PDA

View Full Version : Hi, Guys.



AmericanMarine
27 Dec 05,, 05:18
Hi, sorry if I've got this in the wrong forum, first of all.

But this is AM's brother, or the 'civvy' as I see he calls me, lol. My name is Tommy. Well, im 17 and am strongly looking at a career in the military to follow my brothers. I had heard from several people that the Air Force was the best way to go for technical jobs, which is the kind of stuff im into. He had said that this was the best place to ask, you are all well-mannered. I would hit it on down to the recruiter's and ask, but i am tied up with school activities. Does anyone have any information they could provide me on any technical fields in the Air Force, and what the life is like, college money, requirements? Any help is appreciated. Thanks for your time.

-T

Shek
27 Dec 05,, 05:28
Hi, sorry if I've got this in the wrong forum, first of all.

But this is AM's brother, or the 'civvy' as I see he calls me, lol. My name is Tommy. Well, im 17 and am strongly looking at a career in the military to follow my brothers. I had heard from several people that the Air Force was the best way to go for technical jobs, which is the kind of stuff im into. He had said that this was the best place to ask, you are all well-mannered. I would hit it on down to the recruiter's and ask, but i am tied up with school activities. Does anyone have any information they could provide me on any technical fields in the Air Force, and what the life is like, college money, requirements? Any help is appreciated. Thanks for your time.

-T

T,
What are you looking at doing post-military, or do you want to make the military a career? Where do you think you would like to live? There are plently of contractor's jobs out there now, and where you are stationed can lead to a contractor's job there post-military.

As far as your brother's advice, I would second that the Air Force tends to have the highest quality of life. However, the other services also have some good opportunities and can provide a good fit depending on what you want to do. As far as college money, you should get the same GI Bill benefits, and depending on the state where you enlist from (your home of record), you may receive additional benefits from the state (for example, I'm from Illinois, and they will pay for 4 years of in-state tuition plus pay a small monthly stipend to veterans that separate from the military by a certain point in their career. As far as opportunities to get college credits while in service, you'll have that opportunity within all the services, although you will be limited in the # of "brand" name schools.

Post with some more questions that list some of your interests, and we should be able to narrow down your choices so you can visit some recruiters armed with knowledge, allowing you to get the best deal you can.

AmericanMarine
27 Dec 05,, 05:43
T,
What are you looking at doing post-military, or do you want to make the military a career? Where do you think you would like to live? There are plently of contractor's jobs out there now, and where you are stationed can lead to a contractor's job there post-military.

As far as your brother's advice, I would second that the Air Force tends to have the highest quality of life. However, the other services also have some good opportunities and can provide a good fit depending on what you want to do. As far as college money, you should get the same GI Bill benefits, and depending on the state where you enlist from (your home of record), you may receive additional benefits from the state (for example, I'm from Illinois, and they will pay for 4 years of in-state tuition plus pay a small monthly stipend to veterans that separate from the military by a certain point in their career. As far as opportunities to get college credits while in service, you'll have that opportunity within all the services, although you will be limited in the # of "brand" name schools.

Post with some more questions that list some of your interests, and we should be able to narrow down your choices so you can visit some recruiters armed with knowledge, allowing you to get the best deal you can.
Shek, thanks for a quick reply.

Honestly, I would be looking to turn this into a career, as both of my brothers plan to do. As far as where I end up, im not concerned. I spent a year out at 29 Palms, CA until they deployed, and I came back to Florida. I would like to consider myself as open to wherever said branch needs me placed.

As far as some questions, i dont have too many specific ones yet, but i can start.

-I am into security, systems administration, etc.
-I do plan to retire after 20 and maybe work CIA, DoD, FBI, etc.
-I have a perfectly clean record.
-Still thinking about college. Looking at benefits of a Degree on top of Military background.

Shek
27 Dec 05,, 06:02
Shek, thanks for a quick reply.

Honestly, I would be looking to turn this into a career, as both of my brothers plan to do. As far as where I end up, im not concerned. I spent a year out at 29 Palms, CA until they deployed, and I came back to Florida. I would like to consider myself as open to wherever said branch needs me placed.

As far as some questions, i dont have too many specific ones yet, but i can start.

-I am into security, systems administration, etc.
-I do plan to retire after 20 and maybe work CIA, DoD, FBI, etc.
-I have a perfectly clean record.
-Still thinking about college. Looking at benefits of a Degree on top of Military background.

If you want to work outside of the government/contractor's job after a career, the lack of a college degree will kill you. It's sad, but true - many corporations will look at a 1SG with 20 years experience or a CSM with 25-30 years experience and see a person without a college, notwithstanding the fact that these individuals are tremendously savvy and talented individuals, otherwise they would not have made it to the top of their profession. So, despite having more leadership experience and street smarts than any college graduate, their 20-30 years of military experience means jack in many cases. Maybe some of the others can comment, but from my limited experience, this has been the case.

If you want to go CIA specifically, the Marines are a great proving ground to get your foot in the door there. For the FBI, I'm not sure if there is a best military service. However, from what many soldiers have told me, their local law enforcement agencies prefer guys who have served in the combat arms - don't go MP if you want to do civilian law enforcement - they are not the same thing. For DoD, the quickest way to the top is through grad school, although military experience will go a long way in gaining credibility with uniformed members you will work with as well as to understanding the military culture. Get your security clearances while you are in service - having the clearance already in hand is a discriminating factor for many jobs, because that means the hiring agency doesn't have to worry about losing a person when their interim clearance goes belly up.

As far as getting your college degree while in service, it will certainly be harder in some services than others, especially depending on how often you deploy and the command environment. However, it is certainly doable in all the services if you want to do it. You will find that your classes are much easier to you than to many others because you will be more mature and organized, unlike many undergrad students.

Check out the board in a day or two. Bluesman is a Master Sergeant in the Air Force and can give you good info on the Air Force as well as from an enlisted perspective (I'm an officer type). There's also Sniper, who did one enlistment in the Army (I believe a four year enlistment, but he'll have to verify). Don't let my college talk scare you if owning your own business is your thing. Sniper's self-employed and doing just fine for himself. In the end, I think everyone will agree that your time in the military will be what you make of it, and if you put the effort in, you'll be a better person for it.