold 287,000 vehicles last year, 19 percent fewer than in 2004 and hit by weakness in the world's third-largest vehicle market, an executive, who asked not to be identified, told Reuters.

Volkswagen's other plant, in the northeastern city of Changchun, saw 2005 sales of 277,300 vehicles, another executive said.

The sales figures covered only locally produced vehicles. Volkswagen officials in China declined to comment.

In 2004 the auto maker sold 655,000 units in China, down 6 percent from 2003, executives have said.

oneman28
05 Jan 06,, 05:04
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/05/content_4011060.htm






BEIJING, Jan.5 -- Shanghai General Motors Corp overtook the two joint ventures of Volkswagen AG in China to capture the crown as the top seller of passenger cars in 2005.

It was the first time Shanghai GM has beaten Shanghai Volkswagen and First Automotive Works-Volkswagen to drive to the top as the best seller in the world's third-largest car market over the past decade.

Shanghai GM, General Motors Corp's joint venture with Shanghai Automobile Industry Corp, and the second-largest domestic automaker, sold 325,000 sedans nationwide in 2005, a surge of 29 percent year-on-year.

Shanghai VW, the winner in 2004, reversed one place to first runner-up spot as it sold 287,000 cars to customers, down 19 percent from a year earlier.

FAW-VW, Volkswagen's joint venture with First Automotive Works Group Corp, the largest carmaker domestically, also slipped one position to third place on sales of 270,000 units, a drop of 10 percent from the same period last year.

The market share of German-based Volkswagen AG, which used to dominate the Chinese market for a long time with its popular Santana model, fell from 80 percent to 20 percent while its sales also dropped more than 10 percent on-year.

Shanghai GM's success was helped by its quick response to market demand as it introduced various models to meet people's needs, said business insiders.

Beijing Hyundai Motor Company also surpassed Guangzhou Honda Automobile Co Ltd and moved one position to No. 4 in the sales stakes, followed by Guangzhou Honda,

Sales of Beijing Hyundai Motor Corp jumped 62 percent to 233,668 cars for 2005 after surging a whopping 176.4 percent in 2004.

Guangzhou Honda, which makes Accord, Fit and Odyssey models, sold 233,000 units nationwide in 2005, up 13.9 percent after it raised its sales target in the middle of 2005.

(Source: Shanghai Daily)

oneman28
05 Jan 06,, 05:05
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-01/05/content_509544.htm






Updated: 2006-01-05 10:49

Despite increasing international trade disputes and the appreciation China's currency in 2005, the country's textile industry recorded healthy increases, the China Chamber of Commerce for Import and Export of Textiles said Wednesday.
According to the chamber's estimate, sales revenues, profits and exports all increased 20 percent year on year. Sales revenue totaled 2 trillion yuan (250 billion U.S. dollars), profits were 66 billion yuan, while exports reached 116 billion U.S. dollars in2005.

China's textile export in 2004 totaled 97.3 billion US dollars, according to figures from Chinese customs.

The chamber attributed the textile output and export growth mainly to increased investment in fixed assets and technological innovation that have enhanced the competitiveness of Chinese companies.

Official statistics show in the first ten months of 2005, sales revenue and sales value and industrial added-value of large-sized Chinese textile enterprises grew 26.33, 26.28 and 24.95 percent year on year respectively. This is a growth rate that was higher than the same period of 2004.

Due to oil price hikes, profits in China's chemical fiber sector of the textile industry dropped about 30 percent. If this decline were not included in the industry's calculations the chamber believes profit growth registered 30 percent in most other sectors.

Thanks to the elimination of global textile quota, China's textile exports to the United States and European Union jumped 62.7 percent in the first ten months of 2005, and accounted for 34.09 percent of all of China's textile exports. The ratio in 2004 stood at 25.72 percent.

oneman28
05 Jan 06,, 05:10
http://www.carthagepress.com/articles/2006/01/04/apindex/hitech/d8eu2dq82.txt



BEIJING - China is putting its marathon anti-graft crackdown online, launching a Web site for the public to report corrupt officials.

The site adds to efforts to assure China's public that the ruling Communist Party takes complaints seriously even as many believe they face retaliation for reporting abuses.

The new site is run by the party's Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

The Web site offers Chinese villagers and others a way to lodge complaints directly, bypassing local authorities who are sometimes criticized for retaliating against petitioners or refusing to take action on complaints.

China has the world's second-largest population of Internet users after the United States, with more than 100 million people online.

A service of the Associated Press(AP)

oneman28
05 Jan 06,, 05:12
http://www.chinapost.com.tw/business/detail.asp?ID=74790&GRP=E



2006/1/5
Taipei, CNA



The southern Taiwan Kaohsiung port handled 9,471,056 TEUs (twenty feet equivalent unit) of cargo in 2005, marking the first decline in 14 years, the latest statistics provided by the Ministry of Transportation and Communications (MOTC) showed Wednesday.
The target of the Kaohsiung Harbor last year was to handle 10.3 million TEUs, but it ended up handling 9,471,056 TEUs, down 2.5 percent from 9,710,411 TEUs in 2004.

Faced with the rapid development of Chinese ports, the officials expressed worries that Kaohsiung Harbor will encounter a bigger challenge ahead.

The Kaohsiung Harbor Bureau noted that the volume of cargo handled by the harbor grew annually between 1991 and 2004, but after ports in China began to spring up one after the other, the growth has begun to slip, although there was still modest growth.

MOTC officials noted that a deep-water port at Yangshan in Shanghai began to operate last December, which they estimated will not pose an immediate threat to Kaohsiung.

But they expressed concerns about the fact that Xiamen Harbor, which has established offshore transshipping links with Kaohsiung, is currently constructing three deep-water wharfs.

After the inauguration of the three wharfs next year, containers will no longer have to detour to Kaohsiung for transshipment, and Kaohsiung Harbor stands to see a drop of 600,000 TEUs in cargo handled annually.

oneman28
05 Jan 06,, 07:05
http://images.businessweek.com/ss/05/12/china_wonders/index_01.htm

oneman28
05 Jan 06,, 09:04
http://www.forbes.com/markets/feeds/afx/2006/01/04/afx2426760.html

(
Updating with more details and background)

BEIJING (AFX) - China's gross domestic product (GDP) is expected to grow between 8.3 pct and 9.3 pct in 2006, the State Information Center (SIC) said in a report published in the Shanghai Securities News.

The government think tank said in an earlier report that it expects China's 2005 GDP to grow 9.4 pct.

GDP is expected to grow 8.3 pct, 8.8 pct or 9.3 pct under the three scenarios for this year released by the think tank.

The consumer price index (CPI) is expected to rise 1.5-2.5 pct, the report added.

The think tank said in an earlier report that it expects China's 2005 CPI to grow two pct.

Growth in fixed-assets is expected to slow but will continue to rise sharply, it said.

China's urban fixed-asset investment rose 27.6 pct to 5.58 trln yuan in the first 10 months of 2005.

According to predictions by the SIC in November, overall fixed-asset investment is expected to grow 25.3 pct in 2005 while urban fixed-asset investment is seen rising 27 pct.

The SIC said it expects consumption to make a greater contribution to economic expansion in 2006, with retail sales to grow 12.5-13.5 pct.

The government think tank said earlier it sees China's 2005 retail sales up 12.8 pct.

But the report noted that high oil prices will likely hurt the automobile industry.

According to figures from China Association of Automobile Manufacturers, in 2003 Chinese automobile makers sold 4.39 mln vehicles, up 34.21 pct from the year before. In 2004, sales grew only 15 pct and they were up 12 pct over the first 11 months of 2005.

It added property sector growth will also be held back by the government's cooling measures.

Is said it expects the growth in China's trade surplus to slow to 20 bln usd in 2006 from 65 bln usd in 2005 as the yuan appreciates gradually against the US dollar.

China's exports are expected to grow 18-21 pct in 2006, while imports are likely to rise by 16-22 pct, it said.

The government think-tank said in an earlier report that it expects China's 2005 exports to increase 29 pct year-on-year, while imports are forecast to grow 19 pct.

It added it expects tight energy supplies, a surge in trade disputes, rising production prices, and the government's cooling measures to also hold back export growth, the report said.

The report suggested a prudent monetary policy and a moderate loosening of credit control to support economic growth.

(1 usd = 8.1 yuan)

jqf/dg/dk

oneman28
06 Jan 06,, 00:48
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-12/30/content_507938.htm


By Gong Zhengzheng (China Daily)
Updated: 2005-12-30 06:21


China's shipbuilding tonnage is expected to reach a record high of more than 12.5 million this year, grabbing 17 per cent of the global shipbuilding market, up from 14.3 per cent in 2004.

The tonnage this year will grow by some 42 per cent from 8.8 million last year, said Zhu Rujing, an analyst with Beijing-based China Shipbuilding Economy Research Centre.

Growth of China's shipbuilding tonnage will account for most of the global growth, which will increase to 71.2 million this year from 61.4 million in 2004, Zhu said.

According to statistics from China Shipbuilding Industry Association, the nation's shipbuilding tonnage jumped by 49 per cent year-on-year to 8.92 million in the first three quarters of this year.

Zhu predicted the nation's shipbuilding tonnage will continue to grow steadily in 2006 as a result of mounting capacity of domestic shipyards and abundant orders.

Shipbuilding tonnage in China is expected to reach 15 million in 2006, which will enable the nation to hold 20 per cent of the world's shipbuilding tonnage, he said.

Despite the rapid growth, China will continue to be the world's third biggest shipbuilding country following Japan and South Korea, Zhu said.

Both Japan and South Korea now control more than 30 per cent of global shipbuilding market.

"Many Chinese shipyards appear short of capacity to satisfy the world's strong ship demand," Zhu said.

On Tuesday, China Shipbuilding Industry Corp (CSIC), one of the nation's biggest conglomerates in the industry, signed a contract with a domestic shipping group to build 16 vessels, including very large crude carriers and other ships for liquefied petroleum gas and refined oil.

The deal was worth nearly 6 billion yuan (US$740 million).

CSIC said its shipbuilding tonnage would reach 3 million this year.

However, Zhu warned of overcapacity starting from the second half of 2008 because domestic shipyards are developing massively, and growth of global ship demand will slow down.

He estimated that total shipbuilding capacity in China would exceed 30 million tons by 2010, up from nearly 14 million at present.

CSIC said last month that it aimed to have a total capacity of more than 10 million tons by 2010.

Dalian Shipbuilding Industry (Group) Co Ltd, China's biggest single shipyard affiliated to CSIC, plans to expand its capacity to 6 million tons in 2010 from 2.6 million now.

Foreign shipbuilding giants, such as those from South Korea and Japan, are accelerating penetration into China, with some hoping to gain controlling stakes in Chinese shipyards, and even build wholly-owned shipyards.

But informed sources said China will ban foreign shipbuilding groups from doing this, with an anticipated new policy on the nation's shipbuilding sector.

China's ship exports have also been growing rapidly in recent years due to booming global ship demand.

Zhu said ship exports would exceed 7 million tons this year.

Statistics showed Chinese shipyards built 5.44 million tons of ships for export from January to September this year, up 30 per cent from a year ago.

The ship export value surged by 45.5 per cent to US$3.18 billion during the period.

oneman28
06 Jan 06,, 09:55
http://english.people.com.cn/200601/05/eng20060105_233149.html


China's Ministry of Communications will join hands with provinces along the Yangtze River to deepen the river's watercourse to facilitate transportation of third and fourth generations of container ships.

The project will begin this year and last three years, costing an estimated 15 billion yuan (1.88 billion U.S. dollars), said Cao Desheng, deputy director of the Waterway Transportation Bureau under the Ministry of Communications.

The funds will be spent on building infrastructure projects of navigable courses and a number of ports along the river, Cao said.

In the next three years, the water section downstream Nanjing, capital of Jiangsu Province in east China, will be dredged to facilitate navigation of third and fourth generation of container ships on all weather conditions as well as 100,000 dead-weight-tonnage ships.

By 2010, the section downstream Anqing in east China's Anhui Province, will be dredged to serve navigation of 5,000-10,000 dead-weight-tonnage ocean-going ships, Cao said.

Efforts will be made to expand the navigable course to Shuifu of Yunnan Province in southwest China on the upper reaches, he said.

Statistics from the Ministry of Communications show only about 15 percent of Yangtze's navigable capacity is being utilized.

Source: Xinhua



http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/05/content_4014812.htm



BEIJING, Jan. 5 (Xinhuanet) -- China's 6,300-kilometre-long Yangtze River has become the world's busiest freshwater route, with its annual freight volume surpassing those of the Mississippi of the United States and the Rhine of Europe, said the Chinese Ministry of Communications.

Cao Desheng, vice director of the ministry's Water Transport Department, said that the annual freight volume of the Yangtze River is now 1.6 times that of the Mississippi, which stands at 460 million tons.

The freight volume is also 2.3 times that of the Rhine, said Cao.

Cao said the Yangtze River has been the most important inland waterway in China, which transported 80 percent of the total cargoes shipped on China's all inland waterways.

By the end of 2004, major ports along the Yangtzr River handled a total of 640 million tons of cargoes, 2.8 times that of the year 1995.

As the largest river in China and the third largest river in the world, the Yangtze River starts at the foothills of the 6,621-meter snow-covered Geladandong, the main peak of the Tanggula Mountains in Qinghai Province.

The river flows past Qinghai, Tibet, Yunnan, Sichuan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Anhui, Jiangsu and Shanghai, where it empties into the East China Sea. Important cities along the way are Chongqing, Wuhan, Nanjing and Shanghai.

The total gross domestic product (GDP) of all cities along the Yangtze River accounts for 41 percent of the national total, according to governmental statistics. Enditem

oneman28
06 Jan 06,, 11:53
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/06/content_4018095.htm


BEIJING, Jan. 6 (Xinhuanet) -- China plans to input a total of 160 billion yuan (about 20 billion US dollars) on railway construction in 2006, Minister of Railways Liu Zhijun said here Friday.

At the national railways working conference in Beijing, Liu said the construction of 13 new express passenger rail routes will start this year, with the pace of another 11 rail routes under way to be accelerated.

The year 2006 will witness a large-scale railway building momentum in China, said Liu, noting that the ministry will launch a total of 87 railways projects this year.

As a step to renovate part of the country's outdated low-speed railways, a total length of 3,860 electrified rail routes will go into service across the country in 2006, Liu said.

Meanwhile, two key projects of the railways sector will become operational in 2006, said the minister, one is the highest-latitude Qinghai-Tibet Railway which will go into trial operation in July, and the other is the electrified Beijing-Shanghai Railway to be in service in the year.

Preparations for China's sixth large-scale speed-lift for railways are also scheduled to be completed before October this year, the minister said. Enditem

oneman28
06 Jan 06,, 11:55
http://news.monstersandcritics.com/business/article_1073575.php/China_new_year_festival_big_travel_time



BEIJING, China (UPI) -- Beijing`s two railway stations are expected to carry 13.6 million passengers over China`s Spring Festival and New Year, officials say.

The new year falls on Jan. 29 this year. The peak transportation period for the Spring Festival begins Jan. 14 and last 40 days.

Millions of Chinese return home for family reunions during Spring Festival, an occasion similar to Christmas in the western countries, Xinhuanet said.

The Beijing Western Railway Station expects to carry 7.46 million passengers and the Beijing Railway Station 6.16 million over the holiday period, about a 6.8-percent increase overall.

Forecasters expect passenger flow throughout China to hit 2,042 billion people during the festival period.

oneman28
07 Jan 06,, 09:55
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/06/content_4018848.htm


BEIJING, Jan. 6 (Xinhuanet) -- China is estimated to spend 12 trillion yuan (1.5 trillion U.S. dollars) on its energy and transportation sectors in the upcoming five years, Friday's China Securities Journal reported.

 In the next five years, the annual investment in the coal industry will be increased by 60 billion yuan or 70 billion yuan ayear, the paper quoted a report made by the Macroeconomic Research Institute of the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC)as saying.

The report outlines prospects of investment trend of seven industries in China's 11th Five-Year plan (2006-2010) period.

During the period, investment in the oil sector will grow by 40billion yuan or 50 billion yuan a year, while that in natural gas field, by 20 billion yuan or 30 billion yuan a year, according to the report.

At the same time, China will spend an average 500 billion yuan or 600 billion yuan on installing new power-generating units each year, and another 500 billion yuan or 600 billion yuan on building power grids.

The transportation sector will get 6.5 trillion yuan of investment, representing an annual increase of 18.6 percent.

By the year 2010, China's railway network is expected to reach 85,000 kilometers and the mileage of highway roads will be 2.3 million kilometers.

The port handling capacity in the country is estimated to reach4.4 billion tons. The airports for civilian use will be increased to 180. Enditem

oneman28
07 Jan 06,, 09:58
http://www.menafn.com/qn_news_story.asp?StoryId=Cq735ueidy2HPBMeTzwnVBMr HDge


Date: Friday, January 06, 2006 10:11:51 PM EST

BEIJING, Jan. 6 (UPI) -- China plans to centralize collection of economic statistics into a single agency to ensure accuracy.

The Economic Daily reported the state council has given the National Bureau of Statistics responsibility for all data collection beginning Feb. 1.

Local officials reportedly have a habit of inflating production figures to advance their careers. That has created a gap between national figures and those calculated by aggregating local statistics.

The bureau, which employs 95,000 people, began taking over provincial data collection last year.


--

oneman28
07 Jan 06,, 10:02
http://www.indiacar.net/news/n20608.htm


Visionary Vehicles Founder and CEO Malcolm Bricklin today proudly congratulated his friend and partner Chery Automobile Company President Yin Tongyao for winning China's prestigious Economic Person of the Year award for 2005. Mr. Yin also received an unprecedented special prize honoring "Self-development & Creation" for leading the Chinese automobile industry in four extraordinary categories.

- Chery is the Chinese automobile export leader -selling in 38 countries with 41 key franchise dealers. In 2005 President Yin prepared to make international export history by announcing Chery has teamed with U.S. based Visionary Vehicles to bring the first full line of Chinese luxury cars to North America.

- Chery leads China in single brand automotive sales. Chery has sold more than 100,000 of its popular QQ model, which represents a 129.8% increase over last year. With monthly sales of close to 10,000 cars, the QQ has been on top of for China's minicar sales list for a successive 11 months.

- Chery is China's automotive growth leader. With 185,000 automobiles sold in 2005, Chery more than doubled its 2004 volume.

- Chery created China's first self-developed engine brand, ACTECO.

These honors were announced at the 2005 CCTV Awards Ceremony held in Beijing on December 28 2005.

Mr. Bricklin said he could not be more thrilled to see Mr. Yin receive these honors. "Yin Tongyao is an extraordinary automotive visionary and strategist who is leading Chery to history-making achievements both inside and outside China. We are delighted to be working with this talented executive and his aggressive and innovative team."

oneman28
13 Jan 06,, 17:09
http://www.autonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060113/REG/60113008/1012&refsect=





BEIJING -- More vehicles were sold in China last year than in Japan, making China the world's second largest auto market after the United States, with almost 6 million units sold, a state newspaper said on Friday.

But if imports of 160,000 were excluded, China was still number three, the People's Daily said.

Chinese vehicle sales last year rose 14 percent from 2004 to 5.8 million units, the newspaper said, refering only to China-made products. Sales this year of vehicles -- including everything from cars to buses and trucks -- are expected to grow 10 to 15 percent to 6.4 million to 6.6 million units, the report said, citing figures from the official China Association of Automobile Manufacturers.

But sales of passengers vehicles, including sedans and SUVs, jumped 21 percent to nearly 4 million units, the newspaper said, bouncing back from a relatively lackluster rise of 15 percent in 2004. In 2003, sales almost doubled.

Car sales had been slowing, due in part to Beijing's crackdown on easy auto credit to help cool an overheating Chinese economy.

The stronger performance in 2005 was partly due to healthy sales in secondary markets in poorer inland provinces, the paper said, quoting an official at the auto association.

China has turned into a boom for automakers struggling under discounting in saturated mature markets such as Europe and the United States.

Earlier this month, General Motors reported a 35 percent rise in China sales to 665,390 vehicles in 2005, exceeding the combined 564,300 units sold by Volkswagen AG's two Chinese joint ventures.

oneman28
13 Jan 06,, 17:28
http://metalsplace.com/metalsnews/?a=3572



China's alumina output is expected to hit 9.5 million metric tons this year, up 11.8% from 8.5 million tons in 2005, state-run China Securities Journal says.

Citing Kang Yi, the chairman of the China Nonferrous Metals Industry Association, the newspaper says production of primary aluminium is likely to rise to 8.5 million tons in 2006 from an estimated 7.8 million tons last year.

The newspaper gives no reason for the projected output increases.

China's annual alumina output accounts for around 11% of the world's production every year, while the country's primary aluminium output accounts for 22.5%, according to the newspaper.

Alumina is a key raw material used to make aluminium.

China, the world's largest aluminium producer and an important exporter of the metal, relies heavily on imports to meet domestic alumina demand.

oneman28
13 Jan 06,, 23:26
http://money.cnn.com/2006/01/13/news/international/china_fdi.reut/



Hong Kong remains top source, accounting for about 30 percent of the total.
January 13, 2006: 2:27 PM EST



BEIJING (Reuters) - China attracted more than $60 billion in foreign direct investment in 2005 for the second year in a row as firms flocked to take advantage of the country's low wages and fast-growing market of 1.3 billion people.

Foreign direct investment (FDI) totaled $60.33 billion last year, just shy of the 2004 record of $60.63 billion, after a $7.2 billion spurt in December, the Commerce Ministry said Friday.


"In 2005, foreign investment into China maintained sound momentum and the quality of foreign investment improved," Chong Quan, a ministry spokesman, said in a statement.

The ministry said the data excluded the rising tide of investment into China's banks, brokers and insurance firms.

FDI has been crucial to the export boom that has turned China into the world's third-largest trading nation. Foreign-owned firms account for almost 60 percent of the country's exports.

China has raked in more than $1 billion a week in FDI since it joined the World Trade Organization in late 2001, a pace that experts say might moderate in 2006 and beyond, but not by much.

"I think the general trend is that there is more to come, but maybe at a slower pace," said Edgar Doerig, head of the economic and commercial section at the Swiss Embassy in Beijing.

One possible damper on FDI is a long-awaited plan to unify the tax rate paid by domestic and foreign-invested companies, said Xing Houyuan, a senior researcher at the Chinese Academy of International Trade and Economic Cooperation, a think tank under the Ministry of Commerce.

She said the change, which is expected to raise the tax rate by foreign firms, would probably have the greatest impact on investment in sectors already facing the threat of overcapacity.

"I expect foreign investment in sectors such as manufacturing, processing and real estate will shrink, but investment might increase in the services sector when it opens more to the outside in 2006," she said.

Many foreign firms enjoy preferential income tax rates as low as 15 percent set by local authorities while domestic firms are typically taxed at 33 percent. No date has been set for a unified business tax rate.

Services, inland to prosper
Min Tang, chief economist with the Asian Development Bank in Beijing, agreed that the pattern of FDI was likely to shift towards services like banking and away from manufacturing.

"Some of the labor-intensive, cheap labor type of export-orientated FDI will gradually move more to the center of China and, if not, move out of the country," he said.

Enticing such investment inland instead of letting it slip away to places like Vietnam and Bangladesh would depend on the government creating the right incentives, Tang said.

"Whether China will continue to achieve such high-speed growth in foreign investment in the mid- to longer term is questionable unless China develops new policies," he said.

Hong Kong remained the top source of China's FDI in 2005, accounting for $17.95 billion, or 29.75 percent, of the total.

FDI from the 15 core members of the European Union jumped 22.5 percent, while FDI from the United States dropped 22.3 pct, the ministry said without giving figures.

Charles Martin, president of the American Chamber of Commerce-China, said he was confident China would remain attractive to foreign investors after business tax is unified.

"I think there will continue to be some great tax deals in the inland provinces, in western provinces. And I think in high technology there will continue to be some very good opportunities for tax relief on the coastal areas," he said.

China's booming eastern provinces drew 2.59 percent more FDI in 2005, while FDI into the poorer central and western provinces jumped 27.75 percent and 11.3 percent, respectively.

With China's economy and incomes rising fast, Martin named banking, financial services and healthcare as promising sectors for foreign investors.

Although investment in new manufacturing facilities was likely to slow, Martin said he expected more foreign investors to expand capacity through mergers and acquisitions.

"I've seen more private equity firms coming through here in the past year than in the previous year, and I think that trend continues," he said.

oneman28
13 Jan 06,, 23:32
http://www.nrdc.org/news/newsDetails.asp?nID=1988


1/13/2006 8:36:00 AM
Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


BEIJING - China has told power companies that 5 percent of their electricity will have to come from renewable energy sources by 2010, as the country tries to diversify away from fossil fuels to power its fast-growing economy, a news report said Friday.

Zhang Guobao, vice-minister of China's top economic planning body, said the quota would increase to 10 percent by 2020, according to the China Daily newspaper. Wind and solar power are included but nuclear and hydropower are not, Zhang said.

"Although the proposed percentage might not sound like a big number, it will mean a substantial increase for China and it will boost the use of these new energies," Zhang said.

China, the world's second-biggest producer of greenhouse gases after the United States, has promoted cleaner and renewable energy in hopes of reducing air pollution from its surging fossil fuel use and the potential security risks of growing dependence on imported oil.

In recent years, China has become more reliant on imported fuel to feed the surging demand for energy in its modernizing cities.

But many cities are facing chronic energy shortages with scheduled blackouts and industries forced to shift production to weekends when demand is less.

Total installed capacity of all of China's power plants last year reached 508 gigawatts, up nearly 15 percent from the previous year, but still falls short of the country's needs.

Demand is expected to exceed 1,000 gigawatts within 15 years, according to the report.

The quota applies to large power companies with an installed capacity of more than 5 gigawatts. Analysts estimate that China has 15 such companies generating about half of the country's power supply.

China's larger power companies currently rely mainly on coal and other fossil fuels with renewable energy making up a negligible percentage of their output.

Power grids that use energy generated from wind or solar power would be able to charge higher electricity tariffs, Zhang said, adding it was just one of several financial incentives for companies to explore alternative energy sources.

Datang International Power Generation Co. Ltd., one of China's top power companies, said it plans to cut its coal-fired output from the current 99 percent to 75 percent by 2014, according to the report.

Datang, and Huaneng Group - China's biggest power company - also have both invested in wind turbines.

In another development, China and Germany agreed to invest US$121 million (€100 million) in renewable energy projects, including a wind power plant in the eastern city of Qingdao, a spokeswoman for the German Embassy said.

Coastal Qingdao will host the water sports for the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the project aims to have the five wind turbines up and generating power by then, the China Daily reported.

oneman28
13 Jan 06,, 23:32
CNPC is one of the top 3 petroleum companies in China. The other two are Sino-Petrochem Group and CNOOC (offshore oil).

http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/2238/2006-1-14/65@293300.htm


2006-1-14 1:28:05 CRIENGLISH.com

Crude oil and natural gas output of China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) reached 105.85 million tons and 36.7 billion cubic meters in 2005, up 1.2 and 28 percent respectively, company sources said on Friday.

CNPC's production has reached its maximum level in history, said Chen Geng, CNPC's general manager.

CNPC's revenue and profit in 2005 was 672 billion yuan (84 billion U.S. dollars) and 175.6 billion yuan, up 17.8 and 36.3 percent respectively.

Figures show in 2005, the CNPC found petroleum and natural gas reserves of 570 million tons and 358 billion cubic meters in China, up 10 percent and 78 percent year on year.

During the year, the CNPC refined crude oil of 110.61 million tons, and produced refined oil of 71.14 million tons, up 5.53 million tons from 2004.

In October 2005, the CNPC successfully acquired Canada based PetroKazakhstan Inc. (PK), which owned 12 oilfields and exploration licenses in 6 blocks in Kazakhstan, with great exploration potential.

Last year, the CNPC signed five overseas exploration contracts, with revenue from overseas oil and gas service jumping 58.1 percent to 29.3 billion yuan, said Chen.

The foreign trade volume of CNPC in 2005 reached more than 20 billion U.S. dollars, he said.

"2005 is a harvest year for CNPC's international service," he said.

In 2006, the CNPC will enhance domestic oil and gas exploration and development, he said, placing a focus on oil exploration in western area.

The CNPC is planning to find petroleum and natural gas reserves of another 500 million tons and 300 billion cubic meters in 2006, with output growing 4.7 percent to more than 140 million oil equivalent, said he.

Industrial statistics show that China imports 40 percent of its total oil consumption. Owing to soaring world oil prices, the country has seen its refined oil price rise five times in 2005.

(Source: Xinhua)

oneman28
14 Jan 06,, 08:20
http://webbolt.ecnext.com/coms2/description_57762_GLOBAL040106_RCH



Global Sources' China Sourcing Report: Batteries shows that mainland China's battery production topped 28 billion units in 2004. China now produces 25 percent of global battery supply.

China makers made 22 billion alkaline batteries in 2004 - 79 percent of total production. Other types of batteries produced include:

-- NiCD batteries - one billion units

-- Lithium batteries - 940 million units

-- NiMH batteries - 800 million units

China Sourcing Report: Batteries publisher Mark Saunderson said: "Global demand for batteries will increase by more than six percent annually from 2006, according to market researcher Freedonia Group. Demand for units used in portable electronics and computers is very strong.

"China makers expect production to grow by 20 percent in 2005."

The report shows that six out of 10 makers are increasing production by between 5 percent and 20 percent. Two out of 10 are increasing production by 21 percent to 50 percent.

Saunderson added: "From July 2006, the European Union RoHS directive requires that lead, mercury, cadmium and other harmful chemicals be removed from electronic devices. Makers are upgrading their production technology and manufacturing processes to ensure compliance and protect market share."

oneman28
14 Jan 06,, 12:48
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/14/content_4052084.htm

Guizhou is the poorest province in China due to its geographical settings. Most of its land are montainous. So the transportation system is very important for improving its economy.

The could be one of the efforts for the Chinese gov to promote the western area.

President Hu used to be the govenor in the province.


GUIYANG, Jan. 14 (Xinhuanet) -- Southwest China's Guizhou Province is expected to invest 152.3 billion yuan (about 19 billion U.S. dollars) in the coming 15 years to build a highway framework with its capital of Guiyang as the core, according to sources with the provincial government.

Statistics show Guizhou built 3,258 km high-grade highways, 576km of which are expressways, in 2005.

According to the plan, Guizhou will build three south-north main highways, three east-west main highways and eight branch highways, totaling 7,400 km.

By the year 2020, the completed highway framework will link all counties and cities and any two within four hours distance. Enditem

oneman28
16 Jan 06,, 09:15
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-china16jan16,1,800129.story?coll=la-headlines-business


From Associated Press


BEIJING — China's foreign currency reserves have risen to $818.9 billion, up 34% from a year earlier, state media reported today. At this growth rate, its reserves could reach $1 trillion this year, surpassing Japan's as the world's biggest.

The nation's central bank said reserves rose by $208.9 billion from 2004. Analysts estimate that three-fourths of China's reserves are held in U.S. Treasury bonds.

The government's foreign currency regulator said this month that its plans for 2006 include "actively exploring more efficient use of our [foreign-exchange] reserve assets."

oneman28
16 Jan 06,, 09:47
http://www.eetasia.com/ART_8800403862_499486__no.HTM



Posted : 16 Jan 2006

Print Version E-mail this to a colleague Send inquiry

The chip industry may be hard-pressed to maintain a veneer of composure this year as it struggles to meet expectations for progress on Moore's Law in changing and often cynical times. But amid the pitfalls, savvy industry investors will also spy pockets of opportunitymany of them overseas.

That was the word out of the Needham Growth Conference last week as some 400 executives from the electronics, IT and biomedical sectors sought to cast their companies' positions in the best possible light before an audience of 3,000.

Needham Group analysts see the focus of system and semiconductor design activity shifting from the United States, Japan and Europe to China and the rest of Asia (ROA) over the next decade. That should focus investors' attention on the many Chinese and other Asian fabless IC companies that are listed on the Nasdaq. Investors should also be looking at companies pursuing advanced power-management solutions based on proprietary process technology, Needham analysts said.

"We believe power-management semiconductors will remain one of the fastest-growing industry segments through 2008," analyst N. Quinn Bolton stated in his January portfolio report. He predicts the segment will advance at an 11.2 percent compound annual growth rate between 2004 and 2008, from $5.5 billion to $8.4 billion.

The semiconductor industry's transition from vertical to horizontal integrationin which participants outsource manufacturing and, increasingly, design activities to focus on their core competenciesis ushering in what Needham believes will be a five- to 10-year migration of system and semiconductor design overseas.

"In the future," Bolton said, "we believe many Asian/Chinese fabless IC houses will comfortably attain gross margins of 40 percent and net margins of 20 percentmargins few U.S. companies will be able to match, given their higher labor, accounting and legal costs."

Needham predicts chip industry growth of 8 to 9 percent this year but warns that 2006 will be a critical year for the U.S. chip industry if it is to maintain its competitive edge. Some observers said the U.S. government needs to step in with initiatives for reshaping the competitive landscape. Those moves might include incentives for companies that reinvest at home instead of abroad; beefed-up broadband legislation to bolster the U.S. effort and narrow the gap with Asia and Europe, which are ahead in deployment; and changes in immigration laws, notably the H-1B visa program, to stem the "brain drain" of foreign-born but U.S.-trained scientists and innovators back to their countries of origin.

One vocal advocate at the conference for governmental leadership in safeguarding U.S. competitiveness was small-government champion Newt Gingrich. The competitive threats posed by China are "real," the former Speaker of the House said, "and we need to thoroughly overhaul our approach to math and science education as well as transform our legal and federal institutions in order to leave a better future for our grandchildren." In a keynote address, Gingrich proposed a blueprint for realizing "a vision of the desired future."

Global transformation
The work ethic and outside-the-box thinking needed to succeed in today's borderless industry are being applied by many of the companies that presented at the conference. Needham Group Inc. primarily serves high-tech companies that fly under the radar of the large investment-banking firms, and for the third year in a row it has "managed more public-equity offerings under $200 million for tech companies than any other Wall Street firm," said chairman and CEO George Needham.

Greg Hildebrand, chief financial officer of Volterra Semiconductor Corp., told the conference that his company has taken the high road in tackling the high-performance power-management segment. "Others have solutions that are 80 percent discrete components and 20 percent integrated, while our offerings are 80 percent integrated with 20 percent discrete components. That makes them very scalable," he said.

Volterra's offerings have been designed into systems from ATI, Cisco Systems, Ericsson, Hewlett-Packard, Hitachi, IBM, Juniper, NEC and Nvidia. The company also has "the sole reference design for IBM's Cell processor design-ins," said Hildebrand.

While Volterra has found a way to integrate more functions onto its mixed-signal chips, Catalyst Semiconductor Inc. is "taking apart" integrated E2PROMs, its main product line, and providing the on-board mixed-signal building blocks as self-contained products.

"We are in our first phase of bringing out general-purpose analog and mixed-signal products based on elements [that are] part of our E2PROMs," Catalyst president and CEO Gelu Voicu told the conference. "The next phase is to come up with high-performance analog and application-specific standard products."

The company has operations in Thailand, employs 160 globally, has been profitable for seven years and claims 4,000 customers, only one of which accounts for more than 10 percent of its revenue. "E2PROMs are used everywhere and are the cash generator for our company," said Voicu. "Applications include LCD displays, digital cameras, cell phones, automotive instrumentation, modems, wireless LANs, network cards, DIMM modules, digital satellite box receivers, set-tops and Internet routers."

Innovator e-Silicon Corp. touted its success as a "general contractor" to the semiconductor industry. The company addresses what chairman, president and CEO Jack Harding called the "last unaddressed portion of the design-to-manufacturing cycle: the operations. We make money by shipping chips with our customers' name on them, by engaging in all the needed processes of chip design and fabbing the chip into production for the customer. We have 40-plus customers and are shipping 12 to 15 new products every year, and I think we have the right model for a changing custom-chip market."

Harding, a veteran who in his long career has worked at companies focused on assembly, EDA, wafer fab and design, told EE Times last winter, "I'm not a technologist. I've been fortunate to surround myself with very technically competent people. Early on, I worked in a Manhattan investment bank. Perhaps that has led me to think about the business of designing chips at a more abstract level than if I had focused just on the technology."

A focus on business will need to come more naturally to many in the global market, especially as China emerges in 2006-2007 as a competitive force in semiconductors, according to Needham. The investment firm believes that with the Olympics set for Beijing in 2008, the need to finish infrastructure for the event will drive electronics food chain spending in the 18 months leading up to the games, similar to the technology boost seen in the years preceding the Seoul, South Korea, games in 1992.

Chinese companies have the obvious advantage of proximity to many of their end markets.

Needham's "Outlook 2006" report quotes a statistic from EE Times-Asia that China locally had approximately 16,500 electronics manufacturers by the end of 2004. Many of those companies elect to use locally-designed and produced chips because of lower cost, quicker turnaround and the ability to customize design, the study found.

- Nicolas Mokhoff
EE Times

oneman28
19 Jan 06,, 01:37
http://www.forbes.com/markets/feeds/afx/2006/01/17/afx2456653.html
01.17.2006, 09:06 PM





BEIJING (AFX) - China's productivity growth has averaged 8.7 pct since 2000, the highest levels in Asia, business research organization The Conference Board said.

In 2004, China's productivity growth was 8.4 pct, it said. No figure for 2005 was provided.

The Conference Board said growth since 2000 outstrips the 1995-2000 level, when China averaged 3.1 pct.

'This suggests that dramatic changes in reform policies and the increase in openness prior to China's ascension to the World Trade Organization showed their major impact during the most recent years,' said Bart van Ark, director of The Conference Board's international economic research program.

Most developed nations experienced slowing productivity in 2005, with growth rates between 1.5 to two pct, according to the statement.

The US saw its productivity drop to 1.8 pct in 2005 from three pct in 2004.

The average productivity rate for the European Union in 2005 stood at 0.5 pct, down from 1.4 pct the previous year.

India saw its productivity grow by 4.4 pct in 2004, and experienced average growth of 4.1 pct in the 2000-2004 period. No 2005 figure was provided.

India's slow growth compared to China is related to employment growth of around two pct 'during recent years'. This is double the growth of labor input in China, The Conference Board said, adding that China experienced similar moderate gains in productivity during the late 1980s and early 1990s.

oneman28
19 Jan 06,, 01:38
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/19/content_4069843.htm

www.chinaview.cn 2006-01-19 02:53:44


BEIJING, Jan. 18 (Xinhuanet) -- The number of foreign students studying in China has risen more than 20 percent annually over the past five years, a Chinese educational official said here Wednesday.

"The Chinese government values educational cooperation with foreign countries and welcomes more foreign students to come to China," said Liu Baoli, vice director of the international cooperation department of the Ministry of Education (MOE).

Addressing a Spring Festival reception held for foreign graduates, he said there were 110,000 foreign students studying in China in 2004. The number in 2005, which has not come out yet, should be much higher.

"China wishes to know more about the world and let the world know more about China," said Liu.

He said the rapid development of China's higher education and high-quality universities is attracting more and more foreign students. China has become a popular destination for foreign students.

More than 500 Chinese universities have met conditions of admitting foreign students, he said.

Foreign graduates, Liu said, have contributed positively to friendly exchanges between China and other countries in the world in diplomatic, economic and cultural fields.

He said the ministry will adopt new measures to expand enrollment of foreign students.

"In 2006, about 10,000 foreign students will come to study in China on scholarships provided by the Chinese government," said Liu. "The standard of scholarships will also be lifted."

Since the People's Republic of China was founded in 1949, it has received students from more than 170 countries. Enditem

oneman28
19 Jan 06,, 01:41
http://networks.silicon.com/webwatch/0,39024667,39155722,00.htm


Published: Wednesday 18 January 2006


The number of web users in China, the world's second-largest internet market, grew by 18 per cent in 2005 to 111 million, the Economic Daily reported on Wednesday.

Some 8.5 per cent of the country's 1.3 billion people now have access to the net, the newspaper reported, citing a survey released by the China Internet Network Information Center.

State media previously predicted that 120 million Chinese people would be surfing the web by the end of 2005, as computers find their way into more homes and domestic telecommunications networks grow.

The 2005 gains were higher than those in 2004, when the number of internet users grew 16 per cent to 94 million.

More than half of China's web population - or about 64 million people - accessed the net via broadband connections, suggesting a 50 per cent increase from 2004, as China strongly promotes the development of its broadband networks.

The internet's explosive growth in China has come despite increased efforts by the government to control the medium, in which occasional pockets of free speech have appeared in chat sites and blogs.

China has the world's number two PC market, with nearly 16 million units shipped in 2004 and that number is expected to have grown another 13 per cent in 2005, according to data-tracking firm IDC.

PC makers such as industry leaders Lenovo Group and Dell shipped 5.2 million units in the third quarter of 2005, according to IDC.

The growth of the internet has also spawned a growing number of local online players, including Yahoo!-invested ecommerce firm Alibaba.com, web portal Sina, online game firm Shanda Interactive Entertainment and online search firm Baidu.com.

Major new-media multinationals attracted by the market's big growth potential have also set up shop in China, including Amazon, eBay and Google.

oneman28
19 Jan 06,, 10:22
http://english.eastday.com/eastday/englishedition/nation/userobject1ai1803499.html



19/1/2006 17:12


China provided jobs for 9.7 million urban residents in 2005, compared with 9.8 million in 2004, and helped 5.1 million laid-offs, among which 1.3 million aged 40 to 50, get re-employed, a spokesman with the Ministry of Labor and Social Security said in Beijing today.
During the 2001-2005 period, more than 180 million workers laid off from state-owned enterprises found new jobs, said spokesman Hu Xiaoyi at a press conference.
In 2005, he said, the number of unemployed people stood at 8.39 million, with a registered unemployment rate of 4.2 percent, the same with the previous year.
"This is the third consecutive year China has fully accomplished its goal for employment and re-employment," said Hu, adding that at the end of 2005, China's employed population reached 760 million, 40 million more than at the end of 2000.
In 2005, nearly 700 billion yuan (US$87.5 billion) was pooled as funds for pension, unemployment, medical treatment, work injury and maternity insurance, with 540 billion yuan paid to beneficiaries, the spokesman said.
As for the goal for 2006, he said, China will work to find new jobs for 9 million urban residents and help 5 million of workers laid off from state-owned enterprises get re-employed.
"The registered unemployment rate for urban residents will be controlled below 4.6 percent in 2006," he said.
From 2001 to 2005, enterprise retirees received 1.5876 trillion yuan (US$198.45 billion) in basic pension, a rise of 803.2 billion yuan (US$100.4 billion), or 103 percent, from the previous five years.
At the end of 2005, China's endowment insurance service covered 174.44 million, up 38.26 million, or 28 percent, from at the end of 2000.

oneman28
20 Jan 06,, 21:00
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/21/content_4080126.htm



BEIJING, Jan. 20 (Xinhuanet) -- A 4,200-kilometer-long extra high-tension power grid above 750-kilovolt will be established in China by 2010, said the State Power Grid Development Company here Friday.

Liu Zhenya, general manager of the State Power Grid Development Company, said at the company's first staff conference that more extra high-tension power grids will be built in the coming years, so as to ease bottleneck on power supply in China.

Liu said by 2010, China's trans-province long-distance electricity transmission capacity will reach 70 million kilowatt, with its annual electricity sales exceeding 2.2 trillion kilowatt-hours.

In 2005, the company generated 1.46 trillion kilowatt-hours of electricity, a rise of 13.6 percent, with 77.4 billion kilowatt-hours for trans-province users.

Liu said the company profits 14.4 billion yuan (1.79 billion U.S. dollars) in 2005, 44.9 percent more than that in 2004.

According to Liu, China's first demonstration projects for 750-kilovolt transmission line started operation at the end of 2005, a remarkable sign for the company to accelerate extra high-tension power grids construction in 2006.

The company plans to input 160 billion yuan (19.85 billion U.S. dollars) on power grid construction and renovation in 2006, and put an additional 20,000 kilometers electricity transmission line above 220-kilovolt, said Liu. Enditem

oneman28
20 Jan 06,, 21:07
http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/ceb/2006/01/21/bus/ad.spending.rises.in.asia.hits.$66b..html


SINGAPORE - Chinese consumers buying more lifestyle products drove advertisement spending in key Asia-Pacific media markets up 14 percent to a record $66.6 billion dollars in the year to September 2005, an industry report said yesterday.

The figures, for regional markets excluding Japan, showed corporate spending on television, newspaper and magazine advertisements in China totalled nearly $37 billion, up 21 percent and accounting for 56 percent of the regional market, Nielsen Media Research said.

Ad economy

“China now sits just behind Japan as the third advertising economy globally,” it said in a statement. As a television advertising market only, China is ranked second globally, it added.

Professional services, tonics and vitamins, and shampoo and hair care products were the most advertised in China, with oral care items posting an 80 percent rise in ad spending.

Nielsen Media Research also identified a rising trend of credit card, whisky and luggage advertising campaigns in China last year.

It attributed this trend to “the changing lifestyle of Chinese consumers who have more disposable income than ever before (and) are more willing to spend.”

Gayle Cunningham, executive director for Nielsen Media in China and Hong Kong, said advertising spending in Australia, the Philippines and India also posted strong growth while South Korea, Taiwan and Singapore saw “modest declines.”

Television was the main vehicle, accounting for 66 percent of spending, followed by newspapers and magazines.

For Hong Kong, the advertising market rose 11 percent as more companies advertised skin care as well as health and fitness products.

“In view of the uncertainty about avian flu and SARS, people in Hong Kong have become more health conscious,” the research said. (AFP)

oneman28
20 Jan 06,, 21:14
http://tech.monstersandcritics.com/news/article_1077903.php/Microsoft_China_braces_for_Google

M$ only has the reasearch labs in CHina so far. When Google decided to set up its lab in CHina. Both enter the competetion for the brian power.



BEIJING, China (UPI) -- Analysts see Microsoft`s announcement it was consolidating its Chinese R&D assets as a move preparing for increased competition from Google.

Zhang Yaqin, vice chairman of Microsoft China, said the company`s new Microsoft China Research and Development Group aims to nearly double in 2006 by recruiting 800 people, plus add up to 3,000 more personnel within the next three to five years.

Zhang, who was appointed to head the new group on Wednesday, was quoted in the Chinese media saying, 'Our goal is simple and clear: to allow this group to become a world-class technological and product R&D center.'

At present, the Redmond, Wash.-based company has more than 800 personnel doing R&D in five big groups and several regional teams. Zhang listed the main reasons Microsoft wanted to place all R&D units in one group was to increase coordination and communication for strategic development of local market opportunities.

The company is expected to boost investment in China R&D after consolidating all units under one umbrella organization. Zhang said Microsoft`s annual investment in R&D was about $100 million, a figure that will rise as more personnel are added.

Other objectives of the new group are to work more closely with indigenous firms and establish a department for strategic cooperation. Microsoft promises to outsource more work to local partners in a move to reduce costs and gain goodwill by helping Chinese companies grow.

Analysts say Microsoft is circling the wagons, opening the purse strings and increasing localization ahead of what portends to become one of the big tech battles of the year to watch in China: Microsoft and Google going head to head.

Google, a major threat to Microsoft, is also expected to launch an R&D center in China, headed by Dr. Kaifu Lee. Lee is a former Microsoft corporate vice president and the man who founded its R&D operations in China.

Lee`s defection to rival Google last year sparked a bitter legal battle and bad press for Microsoft in the China market. While it won an injunction to delay Lee joining Google, it was unable to stave off his move to the keenest enemy camp from ultimately happening.

The China Daily reported the Web search giant initially planned to recruit 50 people but has decided to expand more quickly. Most analysts expect this will be possible with Lee at the helm, given his good relations with Chinese officials and solid track record of innovative technology.

Many industry watchers see Microsoft being in the fight of its life. Earlier this week China announced it had 111 million Internet users, third-largest worldwide after the United States and Japan. The country also has more than 350 million mobile-phone subscribers, the biggest single market.

oneman28
24 Jan 06,, 09:13
http://today.reuters.com/business/newsarticle.aspx?type=tnBusinessNews&storyID=nPEK220914&imageid=&cap=


By Jason Subler

BEIJING, Jan 24 (Reuters) - China's top national economic planner estimated that industrial output had grown 16.4 percent in 2005, backing economists' expectation that the country will announce strong and sustained economic growth on Wednesday.

The National Development and Reform Commission also said China's producer price index for 2005 had been up about 5 percent on 2004, the official Xinhua news agency reported.

The forecasts followed statements by two officials earlier this month that China's economy had grown 9.8 percent in 2005.

Both estimates given by the planning agency were largely in line with those of economists polled by Reuters, who also estimate 2005 gross domestic product grew 9.8 percent, while the fourth quarter alone was up 9.7 percent on a year before.

Their median estimate of 2005 growth in industrial output was 16.3 percent, while that for PPI growth was 4.9 percent.

The commission's figures, if they turn out to match those to be issued by the National Bureau of Statistics on Wednesday, would continue a trend of annual growth in industrial production in excess of 16 percent that has been sustained since 2003.

They would also underline a recent trend of slowing annual increases in producer prices, which peaked at 6.1 percent in 2004 but have been steadily dropping since mid-2005.

Analysts expect that fourth-quarter and full-year data to be issued on Wednesday will show that fixed-asset investment -- in such things as bridges, factories and office buildings -- will have continued to grow at high levels through the end of 2005.

The economists polled by Reuters estimated annual growth in urban fixed-asset investment would hit 28 percent in December, and that overall fixed-asset investment would be 25 percent greater in 2005 than a year earlier.


PROMOTING CONSUMPTION

The customs administration said earlier this month that China's trade surplus in 2005 hit $102 billion, helped along by a surplus of $11 billion in December.

Analysts will also be looking to Wednesday's retail sales figures for signs of whether China's economy has begun to show any signs of relying more on consumption as a driver of growth.

China's policy makers have stressed that they hope to reduce the economy's reliance on investments and exports in favour of consumption, which is seen as a more reliable source of growth momentum.

The economic planning agency also said industrial profits in 2005 had been an estimated 20 percent higher than a year earlier, at 1.38 trillion yuan ($171 billion), Xinhua reported.

Separately, Li Rongrong, director of the State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission, said the country's 169 centrally administered state-owned enterprises had made a combined profit of 628 billion yuan ($77.9 billion) in 2005, 27.9 percent more than in 2004.

The official China Daily cited Li as saying the enterprises' net assets amounted to 4.6 trillion yuan ($571 billion) in 2005, 18.1 percent greater than in 2004. Their total assets grew by 15 percent in 2005, the paper said, without citing a figure.

Li attributed the rising profits to improving governance in state firms, according to the report. He said his commission would speed up closures of poorly-performing state-owned firms in the coming year to make the state sector more competitive.

(Additional reporting by Eadie Chen)

($1=8.0620 yuan)

oneman28
24 Jan 06,, 09:17
http://za.today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=businessNews&storyID=2006-01-23T115740Z_01_BAN343113_RTRIDST_0_OZABS-MINERALS-CHINA-STEEL-20060123.XML


BEIJING (Reuters) - China, the world's top steel maker, became a small net exporter in 2005 for the first time as mills produced a little more steel than the country could use, Customs data showed on Monday.

The data showed China exported 27.59 million tonnes of semi-finished steel and steel products last year, while imports reached 27.13 million tonnes, making China a net exporter with 460,000 tonnes.

Rapid expansion by Chinese steel mills and growing exports have threatened margins for global steel players, and helped push up the cost of raw materials, including iron ore.

China produced 371 million tonnes of steel products in 2005, up 24.1 percent on the year earlier. Crude steel output rose 24.5 percent to 349 million tonnes, said analyst Xu Aihua of state-backed metals consultancy Antaike Information Co., citing figures from the China Iron and Steel Association.

China's annual steel capacity reached 470 million tonnes by end-2005, compared with domestic demand estimated at about 350 million tonnes, state media said.

"The surplus is a major reason behind rising steel exports," Xu said.

China's net steel imports reached 12.87 million tonnes in 2004.

"The most important thing to look at is steel products. China is the world's largest importer of steel products, at over 5 million tonnes this year," said Li Xinchuang, vice president of the China Metallurgical Industry Planning and Research Institute and the architect of a policy that encourages consolidation in China's steel industry.

The official figures also showed Chinese 2005 coal imports had jumped 40.1 percent to 26.17 million tonnes, while exports fell 17.3 percent to 71.68 million tonnes. Exports of coke and semi-coke fell 15 percent to 12.76 million tonnes.

China also produced 25.4 percent more iron ore in 2005 at 421 million tonnes.

China's commerce ministry said last week that rising steel stocks and the introduction of new capacity would continue to depress domestic prices of steel products. Prices were already down more than 30 percent from the year earlier.

oneman28
24 Jan 06,, 09:28
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/24/content_4093809.htm


BEIJING, Jan. 24 (Xinhuanet) -- China Huaneng Enterprise Group, the country's leading electricity producer, plans to be equipped with 80,000 megawatts of installed capacity by 2010, according to information provided by the Ministry of Commerce on its website.

During the 10th Five-Year Plan period (2001-2005), the installed capacity and power output of Huaneng had been growing at an average annual rate of 6.9 percent and 14 percent.

The sales revenue of Huaneng reached 73 billion yuan (9.1 billion U.S. dollars) in 2005, and is expected to exceed 140 billion yuan by 2010.

During the 10th Five-Year Plan period, Huaneng's annual growth of sales revenue averaged at 16.3 percent, and that of profit averaged at 12.3 percent.

By the end of 2005, the total asset of this state-owned enterprises reached 234.9 billion yuan, with installed capacity of43,214 megawatts. Enditem

oneman28
25 Jan 06,, 04:29
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-01/25/content_515459.htm




China's economy expanded with full power in 2005, rising an eye-catching 9.9 per cent over 2004, the National Bureau of Statistics said in a publicly-announced statement in Beijing on Wednesday.

The economic volume, in GDP terms, has overtaken France's as the world's 5th largest, analysts and economists said.


A port in Nanjing is seen in this photo taken in January 11, 2006. [newsphoto]


They believed China's economy will continue to power ahead with full steam, led by a rising domestic demand, vigorous overseas consumption of Chinese goods and continuing big investments in infrastructure, urban and rural build-up, and technological innovation and renovation.

The statistical bureau commissioner Li Deshui said that China's gross domestic product rose to 18.2 trillion yuan (US$2.3 trillion) in 2005 after expanding 10.1 percent in 2004.

The economy grew 9.9 percent in the fourth quarter from a year earlier after expanding a revised 9.8 percent in the previous three months, the bureau said.

France's 2004 output was worth $2.05 trillion and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has forecast 1.6 percent growth for the country in 2005, the Bloomberg News reported. China is set to overtake the U.K. this year as the 4th-largest economy in the world.


Li Deshui, commissioner of the National Bureau of Statistics, speaks at a press conference on China's economic performance in Beijing on January 25, 2006. [Xinhua]
The U.S.'s $12 trillion economy stands at No. 1, and Japan's is the second-largest, at $4.7 trillion.

Exports and domestic consumption, coupled with booming fixed-asset investment, made China the world's fastest-growing major economy and an engine for worldwide expansion.

China was the second-biggest contributor to global growth in 2004, after the U.S., according to the International Monetary Fund, the Bloomberg reported.

Exports surged 28 percent to $762 billion last year, generating a record $102 billion trade surplus. Overseas sales amounted to almost 40 percent of GDP, compared with about 25 percent in France, according to the World Bank. Investment makes up about 45 percent of China's output.

A nationwide economic census completed last year that revealed millions of previously unaccounted-for services companies helped ease concerns about China's ability to sustain growth. The census, published last month, added $284 billion -- equivalent to the output of Austria -- to China's 2004 GDP and suggested services are more important to the economy than previously thought.

In announcing their blueprint for economic development for the coming five years in October, China's leaders said they will step up efforts to stimulate consumer spending in an economy where per capita incomes are still a 16th of France's.

oneman28
28 Jan 06,, 09:15
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/26/content_4105566.htm



BEIJING, Jan. 26 (Xinhua) -- Chinese battery makers said here Thursday that they welcomed the verdict made by the U.S. Court of Appeal for the Federal Circuit, which turned off the appeal of the Energizer Holdings against the U.S. International Trade Commission(ITC) on battery patent.

The verdict issued by the court on Jan. 25 means that the ITC's decision to terminate the investigation into the alleged infringement on intellectual property rights by Chinese battery makers was valid, a senior official with China's Fujian Nanping Nanfu Battery Co., Ltd. said.

In April 2003, the U.S. Energizer Holdings complained, in the name of its subsidiary Eveready, to the ITC that the zero-mercury-added alkaline batteries exported to the United States by 24 manufacturers including those from China had infringed its U.S. patent and requested to initiate the procedure of investigation under "Section 337 of the U.S. Tariff Act".

In June 2004, the ITC ruled preliminarily that nine manufacturers from Chinese mainland and Hong Kong infringed the legitimate and valid patent of the U.S. Energizer, recommending a ban on the import of the batteries accused of infringement.

In October 2004, the ITC made the final decision that the Energizer's patent was invalid because of its indefinite right, and terminated the investigation of the above battery manufacturers under Section 337.

Energizer then appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, putting the ITC as defendant.

The official with the Fujian Nanping Nanfu Battery Co., Ltd. said the verdict of the U.S. court indicated that the Chinese battery makers have finally won the three-year-long lawsuit.

He said the victory is a great encouragement to Chinese exporters, who are currently besieged by various trade barriers. "It also helps clear the obstacles for Chinese batteries to enter the U.S. market."

The Fujian company is one of the largest alkaline battery manufacturers and suppliers in China. Enditem

oneman28
28 Jan 06,, 10:15
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/2238/2006-1-28/65@296070.htm


China has decided to abolish agricultural tax as of 2006, three years ahead of its five-year schedule, the State Administration of Taxation said.

China's top legislature late last year adopted a motion to rescinded the country's 2,600-year-old agricultural tax starting from Jan. 1, 2006.

The administration said China began to phase out agricultural tax to reduce farmers' financial burden as early as 2000.

The tax reform helped reduce farmers' tax burden by 22 billion yuan (2.7 billion U.S. dollars) in 2005, and 23.4 billion yuan (2.8 billion U.S. dollars) during the period from 2001 to 2004, the administration said.

Only three of the 31 provincial level areas on the Chinese mainland collected agricultural tax in 2005, while 28 others had abolished the tax.

The tax overhaul was designed to narrow the widening income gap between the rural and urban residents, including about 800 million rural people.

During the more than 2,000 years, agricultural tax was always the main source of the country's coffers. Since the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949, agriculture has made great contribution to the country's economic development.

(Source: Xinhua)

oneman28
28 Jan 06,, 10:20
http://www.fibre2fashion.com/news/textile-news/newsdetails.aspx?news_id=11818


Embroidery machine export by China has shown a remarkable growth in terms of higher value and wider reach to Southeast Asia and South America since 2005, informed the China Chamber of Commerce for Import and Export of Textiles.

China has exported 20,568 embroidery machine tools in the three quarters of 2005, registering a growth of 83 percent compared to last year.

During the first three quarters of 2005 embroidery machines were exported to 88 countries and regions by China.

About 57 percent of China's total embroidery machine exports were made to India and Indonesia.

Embroidery machine export to India jumped to 290 percent, Saudi Arabia 280 percent, Colombia 210 percent, Yemen 150 percent, Peru 270 percent, Mexico 110 percent, Germany 370 percent and Argentina by 200 percent.

oneman28
28 Jan 06,, 10:24
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/28/content_4111613.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-01-28 14:33:51

BEIJING, Jan. 28 (Xinhuanet) -- China has successfully reversed the situation of declining acreage under grain crops over the past five years since 2000, said the Ministry of Agriculture.

China's acreage under grain crops was cut by 14.4 million hectares during the five years after 1998, when the country's acreage under grain crops reached 113 million hectares, the ministry said.

The figure hit a record low in 2003 when the acreage dropped to 99 million hectares.

The acreage under grain crops grew slightly in 2004 and it grew to about 10.4 million hectares last year, up 4.86 million hectares over 2003, thanks to the government's policy to support grain production.

The country's per-unit grain yield has hit a record high of 4.44 tons per hectare during the period from 2000 to 2005, up 25.5kg over the pervious five years, said the ministry.

The ministry said the country's total grain output exceeded 480 billion kg in 2005, compared with 469.4 billion kg in 2004.

The total grain output in 2005 was 20 billion kg over the end of the Ninth Five-Year Plan period (1995-2000), although the acreage under grain crops in 2005 was 4 million hectares less thanthe late 1990s. Enditem

oneman28
28 Jan 06,, 10:33
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/28/content_4110946.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-01-28 10:47:54

BEIJING, Jan. 28 (Xinhuanet) -- China's average tariff level has dropped to 9.9 percent in 2005 as the country is earnestly fulfilling its commitments to the World Trade Organization (WTO), according to figures released by the Ministry of Commerce (MOC).

The average tariff on industrial products dropped to 9.3 percent as against 14.8 percent in 2000, and that for agricultural products was 15.3 percent as against 23.2 percent in 2000, the MOC said.

China's imports have witnessed a rapid growth in recent years as tariffs have kept dropping from an average of 15.6 percent in 2000, and almost all pledged tariff cuts had been made by year end 2005, according to the MOC.

Meanwhile, China also lifted most licensing requirements and import quotas on schedule, said the ministry, adding that China will only maintain import licensing restrictions on controlled chemical products, such as chemicals which can be easily turned into narcotics and ozonosphere-consuming materials. Enditem

oneman28
31 Jan 06,, 09:23
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/31/content_4121962.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-01-31 11:16:42

BEIJING, Jan. 31 (Xinhuanet) -- China's hydroelectric power capacity reached 115 million kilowatts at the end of 2005, reports the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC).

Between 2000 and 2005, China increased its hydroelectric power capacity by 36 million kw with construction underway on a batch of major hydroelectric power stations and many other facilities starting operations.

The construction of the Three Gorges Project progressed well during the period and is expected to be completed in the new Five-Year Plan period (2006-2010), according to the NDRC.

The development of substantial hydroelectric power projects capable of producing 70 million kw of power began during the five-year period, including some in west China as well as the major project linking the power-rich West to the energy-thirsty East.

To encourage the development of hydroelectric power, the Chinese government carried out a census of the country's water resources. It strengthened the preliminary work on hydroelectric power development and worked on designs for strategic projects.

To meet the rising energy demand of the country's booming economy, China is paying more and more attention to the development of renewable energies.

China promulgated a new law on renewable energy in February 2005. The law, which took effect from Jan. 1, 2006, is considered to be of great significance to the development of China's renewable energy industry.

The medium and long-term development projects for renewable energies designed by the NDRC and other related departments are expected to fulfill China's energy objectives up to 2020 and meet the government's emphasis on renewable energy.

Furthermore, the Chinese government has announced incentives infinancing and taxation to encourage the development of renewable energies such as wind power, methane and bio-energy.

According to the NDRC, China's wind power has entered a large-scale development phase. By the end of 2005, China's wind power capacity had reached nearly two million kw.

Over the last five years, the Chinese government has set out a program for wind power development, which has laid firm foundations for China's wind power ambitions.

China has also seen progress in the development and use of bio-energy, solar power and geothermal heat in the past five years.

At the end of 2005, nearly 17 million Chinese rural families were using methane and the number of major methane projects exceeded 2,000.

According to latest statistics, China's annual methane consumption has reached eight billion cubic meters.

Experimental bio-power projects involving burning stalks have been started in north China's Hebei, northeast China's Heilongjiang, and east China's Shandong and Jiangsu provinces.

By the end of 2005, the absorbable capacity of China's solar water heaters had reached 80 million square meters. The energy it produced is equivalent to burning 10 million tons of standard coal.

China's consumption of renewable energies in the year 2005 was equal to 160 million tons of standard coal, accounting for seven percent of the total energy consumption volume of the country, said the NDRC. Enditem

oneman28
31 Jan 06,, 09:31
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2006-01-29-china-roads_x.htm



China's highways go the distance
By Calum MacLeod, USA TODAY
BEIJING — Need to get someplace in China? Try today, the down day in a travel stampede unmatched anywhere.

New elevated highways link the city of Fuzhou, China, to the surrounding towns and villages of Fujian province.
AFP/Getty Images

The Year of the Dog, the lunar new year celebrated in much of Asia, began Sunday. In China, it triggered the world's largest annual mass migration, sending hundreds of millions of Chinese homeward for the festival. At week's end, they will reboard trains, planes and buses so crammed with humanity that sales of adult diapers have soared because getting to washrooms on crowded passenger trains can be impossible.

The record number of travelers — more than 2 billion journeys in the 40 days from Jan. 14 to Feb. 22, by government estimates — underscores the new mobility of Chinese society. This year, it also has drawn attention to highway construction underway in China, which is in the midst of the greatest road-building boom since the United States began linking the Lower 48 with interstate highways in the 1950s.

Today, China is stitching itself together with concrete and asphalt. Its goal: highways that reach all 31 provinces — from the Himalayas of Tibet in the southwest to the Gobi Desert in the north.

ON THE ROAD

1913: China builds first modern highway.
1949: Total road length open to traffic is 50,000 miles.
1988: First expressway — 11.5 miles long — built near Shanghai.
1998: Major construction of expressways begins.
2000: Number of private cars on the road is 6.25 million.
2005: Number of private cars on the road increases to 17 million.
2006: Expressways total 25,480 miles.
2020: Expressway mileage likely to reach 53,000 miles; China likely to be world's leading carmaker.

Source: Chinese government




Already, China's expressway network is second only to America's. "No other country can compete with China when it comes to the expansion speed of road building," says Wang Yuanqing, a professor at the Highway College of Chang'an University in Xian.

The vast majority of New Year trips — 1.86 billion by the Ministry of Communication's estimate — will be made on the roads. Roughly 700,000 buses will handle the strain.

Thousands of travelers crowded central Beijing's Bawangfen bus station Wednesday. "I couldn't get a train ticket this year," said Fan Xiuzhu, 50, as she kept watch over bags of New Year gifts she was taking home to northeast Liaoyang. "But the expressway has cut my journey from 15 hours to eight, the same time as the train.

"The buses are quite luxurious now, with air conditioning, toilet and video. Not like before, when they were filthy and smoky, with hard seats and people packed in the aisle."

Over the past five years, China has spent more on transportation infrastructure than in the previous five decades of Communist Party rule.

From 2001 to 2005, expressways grew by 15,350 miles, more than doubling the total length to 25,480 miles. The United States has 46,000 miles of interstate. By 2020, China is likely to overtake the United States. India has more road miles, but a third are unpaved.

China's high-speed expressways, with speed limits of 75 miles per hour, grew by 4,163 miles in 2005 alone and will stretch 3,107 miles farther this year. The United States built 41,000 miles of new highway from 1957 to 1969; China plans 30,262 miles this decade.

America's interstates brought prosperity and change. China's are doing the same. Many of those using the new roads are migrant workers who have left villages and farms for jobs in booming urban China. The government estimates at least 140 million rural Chinese have left the countryside for the bright lights of the city. The New Year festival is one of the few extended public holidays that give them a chance to return to their roots.

Away from the smooth surfaces of major highways, the inequality of modern China becomes clear. Many rural roads, especially in areas populated by ethnic minorities and near borders, are little more than mud tracks. That has prompted the government to promise 112,000 miles of new rural highways this year alone.

The environmental impact of the road boom is worsened by air pollution — passenger car sales jumped 26% last year. But "even developed countries adopt the 'develop first and refine later' strategy," says highway expert Wang. "We are now trying to build environmentally friendly roads."

China is stressing initiatives that minimize the damage of road construction. However, efforts to get drivers to choose more environmentally friendly cars and use low-sulfur fuels are meeting resistance.

"Chinese car buyers are not rational," Li Xinmin of the State Environmental Protection Administration told a conference in July. "They buy vehicles to show others what a large and beautiful car they have."

As highways expand and car sales boom, cross-country road trips that were once unthinkable are exciting China's newly affluent urban class.

"The road network is great now. You can drive anywhere," says Hou Xin, 28, a computer technician and member of one of several auto clubs now multiplying in Beijing.

In August, Hou and his wife drove their China-made Jeep Cherokee more than 2,300 miles along the Silk Road, the ancient trade route that linked China to Western civilizations. For much of the journey to the far western province of Xinjiang, they were able to travel on new expressways.

Xinjiang, inhabited by Muslim Uighurs, is a place most Chinese "wouldn't dare go before; it's too remote. But now conditions are better," Hou says. "It's like going abroad, to another culture (because people living there) don't understand Mandarin" Chinese.

Gas stations and motels are springing up along the expressways to service the growing traffic volume. Hou's two-week trip cost him $125 a day for gas, a room and tolls. "The toll operators are the only robbers left on the roads," he says.

Hou relishes each escape from polluted Beijing. "The sky is so blue in western China."

Starting in July, a new train running 2,300 miles from Beijing to the Tibetan capital, Lhasa, will shorten a weeklong journey by rail and bus to just 48 hours. Even so, Hou and his wife plan to drive. "It's a great feeling speeding through beautiful scenery," he says. "I feel so free on the road."

oneman28
31 Jan 06,, 09:34
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-01/31/content_516518.htm


Updated: 2006-01-31 14:59

The China National Offshore Oil Corp Limited (CNOOC Ltd) has announced recently that its net production volume in 2006 will reach approximately 170 million barrels of oil equivalent(BOE).



It will represent a nearly 9 percent increase over the 2005 level, says the company. Net production from offshore China is estimated to be 148 million to 149 million BOE in 2006, while the company's overseas output is expected to reach 21 million BOE.



Ten projects offshore China are expected to start operation in 2006. The company also plans to invest US$2.59 billion in business and resource development throughout 2006, up 30 percent year on year.

oneman28
31 Jan 06,, 09:35
http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2006/01/31/1327472.htm


(Asia In Focus Via Thomson Dialog NewsEdge)LHASA, Jan 31 Asia in Focus - The per capita gross domestic product (GDP) topped US$1,000 in southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region last year. This is at least 10 per cent higher than the 2004 figure, according to a report released by the regional legislature.


* Tibet's GDP topped 25 billion yuan (US$3.1 billion) in 2005, more than double the year 2000 figure of 11.78 billion yuan, said the report on Tibet's social and economic development.

* It added Tibet's annual GDP growth has averaged 12 per cent in the past five years.

SUMMARY

Per capita gross domestic product tops US$1,000 in southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region last year

ASIA IN FOCUS

31-01 1741


China's Tibet reports US$8.5 bln in fixed assets investment


http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/-chinas-tibet-reports-us85-bln-fixed-assets-investment-/2006/01/31/1327473.htm


(Asia In Focus Via Thomson Dialog NewsEdge)LHASA, Jan 31 Asia in Focus - Southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region reported 69 billion yuan (US$8.5 billion) in fixed assets investment between 2001 and 2005, three times as much as in the previous five-year period. About 50.8 billion yuan of the investment was appropriated from the central coffer to boost infrastructure construction in the region, said a report on the regional social and economic development during the 10th Five-Year Plan Period (2001-2005).



* In the past five years, 42,700 kilometres of highway opened to traffic and track laying was completed on the world's highest railroad linking Tibet to neighbouring Qinghai Province.

* The region's installed power generating capacity was expanded to 500,000 kilowatts, an increase of 150,000 kilowatts from the year 2000.

SUMMARY

Southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region reports US$8.5 billion in fixed assets investment between 2001 and 2005

ASIA IN FOCUS

31-01 1742

oneman28
01 Feb 06,, 04:09
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/2238/2006-2-1/138@296599.htm



2006-2-1 11:25:05 CRIENGLISH.com

China's steel output was estimated to have reached roughly 350 million tons in 2005, making up nearly one-third of the world's total, the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) reported.

China's steel output, ranking the first place in the world for ten years consecutively, made great contributions to the country's fast economic and social development, said a recent NDRC report.

Steel output in China has been growing by an annual average 22.2 percent since the year 2000. Iron and steel enterprises with annual output of more than 5 million tons increased from 4 in 2000 to 18 in 2005.

The report said China's iron and steel products were becoming competitive in the global market as exports surged to an estimated 20 million tons last year, compared with 6.21 million tons in 2000.

Large and medium-sized steel enterprises posted 88.05 billion yuan (11billion U.S. dollars) in combined profits for 2004, jumping 7.7 times from 2000.

(Source: Xinhua)

oneman28
01 Feb 06,, 04:11
http://www.upi.com/InternationalIntelligence/view.php?StoryID=20060131-071201-3303r


BEIJING, Jan. 31 (UPI) -- The National Development and Reform Commission issued a report Tuesday reviewing China's oil and gas supplies heading into its next major planning period.

According to the NDRC report carried in state-run media, China has expanded its domestic oil and gas supplies over the last five years with crude oil output increasing from 165 million tons in 2000 to 183 million tons in 2005. Production of natural gas climbed from 27 billion cubic meters to 47.5 billion cubic meters in that time frame.

Breakthroughs in exploration and recovery techniques made over the last five years enabled China to maintain what the NDRC characterized as "steady growth."

The government body, which oversees the management of the country's economic development, said oil fields promising high yields were discovered in western China including Xinjiang, Ningxia, Qinghai, Gansu and Shaanxi provinces. Another oil field find was made in the Bay of Bohai.

Six large-scale natural gas finds were made between 2000 and 2005 in the Ordos, Sichuan, Tarim and Qaidam basins, as well as the South China Sea and East China Sea, according to the NDRC.

In 2000, petroleum accounted for 16.6 percent of China's energy consumption, rising to 22.7 percent by 2005. Natural gas use climbed from 2.1 percent in 2000 to 2.6 percent in 2005.

The report also summarized China's energy infrastructure development during the five year period. Since the completion of the West-to-East natural gas pipeline at the end of 2004, the country has established a 24,000 kilometer (14,913 mile) network. China also has a 20,000 km (12,428 mi.) oil pipeline grid.

The NDRC said by the end of 2005, China had signed more than 200 contracts worth over $9.3 billion dollars with foreign energy partners.

oneman28
01 Feb 06,, 15:14
http://www.just-style.com/news_detail.asp?art=39918



Source: just-style.com




China's textile sales reached CNY3.3tn (US$408bn) in 2005, up a massive 115.7% from 2001, according to a report from the National Development and Reform Commission.

An article in today’s People's Daily said apparel exports reached $116bn in 2005, up 118.9% from five years ago.

More than 19 million people were employed by textile firms, and over 70% of the employees come from rural areas, the report said.

oneman28
03 Feb 06,, 10:20
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-02/03/content_516947.htm



(Xinhua)
Updated: 2006-02-03 10:54

China will see a U-turn from power shortage to sufficient supply beginning this year with the operation of newly installed generating units, according to the National Reform and Development Commission.

Power supply and demand in most areas will strike a balance, and a moderate surplus is even expected after 2007, said Zhang Guobao, vice minister in charge of the commission, recently.

China has long been suffering from short supply of electricity. Statistics of the commission show that the country was in short of 35 million kw of electricity in 2004 and 25 million kw in 2005.

This year will be a turning point and the short supply will be reduced to 10 million kw thanks to increased generating capacity.

China's installed generating capacity topped 500 million kw by the end of 2005, more than 200 million kw of which was added during the 2001-2005 period, Zhang said.

Power stations putting under construction last year will have a total generating units of 100 million kw.

However, in some places in north, east and south China, where rapid economic development has resulted in ballooning demand for power, tight supply will continue to be felt this year, the official said.

Those areas relying heavily on hydropower may even face a more severe situation during the dry winter-spring season, he added.

oneman28
07 Feb 06,, 08:24
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-02/06/content_517604.htm


(Xinhua)
Updated: 2006-02-06 15:41

In 2005, China exported medical products worth US$13.8 billion, up 28.1 percent over the previous year, and imported medical products totaling US$11.84 billion, up 18.5 percent, the Ministry of Commerce reports.
China exported US$12.97 billion worth of western medicine, which accounted for 94 percent of its total medicine export over the year, according to the ministry.

Meanwhile, the export volume of raw-material western medicine made up 57.3 percent of China's medicine export, reaching US$7.9 billion, and that of medical equipment made up 26.7 percent, reaching US$3.68 billion.

China's export of biochemical medicine leaped 50.8 percent to 480 million dollars over the year, the fastest growth among all kinds of western medicine export.

In 2005, the country also exported Chinese medicine worth US$830 million, including plant extracts of US$290 million, up 31.2 percent year-on-year, statistics show.

oneman28
07 Feb 06,, 08:41
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/855/2006/02/07/501@48050.htm


2006-02-07 16:01:34 CRIENGLISH.com

SEOUL - Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., the world's top shipbuilder, said Tuesday it will double its annual imports of steel plates from China this year because of their improved quality and competitive prices.

Hyundai Heavy said it has reached a preliminary agreement with top Chinese steel maker Baoshan Iron & Steel Co. on the supply of 180,000 tons of steel plates annually, starting this year.

The supply will raise Hyundai Heavy's imports from China to 500,000 tons this year, 17 per cent of the company's projected annual demand of 3 million tons, the company said.

The amount will be 2.5 times more than the 200,000 tons Hyundai Heavy imported from China last year.

"Chinese products' quality has dramatically improved and they are about 30 per cent cheaper than Japanese products," company spokesman Kim Jun-ho said.

Hyundai Heavy bought about 55 per cent of its annual needs from domestic suppliers such as the world's No. 5 steelmaker POSCO last year, about 30 per cent from Japan and the remainder from various countries, including China, the company said.

Baoshan Iron & Steel has an annual production capacity of 23 million tons of crude steel and 1.4 million tons of steel plates for shipbuilding, the company said.

(Source: Asia Pulse )

oneman28
09 Feb 06,, 06:13
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/855/2006/02/09/262@48480.htm


2006-02-09 09:00:53 China Daily

China shipping giant China Ocean Shipping Company is in talks to own part of a major Greek port giving it increased access to European markets.
Company officials said COSCO Hellas, the firm's subsidiary in Greece, is interested in taking part in possible plans to buy shares in the Piraeus Port Authority (PPA).

So said an official surnamed Chen at COSCO's port operations department.

PPA handles almost 60 per cent of all Greek shipping.

Chen said COSCO President Wei Jiafu discussed port investment when he met Greek Prime Minister Kostas Karamanlis in January, who was on an official visit to China.

Chen would not give further details as talks are in the initial stages.

The chance to buy into ports was created with the privatization of significant ports in Greece, including Piraeus.

The Greek Government owns 74.1 per cent of PPA at the moment.

The Thessalonica Port Authority said COSCO Hellas has also expressed an interest in developing co-operative ties with the northern Greek port.

Another firm, China Shipping Group (CSG) China's second-largest shipping company is seeking facilities in the Greek port of Crete.

COSCO President Wei Jiafu said earlier that port investment is a priority for the company's future expansion.

In December the group was involved in a joint venture formed by AP Moeller-Maersk and Hutchison Whampoa to buy and develop the second phase of Shanghai's Yangshan port. COSCO Pacific, a port investor affiliated to the Group, took 10 per cent of the venture.

In December, the group also signed an agreement to buy a 20 per cent stake in the Suez Canal Container Terminal in Egypt, its first port investment in the Middle East.

COSCO now holds stakes in a number of Chinese ports in the Pearl River Delta, the Yangtze River Delta and the Bohai Rim in northern China.

Outside of China, it has a 49 per cent stake in a terminal in Singapore, a 25 per cent stake in Belgium's Antwerp port and stakes in other ports in the United States.

COSCO is expected to register a pre-tax profit of around 20 billion yuan (US$2.5 billion) in 2005, breaking all past records, said Chen.

(Photo: baidu)



COSCO to ship imported oil for Sinopec
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-02/09/content_518551.htm


(Xinhua)
Updated: 2006-02-09 09:09

China Ocean Shipping (Group) Company (COSCO), China's leading shipping company, will become a long-term partner of the country's largest oil importer -- China Petroleum and Chemical Corporation (Sinopec).

The two giant companies signed a contract on Wednesday, through which COSCO will be responsible for shipping imported oil for Sinopec.

The shipping company hopes to import 6 million tons in 2006 and with the goal of reaching 30 million tons in the coming years, according to the contract.

Economic observers said the contract indicates a progress in China's independence in transporting imported oil, which will be of great importance to ensure the security of long-distance oil transport.

For years, China has depended mainly on foreign shipping companies from Japan and the Republic of Korea to ship its imported oil.

The increase in demand for oil in China has meant an increase in oil imports in recent years. To meet the demand, China has started to establish a domestic shipping fleet to secure the safety of imported oil transport.

Wei Jiafu, president of COSCO, said the two companies agreed to cooperate in oil supply and strengthen cooperation in the fuel market to ensure enough fuel supply for COSCO's fleet.

Sinopec is China's largest oil producer and supplier, and the country's largest oil importer.

Founded in 1961, COSCO now operates a variety of merchant vessels and boasts a fleet of some 600 ships, the world's second largest transport capacity.

In 2005, COSCO transported over 300 million tons of cargo for its domestic and overseas clients, scoring a profit of 20 billion yuan (2.5 billion U.S. dollars).

oneman28
09 Feb 06,, 06:43
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/2238/2006-2-9/64@298112.htm


2006-2-9 13:58:38 CRIENGLISH.com

A report released by the State Oceanic Administration on Thursday reveals that the oceanic industry in China saw rapid growth in 2005 and predicts a smooth development this year.

The figures show that the added value of the oceanic industry reached 720 billion yuan, or about 89 billion US dollars, last year, up 12 percent over 2004.

The output value of coastal tourism, marine fisheries and maritime transportation lead the top three in the oceanic industry, accounting for three fourths of the total output amount.

The marine pharmaceutical industry also saw dramatic growth last year.

oneman28
12 Feb 06,, 06:02
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/12/content_4168432.htm



www.chinaview.cn 2006-02-12 11:27:20

HOHHOT, Feb. 12 (Xinhuanet) -- All villages North China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, including those in the most remote areas, now have access to telephones, local authorities said.

Connecting telephones to every village in the vast and sparsely populated region is no easy job, said Ao Daming, head of the region's telecommunication administration.

The region, China's third largest, covers an area of 1.18 million square kilometers and has only 20 people for every square kilometer.

Since the "telephone for all villages" campaign was launched in 2004, 3,556 villages have been connected to the phone grid. In all 13,120 villages in the region now have access to telephones, Ao said.

Fiver major telecom operators including China Netcom and China Mobile took part in the campaign. Enditem

oneman28
12 Feb 06,, 06:53
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/10/eng20060210_241471.html


International trademark applications from developing countries rose significantly in 2005, with China topping the list of filers, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) announced here on Thursday.

China made 1,334 applications under the Madrid system for the international registration of trademarks, the largest filer among developing countries, whose overall applications increased by 30.6 percent last year, the Geneva-based organization said.

Other outstanding developing countries include the Republic of Korea and Singapore, who made 148 and 137 applications respectively.

In 2005, China also became the most designated country in trademark applications, a position held by Switzerland since 1997.

This showed that China's market is the most attractive, according to Ernesto Rubio, WIPO assistant director general for trademark affairs.

Other countries which have moved up in the ranking of most designated countries compared to 2004 are the United States, Japan, Turkey, Norway etc.

A designated country refers to the country in which trademark applicants want their trademark to be protected. The amount of designation usually reflects the attractiveness of a country's market.

A total of 33,565 international trademark applications were received in 2005 by the WIPO under the Madrid system, which represents a 13.9 percent increase on figures for 2004.

The largest share of the applications was filed by Germany (5, 802 or 17.3 percent of the total), followed by France with 3,497 applications (10.4 percent) and the United States 2,847 (8.5 percent).

Administered by the WIPO, the Madrid system is a user-friendly and cost-effective service for the international registration of trademarks.

The overall current membership of the Madrid system is 78 (77 countries plus the European community).

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
13 Feb 06,, 01:11
http://www.todayonline.com/articles/98589.asp



Increasingly reliant on imports for its energy needs, China's domestic output of oil increased to 183 million tonnes last year, an increase of 18 million tonnes since 2000, state press reported..

In 2005, oil made up 22.7 percent of the nation's total energy needs compared with 16.6 percent five years ago, according to the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), carried by the official Xinhua news agency.
.
Although the nation's net imports of crude and refined oil dropped 5.3 percent year-on-year in 2005, the world's second biggest consumer of oil, imported a record 130 million tonnes of crude in 2005, up 3.3 percent from the previous year.
.

Meanwhile, the output of natural gas last year rose to 47.5 billion cubic meters, up from 27 billion cubic metres produced in 2000.
.
Natural gas totalled only 2.6 percent of the energy-hungry nation's needs, compared with 2.1 percent five years ago and despite a strong push by the government to increase the use of the cleaner resource.
.
China became a crude oil importer in 1993 and has since been racing to secure resources abroad to power its booming economy as domestic production has fallen into an overall decline.
.
China's largest oilfield, Daqing in the northeast, is gradually being exhausted, although officials hope the northwestern region of Xinjiang can become an alternative as it sits on 30 percent of the nation's total oil reserves and 34 percent of its natural gas.
.
By the end of 2005, China had signed more than 200 contracts with foreign oil partners and attracted 9.3 billion dollars in overseas capital for related energy projects, the report said. — AFP

oneman28
13 Feb 06,, 01:18
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/2238/2006-1-29/135@296232.htm


2006-1-29 20:35:28 CRIENGLISH.com

Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region pumped out 10 billion cubic meters of natural gas in 2005, becoming an important supplier of clean energy in the nation.

According to the regional development and reform commission, the Tarim Oilfield company under the China National Petroleum Corp., one of the country's two major onshore oil and gas producers, provided 24 million cubic meters of natural gas every day for the west-to-east gas transportation program.

Meanwhile, Yakera-Dalaoba oil/gas field in Tarim, developed by Sinopec, another major onshore oil/gas producer of the nation, started operation last September.

In early December, construction began on the Tarim Yingmaili gas-field group, so far the largest group of condensed gas fields in China, indicating the west-to-east gas transportation program entered the second stage.

The gas-field group will take a total investment of 5.26 billion yuan (648.6 million U.S. dollars) and is due to come on stream in December 2006.

Xinjiang plans to produce 15 billion cubic meters of natural gas this year. It is estimated that Xinjiang is blessed with natural gas resources of 10.3 trillion cubic meters, or 34 percent of the nation's total.

(Source: Xinhua)

oneman28
13 Feb 06,, 10:08
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/13/eng20060213_242383.html

Chery is doing pretty good in the auto industry even it has a very short history. Very impressive progress. Chery is owned by local gov of Anhui province and some private investers.



The A520 carrying the 2.0L engine independently developed by Chery was officially released in Beijing on Jan.10. Price at 88,888 yuan, it for the first time reduced the price of 2.0L cars below 100,000 yuan. So it is quite surprising that Chery's planned sale of the product is only 30,000 units.

"We want to change our past practice. The marketing of A520 might take our planned marketing rhythm rather than the market demand as guidance". Li Feng, general manager of the Chery Sales, said the purpose is to build up confidence among the consumers. A520 is a very competitive product, Li Feng believed, but of course about thirteen or so domestic mid-market models are sharing the same market segment with it.

Chery will release six new models ¨C A5, S21, A18, V3, S22 and S12 in 2006. Meanwhile, it will launch the upgraded QQ, setting the target of annual sale at 281,000 units. Obviously, QQ which has made distinct contributions to Chery, will still shoulder the task of driving sales in 2006. "Without QQ's annual sale of over 100,000 units there would not have been the second and third model which can top annual sale of 100,000 units". Li Feng believed the second model to catch up with QQ in sale might be Qiyun and the next is A5 series.

Tiggo and Orient Son are the high-end products among Chery's existing models. However, sales of the two models were no quite satisfactory last year. Li Feng believed the world auto industry has its labor of division and it is hard for the growing proprietary brands to make eye-catching performance on the high-end auto market. All the same, it is hard for Benz and BMW to enter the market segments of less than 300,000 yuan. Chery will fortify its brand building and marketing of Tiggo and Orient Son in 2006. In the meantime, engines of existing models as a whole will no longer rely on outsourcing.

By People's Daily Onlilne



China's Geely targets 2006 sales of 200,000 units

http://www.forbes.com/business/feeds/afx/2006/02/12/afx2519840.html

Geely is a private-owned auto company in China.



BEIJING (AFX) - Geely Holdings Group, China's largest privately-owned automaker, said it has targeted sales of 200,000 units this year, compared with more than 150,000 units in 2005.

According to a company statement, Geely will also launch two new models this year, the FC-1 and LG-1, both with a 1.8 liter engine.

Geely said last week that it exported around 7,000 units in 2005, up over 60 pct from a year earlier.

It sold 20,282 cars in January, surging 96.13 pct year-on-year.

oneman28
13 Feb 06,, 22:29
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/local/13861269.htm



scene was pure Silicon Valley: a throng of venture capitalists and entrepreneurs schmoozing and noshing on caviar appetizers and chilled sauvignon blanc at a s****y Palo Alto bistro.

But the talk was pure China. And many of the 200 guests at the capitalist lovefest two weeks ago at Zibibbo were entrepreneurs from Beijing and Shanghai.

Silicon Valley venture capitalists are placing more bets on China, accelerating a trend that began about three years ago. China's swelling consumer market and turbocharged growth rate are capturing the eyes and dollars of such top-tier VC firms as Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Kleiner Perkins and Gobi Partners.

China's ability to attract Silicon Valley's leading venture firms, which have been instrumental in transforming the Bay Area into the world's leading technology center, raises questions about the valley's prospects of maintaining its competitive edge. Already, the infatuation with the Middle Kingdom is causing changes in the Bay Area.

``There's no doubt that any dollars or resource of time that goes toward Asia takes away from the region,'' said Kevin Fong, a managing director of Mayfield Fund, which invested in an $80 million China fund run by its partner, GSR Ventures. Venture capitalists such as Fong invest in private companies in exchange for an equity stake. ``Maybe that's also a sign that there's too much money and competition in the valley.''

Most venture investments in China are in high-tech companies serving the ballooning Chinese domestic market.

Growth potential

Last year, $1.05 billion in venture capital flowed to China, with 30 to 40 percent of that coming from Silicon Valley, estimates Gavin Ni, chief executive of Zero2IPO, a venture research firm in Beijing. The percentage coming from Bay Area firms has doubled from just three years ago, he said.

That $300 million to $400 million is small compared with the $7.69 billion in overall venture money that flowed into Bay Area companies in 2005.

But a string of eye-popping public offerings, most recently of Beijing-based Baidu, which has been described as China's Google, will help China net more Silicon Valley dollars. Baidu's shares skyrocketed 354 percent on its public offering day.
Seven Chinese firms went public last year on the Nasdaq Stock Market. Their total worth today is about $7.6 billion -- the equivalent of the top 12 U.S. firms that also went public in 2005.

``You are following the money,'' said venture capitalist Tim Draper of Draper Fisher Jurvetson, one of the earliest big-name firms to invest in China. The firm's $14 million investment in Baidu has swelled to $325 million. ``The great minds and the capital will move to the places that are the most aggressive, most active and where the growth rate is highest.''

Over the next year or two, Draper and others say, bigger and better deals will increasingly come out of China, not Silicon Valley. That anticipated shift has already brought about behavior changes.

Entrepreneurs and venture capitalists agree that some start-ups are more likely to get funding if they are Chinese-based companies serving the Chinese market, as opposed to Silicon Valley-based firms.

AMEC, a Shanghai-based semiconductor equipment company whose 18 founders all left Silicon Valley to start the firm in China, ``never'' would have received funding if it were based in Silicon Valley, said Hina Group's chief executive, Hong Chen. Hina, the Chinese equity investment firm that hosted the Zibibbo party, brokered the $30 million deal and AMEC eventually received funding from several Silicon Valley venture firms, including a handful of China first-timers.

``No one would fund a start-up in Silicon Valley that's going to compete with Applied,'' said Chen, of Santa Clara-based semiconductor equipment giant, Applied Materials. ``But . . . you get a lot of attention and traction from Silicon Valley VCs if you have a presence in China.''

More consumers

Start-ups in wireless, mobile phone services and semiconductor design may also have better chances at funding if they are China-based. China has eclipsed the United States as the largest consumer of integrated circuits, used in many electronic products.

And Silicon Valley venture firms may be more willing to assume more risk in Chinese investments because their dollar goes further. ``Ten million allows you to make a lot of mistakes in China,'' Chen said.

Because it's relatively cheap to get a Chinese company running, the standards used to judge whether a company is a good investment may be lower in China, others said. On the upside, the venture capitalists get larger stakes of the company because Chinese entrepreneurs are hungry for money.

Too distant for some

But not everyone is betting on China. The partners of Tallwood Venture, which invests its $180 million fund only in semiconductor start-ups, went on an exploratory trip to China in late 2004. They decided to hold off. The primary reason: The investment across the Pacific would require a more passive approach. Along with putting money into its start-ups, the firm joins the board and takes on a full-fledged coaching role.

``We work with them a lot between board meetings. That's the kind of active involvement we take,'' said Ron Yara, a partner. ``You can't do that if you have to hop on a plane.''

China is attracting not just Silicon Valley money but also its talent. Many of the Chinese-based firms with Silicon Valley funding proudly tout executives from the valley. Baidu's chief executive, Robin Li, left valley firm Infoseek to found Baidu.
``Being able to speak the language of Silicon Valley to venture capitalists is very important,'' Li said from his Beijing office.

About 70 percent of Silicon Valley firms' investments in China are in companies with an executive from the Bay Area, estimates Tony Luh, co-founder and managing director of DragonVenture, which has been in China since 1999.
All three of the poeple who served as presidents of Hua Yuan Science and Technology Association, a Bay Area group that attracts mainland Chinese, have returned to China to start firms in the venture investment arena. Min Zhu, current president of Hua Yuan and co-founder of WebEx, was tapped by New Enterprise Associates to run its China fund.

It's difficult to predict what the long-term impact of this movement of money and brains away from Silicon Valley will be. Venture capitalists say innovative start-ups will continue to get funded in the valley. Most don't believe a ``brain drain'' will occur because the area's acclaimed business schools will continue to attract top students from around the world.

``Some people will look at it as a zero-sum game,'' said Marc Verissimo, Silicon Valley Bank's chief strategy officer. ``That's a limiting view. India and China will be competitors in one sense. But valley companies can get something from working with them.''

Foot in both worlds

What may emerge is a ``hybrid'' model, businesses that capitalize on the best that both sides of the Pacific offer.

One example is Anda Networks, a Sunnyvale telecommunications equipment manufacturer that was struggling to improve its margins. It acquired a Chinese firm in 2000 and moved most of its operations and manufacturing to China. The firm recorded a profit for the first time last year.

``It was a good marriage,'' said Charles Kenmore, Anda's chief executive. ``I think it is reasonable that by 2010 virtually all infotech companies in the valley will have made the transition.''

The shift to China, most say, will force Silicon Valley entrepreneurs to focus on what's made Silicon Valley stand apart: innovation.

``The valley's still the best place to start a business anywhere in the world,'' said Richard Lim of GSR Ventures. ``Because of China, the valley will be less dominant, but it will still remain important.''

oneman28
16 Feb 06,, 22:08
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-02/16/content_520806.htm



By Wang Ying (China Daily)
Updated: 2006-02-16 07:21


The nation's biggest nuclear reactor builder, China National Nuclear Corp (CNNC), will join with one of the country's top five power majors, China Huadian Group, to build a nuclear power plant in East China's Fujian Province.

It is the first nuclear project co-operation between China Nuclear and a State-owned power major whose core business is not nuclear power development, China Nuclear said.

The two State-owned electricity generation giants yesterday signed a framework agreement for the construction of the new nuclear facility, which could sit as many as six 1,000-megawatt (MW) reactors.

The new nuclear plant will be located in Hui'an, in the southeast part of the province near Quanzhou.

"The Hui'an nuclear project has been included in China's 11th Five-Year Plan (2006-10) (a national blueprint in which China's key projects are scheduled), and the signing of the framework agreement represents the official start-up of the nuclear programme," CNNC said in a statement yesterday.

According to the agreement, the two Beijing-based conglomerates will create a joint-venture company for the plant.

China Nuclear will be the majority shareholder of the project, and is responsible for constructing and operating the plant. China Huadian will be the second owner, participating in decision-making and project management.

A CNNC company official yesterday told China Daily that the agreement signed yesterday is only the start of their partnership.

"Further details such as specific shares, total investment as well as the size of the plant in the initial phase will be discussed in further talks," the official said.

Technology for the new plant will be decided through international bidding, which means the two firms can choose between Chinese or foreign technologies, another company source yesterday said.

"The coming together of the two companies is the beginning of our long-term co-operation in the energy sector, fuelling the country's fast-growing economy," Kang Rixin, president of China Nuclear, said at the signing ceremony yesterday.

Kang said China Nuclear's rich experience in building nuclear reactors will combine with Huadian's strong expertise in power project management, making the partnership a "win-win" deal.

By the end of last year, China Huadian boasted a total installed power-generating capacity of 38.81 gigawatts (GW), Huadian's president He Gong said.

As much as 80.9 per cent of Huadian's power facilities are coal-fired, the remaining hydropower.

The company plans to increase the capacity to 60 GW within the next five years and to 100 GW by 2020, Huadian said on its website.

Only two companies, China Nuclear and China Guangdong Nuclear Power Group, are authorized to build nuclear plants in China. But other power firms such as Huadian and China Power Investment Corp are also striving to gain a share in the huge market, by taking a stake in partnerships with the two nuclear builders.

China plans to build as many as 32 more nuclear reactors within the next 15 years, supplying 6 per cent of the country's total power demand, China Nuclear's Kang said. Currently the proportion is about 2 per cent.

oneman28
16 Feb 06,, 23:11
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000081&sid=aa31tTMoX1O8&refer=australia



Feb. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Steelmakers in China, the world's biggest buyer of iron ore, need to play a bigger role in pricing the raw material, the nation's Ministry of Commerce said.

``China should have a bigger say in deciding international iron ore prices as its iron ore imports make up 43 percent of the world's seaborne trade'', the ministry said in the statement on its Web site today, citing an unidentified official in charge of foreign trade.

China boosted ore imports 32 percent to 275 million metric tons last year, the customs have said. Soaring demand from China helped contract iron ore prices jump a record 71.5 percent, boosting profit at Cia. Vale do Rio Doce, Rio Tinto Group and BHP Billiton, which account for 75 percent of global exports.

A further increase in costs may crimp earnings at steelmakers as steel prices, which fell 31 percent last year in China, may extend their declines as the country's production outpaces demand.

China's ore importers should be aware of ``risks of blind imports'' as spot prices for the steelmaking ingredient may fall further because of high stockpiles, the commerce ministry said in the statement. China has piled up 47 million tons of iron ore altogether at ports, steelmakers and miners, enough to meet two months' demand, it said.

Baosteel Group Corp., China's biggest steelmaker, is conducting separate talks with the suppliers for 2006 ore prices in Shanghai as Japan's steelmakers including Nippon Steel Corp. are holding negotiations in Tokyo.

Ore Prices

China's spot ore prices, which include cost, insurance and freight charges, have fallen 22 percent to $66 a metric ton from a year earlier, the ministry said. The government will also try to curb demand for the raw material by closing obsolete small mills and prevent steel production capacities from increasing too fast, the statement said.

China is considering shifting imports from some Latin American nations because long distances have added freight costs by as much as $16 a ton for iron ore shipments, the statement said, without identifying the countries.

Exports from Australia, India and Brazil account for 86 percent of China's iron ore purchases by volume.

oneman28
17 Feb 06,, 06:05
http://www.chinaknowledge.com/news-detail.aspx?id=2131


Feb. 17, 2006 (China Knowledge) – According to Chairman of the Hong Kong Chinese Enterprises Association Qin Xiao, Mainland China has become a major source of direct investment in Hong Kong, as reported by the Chinanews.com.

Chinese-based companies account for 30% of Hong Kong’s direct investment inflow, the report quoted Qin as saying.

In 2005, the Chinese Mainland approved 253 companies to invest in Hong Kong, an increase of 58% over 2004. The Mainland was the largest investment source of Hong Kong in 2004, with up to HK$62 billion flowing into Hong Kong.

As of now, there are about 2,000 Chinese-based companies operating in Hong Kong, with a total asset value of US$220 billion, said Qin.

oneman28
17 Feb 06,, 06:16
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/02/17/asia/auto.php



CHONGQING, China, Feb. 16 — China is pursuing a novel way to catapult its automaking into a global force: buy one of the world's most sophisticated engine plants, take it apart, piece by piece, transport it halfway around the globe and put it back together again at home.

In the latest sign of this country's manufacturing ambitions, a major Chinese company, hand-in-hand with the Communist Party, is bidding to buy from DaimlerChrysler and BMW a car engine plant in Brazil.

Because the plant is so sophisticated, it is far more feasible for the Chinese carmaker, the Lifan Group, to go through such an effort to move it 8,300 miles, rather than to develop its own technology in this industrial hub in western China, the company's president said Thursday.

If the purchase succeeds — and it is early in the process — China could leapfrog competitors like South Korea to catch up with Japan, Germany and the United States in selling some of the most fuel-efficient yet comfortable cars on the market, like the Honda Civic or the Toyota Corolla.

The failure of China to develop its own version of sophisticated, reliable engines has been the biggest technical obstacle facing Chinese automakers as they modernize and prepare to export to the United States and Europe, Western auto executives and analysts said.

Buying that technology from overseas would not only remove this obstacle but would also plant China's auto industry solidly in a position to produce roomy cars that can also get more than 30 miles to the gallon.

The engine plant is one of the most famous and unusual in the auto industry. Built in southern Brazil in the late 1990's at a cost of $500 million by a 50-50 joint venture of Chrysler and BMW, the Campo Largo factory combines the latest American and German technology to produce the 1.6-liter, 16-valve Tritec engine.

Lifan says it is the sole bidder for the factory and wants to bring it here to start producing engines in 2008. Though China's Communist Party is actively behind the effort, the bold moves are being driven by one of China's remarkable entrepreneurs: Yin Mingshan has become one of China's most successful and most politically connected corporate executives, with a hardscrabble upbringing that included spending 22 years of his earlier life in Communist labor camps and prison as punishment for his political dissent.

Now the enormously wealthy and prominent president and principal owner of Lifan, Mr. Yin has his sights on exporting to Europe in 2008 and the American market in 2009.

Trevor Hale, a DaimlerChrysler spokesman, and Marc Hassinger, a Bayerische Motoren Werke spokesman, each said separately that their companies were assessing their options for when their joint venture legal agreement expires at the end of next year, but that it was premature to provide details.

The Tritec engine is one of the most technologically sophisticated and fuel-efficient car engines in the world, said Yale Zhang, an analyst in the Shanghai office of CSM Worldwide, a big auto consulting company based in the Detroit suburbs. Mr. Yin said he wanted to rebuild the factory on vacant land next door to his car assembly plant here. His goal is to understand the technology thoroughly so that he can supply engines not only for Lifan but also for other Chinese automakers.

In an interview on Thursday in a glass-walled conference room overlooking his recently completed car assembly plant, Mr. Yin, 67, said that while Lifan would pay for the factory, the Chinese negotiating team is being led not by a Lifan official but by a senior Chinese Communist party official, Huang Zhendong.

Mr. Huang, 65, is a member of the party's powerful Central Committee and led the party's Chongqing branch until December, when he became a senior member of the influential legal committee of the National People's Congress in Beijing.

Mr. Yin's deputy, Yang Jong, Lifan's chief executive, has accompanied Mr. Huang on a visit to Brazil. "Everyone knows you need government support — the government may provide land," Mr. Yin said.

Any attempt to buy a comparable factory in the United States might be blocked. But Mr. Yin said that Brazil did not have comparable restrictions on the export of high technology.

Lifan, already one of the world's largest motorcycle manufacturers with sales in 112 countries, is about to start exporting its remarkably well-built, $9,700 midsize sedans to developing countries in Asia, the Mideast and the Caribbean. But several more years of work is needed before the company is ready to compete in industrialized countries, Mr. Yin said.

"Chairman Mao taught us: if you can win then fight the war, if you cannot win, then run away," he said. "I want to train my army in these smaller markets, and when we are ready, we will move on to bigger markets."

Accustomed to producing lightweight, fuel-sipping cars for cost-conscious Chinese families, Chinese automakers want to use that expertise as a competitive advantage around the world while oil prices stay high. Geely, a separate Chinese carmaker that surprised American and European manufacturers by announcing plans at Detroit's auto show last month to enter the American market in 2007, was emphasizing gas mileage even before oil prices surged in the last two years.

When crude oil prices were much lower than they are today, Geely switched from an inexpensive electronic engine control and fuel injections system made by Denso of Japan to a more expensive but more fuel-efficient model made by Bosch of Germany, said Lawrence Ang, an executive director of Geely.

Multinational automakers have struggled in China to keep up with the public's growing appetite for fuel-efficient models. Chinese carmakers like Chery and Geely captured a quarter of the Chinese market last year, up from less than 10 percent just two years earlier, said Michael Dunne, the president of Automotive Resources Asia, a consulting firm.

"Why the spurt? Small cars powered by gas-sipping engines that start at $4,000," Mr. Dunne said.

Raymond Bierzynski, the president of the Pan Asia Technical Automotive Center of General Motors in Shanghai, said that gasoline costs were more important to consumers in China than elsewhere because these costs represent a higher share of the low household incomes in China. G.M. sells its Buick Excelle compact sedan with special, low-rolling-resistance tires in China, which it does not do in any other market and which increases gas mileage by up to 2 percent, he said.

Chrysler and BMW began construction of the Campo Largo factory in April 1998, a month before Daimler-Benz began a takeover of Chrysler that it completed in November of that year. Heralded in the automotive press at the time as arguably the most advanced engine factory ever built, the factory had already become a corporate orphan by the time production began in September, 1999.

The Brazilian auto market had entered a slump by then and Daimler already had ample engine manufacturing capacity of its own and was uncomfortable collaborating with its longtime German rival, BMW.

BMW installs its half of the engines from the factory in its award-winning Mini Coopers. But it has already announced that future engines for these cars will come from a factory in France that is owned and operated by PSA Peugeot Citroën.

Chrysler used to put the Brazilian-made engines in its Neon compact cars and the PT Cruiser. But it is now selling its half of the engines to Lifan and to Chery Automotive and a Chinese joint venture by Mazda.

Mr. Yin and spokesmen from DaimlerChrysler and BMW declined to comment on the price under negotiation for the factory.

Lifan made its debut into the car market just last month with the introduction of the Lifan 520 sedan, assembled in the company's sprawling new assembly plant here, where the conveyor belt is bright red and the giant clamps holding unfinished cars are bright yellow — the colors of China's flag. Lifan models itself on Honda, another motorcycle manufacturer that entered the car market, and shares Honda's emphasis on efficient, energy-saving designs.

Lifan has also copied Honda's focus on quality. Huge characters of Mr. Yin's sayings adorn a Lifan motorcycle engine factory inside and out; an illuminated board over the assembly line reads: "Whoever wrecks Lifan's brand, Lifan will wreck that person's rice bowl."

A test drive here of the Lifan 520 sedan showed it to have an impressively sturdy body with no rattles or wiggles even when traveling over very rough pavement — although this is no guarantee of long-term reliability. There is ample headroom in the front seats and even the rear seats for a 6-foot-4 occupant.

The $9,700 price tag includes leather seats, dual air bags, a huge trunk and a DVD system with a video screen facing the front passenger — a combination that could cost twice as much in a comparably equipped midsize sedan in the United States.

Wages of less than $100 a month have helped control the cost. The assembly plant is better organized than many Chinese factories, although it still maintains large inventories of parts and materials awaiting assembly, incurring interest charges to finance these supplies.

Mr. Yin has no doubts that China can also compete with the United States.

"Americans work 5 days a week, we in China work 7 days," he said. "Americans work 8 hours a day, and we work 16 hours."

CHONGQING, China, Feb. 16 — China is pursuing a novel way to catapult its automaking into a global force: buy one of the world's most sophisticated engine plants, take it apart, piece by piece, transport it halfway around the globe and put it back together again at home.

In the latest sign of this country's manufacturing ambitions, a major Chinese company, hand-in-hand with the Communist Party, is bidding to buy from DaimlerChrysler and BMW a car engine plant in Brazil.

Because the plant is so sophisticated, it is far more feasible for the Chinese carmaker, the Lifan Group, to go through such an effort to move it 8,300 miles, rather than to develop its own technology in this industrial hub in western China, the company's president said Thursday.

If the purchase succeeds — and it is early in the process — China could leapfrog competitors like South Korea to catch up with Japan, Germany and the United States in selling some of the most fuel-efficient yet comfortable cars on the market, like the Honda Civic or the Toyota Corolla.

The failure of China to develop its own version of sophisticated, reliable engines has been the biggest technical obstacle facing Chinese automakers as they modernize and prepare to export to the United States and Europe, Western auto executives and analysts said.

Buying that technology from overseas would not only remove this obstacle but would also plant China's auto industry solidly in a position to produce roomy cars that can also get more than 30 miles to the gallon.

The engine plant is one of the most famous and unusual in the auto industry. Built in southern Brazil in the late 1990's at a cost of $500 million by a 50-50 joint venture of Chrysler and BMW, the Campo Largo factory combines the latest American and German technology to produce the 1.6-liter, 16-valve Tritec engine.

Lifan says it is the sole bidder for the factory and wants to bring it here to start producing engines in 2008. Though China's Communist Party is actively behind the effort, the bold moves are being driven by one of China's remarkable entrepreneurs: Yin Mingshan has become one of China's most successful and most politically connected corporate executives, with a hardscrabble upbringing that included spending 22 years of his earlier life in Communist labor camps and prison as punishment for his political dissent.

Now the enormously wealthy and prominent president and principal owner of Lifan, Mr. Yin has his sights on exporting to Europe in 2008 and the American market in 2009.

Trevor Hale, a DaimlerChrysler spokesman, and Marc Hassinger, a Bayerische Motoren Werke spokesman, each said separately that their companies were assessing their options for when their joint venture legal agreement expires at the end of next year, but that it was premature to provide details.

The Tritec engine is one of the most technologically sophisticated and fuel-efficient car engines in the world, said Yale Zhang, an analyst in the Shanghai office of CSM Worldwide, a big auto consulting company based in the Detroit suburbs. Mr. Yin said he wanted to rebuild the factory on vacant land next door to his car assembly plant here. His goal is to understand the technology thoroughly so that he can supply engines not only for Lifan but also for other Chinese automakers.

In an interview on Thursday in a glass-walled conference room overlooking his recently completed car assembly plant, Mr. Yin, 67, said that while Lifan would pay for the factory, the Chinese negotiating team is being led not by a Lifan official but by a senior Chinese Communist party official, Huang Zhendong.

Mr. Huang, 65, is a member of the party's powerful Central Committee and led the party's Chongqing branch until December, when he became a senior member of the influential legal committee of the National People's Congress in Beijing.

Mr. Yin's deputy, Yang Jong, Lifan's chief executive, has accompanied Mr. Huang on a visit to Brazil. "Everyone knows you need government support — the government may provide land," Mr. Yin said.

Any attempt to buy a comparable factory in the United States might be blocked. But Mr. Yin said that Brazil did not have comparable restrictions on the export of high technology.

Lifan, already one of the world's largest motorcycle manufacturers with sales in 112 countries, is about to start exporting its remarkably well-built, $9,700 midsize sedans to developing countries in Asia, the Mideast and the Caribbean. But several more years of work is needed before the company is ready to compete in industrialized countries, Mr. Yin said.

"Chairman Mao taught us: if you can win then fight the war, if you cannot win, then run away," he said. "I want to train my army in these smaller markets, and when we are ready, we will move on to bigger markets."

Accustomed to producing lightweight, fuel-sipping cars for cost-conscious Chinese families, Chinese automakers want to use that expertise as a competitive advantage around the world while oil prices stay high. Geely, a separate Chinese carmaker that surprised American and European manufacturers by announcing plans at Detroit's auto show last month to enter the American market in 2007, was emphasizing gas mileage even before oil prices surged in the last two years.

When crude oil prices were much lower than they are today, Geely switched from an inexpensive electronic engine control and fuel injections system made by Denso of Japan to a more expensive but more fuel-efficient model made by Bosch of Germany, said Lawrence Ang, an executive director of Geely.

Multinational automakers have struggled in China to keep up with the public's growing appetite for fuel-efficient models. Chinese carmakers like Chery and Geely captured a quarter of the Chinese market last year, up from less than 10 percent just two years earlier, said Michael Dunne, the president of Automotive Resources Asia, a consulting firm.

"Why the spurt? Small cars powered by gas-sipping engines that start at $4,000," Mr. Dunne said.

Raymond Bierzynski, the president of the Pan Asia Technical Automotive Center of General Motors in Shanghai, said that gasoline costs were more important to consumers in China than elsewhere because these costs represent a higher share of the low household incomes in China. G.M. sells its Buick Excelle compact sedan with special, low-rolling-resistance tires in China, which it does not do in any other market and which increases gas mileage by up to 2 percent, he said.

Chrysler and BMW began construction of the Campo Largo factory in April 1998, a month before Daimler-Benz began a takeover of Chrysler that it completed in November of that year. Heralded in the automotive press at the time as arguably the most advanced engine factory ever built, the factory had already become a corporate orphan by the time production began in September, 1999.

The Brazilian auto market had entered a slump by then and Daimler already had ample engine manufacturing capacity of its own and was uncomfortable collaborating with its longtime German rival, BMW.

BMW installs its half of the engines from the factory in its award-winning Mini Coopers. But it has already announced that future engines for these cars will come from a factory in France that is owned and operated by PSA Peugeot Citroën.

Chrysler used to put the Brazilian-made engines in its Neon compact cars and the PT Cruiser. But it is now selling its half of the engines to Lifan and to Chery Automotive and a Chinese joint venture by Mazda.

Mr. Yin and spokesmen from DaimlerChrysler and BMW declined to comment on the price under negotiation for the factory.

Lifan made its debut into the car market just last month with the introduction of the Lifan 520 sedan, assembled in the company's sprawling new assembly plant here, where the conveyor belt is bright red and the giant clamps holding unfinished cars are bright yellow — the colors of China's flag. Lifan models itself on Honda, another motorcycle manufacturer that entered the car market, and shares Honda's emphasis on efficient, energy-saving designs.

Lifan has also copied Honda's focus on quality. Huge characters of Mr. Yin's sayings adorn a Lifan motorcycle engine factory inside and out; an illuminated board over the assembly line reads: "Whoever wrecks Lifan's brand, Lifan will wreck that person's rice bowl."

A test drive here of the Lifan 520 sedan showed it to have an impressively sturdy body with no rattles or wiggles even when traveling over very rough pavement — although this is no guarantee of long-term reliability. There is ample headroom in the front seats and even the rear seats for a 6-foot-4 occupant.

The $9,700 price tag includes leather seats, dual air bags, a huge trunk and a DVD system with a video screen facing the front passenger — a combination that could cost twice as much in a comparably equipped midsize sedan in the United States.

Wages of less than $100 a month have helped control the cost. The assembly plant is better organized than many Chinese factories, although it still maintains large inventories of parts and materials awaiting assembly, incurring interest charges to finance these supplies.

Mr. Yin has no doubts that China can also compete with the United States.

"Americans work 5 days a week, we in China work 7 days," he said. "Americans work 8 hours a day, and we work 16 hours."

Neo
18 Feb 06,, 15:52
Iran, China near deal on $100 billion oil project
Reports say both sides hurry to beat sanctions


By ELAINE KURTENBACH
Associated Press

SHANGHAI, CHINA - China and Iran are close to setting plans to develop Iran's Yadavaran oil field, according to published reports, a multibillion-dollar deal that comes as Tehran faces the prospect of sanctions over its nuclear program.

The deal is thought potentially to be worth about $100 billion.

According to Caijing, a respected financial magazine, a Chinese government delegation is due to visit Iran as early as March to formally sign an agreement allowing China Petrochemical Corp., also known as Sinopec, to develop Yadavaran.

The Wall Street Journal also reported in Friday's editions that the two sides are trying to conclude the deal in coming weeks before potential sanctions are imposed on Iran for its nuclear ambitions. The report cited unnamed Iranian oil ministry officials familiar with the talks.

In exchange for developing Yadavaran, one of Iran's largest onshore oil fields, China would agree to buy 10 million tons of liquefied natural gas a year for 25 years beginning in 2009, the Caijing report said, citing Sinopec board member Mou Shuling.

Chinese and Iranian officials in Beijing said they could not confirm the report.

China, seeking oil and gas to fuel its booming economy amid stagnant production at home, has been snapping up energy resources in places as far flung as Venezuela, Kazakhstan, Nigeria and Australia. Its investments in Iran and Sudan have prompted complaints it is undermining diplomatic efforts to bring recalcitrant regimes in line.

Beijing has strongly urged that a diplomatic solution be found to the impasse over Iran's nuclear program.

Iran is negotiating with other Asian nations. India and Pakistan said they are committed to securing their energy sources by building a $7.4 billion gas pipeline from Iran.

Pakistan and India need the pipeline to fulfill the South Asian nations' fuel needs, Pakistani Oil Minister Amanullah Jadoon told reporters in New Delhi during a visit Friday. India's prime minister, Manmohan Singh, said his country's vote against Iran's nuclear program at a Feb. 4 meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency would not obstruct the pipeline project.

Bloomberg News contributed to this report.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/business/energy/3668287.html

oneman28
20 Feb 06,, 07:25
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/19/content_4200203.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-02-19 15:42:14


BEIJING, Feb. 19 (Xinhuanet) -- China is trying to enhance its railway freight transportation capacity by 16.7 percent through upgrading freight trains with 70-ton ones, the Shanghai Securities News reported on Sunday.

From this year, all the newly-built freight trains in China will be 70-ton trains, which will gradually replace the outdated 60-ton trains widely used in China, the Ministry of Railways told the newspaper.

The new-type 70-ton freight trains, designed with China's own intellectual property right, can carry more weight and run at a speed of 120 km per hour. While the 60-ton freight trains speed at about 80 km per hour.

In 2005, about 2,000 70-ton freight trains were firstly used in China on the railways connecting western coal-rich Shanxi Province and Qinhuangdao, a port city in the North China's Hebei Province.

The wide use of such new freight trains is expected to further alleviate China's transportation crunch, the Ministry of Railways said. Enditem



Chinese Railways: charging ahead on the fast track

http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=117923


Unlike Indian Railways, China followed a pragmatic policy shorn of ideological baggage

RAGHU DAYAL
Posted online: Saturday, February 18, 2006 at 0000 hours IST


Despite the travails of World War II and India’s partition, the post-Independence Indian Railways was ahead of Chinese Railways in terms of size, technology, and overall traffic volumes. Today, in comparison, Indian Railways has run out of steam, while Chinese Railways surges ahead.

China has announced the commissioning of a 1,118 km new rail line connecting Golmud in the north-western Qinghai province with Lhasa at the roof of the world. The line is an extension of the 845-km Xining-Golmud section opened to traffic in 1984 as phase I, one of the world’s most ambitious and challenging rail projects.

With 75,000 route-km of rail lines, China now has the world’s third largest rail system after those in America and Russia. It extended its rail network by 13,800 km, or 24%, during the decade 1992-2002 when Indian Railways’ network over the period grew by a mere 1%, or 682 route-km.

It is not only the expansion of the rail system in China, but also the frenetic speed in the execution of its rail projects that has overawed the world. China’s Tenth Plan (2001-2005) provides for an investment of $42 billion for rail construction and modernisation. It further envisages $240 billion schemes to expand the rail infrastructure, to 100,000 km by 2020.

Though China Railways continued to expand, it kept losing market share. In 1990, it enjoyed 53% share of total passenger km and a dominant 71% share of total freight tonne km; by 1995, these figures dropped to 39% and 54% and, lately, to 36% and 40%, respectively. The demand from trade and industry is far more than what it is currently able to meet. It made a profit on transport operations between 1986 and 1992.

The situation changed in 1993, when it reported a loss, which prompted former Prime Minister, Zhu Rongji’s far-reaching reforms. It returned to profit after five years of losses, one-year ahead of the target.

Chinese Railways has been steadily restructured with a three-fold objective: separate government functions from rail enterprise responsibilities; rail system to become a commercially-driven undertaking with the government assuming only policy and regulatory responsibilities; and making the transport enterprises responsive to market demands, rather than specific production targets.

Chinese Railways was divested of the social support; manufacturing and construction activities; five railway corporations, one each for industry, engineering, construction, goods and materials, communications and signalling, were brought into effect as autonomous entities as per a three-year contract.

There is a great lesson for Indian Railways in the way China followed a policy of pragmatism shorn of any baggage of ideology or dogma, enabling it to focus on its core activities, organisational restructuring, hiving off non-core activities, relieving it of ‘social’ activities and obligations.

Contrary to the measure taken by Indian Railways to increase the number of zonal administrations, Chinese Railways has embarked on a rationalisation scheme, projected to reduce the number of regional administrations from the existing 14 to an optimal number, likely to be only five.

The 10th plan, forming a part of a 15-year strategy, emphasises expansion as much as modernisation of the system: construction of high-speed corridors with a 14,000-16,000-km exclusive express passenger network, some prominent corridors, like Beijing-Guangzhou and Beijing-Shanghai, being served by China’s first high-speed rail services, like TGV or Shinkansen type or the transrapid Maglev; creating an express freight network initially between 30 major cities; raising capacity on busy routes.

An interesting evaluation carried out by World Bank for the railways in China and India during the 1992-2002 decade reveals that, notwithstanding the network in the two countries being almost of similar size at the beginning of the period, Chinese Railways’ total traffic output is 2.5 times that of Indian Railways; both carry almost similar volume of passengers in terms of passenger km but freight output on Chinese Raiwlays is 4.5 times that of Indian Railways.

Chinese Railways accounts for one-fourth of the global rail transport volume. Density of its traffic exceeds twice that of Indian Railways. Its output per locomotive, per freight car, and per passenger coach is among the highest in the world. Its’ operating ratio is far better than India’s, with the latter’s staff cost accounting for 53% of working expenses versus 25% on Chinese Railways.

The World Bank appraisal lauds Chinese Railways for its clear focus, relative freedom, management-related autonomy to achieve agreed objectives together with associated accountabilities, large-scale restructuring including separation of non-core activities, outsourcing, and, above all, substantial reduction of staff, by as much as half.

China has encouraged local authorities to build and operate their own railway lines, each up to 2,000 km length. It has permitted foreign investment in railways, in fact, encouraged foreign capital in Chinese rail market, with a special attraction for new line constructions.

oneman28
20 Feb 06,, 07:30
http://www.thedailystar.net/2006/02/19/d60219050145.htm



Jasim Uddin Khan

China has emerged as number one import source for Bangladesh, beating India for the first time.

Bangladeshi import from China amounted to Tk 3,214 crore during July-September period of the current fiscal against Tk 2,708 crore import from India during the same period, according to the statistics of Chief Controller of Import and Export (CCIF).

Textile fabrics, capital machinery and dyeing chemicals are some of the major items that helped China become the top source of Bangladesh's import in the first three months of the 2005-06 fiscal.

"China is set to dominate Bangladesh market as the importers here are shifting from India," said a top commerce ministry official.

Bangladesh imported textile products worth Tk 1,654.24 crore from China while import from India was Tk 526.31 crore during the period. China exported capital machinery worth Tk 659.77 crore while import from India was Tk 334.64 crore for the same category. Besides, dyeing chemicals worth Tk 373.45 crore were imported from China against Tk 252.69 crore from India.


On the other hand, iron products, vehicles and spare parts, and mineral products are some of the major items imported more from India than China, CCIF sources said.

Bangladesh imported iron products worth Tk 228.38 crore from India while the amount was Tk 100.20 crore from China. Spare parts of different vehicles worth Tk 159.39 crore were imported from India while Tk 65.52 crore from China. The country imported mineral products worth Tk 130.29 crore from India against Tk 86 crore from China during the same period.


"Chinese products are cheap compared to the same standard products of India," said an importer at Polwel Market in the capital.

Both the countries stand almost equal in selling such goods as food stuff, plastic and rubber goods, wood and wooden products, raw hides, pulp and papers to Bangladesh.

China offers goods with wide price range and importers become interested in China due to its easy trade procedure and speedy shipment, the importer explained.

China usually sends its products to Bangladesh within 25 days on an average by completing all the formalities while import from India takes 35 days.

Bangladesh's import from India was Tk 12,333 crore in the 2004-05 fiscal while the amount was Tk 9,905 crore from China during the same period.

India exported goods worth Tk 9,420 crore in the 2003-04 financial year while China exported products worth Tk 6,676 crore to Bangladesh in the same fiscal.

India was the top source of Bangladesh's import in the 2002-2003 fiscal exporting goods worth Tk 7,845.35 crore against Tk 4,521 crore from China.

oneman28
20 Feb 06,, 07:31
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/17/content_4191967.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-02-17 10:56:14

BEIJING, Feb. 17 -- China National Chemical Corporation (ChemChina), one of the leading producers of chemical products in China, is expected to invest US$8.93 billion into a project in Cangzhou, North China's Hebei Province.

ChemChina has agreed to take part in Hebei Cangzhou Dahua Co Ltd by buying a 60 per cent stake in its parent company, Cangzhou Dahua Group, according to a statement released to the Shanghai stock exchange on Wednesday.

By the end of 2011, ChemChina will invest a total of 72 billion yuan (US$8.93 billion) to build Cangzhou Dahua into one of its chemicals production bases, the statement said.

"The acquisition of Cangzhou Dahua will help ChemChina strengthen its presence in the petrochemical products business, which is also known as the downstream business," said Li Guohong, an analyst from China Galaxy Securities.

"The business integration will help the company reduce the impact which higher crude oil prices have caused," said Li.

Along with the price hike of crude oil, the production cost of oil refining enterprises climbed and economic profit decreased greatly.

Shares of Cangzhou Dahua yesterday went up 8.06 per cent to 6.7 yuan (83 US cents) in the Shanghai Stock Exchange.

Li said, followed by its domestic rival Petrochina and Sinopec, the acquisition is an important step in the expansion of ChemChina.

Recently several State-owned flagship companies have quickened their step in the expansion. On Wednesday, Asia's largest oil refiner Sinopec paid 14.3 billion yuan (US$1.78 billion) in cash to buy back its four listed subsidiaries.

PetroChina bought back all the public shares of its three listed subsidiaries based in Northeast China at the end of last year.

Li said being smaller than Petrochina and Sinopec, ChemChina is actually quickening its expansion pace.

Earlier this year, ChemChina bought the stake in Qingdao Yellow Sea Rubber Company Limited. ChemChina plans to develop the latter into its rubber production base.

In January, ChemChina's subsidiary, China National BlueStar Group Corporation took over Adisseo Group, the largest animal nutrition supplement producer in the world. It is the first case of a Chinese enterprise acquiring an overseas firm in the field.

(Source: China Daily)

oneman28
20 Feb 06,, 08:25
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/20/content_4203568.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-02-20 14:48:04

BEIJING, Feb. 20 -- CNOOC Ltd, China's biggest offshore oil and gas producer, has signed a production sharing contract to explore for crude oil and natural gas and develop an area offshore of Equatorial Guinea.

The contract area covers 2,287 square kilometers with a water depth between 30 meters and 1,500 meters, according to a statement issued by the Beijing-based company over the weekend.

The contract was signed between CNOOC Africa Ltd, the National Oil Company of Equatorial Guinea and the Ministry of Mines, Industry and Energy, according to the statement.

The exploration period was set at five years, and CNOOC will act as the project's technical operator, the statement said

Under the terms of the contract, CNOOC will conduct seismic data interpretation and drill exploratory wells.

Zhu Mingcai, a CNOOC vice president, said the signing of the agreement represents another sign of progress in CNOOC's overseas expansion effort.

The parties to the agreement said they foresee significant breakthroughs in the area, which has favorable geological conditions, Zhu said.

China is encouraging its companies to secure oil and gas supplies at home and abroad to meet rising domestic demand.

CNOOC said in January that it aims to boost oil and natural gas output by about 9 percent this year, aided by contributions from new wells.

Output may rise to the equivalent of 170 million barrels of crude oil this year, from 157 million barrels in 2005, CNOOC said.

Production at fields off the coast of China may amount to 149 million barrels this year.

(Source: ShanghaiDaily.com/Agencies)

oneman28
20 Feb 06,, 08:27
http://www.todayonline.com/articles/102074.asp


Smoke billows from a power plant over the skies of Beijing. China expects its power shortages to end this year, relieving its fast-expanding economy of a seemingly intractable bottleneck

China expects its seemingly perennial energy shortages to end this year, only to risk facing the opposite problem of having too much power-generating capacity, state media and analysts say.
.
The elimination of the nation's widespread brown-outs will come about as new capacity comes online while growth in electricity demand slows, the China Daily reported.
.
"This marks a turning point in the electricity supply shortfalls of a few years ago," said Zhang Guobao, deputy head of the National Development and Reform Commission, the top planning body.
.
China first reported failures to meet power demand in 2000 and the situation deteriorated steadily. In 2004, 24 of China's 31 provinces and regions suffered outages.
.
Many major power plants had run low on coal supplies due to bottlenecks in the industry's over-burdened transport networks and soaring demand stemming from the country's rapid economic growth.
.
On the supply side, the situation is now gradually being relieved, with a total installed capacity of 750 gigawatts by 2010, up from 500 gigawatts late last year, the paper said.
.
On the demand side, power consumption is expected to rise by less than seven percent annually over the next five years, down from annual increases of at least 10 percent during the past five years, the newspaper said.
.
This is a side effect from a recent government drive to curb over-investment in energy-intensive sectors such as steel and machinery, and to encourage growth in the service and high-tech IT industries, according to the report.
.
The abrupt increase will be initially welcomed by enterprises that have been screaming for more fuel in recent months, but it may backfire, analysts warned.
.
"They will probably have an over-supply problem very soon, after investing heavily in the power sector in recent years," said Yiping Huang, an economist with Citigroup in Hong Kong.
.
"So what they'll likely have to do is start rationing new investment (in power plants)."
.
Power is not like more tangible commodities that can be easily transported around, and it is not an option to bring down the excess supply by selling it cheaply inside or outside of China's borders.
.
"Electricity doesn't travel very well. And there's no big power consumer among China's immediate neighbors that China can sell to," said Tai Hui, a Hong Kong-based economist with Standard Chartered Bank.
.
There are already signs that power producers are getting jittery, lobbying for the right to price their products higher when their own input, overwhelmingly coal, gets more expensive.
.
"The government should introduce a system that will pass the high fuel costs to end users," said Wang Yonggan, secretary general of the China Electricity Council, an industry consortium.
.
"Otherwise, electricity producers will suffer severe losses as fuel prices fluctuate."
.
Although market conditions could be tough for electricity producers, they might be able to find a market among companies that have so far resorted to stop-gap measures to keep up their production.
.
"What we could see would be companies that stop using their own diesel generators and buy from official suppliers," said Standard Chartered's Tai Hui.
.
The vast increase in new generating capacity has done little to change China's energy mix.
.
Most new capacity in China is coal-fired, and the fossil fuel will remain China's main energy source for decades to come even if its proportion of the nation's total power consumption is declining slowly.
.
The China Daily Monday quoted official statistics as saying the country's dependence on coal is expected to fall to 70.2 percent in 2010 from 75.6 percent last year. — AFP
China expects its seemingly perennial energy shortages to end this year, only to risk facing the opposite problem of having too much power-generating capacity, state media and analysts say.
.
The elimination of the nation's widespread brown-outs will come about as new capacity comes online while growth in electricity demand slows, the China Daily reported.
.
"This marks a turning point in the electricity supply shortfalls of a few years ago," said Zhang Guobao, deputy head of the National Development and Reform Commission, the top planning body.
.
China first reported failures to meet power demand in 2000 and the situation deteriorated steadily. In 2004, 24 of China's 31 provinces and regions suffered outages.
.
Many major power plants had run low on coal supplies due to bottlenecks in the industry's over-burdened transport networks and soaring demand stemming from the country's rapid economic growth.
.
On the supply side, the situation is now gradually being relieved, with a total installed capacity of 750 gigawatts by 2010, up from 500 gigawatts late last year, the paper said.
.
On the demand side, power consumption is expected to rise by less than seven percent annually over the next five years, down from annual increases of at least 10 percent during the past five years, the newspaper said.
.
This is a side effect from a recent government drive to curb over-investment in energy-intensive sectors such as steel and machinery, and to encourage growth in the service and high-tech IT industries, according to the report.
.
The abrupt increase will be initially welcomed by enterprises that have been screaming for more fuel in recent months, but it may backfire, analysts warned.
.
"They will probably have an over-supply problem very soon, after investing heavily in the power sector in recent years," said Yiping Huang, an economist with Citigroup in Hong Kong.
.
"So what they'll likely have to do is start rationing new investment (in power plants)."
.
Power is not like more tangible commodities that can be easily transported around, and it is not an option to bring down the excess supply by selling it cheaply inside or outside of China's borders.
.
"Electricity doesn't travel very well. And there's no big power consumer among China's immediate neighbors that China can sell to," said Tai Hui, a Hong Kong-based economist with Standard Chartered Bank.
.
There are already signs that power producers are getting jittery, lobbying for the right to price their products higher when their own input, overwhelmingly coal, gets more expensive.
.
"The government should introduce a system that will pass the high fuel costs to end users," said Wang Yonggan, secretary general of the China Electricity Council, an industry consortium.
.
"Otherwise, electricity producers will suffer severe losses as fuel prices fluctuate."
.
Although market conditions could be tough for electricity producers, they might be able to find a market among companies that have so far resorted to stop-gap measures to keep up their production.
.
"What we could see would be companies that stop using their own diesel generators and buy from official suppliers," said Standard Chartered's Tai Hui.
.
The vast increase in new generating capacity has done little to change China's energy mix.
.
Most new capacity in China is coal-fired, and the fossil fuel will remain China's main energy source for decades to come even if its proportion of the nation's total power consumption is declining slowly.
.
The China Daily Monday quoted official statistics as saying the country's dependence on coal is expected to fall to 70.2 percent in 2010 from 75.6 percent last year. — AFP China expects its seemingly perennial energy shortages to end this year, only to risk facing the opposite problem of having too much power-generating capacity, state media and analysts say.
.
The elimination of the nation's widespread brown-outs will come about as new capacity comes online while growth in electricity demand slows, the China Daily reported.
.
"This marks a turning point in the electricity supply shortfalls of a few years ago," said Zhang Guobao, deputy head of the National Development and Reform Commission, the top planning body.
.
China first reported failures to meet power demand in 2000 and the situation deteriorated steadily. In 2004, 24 of China's 31 provinces and regions suffered outages.
.
Many major power plants had run low on coal supplies due to bottlenecks in the industry's over-burdened transport networks and soaring demand stemming from the country's rapid economic growth.
.
On the supply side, the situation is now gradually being relieved, with a total installed capacity of 750 gigawatts by 2010, up from 500 gigawatts late last year, the paper said.
.
On the demand side, power consumption is expected to rise by less than seven percent annually over the next five years, down from annual increases of at least 10 percent during the past five years, the newspaper said.
.
This is a side effect from a recent government drive to curb over-investment in energy-intensive sectors such as steel and machinery, and to encourage growth in the service and high-tech IT industries, according to the report.
.
The abrupt increase will be initially welcomed by enterprises that have been screaming for more fuel in recent months, but it may backfire, analysts warned.
.
"They will probably have an over-supply problem very soon, after investing heavily in the power sector in recent years," said Yiping Huang, an economist with Citigroup in Hong Kong.
.
"So what they'll likely have to do is start rationing new investment (in power plants)."
.
Power is not like more tangible commodities that can be easily transported around, and it is not an option to bring down the excess supply by selling it cheaply inside or outside of China's borders.
.
"Electricity doesn't travel very well. And there's no big power consumer among China's immediate neighbors that China can sell to," said Tai Hui, a Hong Kong-based economist with Standard Chartered Bank.
.
There are already signs that power producers are getting jittery, lobbying for the right to price their products higher when their own input, overwhelmingly coal, gets more expensive.
.
"The government should introduce a system that will pass the high fuel costs to end users," said Wang Yonggan, secretary general of the China Electricity Council, an industry consortium.
.
"Otherwise, electricity producers will suffer severe losses as fuel prices fluctuate."
.
Although market conditions could be tough for electricity producers, they might be able to find a market among companies that have so far resorted to stop-gap measures to keep up their production.
.
"What we could see would be companies that stop using their own diesel generators and buy from official suppliers," said Standard Chartered's Tai Hui.
.
The vast increase in new generating capacity has done little to change China's energy mix.
.
Most new capacity in China is coal-fired, and the fossil fuel will remain China's main energy source for decades to come even if its proportion of the nation's total power consumption is declining slowly.
.
The China Daily Monday quoted official statistics as saying the country's dependence on coal is expected to fall to 70.2 percent in 2010 from 75.6 percent last year. — AFP China expects its seemingly perennial energy shortages to end this year, only to risk facing the opposite problem of having too much power-generating capacity, state media and analysts say.
.
The elimination of the nation's widespread brown-outs will come about as new capacity comes online while growth in electricity demand slows, the China Daily reported.
.
"This marks a turning point in the electricity supply shortfalls of a few years ago," said Zhang Guobao, deputy head of the National Development and Reform Commission, the top planning body.
.
China first reported failures to meet power demand in 2000 and the situation deteriorated steadily. In 2004, 24 of China's 31 provinces and regions suffered outages.
.
Many major power plants had run low on coal supplies due to bottlenecks in the industry's over-burdened transport networks and soaring demand stemming from the country's rapid economic growth.
.
On the supply side, the situation is now gradually being relieved, with a total installed capacity of 750 gigawatts by 2010, up from 500 gigawatts late last year, the paper said.
.
On the demand side, power consumption is expected to rise by less than seven percent annually over the next five years, down from annual increases of at least 10 percent during the past five years, the newspaper said.
.
This is a side effect from a recent government drive to curb over-investment in energy-intensive sectors such as steel and machinery, and to encourage growth in the service and high-tech IT industries, according to the report.
.
The abrupt increase will be initially welcomed by enterprises that have been screaming for more fuel in recent months, but it may backfire, analysts warned.
.
"They will probably have an over-supply problem very soon, after investing heavily in the power sector in recent years," said Yiping Huang, an economist with Citigroup in Hong Kong.
.
"So what they'll likely have to do is start rationing new investment (in power plants)."
.
Power is not like more tangible commodities that can be easily transported around, and it is not an option to bring down the excess supply by selling it cheaply inside or outside of China's borders.
.
"Electricity doesn't travel very well. And there's no big power consumer among China's immediate neighbors that China can sell to," said Tai Hui, a Hong Kong-based economist with Standard Chartered Bank.
.
There are already signs that power producers are getting jittery, lobbying for the right to price their products higher when their own input, overwhelmingly coal, gets more expensive.
.
"The government should introduce a system that will pass the high fuel costs to end users," said Wang Yonggan, secretary general of the China Electricity Council, an industry consortium.
.
"Otherwise, electricity producers will suffer severe losses as fuel prices fluctuate."
.
Although market conditions could be tough for electricity producers, they might be able to find a market among companies that have so far resorted to stop-gap measures to keep up their production.
.
"What we could see would be companies that stop using their own diesel generators and buy from official suppliers," said Standard Chartered's Tai Hui.
.
The vast increase in new generating capacity has done little to change China's energy mix.
.
Most new capacity in China is coal-fired, and the fossil fuel will remain China's main energy source for decades to come even if its proportion of the nation's total power consumption is declining slowly.
.
The China Daily Monday quoted official statistics as saying the country's dependence on coal is expected to fall to 70.2 percent in 2010 from 75.6 percent last year. — AFP

oneman28
20 Feb 06,, 08:31
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/855/2006/02/20/262@53029.htm


2006-02-20 14:30:46 CRIENGLISH.com

China has announced its introduction of revised corporate accounting standards and registered accountants' standards to meet the needs of its market economy. The revised standards, in line with internationally accepted rules, signal a move that will likely boost foreign investors' confidence in the quality of financial information in China's fast-growing economy. Wei Tong elaborates:
China's Ministry of Finance issued the revised standards, including 39 items for corporate accounting and 48 items for auditing by registered accountants. The issuing and implementing of the two codes are expected to improve China's market-oriented economic system.

Jin Renqing, China's Finance Minister, says what's most noticeable about the new standards are that they are brought into line with international rules.

"The newly-issued standards are aimed at improving the quality of financial information. More strict and scientific regulations are applied to the format and announcement of financial information. The basic accounting standard to be adopted in China will be based on the International Financial Reporting Standards."

Jin Renqing says that the new corporate accounting standards will be put into practice for listed companies starting the first of January next year, while the new standards for auditing will be implemented at the same time by accountants' offices on the Chinese mainland.

The move gives further evidence of the Chinese government's determination to internationalize its economy. Both domestic and international economic authorities have given positive feedback on the newly-issued standards.

David Tweedie is the chairman of the International Accounting Standards Board.

"The benefits of these accounting reforms for China are clear. The new Chinese standards that incorporate accounting principles familiar to investors worldwide will encourage investor confidence in China's financial reporting and capital market. There'll also be an additional spur of investment from both domestic and foreign sources of capital."

It's acknowledged by some economists that the new standards will benefit the healthy development of China's capital market.
But, at the same time, some believe the introduction of the new standards will be a challenge for local accounting firms, which have already been struggling to compete with big international firms.

Wei Tong, CRI news.

oneman28
21 Feb 06,, 11:12
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/21/eng20060221_244662.html




China's total expenditure in advertising in 2005 reached 243.9 billion yuan. Although the lowest in the past three years, advertising spending on credit cards, foreign alcoholic beverages and some new luxury products surged, thus putting China among the world top three following the US and Japan, according to a report released yesterday by Beijing-based CTR Market Research.

The report indicates that China has entered into a slow growth period in advertising spending, but the growth in some luxury products is quite amazing, advertising spent on credit cards grew 80% to 900 million yuan and foreign alcoholic beverages surged 156% to reach 1.1 billion yuan in 2005.

As WTO accession runs deep in China, tariff on imported alcoholic beverages declined, China's huge market capacity and young Chinese pursuit of foreign brands have attracted a lot of foreign wine dealers to make ads in China.

With economic development, China's middle class is being formed. They are in some degree influenced by western culture and in pursuit of western lifestyle. Luxury goods will become a new heat in future market, according to Tian Tao, vice president of CTR.

Although traditional media like TV, newspapers still dominate advertising market, newspapers are losing market share to TV, radio, outdoor and other media. Advertising expenditure in newspapers declined by 1% in 2005 while TV advertising increased by 19%.

Outdoor advertising showed a prosperous trend last year as a series of new media forms like LCD TV in buildings and mobile TV emerged. Expenditure in outside advertising reached 13.2 billion yuan, up 79% in 2005.

By People's Daily Online

oneman28
21 Feb 06,, 11:17
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-02/17/content_521197.htm


By Jiang Wei (China Daily)
Updated: 2006-02-17 08:31


China inked 661 technology import contracts with a total value of US$1.83 billion in January, according to statistics released yesterday by the Ministry of Commerce.

The number of technology import contracts reflected an increase of 14.5 per cent over the previous year. Royalties from the technology imports totalled US$690 million.

The ministry said the import of whole-set and key equipments, such as railway engines, led overall imported technologies.

In January, contracts of whole-set and key equipments, which involved in technology import, increased more than three times year-on-year to US$600 million.

The European Union remained China's largest technology source last month.

It chalked up US$940 million worth of technology contracts with China, reflecting a 150 per cent increase over a year ago.

The European Union's technology exports to China accounted for more than half of China's total in January. It was followed by Japan and South Korea.

The railway sector witnessed the fastest increase last month. Technologies flowing into the industry soared 24-fold year-on-year to US$1.06 billion.

According to statistics published by the ministry, China had a major increase in technology imports during its 10th Five-Year Plan from 2001 to 2005.

The value of imported technology stood at US$70 billion during the past five years, accounting for nearly one-third of the total since China's reform and opening up in 1980s.

The imported technologies helped promote the upgrading of domestic industrial structure, the ministry said.

"Technology and production capability in a number of industries, including electrics, metallurgy and petrochemical, were remarkably enhanced by the imports," it said.

However, the imported technology only represents a small figure when compared to the country's exports of high-tech products.

Encouraged by the central government's policies, China's export of high-tech products has grown into a major portion of total exports.

The country's high-tech product export totalled US$600 billion between 2001 and 2005, data from the customs showed.


(China Daily 02/17/2006 page9)


Close

oneman28
21 Feb 06,, 12:58
http://www.edu.cn/20050927/3153720.shtml


China will trial produce the advanced regional jet for the 21st century, (ARJ-21), or a kind of short-haul passenger plane wherein the country possesses the intellectual property, late this year.

It will be the first advanced jet China designs its own in accordance with international practices, which has passed an appraisal for airworthiness. It is believed that the looks of the plane will do away with the monopoly formed by Boeing and Airbus on the Chinese market of airplanes.

Huang Qiang, president of the first Airplane Designing Institute with China Aviation Industry Corporation I (AVIC I), said his institute, based at Yanliang near Xi'an, capital of northwest China's Shaanxi Province, had been busy with the jet's final interface designing, but details of the designing for the plane will be completed by the end of the year.

And systematic designs of the passenger jet have been done and provided by 19 international suppliers, acknowledged Huang, who didn't disclose the exact number of planes that will be turned out during trial production.

The plane's maiden flight will be conducted in late 2006.

According to Huang, ARJ-21 planes will each have a passenger cabin 3.14 meters wide and 2.06 meters high, and designed to have 78 to 105 seats, and they will be capable of flying 39,000 feet above the ground.

So far, AVIC I has so far received orders from three Chinese air companies for 35 ARJ-21 planes.


Airbus to Announce New CH Production Site

http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/855/2006/02/21/262@53424.htm

2006-02-21 10:51:22 CRIENGLISH.com

Airbus will announce the Chinese production site for its A320-family single-aisle aircraft next month, making China the first country assembling Airbus jets outside of Europe.
Related Story: China to Join Airbus in A350 Design and Manufacturing

The four candidate cities are Tianjin, Shanghai, Xi'an of Shaanxi Province and Zhuhai of Guangdong Province.

The European aircraft giant said details of its partnership with the Chinese aviation industry, including the annual production volume and the name of its partner, would be made public by the middle of the year.

Laurence Barron, president of Airbus China, made the remarks last Friday on the sidelines of the delivery of two A319s to Shenzhen Airlines.

Airbus and the National Development and Reform Commission of China began studying the feasibility of setting up an assembly line in China shortly after the two sides signed a memorandum of understanding during Premier Wen Jiabao's visit to France at the end of last year.

Currently five affiliates of China Aviation Industry Corp I (AVIC I) and AVIC II are producing parts for Airbus aircraft. The aircraft is assembled in France and Germany.

At the same time, Barron said Airbus will sign official agreement with AVIC I and AVIC about details of the work share of the Airbus (Beijing) Engineering Centre in the first half of this year.

The engineering centre was set up last July and will design the A350 parts to be manufactured in China. The agreement will decide which part of the ultra-long range A350 will be designed at the centre.

Airbus has agreed to allocate up to 5 per cent of the work share to China.

The centre will be a joint venture in which AVIC II holds a 25-per-cent share, AVIC I takes 5 per cent and Airbus holds the rest, Barron said earlier last year.

The double-decker A380 will be showcased at Asian Aerospace 2006 beginning today in Singapore, Airbus said in a newsletter yesterday.

It said the super jumbo would fly to China for the first time later this year during the sixth China International Aviation and Aerospace Exhibition in Zhuhai, Guangdong Province.

"If possible, we would also like to have a tour for the A380 in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou," Airbus said.

Airbus plans to deliver about 80 aircraft to China in 2006, Barron said. Last year the Toulouse-based company delivered 65 planes to Chinese airlines, a 20 per cent year-on-year rise, accounting for one-fifth of its global delivery.

Shenzhen Airlines will have six A320 family aircraft in service this year including the two new A319s that arrived last Friday.

(Source: ChinaDaily)


http://www.dailyexpress.com.my/news.cfm?NewsID=40293

China to design parts for new Airbus

SHANGHAI: China and Europe's Airbus expect to sign a final agreement in about two months that will see Chinese engineers design parts for the new A350 commercial jet, an Airbus spokesman said Monday.

Two framework agreements signed mid last year between China Aviation Industry Corp 1 and 2 will allow the state-run groups to be responsible for five percent of the design and production of the new airliner.

"The deal totals five percent of the volume of the airframe of the newest A350, including design and production," said Gu Wei, spokesman for Airbus in Beijing told AFP.

Chinese engineers will make the A350 components at Airbus's new technology centre in Beijing, although which parts have yet to be decided, said Gu.

Currently Airbus has 54 Chinese engineers working at the centre but aims to raise that number to 200 by 2008, Gu said.

Owned jointly by the European Aerospace, Defence and Space company and British defence group BAE Systems, Airbus already has a network of sub-contractors in China to give it a presence in the globe's third largest aviation market.

Since the mid-1980s Chinese manufacturers have delivered to Airbus parts for doors, noses and wings valued at more than 500 million dollars, according to an earlier report by the official Xinhua news agency.

But the European giant wants to ramp up the construction of plane parts in China to help lift sales in a country that is seeing explosive growth in the commercial aviation sector.

"We want to upgrade our cooperation with Chinese so it involves not only production but also design. The formal design work will start after the final contract is signed," said Gu. - AFP


http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000082&sid=a5mlLw0fcZYg&refer=canada

Bombardier, China's AVIC I in Talks on C-Series Parts


Feb. 21 (Bloomberg) -- Bombardier Inc., the world's third- largest commercial-aircraft maker, said it's in talks to buy and produce parts with China Aviation Industry Corp. I, part of a plan to resume its $2.1 billion program for a new line of planes.

Bombardier on Jan. 31 shelved plans for the proposed C Series because it couldn't find airline customers. Still, it's in talks with Beijing-based AVIC I, China's biggest aircraft maker, to make ``some major components'' of the plane if it gets built, Bombardier's new commercial plane program director Benjamin Boehm said in Singapore today, without giving details.

An agreement with AVIC I, a supplier of doors and other parts for Bombardier planes, may help the Montreal-based company resume its development of aircraft that seat between 110 and 130 people. Low-fare carriers in Asia have been boosting the market for aircraft with between 100 and 150 seats, spurring Airbus SAS and Boeing Co. to report record orders last year, led by their A320 and 737 models.

Bombardier hopes that state-owned AVIC I ``might become a very important partner in the building of the C Series,'' Boehm said in an interview at the Asian Aerospace 2006 show today. Liu Yonghui, AVIC I's spokesman, could not be reached to comment in Singapore.

Abandoning Program

Abandoning the C Series would leave Bombardier out of the growing market for larger aircraft as demand shrinks for 50- to 90-seat planes. Sales of these small regional jets fell 26 percent last year, the second straight annual decline.

The C Series was shelved because it failed to sign up any buyers, Bombardier said. The program may be revived in 2007 as Northwest Airlines Corp. and other potential customers exit bankruptcy protection, according to a Feb. 15 speech by Bombardier's aerospace chief Pierre Beaudoin.

Separately, OAO Sukhoi Co.'s civilian plane unit, which is developing an aircraft for between 70 and 100 people, said today that it is not interested in working with Bombardier on the jet. Bombardier when it shelved the C Series Jan. 31 had said it was talking to the Russian plane maker about a possible partnership.

``I don't know what they can offer us as the C Series program is closed,'' said the company's Asia Pacific regional director Anatoly Mezhevov in Singapore today.

Finmeccanica today said it will invest in 25 percent of Sukhoi Civil Aircraft.

Bombardier may spend another $20 million on the plane this fiscal year to devise a plan that may include outside partners and will review the project's status within a year.

The C Series will also compete with Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica SA's Embraer 195 model. Bombardier and Brazil's Embraer are the world's biggest makers of planes that carry fewer than 100 people.

Bombardier is also considering stretched versions of all existing aircraft models, Boehm said, without giving details.

Embraer already has a $50 million venture with state-owned China Aviation Industry Corp. II in the northeastern Chinese city of Harbin that makes ERJ 135, 140 and 145 planes. The ERJ 145, the biggest of the three, can carry 50 people as far as 1,550 nautical miles (2,871 kilometers), or from Singapore to Hanoi.

oneman28
22 Feb 06,, 08:45
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/17/content_4190937.htm



www.chinaview.cn 2006-02-17 08:41:24

BEIJING, Feb. 17 -- Domestic auto production rose 52 percent in January to 391,600 units from a year earlier while car sales jumped 73 percent to 418,900 units, Xinhua reported Thursday, citing an industry group's data.

However, January's car production was 4 percent lower than December and sales fell 8 percent from the previous month, the report said, citing data from the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers.

The report didn't provide the previous months' figures for comparison.

January's numbers are traditionally lower than those of December, when automakers tend to boost production and sales to meet their full-year targets.

January also had fewer working days this year as the weeklong Chinese New Year holiday, which started Jan. 29.

Domestic total vehicle production in January rose 28 percent from the same month last year to 521,600 units, though it fell 7 percent from December last year. Vehicle sales totaled 530,100 units, a 45 percent rise from January last year but a fall of 15 percent from December, the report said.

Domestic commercial vehicle production fell 13 percent year on year and 16 percent month on month to 130,000 units in January. Sales of commercial vehicle also declined by 10 percent from January last year and by 33 percent from December to 111,100 units, according to the report.

(Source: Shenzhen Daily/Agencies)

oneman28
24 Feb 06,, 09:00
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/23/content_4218207.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-02-23 18:01:41


BEIJING, Feb. 23 (Xinhuanet) -- The number of mobile phone subscribers in China hit a record of 400 million at present, a source with the Ministry of Information Industry (MII) said on Thursday.

Statistics show that the number reached 398 million at the end of January with an increase of 5.37 million in the month, twice the increase of fixed-line users.

The average increase every month has been between 3 million and 4 million in the past 12 months, said the ministry source.

China's mobile subscribers have gained a stronger momentum of growth since they outnumbered fixed-line phone subscribers in October 2003.

Along with the increase in mobile phone subscribers, the short message volume climbed 65.7 percent year-on-year in the first month to 33.72 billion.

The ministry source also said in January that this year China's total post and telecommunications revenue reached 55.34 billion yuan, up 10.8 percent over the same period last year.

China imported its first mobile phone telecom facilities in 1987, and it took a decade for the number of subscribers to reach 10 million. Four years later, the country had the largest number of mobile phone subscribers in the world. Enditem

oneman28
25 Feb 06,, 03:36
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/25/content_4225745.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-02-25 10:03:26


LHASA, Feb. 25 (Xinhuanet) -- Traveling overland through snow-capped mountains and high-land meadows to visit mysterious Tibetan Buddhist shrines on the world's highest plateau will soon no longer require the grit and resolve of an adventurous backpacker.

This July the first train of the new Qinghai-Tibet railway will whisk passengers from Beijing to Lhasa in 48 scenery-filled hours.

Tourists venturing to the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region from China's national capital can now get there by land in the lap of luxury. Special tourist trains will feature hotel-like services and special viewing cars for the journey to the 'roof of the world'.

Railway officials say they've tried to think of everything to allure the suit-case traveler who might previously eschewed the arduous travel required to get to the world's 'third pole'.

Huang Difu, who is in charge of the Qinghai-Tibet railway construction project says, "The trains will offer suites and hotel-like services. There will oxygen bars to help travelers adjust to the higher altitude,"

The completion of the new rail line, which snakes through rugged mountain regions and a flower-filled idyllic countryside, has been a source of great national pride.

The railway is hoping its trains will also make visiting the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau another of China 'golden' tourist routes.

It is expected to bring many new tourist dollars to Tibet and other provinces. Research by experts with the Academy of Social Sciences in Tibet and the Institute of Industrial Economy under the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences say that the new overland route could bring fundamental changes to Tibet's tourism.

Tibet is working with the neighboring provinces of Qinghai, Sichuan and Yunnan to jointly explore how to bring more visitors to the region. Developers are expected to invest some 50 billion yuan (6.25 billion U.S.dollars) over the next decade to improve tourist facilities along the railroad. Enidtem

oneman28
25 Feb 06,, 03:50
http://www.statesman.com/life/content/life/stories/travel/02/26yangtze.html



By Jean Scheidnes
AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF
Sunday, February 26, 2006

WUHAN, China—The things non-Western people do to appeal to Western tourists are an endless source of fascination, chagrin and puzzlement to me.

For example, a Salvation Army-esque marching band banged out "Jingle Bells" as my mother and I hurried toward a cruise ship on the Yangtze River.

Could Hollywood movies have given someone in China the impression that Christmas is synonymous with celebration in America? I never got an answer. But "Jingle Bells" in October was the first sign that we were in for an other-worldly experience. By that time, we'd been challenged by China's otherness for several days — as pollution and scenes of poverty compounded mere culture shock and language frustration.

This was all right. After all, we did not go to China to avoid challenge. We went to witness an economy exploding with the energy of 1.3 billion free-enterprise communists. We hoped to comprehend the scale of the Three Gorges Dam, which is being built to fuel that economy.

Likewise, we did not cruise the Yangtze ("yang-zee") for a fun-filled illusion of utopia.

It just wasn't that kind of cruise.

In lieu of swimming pools, casinos and midnight buffets, we got a crash course in Chinese culture that made my head spin, a chance to marvel up close at the monumental dam project and a respite from China's overwhelming cities.

The Yangtze's waters originate in Tibet and flow 3,800 miles through China before emptying into the East China Sea. The most celebrated of its diverse features are the towering mountains and limestone cliffs of the Three Gorges. In the stretches between gorges, where the river widens and the land loses its verticality, farms thrive on misty shores, but hundreds of these settlements will have been submerged by 2009, when the controversial dam will be complete, and one has to assume that the higher water line will have rendered the gorges somewhat less dramatic.

Our six-day cruise, which started in Wuhan and ended in Chongqing, was the centerpiece of a three-week tour run by Boston-based Grand Circle Travel. We spent five days in Beijing (population 14 million) and four days in Shanghai (16 million) before boarding Regal China Cruises' Princess Elaine in Wuhan (8 million). A few of the 258 passengers were Chinese but the majority were members of American and British tour groups.

The 150 staff members, at least those who interacted with passengers, were a young and sweetly enthusiastic bunch. The same people who cleaned the rooms also served in the dining rooms, taught lessons and gave demonstrations during the day, and sang and danced for our entertainment at night. They were curious about the United States and hungry for conversational English.

Each Regal China ship has an English-speaking cruise director from the United States who is fluent in Mandarin. Ours was Jared, an impressive young man from Kansas City who was working for undergraduate credit from Brigham Young University.

We gathered on the outer decks and glassed-in lounges of the ship's bow to hear him narrate our passage through each of the Three Gorges. Between Jared and the rest of the staff, we learned about the geography of the river, the dam, Mandarin, Chinese medicine, tai chi, herbal skin care, mah jongg, kite making, silk embroidery, vegetable carving, folk dance and other regional specialties.

As for the amenities, Regal China calls itself "five star," but consider the source. Our vessel was built in 1993 in Germany for cruising Russia's Volga River. The outer decks featured only Astroturf and plastic chairs. On the other hand, our cramped double room was temperature-controlled. We could take hot showers and watch the shore through our amply sized window while drinking hot tea.

It was chilly out there, with damp air whipping around us, especially in the shadows of the gorges.

The ship sailed nonstop through undramatic scenery on the first full day, which gave us a chance to turn our attention inward and simply unwind from the urban pressures of Beijing and Shanghai. I decided to take advantage of the Chinese medicinal services offered and get a full-body massage for only $31.

In China, massage is considered a medical necessity, not an indulgence. As such, the facility was Spartan and the massage itself was at times jarring, not soothing. The masseuse was not meticulous about keeping the towel over body parts that a person might want to keep covered. But for another $31 I got a 45-minute reflexology session (foot rub) that was heaven. I ordered my mom to get one, too.

Meanwhile, we were heading swiftly toward the largest public works project in history, the hotly-debated Three Gorges Dam. It will be almost four times larger than the Hoover Dam in terms of electrical output. Proponents say it will provide the country with sorely needed electricity, allow for the passage of larger ships on the river and sharply reduce the severity of flooding.

However, it is forcing the resettlement of 1.3 million people, mostly farmers who are deeply rooted to their land.

Opponents say the reservoir, which will be 360 miles long, is submerging the best agricultural land in the region, and that heavy sediment might continue to hinder navigation. Sites of cultural and historical importance are being lost, although efforts are being made to salvage artifacts and put them in museums.

And finally, the environmental impact throughout Asia is immeasurable. But the debates are moot at this point, as the dam is already about two-thirds complete, and the water level has already risen 511 feet, with only 66 feet to go.

On day three we went ashore at Sandouping, which was chosen as the site for the dam because it had a natural island, a natural granite foundation and low seismic activity. A park and visitors' center there was throbbing with tourists, mostly Chinese. The dam is certainly a feat of engineering and a great source of national pride, from what I could tell. After reboarding, we joined other ships crowding through the five-stage locks, which took most of the afternoon, before we encountered our first of the Three Gorges, the jagged cliff-bound Xiling Gorge.

I chose not to concern myself with sorting out which gorges are which. The designations are confusing because each of the Three Gorges is actually a series of gorges, not just one. And the individual gorges have names like "Gorge of The Ox's Liver and The Horse's Lung." It's useless to try to make fine distinctions on the first pass, and better to go with overall impressions.

We awoke on day four in the Wu Gorge.A ferry took us into the verdant Lesser Gorges, where we noted goats, monkeys and one of the last undisturbed "hanging coffins," so called because an ancient culture cantilevered some of them on poles extruding from the rock faces. Others, like this one, were simply inserted into crevices.

We came to a landing where several crews of rough-hewn gondolas known as "peapod boats" awaited to take us up the narrow, lagoon-like Shennong Stream. When it became too shallow to row, the trackers jumped out and towed us with ropes.

Years ago, they used to do this in the nude, making for a pretty famous attraction. On this day they wore jackets and tiny shorts. But the experience was undiminished. Back on the Princess Elaine that afternoon, we continued through the arid and brushy Qutang Gorge.

The following day we went ashore at the city of Wanzhou, the largest city due to be flooded by the reservoir, though not entirely. We visited a family that was among the first to be resettled from lower ground, now submerged. With the money they received from the government, they bought a building and now earn income from renters. They clearly preferred this to their old life of farming. We also dropped in on a kindergarten, an acrobat school and a museum dedicated to the hanging coffins that have been rescued from the rising water.

Finally, the next day we disembarked in Chongqing (population 14 million, 31 million if you count the entire "municipality"), formerly known as Chungking. We explored a museum dedicated to the American forces in World War II, a painters' village, and the Chongqing Zoo, where I was allowed to enter an enclosure and pet a giant panda.

Major highlight!

After Chongqing, our group flew to Xi'an (7 million) mainly to see the Terra Cotta Army. More than 8,000 life-sized and one-of-a-kind terra cotta soldiers guarded an emperor's tomb for more than 2000 years. They were discovered in 1974 and the excavation is ongoing.From Xi'an we continued to Guilin (a mere 600,000) mainly for a day cruise on the Li River and a visit to an orphanage that Grand Circle Travel helps support. Finally we went to Hong Kong (6.4 million,) mainly to shop.

Touring China is exhausting and emotionally taxing, but after you recover, what remains is an education. I'm convinced China will be the world's single biggest force of economic and environmental change in the next 100 years, if not right now. Whether you go to China or not, China is coming to you. It will touch every dollar you touch. Try to go see it. Make friends with it. Get used to it.


If you go . . .

Three-week 'China & The Yangtze' tours with Grand Circle Travel start at $2,695. I paid $3,487, including taxes, airfare from Austin and adjustment for peak season.

(800) 221-2610, www.gct.com.

You also can book a cruise directly through Regal China Cruises. It costs $360 to $480, depending on the season and the direction. If you sail downstream, from Chongqing to Wuhan, it takes four days instead of six. Peak season: April, May, September, October. www.yzcruises.com/english/ships/RegalChina.asp.

oneman28
25 Feb 06,, 04:02
http://www.financialexpress.com/fe_full_story.php?content_id=118698





BEIJING, FEB 24: Buoyed by higher prices for commodities and petrochemical goods, profits of China’s state-owned enterprises (SOEs) grew by an impressive 25% year-on-year in 2005 to $112 billion, a record high, the government said.
Profits of SOEs touched a record at $112 billion in 2005, registering a growth of 25%. The sales revenue of the soes totalled $1,424 billion last year, up 19.2% from the previous year, vice-minister of finance, Zhu Zhigang said.

Zhu attributed the rapid growth to sound macro-economic practices, improved corporate governance, restructuring, and higher commodity and petrochemical prices. China’s macroeconomic regulation in the past year was designed to make its rapid economic growth sustainable by cooling investment in overheated sectors as iron and steel and cement, while increasing investment in agriculture, energy, transportation and public services, or the ‘weak links’ of the country.

Between 1999 and 2004 China cut 80,000 SOEs, or 37% of the total. The number of soe employees dropped 49% to 38.25 million, Xinhua quoted Zhu as saying.

oneman28
25 Feb 06,, 04:43
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/10/eng20060210_241638.html



News from Ministry of Railways on Feb. 9 said that China's railway have performed even better than expected, making historical records in transportation olume, the cargo transportation as well as cargo turnover. China's railway leads the world in various aspects.

According to statistics, the passenger visits by railroad in 2005 stood at 1.15 billion, a year-on-year increase of 3.3 percent; and direct passenger trips 434.52 million, up 6.9 percent. The passenger turnover reached 603 billion passenger/km, up 5.6 percent.

Also in 2005, the volume of cargo dispatched by railway across the country hit 2.7 billion tons, up 8.2 percent, and cargo turnover 2,054 billion ton/km, up 7.5 percent.

By People's Daily Online

oneman28
25 Feb 06,, 04:47
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-01/31/content_4121796.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-01-31 10:02:24

LHASA, Jan. 31 (Xinhuanet) -- Southwest China's Tibet Autonomous Region reported 69 billion yuan (8.6 billion U.S. dollars) of fixed assets investment between 2001 and 2005, three times as much as in the previous five-year period.

About 50.8 billion yuan (6.35 billion U.S. dollars) of the investment was appropriated from the central coffer to boost infrastructure construction in the region, said a report on the regional social and economic development during the 10th Five-Year Plan Period (2001-2005).

In the past five years, 42,700 kilometers of highways opened totraffic and track laying was completed on the world's most elevated railroad linking Tibet to neighboring Qinghai Province.

The region's installed power generating capacity was expanded to 500,000 kilowatts, an increase of 150,000 kilowatts from year 2000.

The past five years also witnessed the construction of more water conservancy and storage facilities that provide safe drinking water for 588,000 herders in Tibet. Enditem

oneman28
25 Feb 06,, 06:58
http://english.people.com.cn/200601/06/eng20060106_233407.html




China plans to input a total of 160 billion yuan (about 20 billion US dollars) on railway construction in 2006, Minister of Railways Liu Zhijun said in Beijing Friday.

At the national railways working conference in Beijing, Liu said the construction of 13 new express passenger rail routes will start this year, with the pace of another 11 rail routes under way to be accelerated.

The year 2006 will witness a large-scale railway building momentum in China, said Liu, noting that the ministry will launch a total of 87 railways projects this year.

As a step to renovate part of the country's outdated low-speed railways, a total length of 3,860 electrified rail routes will go into service across the country in 2006, Liu said.

Meanwhile, two key projects of the railways sector will become operational in 2006, said the minister, one is the highest-latitude Qinghai-Tibet Railway which will go into trial operation in July, and the other is the electrified Beijing-Shanghai Railway to be in service in the year.

Preparations for China's sixth large-scale speed-lift for railways is also scheduled to be completed before October this year, the minister said.

Source: Xinhua

Neo
25 Feb 06,, 10:16
BEIJING: China’s foreign exchange reserves, which are set to surpass those of Japan to become the world’s biggest, are likely to reach more than $950 billion by the end of 2006, a government economist said in a forecast seen on Friday.

“The foreign exchange reserves are likely to rise by about $150 billion from the end-2005 level,” Zhu Baoliang, senior economist at the State Information Centre, a top government think-tank, wrote in an article in the Securities Market Weekly.

China’s trade surplus more than tripled in 2005 to $102 billion, which, along with inflows of foreign investment and speculative funds, pushed up the country’s foreign exchange reserves to a record $818.9 billion at the end of last year.

UBS economist Jonathan Anderson has forecast China’s foreign currency reserves will top $1 trillion some time in late 2006, exceeding by a good margin those of Japan, which grew a meagre 0.28 percent in 2005 to $846.9 billion.

“In 2006, the yuan faces pressure to appreciate while there are also some factors that could help ease such pressure, but the trend of the yuan’s appreciation will not change,” Zhu wrote.

Chinese officials have repeatedly said the country is committed to pursuing a basic balance in its balance of payments and have promised to take steps to spur domestic consumption. The US has put persistent pressure on China to let the yuan rise. reuters

oneman28
26 Feb 06,, 02:12
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-01/28/content_516263.htm


(china.org.cn)
Updated: 2006-01-28 09:38

China's telecommunications sector saw stable growth in 2005, with total revenues of 579.9 billion yuan (US$71.93 billion) and a 11.7 percent growth from the previous year, according to information published on the Ministry of Information Industry website on Tuesday.

The growth was partly driven by an increase of nearly 100 million subscribers last year. By the end of 2005, there were a total of 740 million phone users, including 350 million fixed line users and 390 million mobile users. The number of new fixed line users and mobile users were 38.68 million and 58.6 million respectively.

The penetration rate for fixed line services is 27 sets per hundred persons, and 30 sets per hundred persons for mobile services.

In 2005, there were about 12.63 million more users with access to broadband Internet services, bringing the total to 37.5 million.

According to statistics released by China Internet Network Information Center on January 17, China now has 111 million Internet users, the second highest in the world after the United States.

Short message service (SMS) remained a major contributor to telecom growth last year. About 304.65 billion messages were sent, an increase of 40 percent over the previous year, and total revenue surpassed 30 billion yuan (US$3.72 billion). In addition, other value-added services (VAS) like multimedia message service (MMS), ring tone downloads, and broadband Internet, also saw robust growth.

Due to the uncertainty of 3G policies last year, overall telecom investment was slashed by 4.8 percent to 203.34 billion yuan (US$25.22 billion). Experts believed that investments should rebound following the announcement of a national 3G standard and the implementation of 3G policies.

Su Jinsheng, director of the Telecom Management Bureau under the MII, outlined the bureau's aims for this year during a recent interview with People's Posts and Telecommunications News:

? Develop the layout for the 11th Five-Year Development Guidelines (2006-2010);

? Set up an evaluation system for basic telecom services, and boost the all-round operations of telecom service operators;

? Further improve policies and measures in the areas of industrial development, business coordination, market standards, resource allocation and inter-network settlement; and

? Research policies and measures for an enhanced opening-up of the telecom market, encourage and guide the private sector to play a greater role in telecom service, assist related departments to study policies developed after China's entry to the World Trade Organization so as to raise the sector's importance in the national economy.

As for the development of new technologies and businesses, Su highlighted a three-pronged approach:

First, keep close watch on new broadband access and application technologies, and carry out advanced research in this area.

Second, the bureau will evaluate pilot programs already conducted in the areas of 3G networks, Internet protocol television (IPTV) and ENUM (protocol for phone number mapping) for next-step development planning.

In addition, the bureau will set up an exchange mechanism with key enterprises, and an information sharing mechanism with industry associations to keep abreast of the status of development of new technologies and businesses.

Third, the bureau will set up program models for enterprises, and strengthen the support for new businesses.

oneman28
26 Feb 06,, 11:30
http://www.forbes.com/business/feeds/afx/2006/02/16/afx2531293.html



BEIJING (AFX) - China's PC market grew 29 pct in 2005, with total shipments of 19.3 mln units in the year, research firm Gartner said.

China's top PC vendor was Lenovo, which achieved a 40.5 pct increase from a year earlier to 6.35 mln units.

Founder Electronics was the second-placed vendor in China, with 2.14 mln sales, followed by Tongfang, Dell Inc, and Hewlett-Packard, who sold 1.58 mln, 1.5 mln and 1.22 mln units respectively, Gartner said.

China's PC industry had a strong fourth quarter last year, recording a 40.7 pct year-on-year growth and 8.3 pct growth from the previous quarter, Gartner analyst Simon Ye said in a statement.

'From a consumer perspective, the October National Day Holiday and early winter promotions in December were the main growth drivers,' Ye said.

Notebook PCs outpaced desk-based PCs with a 46.6 pct year-on-year growth, Gartner said, without providing figures.

'Considering the low PC penetration rate and purchasing power, most Chinese may still consider desk-based PCs for their first time purchase,' Ye added.

Total PC shipments in Asia Pacific, excluding Japan, reached 41.7 mln units in 2005, up 26.2 pct from 33.1 mln units in 2004, Gartner said.

In the fourth quarter, 11.6 mln units were shipped, up 32.6 pct from a year earlier.

The research firm added that there was exceptional demand from the professional market.

The professional market experienced 34 pct growth in the fourth quarter compared with the home market which grew 31 pct.

China, India and Hong Kong were the key drivers to strong demand from the professional market, Gartner said.

will.davies@xinhuafinance.com

oneman28
26 Feb 06,, 14:37
http://www.theage.com.au/news/business/china-turns-to-mining-ventures/2006/02/26/1140888748582.html



CHINESE industrial giant Sinosteel has revealed a $3 billion war chest to kickstart new overseas mining ventures, including in Australia, as China tries to escape the dominance of iron ore heavyweights BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto and Brazil's CVRD.

The revelation comes as Chinese steel makers hold out against another likely big increase in iron ore prices this year, warning that miners were putting at risk their relationship with the world's biggest ore importer.

It also comes as Sinosteel-backed junior Midwest Corporation loads the first shipment from its new Koolanooka hematite mine, east of Geraldton in Western Australia, for delivery to the conglomerate next month.

Speaking on the sidelines of the AJM Iron and Steel conference in Perth, Sinosteel Australia managing director Xiaofei Cui said China was eager to identify and control new supplies of raw materials.

To that end, Sinosteel, which last year traded more than 20 million tonnes of iron ore, had already secured two bank facilities giving it $3 billion for new mining ventures, Mr Cui said. How much was invested in Australia would depend on the quality of opportunities brought to Sinosteel.

oneman28
26 Feb 06,, 14:40
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2006-02/26/content_524026.htm


(xinhua)
Updated: 2006-02-26 09:15


China's trade in farm products grew steadily in 2005 to reach 55.8 billion U.S. dollars, reducing the trade deficit by 70 percent in a year, the Chinese Minister of Agriculture has said.

Briefing the Standing Committee of the 10th National People's Congress (NPC), China's top legislature, on Saturday, Minister Du Qinglin said exports of farm products topped 27.18 billion U.S. dollars in 2005, up 17.7 percent on the previous year.

Imports rose 2.4 percent to reach 28.65 billion U.S. dollars, Du said, adding that the trade deficit was under control, dropping from 4.88 billion U.S. dollars in 2004 to 1.47 billion in 2005.

Despite a heavy blow to domestic poultry raisers following the bird flu outbreak, the export of poultry and related products rose 26.6 percent to reach 1.35 billion U.S. dollars last year, he added.

Though trade of farm products developed well in 2005, most of China's farm products were not so competitive in the international market, with the technical trade barriers increasing, Du said.

oneman28
27 Feb 06,, 04:00
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/27/content_4233269.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-02-27 10:54:49


BEIJING, Feb. 27 (Xinhuanet) -- China posts two-digit growth in total forestry output value every year from 2001 to 2005, reachingmore than 700 billion yuan (about 87.0 billion US dollars) in 2005,the State Forestry Administration (SFA) announced here Monday. Enditem

China plants over 12 bln trees in 2001-2005 period

China planted more than 12 billion trees in the 2001-2005 period, the State Forestry Administration (SFA) announced here Monday.

A total of 2.75 billion volunteers participated in tree planting in the five-year period, according to SFA. Enditem

China reports downsizing in desert encroachment

China's desert area has shrunk byan average 1,283 square kilometers annually in recent years, the State Forestry Administration (SFA) announced here Monday.

This marked a reverse for the first time in the period since 1949 when China has reported continuous expansion in desert areas.China witnessed its desert area expanding by an average of 3,436 square kilometers annually till the end of last century, accordingto SFA. Enditem

China's forest coverage rate reaches 18.21 percent

  China planted 32 million hectaresof trees in the 2001-2005 period, with the forest coverage rate rising to the current 18.21 percent from 16.55 percent, the State Forestry Administration announced here Monday. Enditem

oneman28
27 Feb 06,, 07:02
http://www.autonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060227/SUB/60224160/1003&refsect=




DETROIT -- General Motors has shifted its worldwide electronics purchasing unit from Warren, Mich., to Shanghai to place it at the hub of China's electronics industry.

According to sources familiar with GM's plans, the move is intended to keep GM abreast of trends in automotive electronics and buy more electronic components in China.

"Just about all electronic subcomponents now originate in China or Korea or Singapore," says a source close to GM who asked to not be named. "You are more aware and you buy better when you are where the action is."

GM's other six commodity buying groups will remain in the Detroit area.

The move to China illustrates the strategic importance of electronics. Every year, GM buys $85 billion worth of components worldwide. Electronics made up about 10 percent of a vehicle's value in the early 1990s and will rise to 40 percent by 2010, according to trade publication Electronic Business.

China is widely viewed as the world's new hub for consumer electronics. It also is GM's largest growth market. Much of the electronics that GM buys in China are destined for its Asian assembly lines, not U.S. shores, a senior GM official said Friday, Feb. 24.

It indicates how important GM's Asian assembly plants have become. In 2005, GM produced 1.6 million vehicles in Asia, up nearly 22 percent from the year before. If current trends continue, GM's Asian assembly plants soon will outproduce its European plants, which produced 1.9 million cars and trucks last year.

By 2009, GM expects to buy $6 billion worth of China-made parts annually for its operations in China, more than double its purchases in 2003.

A Shanghai headquarters also will help GM to export more components to plants in Europe and North America. By 2009, the company expects to buy $4 billion worth of Chinese parts annually for GM assembly plants outside China, up from $200 million in 2003.

To ensure the success of its electronics venture, GM has dispatched a top purchasing executive to China. Effective Wednesday, March 1, GM Vice President Jim Bovenzi will run GM's overall purchasing operations in Asia. He will operate out of Shanghai.

Suppliers also are watching Akhil Puri, the 31-year-old executive director who moved the automaker's electronics commodity group from Warren to China. Puri is considered to be a rising star at GM. In his position, Puri will have enormous influence over the electronic guts of GM vehicles.

Five managers from Puri's Warren team have joined him at his new headquarters in the gleaming 88-story Jin Mao Tower near Shanghai's bustling harbor, says the GM source. Puri has hired more than 100 employees in the group.

Puri's job is to engage suppliers, set strategy and work with engineering. GM has about 400 Chinese suppliers, including joint ventures and government-owned companies. It also is developing 50 independent suppliers in China.

"The pressure to source from the low-cost countries has become relentless," says the former CEO of a key GM supplier. "This will give them more impetus."

Bo Andersson, GM's global purchasing chief, has encouraged his staffers to make frequent face-to-face contact with suppliers. Andersson himself spends much of his time in supplier factories looking for ways to cut waste.

Moving the electronics purchasing functions to China gives GM purchasers more daily contact with electronics suppliers.

GM executives "want to spend more time in supplier factories and less time in the office," says the senior GM executive. This helps the company "better understand what we are buying."

Asked about the risks of the initiative, the senior executive admitted that a more intense focus on China could make it too easy for an executive to assume that the China price is always the best solution.

"The end goal is not buying from China," the executive said. "The goal is to (obtain) the best value and the best technology."

You may e-mail Robert Sherefkin at rsherefkin@crain.com

oneman28
27 Feb 06,, 12:10
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/1641/2006/02/27/65@55559.htm


2006-02-27 11:01:34 CRIENGLISH.com

China's desert area has shrunk by an average 1,283 square kilometers annually in recent years, the State Forestry Administration (SFA) announced Monday.


This marked a reverse for the first time in the period since 1949 when China has reported continuous expansion in desert areas.

China witnessed its desert area expanding by an average of 3,436 square kilometers annually till the end of last century, according to SFA.








Forest coverage to reach 30% in most of cities: SFA

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/27/content_4233269.htm



BEIJING, Feb. 27 (Xinhuanet) -- China will strive to increase its forest coverage in 70 percent of the cities nationwide to 30 percent, with per capita public land under vegetation reaching eight square meters, Jia Zhibang, director of the State Forestry Administration (SFA) announced here Monday.

Forest coverage to reach 20 pct in 2010

China will strive to increase its forest coverage to 20 percent and to bring half of its natural wetlands and 90 percent of the country's key wildlife species under protection in 2010.

Jia told a press conference that the total forestry output value would reach 1,200 billion yuan (149.1 billion US dollars) in 2010.
Forestry output value grows by 2 digits annually

China posts two-digit growth in total forestry output value every year from 2001 to 2005, reaching more than 700 billion yuan (about 87.0 billion US dollars) in 2005.

12 bln trees planted in 2001-2005 period

Jia Zhibang said 12 billion trees were plated across the country in the 2001-2005 period, and a total of 2.75 billion volunteers participated in tree planting.

Desert encroachment reduced, forest coverage increase

The desert area has shrunk by an average 1,283 square kilometers annually in recent years. This marked a reverse for the first time in the period since 1949 when China has reported continuous expansion in desert areas.

Thanks to the 32 million hectares of trees planted in the 2001-2005 period, the forest coverage rate in the country has risen to the current 18.21 percent from 16.55 percent, the State Forestry Administration said. Enditem

oneman28
27 Feb 06,, 15:08
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-02/27/content_4235450.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-02-27 20:19:50


BEIJING, Feb 27 (Xinhuanet) -- The world's largest personal credit information databank has been put into operation in China, with the number of persons covered reaching 486 million by late January,the People's Bank of China has said.

Su Ning, vice-governor of the central bank, said at a national conference over the weekend that almost every Chinese citizen who is economically active is now covered by the databank.

The databank provides information concerning one's basic facts, bank accounts, borrowing records and his/her accounts at the national housing saving pool, he told the conference on the administration of credit information collection in Guilin, south China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region.

The vice-governor said another credit information databank targeting enterprises has also launched operation on a trial basis and would start full operation at the middle of the year.

He called for the better utilization of the databanks by enterprises and personal credit information for safeguarding financial security and providing a benchmark for monetary and macroeconomic policy makers. Enditem

oneman28
28 Feb 06,, 10:33
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/business/nationworld/ats-ap_business13feb28,0,230368.story?coll=sns-business-headlines



HONG KONG -- China will spend 140 billion Chinese yuan ($17.4 billion) over the next five years to expand its airport infrastructure to meet a forecast 14 percent annual growth in domestic air traffic, a civil aviation official said Tuesday.

That is sharply higher than the 120 billion yuan ($14.9 billion) the government spent on airport infrastructure in the fifteen years from 1990 to 2005.

"By 2010, the mainland will have about 186 airports, up from 142 currently," said Gao Hongfeng, vice-minister of the Civil Aviation Administration of China, or CAAC. Several existing airports will also be expanded to ease the pressure on capacity from rising traffic, he said at an aviation conference in Hong Kong.

Gao also said China's fleet of commercial aircraft will grow to 1,580 by 2010, up from 863 currently, before reaching a total of about 4,000 aircraft by 2020.

The government will continue to expand the country's three largest airports -- Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou -- to help them maintain their role as China's main international air transport hubs for passengers and cargo, he said.

Other airports slated for expansion include those in Shenzhen, Chengdu, Haikou, Hangzhou and Xian, he said.

China's aggressive aviation development plans come as air traffic continues to grow at double-digit rates. In 2005, Chinese airlines carried 138 million passengers, up 15.5 percent from the previous year, and 3.4 million tons of cargo, up 13.8 percent.

The CAAC said it expects passenger and cargo traffic to grow at an average of 14 percent a year until 2010, with growth then slowing to 11 percent annually in the period 2011-2020.

Gao said China is considering to establish a more open and free air transport network with ASEAN countries, which include Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, the Philippines, Singapore, Brunei and Vietnam.

oneman28
28 Feb 06,, 10:48
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/28/eng20060228_246717.html


China is drafting an action plan for measles control for the next few years which aims to eliminate measles by 2012, according to a health official Tuesday in Xiamen.

The rate of measles incidence in China has decreased by 95 percent since the 1990s due to the planned immunization that started in 1978, with the lowest figure in history reported in 1995, about five per 100,000, said Qi Xiaoqiu, director of the Department of Disease Control under the Ministry of Health.

However, since 1995, the incidence of measles has been rising again. In 2005, the highest incidence rate was reported in the past 10 years. Some provinces are still seeing high prevalence this year, Qi said at a national conference on the immunization plan of 2006.

Last year, China reported nearly 130,000 measles cases nationwide, with the incidence rate at 10 per 100,000. Most provinces and regions saw measles outbreaks, including underdeveloped western regions and eastern parts with large rural-migrant floating populations, according to epidemic reports by the ministry.

Today, measles is still a major infectious disease menacing Chinese children's health and life, said Qi, noting that the elimination of measles is another great challenge in public health after poliomyelitis.

To achieve the goal, local governments should maintain a high immunization rate by making sure the percentage of the two-dose vaccination reaches at least 95. The surveillance system should be improved as well, he said.

Measles will hopefully be the third infectious disease to be eliminated in the world after smallpox and poliomyelitis, which expected to be vanished soon. The Americas region of the World Health Organization (WHO) eliminated measles in 2000, while the European region, the eastern Mediterranean region and the western Pacific region have pledged to achieve the goal by 2007, 2010 and 2012, respectively.

Source: Xinhua



China to survey hepatitis B epidemic situation
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/28/eng20060228_246713.html



China's Ministry of Health is going to launch a nationwide survey on the current epidemic situation of hepatitis B in a bid to give scientific support to the country's prevention of the disease.

The control of hepatitis B has been listed on the 11th national five-year program (2006-2010) and is one of the priorities of the ministry on its infectious disease control agenda, said Qi Xiaoqiu, director of the Department of Disease Control under the ministry.

The survey will focus on the current epidemic situation, changing trends, transmission elements, financial burdens and immunization evaluation of hepatitis B, noted Qi at a national conference on the immunization plan of 2006 held on Tuesday.

"The control of hepatitis B is a crucial task of the ministry this year. We are organizing experts to assess the survey and will work out a detailed plan soon," said Qi.

Hepatitis B is one of the major infectious disease in China, which carried out nationwide surveys about the epidemic situation of hepatitis on 1979 and 1992. According to experts, the country currently has 20 million people infected with chronic hepatitis B.

On Jan. 28, the ministry issued a national prevention and control plan on hepatitis B for the next five years, which set a goal of significant decrease in the incidence of hepatitis B and deaths caused by hepatocirrhosis and liver cancer by 2010.

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
28 Feb 06,, 10:55
http://www.polymerupdate.com/polymer-petrochemical-news/checkbreak.asp?id=31726&types=brk


Date - Feb 28, 2006 14:50
PetroChina Company Limited has announced today that it has broken ground on an ethylene plant in Sichuan Province. The petrochemical facility will have an annual capacity of 800 kt/annum of ethylene, the first ever complex of such scale in China~s southwestern region.

PetroChina owns 51 percent of the project, which has a total investment of approximately RMB 21 billion. Chengdu Petrochemical Co. Ltd. owns the remaining 49 percent stake....

oneman28
28 Feb 06,, 10:59
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/28/eng20060228_246711.html



China's first Euro IV diesel engine with independent property rights YC6L-40 was born at China's largest internal combustion engine production base - Guangxi Yuchai Machinery on Feb.26. The "green power" engine will be installed on buses in Beijing in serving the Beijing "green Olympics".

The Yuchai YC6L-40 engine has not only reached the Euro IV standard, it is also of quite good power performance and economical efficiency. With high power, low emission, low noise and high reliability it is fit for use in luxury passenger cars and city buses.

By People's Daily Online

oneman28
28 Feb 06,, 11:10
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/28/eng20060228_246677.html


China had a 1.30756 billion population by the end of 2005, 7.68 million more than that in the previous year, according to a report released by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) on Tuesday.

China has made persistent efforts to slow its population growth over the past 30 years and succeeded in reducing the birthrate.

The birthrate dropped from 21.06 per thousand in 1990 to 12.40 in 2005, while the growth rate went down from 14.39 per thousand to 5.89, according to figures from the NBS.

Although the population growth rate has been reduced, the actual increase is still huge. The country is expecting a peak in the number of elderly and migrant population amid growing imbalance in gender proportions among newborn babies.

China's urban population totaled 562.12 million by the end of 2005, accounting for 43 percent of the total, and rural population reached 745.44 million, accounting for 57 percent.

NBS figures show 673.75 million Chinese are male, making up 51.5 percent, and 633.81 million are female, making up 48.5 percent.

Some 100.55 million Chinese people are over 65 years old, accounting for 7.7 percent of the total.

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
28 Feb 06,, 11:12
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/28/eng20060228_246674.html



China's grain output reached 484.01 million tons in 2005, up 3.1 percent on the previous year, according to a report released Tuesday by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS).

The report on the country's national economy and social development in 2005 also said China's cotton output decreased by 9.8 percent to 5.7 million tons, and oil-bearing crops output rose 0.4 percent to hit 30.78 million tons.

Meanwhile sugar production fell 0.2 percent to 95.51 million tons in 2005. The production of vegetables and fruit maintained a stable growth.

According to the report, China's grain cultivating area hit 104.27 million hectares in 2005, 2.67 million hectares more than 2004.

The area devoted to cotton-growing, however, dropped 630,000 hectares to 5.06 million hectares last year.

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
28 Feb 06,, 11:17
http://english.people.com.cn/200602/28/eng20060228_246675.html



China's output of energy and raw materials grew fast in 2005, figures released by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) Tuesday show.

According to an NBS report on China's economic and social development in 2005, China last year produced energy equivalent to 2.06 billion tons of standard coal, up 9.5 percent year on year.

In 2005, China generated electricity of 2.4747 trillion kilowatts hour, up 12.3 percent, produced crude coal of 2.19 billion tons, up 9.9 percent, and produced crude oil of 181 million tons, up 2.8 percent.

China produced crude steel of 352 million tons, up 24.6 percent, rolled steel of 397 million tons, up 24.1 percent and cement of 1.06 billion tons, up 10 percent.

In 2005, China manufactured 5.7 million cars, up 12.1 percent. The added value of China's high-tech industry grew 19.8 percent to 783.9 billion yuan (98 billion U.S. dollars), NBS figures show.

Source: Xinhua

oneman28
28 Feb 06,, 11:30
http://www.fibre2fashion.com/news/textile-news/newsdetails.aspx?news_id=13397
February 28, 2006



In the wake of its strategic move, China Texmatech is to open its first after sales service centre for its textile machinery in India on March 1, 2006.

The company has selected Coimbatore to open the centre and there would be similar centres near Mumbai and New Delhi.

A senior official of the company informed that the idea would be a great success as Indian manufacturers fail to supply the demand of 4 million spindles because they are able to manufacture only half of the current demand.

China Texmatech also plans to start a pilot spinning project in Coimbatore by August 2006 as it considers possibility of assembly or manufacturing operations in India.

China Texmatech started marketing its machinery in India in July 2005 and has already received orders worth $40 million for spinning machinery and $30 million for fibre plant machinery.

China Texmatech is the overseas marketing section of the state-owned China Hengtian Group.

oneman28
03 Mar 06,, 15:23
http://www.thecouriermail.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,18337733%255E13360,00.html



THE announcement that Chinese aluminium company Chalco is preparing to invest $3 billion in Queensland's bauxite and alumina industries is welcome news.

After a tortured recent past, it now appears that real progress will soon be made to exploit the long identified bauxite reserves at Aurukun, developing much needed industry for the Cape York Peninsula and delivering on the long-cherished ambition of downstream processing of the state's natural resources.

Chalco has been identified as sole bidder, and will prepare a final proposal for the State Government to develop the giant Aurukun bauxite reserves, including a mine and washing plant.

In addition, the company is prepared to commit to a refinery to turn the bauxite into alumina at either Bowen, Townsville or Gladstone.

The Chalco investment is highly significant on two fronts. Firstly, it represents the beginning of what could become a tidal-wave of direct Chinese investment in the Queensland resource sector.

As China scours the world for resource projects to underpin its dramatic economic transformation it is only natural that Queensland should be a key partner.

The China boom, through deals like this one, has the potential to underpin the financial well-being of the state for future generations. Secondly, it will deliver what words and good intentions alone will never achieve, real jobs to lift the life circumstance for communities on the Cape York Peninsula.

oneman28
03 Mar 06,, 15:34
http://metalsplace.com/metalsnews/?a=4128



Alumina|Bauxite CatalogChina's alumina production capacity is expected to rise to 21 million metric tons by the end of 2010, due to 'blind' investments and development in new projects, the National Development and Reform Commission said in a report this week.

China's top economic planner said investments in expanding the country's alumina production capacity were made without regard for environmental issues and other factors like power constraints.

Alumina is the raw material used to produce aluminium.

The NDRC estimates the capacity of ongoing alumina expansion projects is 12.15 million tons, involving investments totaling about CNY55 billion (around US$6.84 billion).

An additional 3.2 million tons of alumina production capacity is being planned, but construction has not yet begun, said the report.

Based on these numbers, the NDRC said China's total alumina production capacity will hit 11.3 million tons this year and 17.5 million tons in 2007.

oneman28
03 Mar 06,, 20:53
http://www.shanghaidaily.com/art/2006/03/04/245767/Chery_cracks_the_top_3_in_auto_sales.htm



Jin Jing
2006-03-04
CHERY Automobile Corp moved up three notches in China's car sales ranking last month - the first time a domestic automaker has unseated a foreign joint venture to break into the top three.

Chery sold 21,000 vehicles in February, a 130-percent jump from the same period a year ago, following Shanghai Volkswagen with 23,600 units and Shanghai General Motors Corp with 22,800.

In January, the top three sales leaders were Shanghai GM, Shanghai VW and First Automobile Works' joint venture with VW.

Chery's sales boom - prompted by its highly popular QQ and three new models that hit the streets in January - moved the company up from No. 6 in January, when it sold 17,000 vehicles.

"The central government's efforts to encourage the sale of small cars to help energy conservation was important for Chery," said Sun Muzi, an auto analyst at Sinotrust Marketing Research and Consulting Ltd.

"This private company is good at offering inexpensive self-designed cars at a very attractive price to China's cost-sensitive consumers," he said.

In January, China's central authorities ordered local governments to lift roadway restrictions on small cars by the end of March in an effort to ease tight energy supplies, protect the environment and nurture China's independent auto brands. In the past, cars with small engines were banned from some highways.

The new policy primarily benefited domestic manufacturers of economy cars, including Geely Group and Changan Automobile Co.

"But Chery also needs to improve in developing models to extend its presence into the middle and high-end markets, not only to be a successful car producer but also for profitability," Sun told Shanghai Daily.

Chery's most popular small car, the QQ, priced around 40,000 yuan (US$4,950), generates only a 500 yuan profit, while cars in the mid and upper ranges can be marked up 20,000 yuan or more.

Last year, the company's profit fell to 95 million yuan from 188 million yuan in 2004 despite a 118 percent sales surge to 185,000 units.

In comparison, sales in China's auto market grew 26 percent overall last year.

oneman28
05 Mar 06,, 15:53
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,18357661%255E36375,00.html


John Reed, London
March 06, 2006
A MURAL in the art deco headquarters of Angola's Benguela Railway shows Africa's colonial rail network in fading tones of sepia and black. During Portuguese rule the line led 1304km east from the coast to the mines of the interior, now Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Completed by British engineers in 1929, Benguela Railway was bombed and dynamited beyond use during Angola's civil war. Today its longest working stretch ends 150km east of the coast, in the town of Cubal.

Passengers ride in or on the roofs of open boxcars on a four-times-daily shuttle between Benguela and Lobito, a coastal city nearby. Now the railway is due for an overhaul costing $US300 million ($405 million) to $US500 million, financed by a new foreign partner, China.

Three tidy fenced tent camps housing Chinese workers have already sprung up in the muddy fields alongside the line.

Ground is due to be broken on the railway's "expedited rehabilitation" this month, with completion planned for August 2007.









"We hope to move 30 million tonnes of goods and 4 million passengers every year," says Daniel Quipaxe, the railway's director.

The project is just one example of China's expanding influence in Africa, which has rich reserves of many of the raw materials China's booming economy needs. In Angola alone, Chinese engineers are refurbishing two other rail lines, government buildings and a new airport in Luanda, with the help of a $US2 billion credit for infrastructure from China's Eximbank approved in 2004.

President Jose Eduardo dos Santos, who last stood for election in 1992, said recently that his Government needed to rebuild Angola's road and rail networks before holding elections.

Angola never held a donors' conference to gather pledges for aid to rebuild infrastructure ruined in the war, which lasted with interruptions from 1975 until 2002. Last November, Finance Minister Jose Pedro de Morais admitted it was probably now "too late" to hold one.

Angola lacks a financing agreement with the International Monetary Fund, in part because of IMF misgivings about how it accounts for the massive revenues it receives from oil. China is a more supportive and less critical partner, providing financing and skills to a country that lost many educated people to post-colonial emigration and war.

For China, Angola's chief attraction is its oil. China rivals the US as the largest importer of this. State-owned petroleum firm Sinopec picked up a share in offshore Block 3 last year when Angola refused to renew a concession held by France's Total.

No reason for the non-renewal was given but some analysts linked it to a criminal case in France that had aired corruption allegations against Angolan officials.

Refurbishing the railway will require replacing its rails and substituting concrete sleepers for the colonial-era wooden ones, rebuilding 37 bridges and building new stations.

oneman28
05 Mar 06,, 16:01
http://www.stats.gov.cn/english/newsandcomingevents/t20060302_402308116.htm

The full report from National Bureau of Statistics of China

China's National Economic and Social Development in 2005

oneman28
05 Mar 06,, 16:27
http://english.people.com.cn/200603/05/eng20060305_248027.html



Following are the main targets for China's economic and social development in 2006, revealed in the report on the work of the government delivered by Premier Wen Jiabao Sunday at the annual session of China's national legislature:

-- GDP should grow about 8 percent, and energy consumption per unit of GDP should fall by about 4 percent.

-- The rise in consumer prices should be kept under 3 percent.

-- Urban employment should increase by 9 million persons, and the urban registered unemployment rate should be kept under 4.6 percent.

-- The equilibrium in the balance of payments should stay basically balanced.

-- The government plans to issue 60 billion yuan worth of long- term treasury bonds, 20 billion yuan less than last year, while increasing regular construction investment from the central government budget by 10 billion yuan.

-- The deficit in the central government budget is projected to be 295 billion yuan, 5 billion yuan less than last year.


Facts and figures: China´s drive to build socialist new countryside
http://english.cctv.com/english/20060305/100545.shtml


Following are the main facts and figures about China's drive to "build a socialist new countryside",revealed in the government work report delivered by Premier Wen Jiabao on Sunday at the annual session of China's national legislature:

-- Central government budget expenditures for agriculture, rural areas and farmers this year will total 339.7 billion yuan, 42.2 billion yuan more than last year;

-- China will completely rescind the agricultural tax throughout the country in 2006, a tax that China has been collecting for 2,600 years. The reform of rural taxes and fees has greatly benefited farmers by eliminating 33.6 billion yuan of agricultural tax and over 70 billion yuan of various sorts of fees and charges.

-- Starting this year, the government will appropriate over 103 billion yuan annually to ensure the normal operation of town and township governments and meet the needs of rural compulsory education. This figure is comprised of more than 78 billion yuan in transfer payments from the central government budget and over 25 billion yuan from local government budgets.

-- This year the central government will allocate 71.6 billion yuan for investment in science and technology, a year-on-year increase of 19.2 percent.

-- Over the next two years, the government will completely eliminate tuition and miscellaneous fees for all rural students receiving compulsory education. The Central government budget expenditures for compulsory education will increase by 218.2 billion yuan over the next five years.

-- The state will spend more than 20 billion yuan over the next five years on renovating hospital buildings in towns and townships and in some counties and upgrading their equipment.

-- China will speed up the establishment of a new type of rural cooperative medical care system by extending the scope of current trials to 40 percent of the counties in China this year and by increasing the allowances paid by the central and local governments to farmers participating in the system from 20 yuan to 40 yuan. An additional 4.2 billion yuan will be allocated from the central government budget for this program.
1

oneman28
05 Mar 06,, 16:36
http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=reutersEdge&storyid=2006-03-05T152228Z_01_PEK267061_RTRUKOC_0_US-MINERALS-CHINA-STEEL.xml


By Niu Shuping

BEIJING (Reuters) - Beijing will shut small steel mills and encourage big and mid-sized domestic mills to merge, but would not look as kindly at acquisitions by foreign producers, a senior industry official told Reuters on Sunday.

China plans to use new environmental, energy and water consumption and product quality standards to close 30 percent of the country's shoddiest steel capacity, said Luo Bingsheng, secretary general of the China Iron and Steel Association.

"Foreigners taking a controlling stake in our major steel mills is against our iron and steel development policy. We have a batch of competitive steel mills, which can play an important role in the restructuring of the industry."

The new regulations, yet to be issued, will force outdated, polluting steel capacity to shut, Luo said.

"The top priority is legally eliminate steel mills with heavy pollution and high energy consumption."

The association opposes any foreign efforts to take a controlling stake in a Chinese mills, Luo said, citing Mittal Steel's talks with Baotou Iron and Steel (Group) Co. for a 49 percent stake.

He said Arcelor would have difficulty getting central government approval of a recently signed deal to take a 38.41 percent stake in Laiwu Steel Corp. Ltd.

Arcelor's share is equal to that of Laiwu's state-owned parent, although a provincial investment body owns another 1.19 percent.

Mittal, the world's largest steel firm, has launched a hostile takeover bid for Arcelor, the second-largest.

Beijing is promoting cooperation between China's largest mill, Baosteel Group and Bayi Iron and Steel Co. in Xinjiang.

It is also urging the merger of Shougang Group in Beijing with Hebei's Tangshan Iron and Steel Group, and of Wuhan Iron and Steel Co. with Liuzhou Iron & Steel Group in Guangxi.

Luo forecast profit growth for the industry of between 5 percent and 7 percent this year.

SHUTDOWNS

China's steel industry produced a surplus of 45 million tonnes of steel in 2005, driving down prices and making it harder for the newly expanded mills to pay their debts.

"The overcapacity problem has provided a very good opportunity to promote restructuring in the steel industry," Luo said.

Local governments, which built steel mills to profit from China's booming economy, are expected to combat efforts to shut down their major employers and taxpayers.

The steel association targets steel output growth of 10 percent this year, after nearly 25 percent growth last year.

"If we produce more than the target, the output will exceed demand, which will hurt everybody's interests," Luo said.

"This year we will actively push for mills to produce only what they know they can sell."

Chinese industry is resisting any rise in iron ore prices during the year beginning April 1.

China won the right to a bigger role in the talks with iron ore suppliers after Chinese mills bitterly resented a 71.5 percent hike in prices last year. Talks are traditionally led by Japanese steel mills, the world's biggest term iron ore buyers.

"Talks are in a tough period," Luo said, adding that China's representative, Baosteel, is still pushing for a price cut.

The association has threatened to punish any steel mills that hold separate talks with miners, by not issuing them iron ore licenses this year.

Luo said Chinese mills have stockpiled enough iron ore to face down miner's demands for a higher price.

Port stocks of iron ore are at about 35 million tonnes, steel mills hold 22 million tonnes of inventory and domestic miners hold another 5 million tonnes, Luo said.

"If there are no iron ore imports for two months, steel mills will not be hurt."

oneman28
06 Mar 06,, 20:20
http://www.autonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060306/SUB/60302026/1003&refsect=


SHANGHAI -- Recent moves by some major players signaled the beginning of a new era for China's electronics industry.

China no longer is merely a place to churn out low-tech, high-labor components. It is fast becoming an important source of automotive electronics for the global market.

Some signs of the change:


Late last year, General Motors moved its global electronics purchasing office to Shanghai.


Visteon Corp. announced recently that its global electronics group will be headquartered here.


TRW has more than 40 people on a purchasing team in Shanghai.


"On the electrical mechanical side, in the future, I see a huge increase in sourcing from the Asia Pacific region," says Edward Carpenter, vice president of Asia Pacific for TRW Automotive Inc.

China is the center of that effort. Carpenter worked in TRW's purchasing office in the United States for five years before relocating to Shanghai last October. TRW's regional headquarters is in Shanghai, along with its regional research and development center.

Hurdles remain
There are hurdles to overcome. Chinese engineers lack auto-electronics design experience, and local suppliers lack manufacturing and technical finesse.

But China already has a thriving consumer electronics business, as a major producer of CD players, computers and other mass-market items. There also is a growing semiconductor manufacturing sector.

Those skills can be adapted to automotive electronics -- with help from foreign companies.

"China's development capabilities are now reaching a critical mass in quantity and quality, which will allow China's importance as a global electronics source to grow rapidly in the future," says Steve Meszaros, vice president of global electronics for Visteon Corp.

TRW currently sources electric motors, electrical control units, printed circuit boards, complex connectors and forgings from its China operations.

TRW declined to provide exact figures, but its biggest export is electric control units for airbags, which go to Europe, Japan, Thailand and Malaysia.

At TRW's r&d center, four of the 80 engineers had been devoted to automotive electronics; eight more were hired recently, and more are coming. "The plan is to have 25 by the end of 2006," says Kevin Elgood, engineering director at TRW's Shanghai r&d center.

49% jump
China exported $1.49 billion worth of automotive electronics and electrical instruments in 2005, up 49.0 percent from 2004, according to figures compiled by China supplier Asimco Technologies Ltd., based on government figures.

That number includes navigational radios, speedometers and the like -- but not tiny electrical motors, lighting or many other components. Complete figures for automotive electronics do not exist.

The majority of the automotive electronics exports are coming from foreign-invested firms rather than fully domestic companies, because most domestic companies lack the necessary advanced technology.

Even for foreign firms, there are limits to what kind of electronic products China can produce, says Douglas Brandt, director of business planning and sales operations for electronic and safety at Delphi Asia Pacific.

"There isn't a lot of core design experience in China," he says. But foreign firms' engineering centers -- such as Delphi's 350-engineer tech center in Shanghai -- are helping engineers gain that experience.

A shortage of qualified second-tier suppliers will impede the growth of China's automotive electronics imports, says Sun Jian, a principal with consultants A.T. Kearney in Shanghai. Currently, local suppliers' defect rates are higher than those in more developed markets, he says.

But foreign companies are putting time and money into developing a local supplier network. TRW has 18 people on its supplier-development team, for example.


Skills rise with volume
The fast growth of China's car market also speeds up suppliers' development. Car sales grew by 27.0 percent to 3.1 million units in 2005. Similar growth is expected again this year.

"You have a learning curve," says Sun. "You have to hit the first 1 million units before you get the quality level. With a big volume, you hit that point earlier."

That level is approaching quickly. Magneti Marelli Holding S.p.A. of Italy figures to export 800,000 to 1 million partially assembled instrument clusters from its plant in Guangzhou in southern China by 2007, says Luca Biagini, country manager, China for the Italian supplier. The components will go to Italy, France and Brazil.

Magneti Marelli also manufactures body computers, lighting, and fuel and speed sensors in China.

Says Biagini: "China will completely become a source of worldwide electronics."

oneman28
13 Mar 06,, 14:47
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-03/13/content_4298828.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-03-13 16:33:23

Special Report: NPC & CPPCC Sessions 2006

BEIJING, March 13 (Xinhuanet) -- The eye-catching Qinghai-Tibet railway, which will begin its trial runs this July, is expected to be further extended from Lhasa, capital of Tibet Autonomous Region, to Xigaze City in the southwestern part of the region, according to Tibetan chairman Qingba Puncog.

The projected section between Lhasa and Xigaze is expected to be completed in the period of the 11th Five-Year Plan for National Economic and Social Development (2006-2010), Puncog said Saturday in an exclusive interview with Xinhua on the sidelines of the annual session of the Tenth National People's Congress (NPC), China's top legislative body.

The 1,142-kilometer-long Qinghai-Tibet railway, which runs across the frozen tundras of the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau and links Golmud of Qinghai with Lhasa, is the first railway connecting Tibet with other parts of China.

"The world's highest railroad is expected to help further boost economic development in Tibet and bring more benefits to local people," Puncog said.

Upon completion, the line will link Tibet to China's extensive rail network, with the journey from Beijing to Lhasa - in pressurized aircraft-like carriages - taking 48 hours. Noting that protection of the ecological environment was an essential concern in the design of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway, Puncog said the routes were selected so that they would keep away from the major habitats of wild animals.

As for the so-called "ecological disaster" that some foreign media reports have played up, Puncog stressed that the Qinghai-Tibet Railway has never caused and will never cause any side effects on the ecological environment. Enditem

oneman28
13 Mar 06,, 14:53
http://en.chinabroadcast.cn/855/2006/03/13/501@61362.htm


2006-03-13 16:33:03 Reuters

BEIJING - China State Shipbuilding Corp., whose new orders increase 86 percent by tonnage in 2005 from 2004, is considering raising capital to help fund some $2 billion in planned shipyard construction.
The world's third-largest shipbuilder secured orders for 8.56 million deadweight tonnes (dwt) in 2005, taking orders on its books to 17 million dwt worth 100 billion yuan ($12.4 billion) and filling its slate until 2009, Chen Xiaojin said in a document prepared for Reuters.

Now, the firm may sell additional shares in mainland-listed units -- such as Hudong Heavy Machinery Co. Ltd. or Jiangnan Heavy Industry Co. Ltd. -- or initiate "a massive capital exercise" to bankroll some $2 billion of planned yard construction.

It is also open to foreign investment, though Chen would not elaborate.

Despite predictions that the global shipping cycle had peaked and demand could slow, Chen said he was optimistic.

"Our main yards are fully booked until 2009," he said in a statement prepared in response to Reuters' questions.

"We remain upbeat on the outlook for this year," he said. Demand "in the shipbuilding industry remains strong, domestically and internationally."

China's enormous appetite for energy and bulk mineral resources has spurred shippers around the globe to expand fleets.

Spillover orders from China poured into yards around the region, helping fuel a sector revival in countries such as Singapore, where shipbuilding had been considered a sunset industry as shipping lines sent more business to lower-cost yards in China, India and the Middle East.

China State Shipbuilding is the world's top builder of ocean-going vessels after Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. and Japan's Imabari Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., as ranked by capacity, according to shipbrokers Clarkson Plc..

South Korea and Japan control about 70 percent of the global shipbuilding market, with China and the European Union roughly splitting the remainder, state media say.

Analysts reckon Chinese yards are some five years behind in terms of technology, but charge about 20 percent less.

"It's a common practice to enter the international market by competitive pricing. China's price gap against other major ship building countries has been closing fast," Chen said.

AMBITION

China State Shipbuilding floated unit Guangzhou Shipyard International Co. Ltd. in Hong Kong and Shanghai in 1993. Its shares closed at a post-1997 high of HK$3.225 last Friday, having more than doubled so far this year.

The state firm built 5.13 million dwt in 2005, up 44 percent from 2004, for a 7 percent worldwide market share, Chen said.

Chen would not say if the company was in actual discussions with potential investors. His firm needs to fund the construction of multi-billion dollar yards in Shanghai and Guangzhou, he added.

The company wants to become the world's largest shipping group by 2015 when it is due to complete the construction of a new base in Shanghai, which will have annual capacity of about 8 million dwt.

The first phase of that project alone, with capacity of 4.5 million tonnes, would cost over 10 billion yuan to build, according to the document.

Beijing also recently approved its plans to invest nearly 6 billion yuan in a new shipyard in Guangzhou -- quadrupling its capacity at Guangzhou to 2 million dwt when completed in 2007.

(US$1=8.05 yuan)

oneman28
13 Mar 06,, 15:21
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/03/13/business/chicars.php



By Keith Bradsher The New York Times

MONDAY, MARCH 13, 2006


CHONGQING, China Volkswagen and other carmakers used to prosper by sending outdated factory equipment to China to produce older models no longer salable in the West.

But competition has become so fierce here that Honda Motor is about to introduce its latest version of the Civic only a matter of months after it went on sale in Europe, Japan and the United States. Toyota Motor, meanwhile, is assembling its Prius gasoline-electric sedan only in Japan and China.

When Ford Motor opened its first production line here in western China just three years ago, it used a layout copied from a Ford factory in the Philippines to produce 20,000 sedans a year based on a small car design taken from Ford operations in India.

But this winter, Ford opened a second production line next door that is practically identical to one of its most advanced factories, the Saarlouis operation in southwestern Germany. The new line produces the Focus, the same small car it builds in Germany (but different from the Focus sold in the United States). And with continuing improvements to the first line, it will bring total capacity here to 200,000 cars a year by June.

But the Chinese managers are not even satisfied with that.

"I want to learn from Germany and then improve on it," said Li Jianping, the factory's vice director of manufacturing.

Ford's success in rapidly expanding the scale and sophistication of its Chongqing operations illustrates how quickly the auto industry is expanding and modernizing in China.

One requirement for a country to become an automobile exporter is to develop a highly competitive domestic market that demands quality and efficiency, and China has managed to create just such a market.

American and European carmakers, including Ford, General Motors, DaimlerChrysler and Volkswagen, as well as Toyota, Honda and Nissan of Japan, are introducing their best technology to their plants in China, and not only to compete against one another. They also face rapidly growing competition in the Chinese market from purely local companies like Geely, Chery and Lifan.

These Chinese automakers captured 28.7 percent of the market in January, the first time in many years that Chinese brands have been pre-eminent - ahead of brands from Japan (27.8 percent), Europe (19 percent), the United States (14 percent) and South Korea (10.3 percent), according to Automotive Resources Asia, a consulting firm in Shanghai.

The multinationals "really have to bring their latest models," said Yale Zhang, an analyst in the Shanghai office of CSM Worldwide, an auto consulting company based in the Detroit suburbs. "Even average consumers understand if this is not the latest model."

Multinational joint ventures in China produced a total of 2.3 million family vehicles last year.

In the race to be No. 1 in China, the world's fastest-growing car market, multinationals from the United States, Japan and Europe are falling over one another to share their latest designs, technology and manufacturing expertise with Chinese partners. But industry specialists say the sharing has helped China prepare to become a major car exporter within four years, increasing the pressure on GM, Ford and other industry giants, which are already losing sales and market share to foreign rivals.

Few auto executives now doubt that the successful Chinese companies that emerge from the free-for-all in their home country will be ready to tackle world markets.

"I've seen the Chinese vehicles in China from various, various brands, and I've said it's a threat that will come to the U.S., I think, by the end of the decade," said Thomas LaSorda, the Chrysler chief executive.

All of the multinationals rapidly expanding in China say their main goal lies in serving the Chinese market and not in exports. Still, Honda is already exporting small cars from China to Europe, while DaimlerChrysler is negotiating to build very small cars in China for sale in the United States, probably under the Dodge brand.

Until the past few years, China's main advantages in the global auto manufacturing market were in its cheap labor and its talent for copying older Western designs, often while avoiding licensing fees, a practice that cut research and development costs to almost nothing.

Wages of less than $200 a month remain a big advantage for China, but it is developing another. Domestic and foreign automakers are starting with clean slates to build new operations, using efficient approaches and advanced management methods. It is similar to the way German and Japanese companies built new and more efficient factories starting in the 1980s, mostly in the American South, helping them to leap beyond Detroit's expertise.

GM and its local partner, Shanghai Automotive Industry, built an extensive vehicle design and engineering studio in Shanghai that has just finished a redesign of the Buick LaCrosse for the Chinese market.

In the central city of Wuhan, Honda has just finished quadrupling the capacity of its joint-venture factory with Dongfeng Motor Group, to 120,000 cars a year. It is also starting to build the Civic there. The expansion, costing $350 million, took just a year.

Perhaps most tellingly, on Dec. 15 Toyota began assembling Prius hybrids in the northern city of Changchun. The world's multinationals had long been wary of transferring proprietary technology to make hybrid gasoline-electric engines in China for fear that it would be copied. While Toyota is still cautious, China is nonetheless the only place besides Japan where Toyota is assembling the Prius, arguably its most important car in a decade.

Furthermore, Volkswagen said in September that it would jointly develop a hybrid minivan for the Chinese market with Shanghai Automotive - a project that is likely to give the Chinese automaker a significant understanding of the technology.

The risk for the multinationals is that their inventions may be turned against them. When GM followed Volkswagen into the Chinese market in the mid- 1990s, it was assigned the same partner: Shanghai Automotive, which announced plans on Feb. 23 to begin assembling and selling its own brand of cars in China while retaining the joint ventures.

Jeremy W. Peters contributed reporting from Detroit.

CHONGQING, China Volkswagen and other carmakers used to prosper by sending outdated factory equipment to China to produce older models no longer salable in the West.

But competition has become so fierce here that Honda Motor is about to introduce its latest version of the Civic only a matter of months after it went on sale in Europe, Japan and the United States. Toyota Motor, meanwhile, is assembling its Prius gasoline-electric sedan only in Japan and China.

When Ford Motor opened its first production line here in western China just three years ago, it used a layout copied from a Ford factory in the Philippines to produce 20,000 sedans a year based on a small car design taken from Ford operations in India.

But this winter, Ford opened a second production line next door that is practically identical to one of its most advanced factories, the Saarlouis operation in southwestern Germany. The new line produces the Focus, the same small car it builds in Germany (but different from the Focus sold in the United States). And with continuing improvements to the first line, it will bring total capacity here to 200,000 cars a year by June.

But the Chinese managers are not even satisfied with that.

"I want to learn from Germany and then improve on it," said Li Jianping, the factory's vice director of manufacturing.

Ford's success in rapidly expanding the scale and sophistication of its Chongqing operations illustrates how quickly the auto industry is expanding and modernizing in China.

One requirement for a country to become an automobile exporter is to develop a highly competitive domestic market that demands quality and efficiency, and China has managed to create just such a market.

American and European carmakers, including Ford, General Motors, DaimlerChrysler and Volkswagen, as well as Toyota, Honda and Nissan of Japan, are introducing their best technology to their plants in China, and not only to compete against one another. They also face rapidly growing competition in the Chinese market from purely local companies like Geely, Chery and Lifan.

These Chinese automakers captured 28.7 percent of the market in January, the first time in many years that Chinese brands have been pre-eminent - ahead of brands from Japan (27.8 percent), Europe (19 percent), the United States (14 percent) and South Korea (10.3 percent), according to Automotive Resources Asia, a consulting firm in Shanghai.

The multinationals "really have to bring their latest models," said Yale Zhang, an analyst in the Shanghai office of CSM Worldwide, an auto consulting company based in the Detroit suburbs. "Even average consumers understand if this is not the latest model."

Multinational joint ventures in China produced a total of 2.3 million family vehicles last year.

In the race to be No. 1 in China, the world's fastest-growing car market, multinationals from the United States, Japan and Europe are falling over one another to share their latest designs, technology and manufacturing expertise with Chinese partners. But industry specialists say the sharing has helped China prepare to become a major car exporter within four years, increasing the pressure on GM, Ford and other industry giants, which are already losing sales and market share to foreign rivals.

Few auto executives now doubt that the successful Chinese companies that emerge from the free-for-all in their home country will be ready to tackle world markets.

"I've seen the Chinese vehicles in China from various, various brands, and I've said it's a threat that will come to the U.S., I think, by the end of the decade," said Thomas LaSorda, the Chrysler chief executive.

All of the multinationals rapidly expanding in China say their main goal lies in serving the Chinese market and not in exports. Still, Honda is already exporting small cars from China to Europe, while DaimlerChrysler is negotiating to build very small cars in China for sale in the United States, probably under the Dodge brand.

Until the past few years, China's main advantages in the global auto manufacturing market were in its cheap labor and its talent for copying older Western designs, often while avoiding licensing fees, a practice that cut research and development costs to almost nothing.

Wages of less than $200 a month remain a big advantage for China, but it is developing another. Domestic and foreign automakers are starting with clean slates to build new operations, using efficient approaches and advanced management methods. It is similar to the way German and Japanese companies built new and more efficient factories starting in the 1980s, mostly in the American South, helping them to leap beyond Detroit's expertise.

GM and its local partner, Shanghai Automotive Industry, built an extensive vehicle design and engineering studio in Shanghai that has just finished a redesign of the Buick LaCrosse for the Chinese market.

In the central city of Wuhan, Honda has just finished quadrupling the capacity of its joint-venture factory with Dongfeng Motor Group, to 120,000 cars a year. It is also starting to build the Civic there. The expansion, costing $350 million, took just a year.

Perhaps most tellingly, on Dec. 15 Toyota began assembling Prius hybrids in the northern city of Changchun. The world's multinationals had long been wary of transferring proprietary technology to make hybrid gasoline-electric engines in China for fear that it would be copied. While Toyota is still cautious, China is nonetheless the only place besides Japan where Toyota is assembling the Prius, arguably its most important car in a decade.

Furthermore, Volkswagen said in September that it would jointly develop a hybrid minivan for the Chinese market with Shanghai Automotive - a project that is likely to give the Chinese automaker a significant understanding of the technology.

The risk for the multinationals is that their inventions may be turned against them. When GM followed Volkswagen into the Chinese market in the mid- 1990s, it was assigned the same partner: Shanghai Automotive, which announced plans on Feb. 23 to begin assembling and selling its own brand of cars in China while retaining the joint ventures.

Jeremy W. Peters contributed reporting from Detroit.

oneman28
13 Mar 06,, 15:30
http://www.peopleandplanet.net/doc.php?id=2690




by Yingling Liu

The opening of Beijing's 16- kilometre Rapid Transit bus system has begun to transform communications in that crowded city, says Yingling Liu, and is a sign that the Chinese Government has now accepted the merits of public transport.
Rush hour is usually a nightmare for Beijing's bus commuters. Squeezed from all sides, riders endure polluted air and chilly winter winds that seep in through gaps in the windows, or suffer en masse in the scorching summer sun. They look down in envy at their fellow residents, zipping through the traffic in air conditioned cars. But with the opening of Beijing's first Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) line on December 30, car owners may soon be jealous of bus riders.

The new 18-metre-long BRT buses traverse a 16-kilometre, 17-stop route, dubbed Southern Axis BRT Line One. It links eight residential areas, with a total population of 200,000, and four bustling commercial circles in the city's southern districts.


In its two months in service it has attracted overwhelming ridership, with daily passenger flows averaging around 80,000 commuters. Officials originally expected the peak flow —estimated at around 150,000 passengers per day —to occur in 2007, but on the third day of operation, passengers already neared 130,000.


"It's very likely the flow will exceed 150,000 during the golden week of the Labour Day," noted Yan Yabin, Vice President of Beijing BRT Company, Ltd., which manages the line, referring to the seven-day holiday in early May when Beijing sees a huge influx of tourists and commercial activity.


Right-of-Way


Bus Rapid Transit, the term for a high-speed bus system that operates within an exclusive right-of-way, was first developed in Brazil in the 1970s. But it has quietly taken hold in China, where more than 20 cities, including Shanghai, Chongqing, Chengdou, and Shenyang, are now constructing or designing BRT systems.


BRT combines the single-corridor quality of rail transit with the flexibility of buses. It is also considerably cheaper than rail, at one-tenth the construction and operational costs, and takes less time to set up — typically less than three years from design to completion.


Beijing BRT Company currently operates more than 40 buses and is expecting another 50 by April, bringing the total fleet to 90. According to Yan, the major attraction of the new line is that it is convenient, cheap, comfortable, and fast — taking 37 minutes to complete what is usually a one-hour journey.


The 18-meter buses are equipped with an electronic stop announcement system and air conditioning, which most regular city buses don't have. And the buses' low entry step allows access for wheelchairs, a feature that Beijing only recently began incorporating into city transport. "We are trying to make BRT into 'luxurious sedans for common residents,'" Yan proclaimed, expressing his pride and confidence in the new system.


Successful model


He Dongquan, programme officer for transportation with the Beijing office of The Energy Foundation, believes that the southern-axis BRT line is a very successful technical model. A second line, the Chaoyanglu Line, is currently under construction in Beijing's eastern districts, and two more lines cutting across the north and the west are in the planning stages. All three lines are scheduled for completion by 2008, in time for the Beijing Summer Olympics, and will extend the total distance covered by BRT routes to 60 kilometres.


According to He, BRT is a good way to tackle colossal urban transportation problems. "Many people don't realise that it's a dead end to develop small automobiles," he said. The city of Beijing, with a population of 14 million, is now home to around 2.8 million cars, or an average of roughly 20 cars per 100 people. More than 20 per cent of city residents use cars to get around — roughly the same number as those who use public transport — while more than 40 per cent rely on bicycles or walk.


As Beijing continues its rapid expansion, residents of the city's older core districts will increasingly be pushed out into the suburbs, making it nearly impossible for them to bike or walk to workplaces and other destinations in the city centre. Most of these people end up being dependent on public transport. Yet over the past decade, the lion's share of Beijing's transport dollars has gone to expanding roads, crossroads, and parking lots, which mainly benefit car users. "The problem is, the wider the streets become, the more cars they will attract," said He.


Vicious circle


An influx of cars inevitably slows down traffic, while inadequate investment in public transport leads to decaying services and a shrinking customer base. In Beijing and throughout China's cities, many former bus riders have been forced to resort to cars to avoid increasingly long bus rides and exhausting walks to local stops—only adding to the worsening road congestion. To break this vicious circle, cities will need to invest in highly efficient public transport, such as BRT.


BRT construction will inevitably go against the interests of current car users, since it requires an exclusive right-of-way. But it doesn't just involve the construction of a few roads; it calls for a fundamental change in how people think about their right to mobility. "Transportation is indeed a political issue," explained He. "It requires the redistribution of benefits among different groups."


Fortunately, China's government now recognizes the value of public transportation and has made it a long overdue priority. In 2005, six departments of the central government issued a joint document promoting BRT construction. Beijing's inaugural southern line has received a green light and strong government support ever since it was first proposed.


The Chinese public should recognise the relative freedom it enjoys in choosing from a variety of transportation modes. People will increasingly need to weigh their own comfort and privacy against the benefits of mobility and speed. "Beijing's BRT system gives attention to both fairness and efficiency for all," said He. "We have to guarantee the mobility of the city first, then consider how to assign the remaining resources to small cars."


Source: Worldwatch Institute/Global Environment Institute China Watch project

oneman28
16 Mar 06,, 03:36
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-03/15/content_4307232.htm


www.chinaview.cn 2006-03-15 21:57:15

BEIJING, March 15 (Xinhuanet) -- The added value of China's large-and medium-sized industrial enterprises recorded 16.2 percent year-on-year growth to 1111.3 billion yuan (139 billion U.S. dollars) in the first two months, said a monthly report of the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) on Wednesday.

The output value of the textile industry grew 15.3 percent and the raw chemical materials and chemical products rose 19.1 percent.

The output value of nonmetal mineral products and the smelting and pressing of ferrous metals grew 22 percent and 8.1 percent respectively during the January-February period this year.

Meanwhile, the general-purpose equipment manufacturing sector rose 21.2 percent and transport equipment manufacturing, 21.3 percent.

Communication equipment, computers and other electronic equipment production witnessed a year-on-year increase of 25.3 percent, and the power and heat production and supply sector rose 11.7 percent during the period.

In terms of products, the output of coal went up by 9.6 percent, electricity, up 2.5 percent and crude oil, up 11.2 percent.

The output of pig iron, crude steel and steel rose 19.9 percent, 16.8 percent and 21.3 percent, respectively, the NBS said.

Besides, the production of cement increased by 21.3 percent andthat of automobiles, 40.6 percent, with the output of sedan cars growing 83.1 percent.

The first two months of the year also witnessed a 24.2-percent growth in the value of goods for export delivered by large-and medium-sized enterprises, at 745.4 billion yuan (93 billion dollars).

The sales ratio of industrial goods dropped by 0.28 percentage points year-on-year to 96.99 percent.

Large-and medium-sized enterprises comprise all state-owned ones and non-state owned ones whose annual sales exceed 5 million yuan (625,000 dollars). Enditem

Neo
28 Mar 06,, 08:20
SHANGHAI (updated on: March 28, 2006, 11:27 PST): China has overtaken Japan as the world's largest holder of foreign exchange reserves with 853.7 billion dollars at the end of February, a state-run newspaper reported on Tuesday.

China's reserves rose a sharp 26.3 billion dollars in January to 845.2 billion dollars, then added another 8.5 billion dollars last month, the China Business News said.

Japan's reserves at end of February stood at 850.06 billion dollars, according to the Japanese finance ministry. The China Business News said the central bank had not yet verified the figures and the official report was expected to be released in April.

China's foreign exchange reserves have grown remarkably in recent years -- more than doubling from 403.3 billion dollars in 2003 -- thanks to strong fund inflows and a burgeoning trade surplus.

"The massive forex reserves have brought many advantages and at the same time it also means that the domestic economy continues to be imbalanced," the China Business News said.

Neo
26 May 06,, 18:20
China 2006 GDP growth forecast at 10 per cent



BEIJING: The Chinese economy is expected to race ahead at around 10 per cent average growth this year, the central bank said on Thursday, as regulators called for a clampdown on credit to the heated real estate sector. The People’s Bank of China forecast represents an average of economic growth rates across most of the country, it said on its website.

The government’s official target for national gross domestic product (GDP) growth in 2006 is a modest eight per cent, but China’s economy posted a 10.3 per cent expansion in the first quarter. The report also warned that overcapacity could impact industries this year, highlighting continued concerns in Beijing about overinvestment and the risk of sector-specific deflationary scenarios.

At the same time banking regulators added their official concerns about the level of surplus credit in the country’s fragile banking system that is still undergoing restructuring. Liu Mingkang, chairman of China Banking Regulatory Commission (CBRC), said China’s macro economy and financial sector were developing at a fast and stable rate, but more needed to be done to reel in the booming property sector.

“We need some strong action to maintain the banking industry’s stable momentum,” Liu said in the report posted on the commission’s website. New measures proposed included strict controls of new loans, curbing financing to property developers and stemming the issuance of credit lines to local governments.

Reducing banks’ non-performing loans, optimising lending structure, while increasing credit to small- and medium- enterprises were also cited. “Banks with capital adequacy ratios under the eight percent requirement should especially control the pace of their lending,” it said.

Premier Wen Jiabao last week called on regulators to use further tax, credit and land polices to bring high city property prices under control and address the “imbalanced” structure of the real estate sector.

The banking commission’s also said that lenders should priorities first-home buyers in their credit decisions and stay away from financing luxury housing projects.

A number of key state agencies last month jointly issued an order to commercial banks to curb their issuance of credit lines to local governments, warning that they could translate into higher and unsustainable rates of fixed-asset investment. China’s banks extended about 1.57 trillion yuan (196 billion dollars) in new loans in the first four months of this year - more than half the 2.5 trillion yuan target set for the year.

http://www.thenews.com.pk/daily_detail.asp?id=7910

Neo
27 May 06,, 09:44
China again urges efforts to close income gap



BEIJING: China again called on all sectors of society and government on Friday to work on closing the widening income gap, stressing the need for a just system of distributing wealth.

“We must place high importance on building a well-rounded and prosperous society,” Xinhua news agency said, quoting from the minutes of a meeting chaired by President Hu Jintao. Closing the widening income gap between the wealthy cities and poor countryside is one of the primary goals of the latest five-year economic plan which was unveiled in March. The report comes a week after a Chinese think-tank called for higher minimum wages to halt the emergence of a new urban underclass, as minimum wage rises did not match average urban income rises from 1994-2004.

China has no nationally prescribed minimum wage. It relies on provincial governments to set their own levels. The country has been relying on rapid urbanisation to lift millions out of poverty but some researchers say the hordes of people flocking from rural areas are becoming an underclass within the cities.

Beijing is alarmed by rising unrest in the countryside as property developers, often in cooperation with local governments, have seized land from poor farmers at cheap prices.

Tronic
27 May 06,, 15:31
I don't think this belongs in the South Asian section...