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Jay
01 Dec 05,, 18:32
http://images.akihabaranews.com/news_pics/10749/1.jpg

The first watch that uses flexible e-paper hits the stores
The Japanese company Seiko will release a limited edition of 500 units of their Spectrum SVRD001, the first watch in the world that uses flexible e-paper or Electrophoretic Display (EPD). The design of the watch is similar to a bracelet and the body is made of stainless steel and a black & white e-paper. The price of one of these 500 units is an extremely affordable 1900 EUR. It will weigh 134g and will be 37mm thick. It will be available worldwide in January 2006.

http://www.akihabaranews.com/en/news-10749-The+first+watch+that+uses+flexible+e-paper+hits+the+stores.html

giggs88
02 Dec 05,, 02:32
dayummmmnn....

Parihaka
02 Dec 05,, 02:41
oooooh, e-paper.... drools.....

Confed999
02 Dec 05,, 03:07
1900 EUR
Bite me, my cell phone has a clock for free... ;)

Samudra
02 Dec 05,, 03:34
HAH! I can find out the time by looking at the sun! :rolleyes:

Parihaka
02 Dec 05,, 03:49
HAH! I can find out the time by looking at the sun! :rolleyes:
What happens when it's dark?

Confed999
02 Dec 05,, 04:19
HAH! I can find out the time by looking at the sun! :rolleyes:
I can only tell two times that way, day time and night time. :tongue:

Leader
02 Dec 05,, 07:00
Bite me, my cell phone has a clock for free... ;)

Yeah I don't even wear a watch anymore.

Confed999
02 Dec 05,, 07:01
Yeah I don't even wear a watch anymore.
Every time I got electrocuted my watch quit working, so I just quit buying them.

Leader
02 Dec 05,, 07:07
Every time I got electrocuted my watch quit working, so I just quit buying them.
I actually have a nice one, but the battery went dead and I'm too lazy to fix it/get it fixed.

indianguy4u
02 Dec 05,, 17:23
The biggest joke on watch recently in India was a swiss [maybe swatch or some other Co.] brought a ltd edition watch for some 52 lakhs RS [120000 US$] & get a honda city free [18000 US$]. I just want to know will the buyer of such costly watch ride on such sheap car [in comparison]. He must be a owner of beemer or merc isnt it? Idiot are these marketing mgnrs :biggrin:.

THL
02 Dec 05,, 17:42
Every time I got electrocuted my watch quit working, so I just quit buying them.
Is this really a big problem for you - Getting electrocuted? I cannot even remember the last time I was electrocuted (probably that time I was on a date with Herman Munster). :tongue:

TopHatter
02 Dec 05,, 17:45
Is this really a big problem for you - Getting electrocuted? I cannot even remember the last time I was electrocuted (probably that time I was on a date with Herman Munster). :tongue:
You dated Fred Gwynne? :confused:

Neo
02 Dec 05,, 18:40
I can only tell two times that way, day time and night time. :tongue:
:biggrin:

THL
02 Dec 05,, 18:54
You dated Fred Gwynne? :confused:
Just someone that had a strong resemblence to him (in Herman Munster character) so that is how I referred to him.

Leader
02 Dec 05,, 19:10
Is this really a big problem for you - Getting electrocuted? I cannot even remember the last time I was electrocuted (probably that time I was on a date with Herman Munster). :tongue:
Well he is an electrician. I'm not sure if that makes it any better really.

THL
02 Dec 05,, 21:05
Well he is an electrician. I'm not sure if that makes it any better really.
It does, actually. Explains a lot. Much better than just being someone who gets happy over licking electrical outlets.

:tongue:

leib10
02 Dec 05,, 22:12
I'm fine with my Wal-Mart brand wris****ch, thank you very much.

Oh my god, the thing edited out twaat... :rolleyes:

Parihaka
02 Dec 05,, 23:06
It does, actually. Explains a lot. Much better than just being someone who gets happy over licking electrical outlets.

:tongue:
Still, an electrician who gets electrocuted all the time? Confed? :tongue:

THL
03 Dec 05,, 03:28
Still, an electrician who gets electrocuted all the time? Confed? :tongue:
No different than a secretary who gets paper cuts, a snake charmer who gets bit or a gym teacher who pulls a muscle, no?

:tongue:

Samudra
03 Dec 05,, 06:55
What happens when it's dark?

Then I look at the moon!

I cant afford this watch anyway...., the sun and moon shall tell me the time, they can keep their ultra modern so called watch unless they reduce the price. :mad: :tongue:

and if there is no Moon, I'll look at the stars.
No stars ? I'll ask my neighbour! :mad:

bull
03 Dec 05,, 07:08
what a piece!!!

THL
03 Dec 05,, 07:14
Then I look at the moon!

I cant afford this watch anyway...., the sun and moon shall tell me the time, they can keep their ultra modern so called watch unless they reduce the price. :mad: :tongue:

and if there is no Moon, I'll look at the stars.
No stars ? I'll ask my neighbour! :mad:
Sam, Don't tell me you have a sun-dial out in front of your house... :tongue:

Samudra
03 Dec 05,, 08:53
THL,
Thanks for the idea. ;)

Parihaka
03 Dec 05,, 11:20
personally I really couldn't give a monkeys about the watch, during the week I have a least 5 people constantly reminding me of the time, but the e-paper.... Ohhhhhhh....... e-paper...... drools...... me want. me want now.

Kid<2>Nite
03 Dec 05,, 11:32
The first watch that uses flexible e-paper hits the stores
The Japanese company Seiko will release a limited edition of 500 units of their Spectrum SVRD001, the first watch in the world that uses flexible e-paper or Electrophoretic Display (EPD). The design of the watch is similar to a bracelet and the body is made of stainless steel and a black & white e-paper
================================================== ==

I'm still trying to find a buyer for my pet rock. :rolleyes:

I don’t do baubles; I put my ornaments on the Christmas tree

THL
03 Dec 05,, 16:04
but the e-paper.... Ohhhhhhh....... e-paper...... drools...... me want. me want now.
Can someone explain to my non-technical mind what exactly e-paper is?

and btw, I think the watch is ugly anyway.

Parihaka
04 Dec 05,, 07:55
Can someone explain to my non-technical mind what exactly e-paper is?

and btw, I think the watch is ugly anyway.
Take an LED display such as is currently coming out as computer monitors and tv sets. Make the resolution much better. (not yet achieved but will be within the next six months) take that LED display and make it as thin as a sheet of paper. Build a computer into it that is part of the thickness of paper. Also make it flexible (as in you can fold it up) and make it shape remembering. (it doesn't crease and lays itself flat when you put it on the table.)
Want to read the paper? Call up the Boston Snitchet on-line (it is of course wireless) and away you go.
Want to send an email? It is of course a touchscreen so you don't need a keyboard, though a pen (as in pen and tablet) is recommended.
Want to watch TV? Dial up your favourite channel and blue tack it to the wall. (yes, vibrating crystals do provide nice sound).
Gone out in the sun without a hat? Fold it up the way you used to make pirate hats when you were a child but get it to play mp3s to you at the same time. (if you have really bad taste you could get it to play those skin colour themes that real player et al do in time to the music)
All of the components are there, nobody is putting it together yet but they will soon, bless them. E-paper. It already has its own name.

In other words, in about five years imagine everything you have in your computer being only the 2 dimensional screen surface you see in front of you, with all the hard lumpy bits gone.

THL
04 Dec 05,, 08:34
All of the components are there, nobody is putting it together yet but they will soon, bless them. E-paper. It already has its own name.

In other words, in about five years imagine everything you have in your computer being only the 2 dimensional screen surface you see in front of you, with all the hard lumpy bits gone.
So it is technology, but paper thin? I was thinking it was actual paper. I think I get it now. I think.

Thanks much! :)

Parihaka
04 Dec 05,, 10:47
So it is technology, but paper thin?Yes
I was thinking it was actual paper. I think I get it now. I think.
It will replace paper. On casual inspection It can look and act like paper if you want it to.

Thanks much! :) A pleasure.

Confed999
09 Dec 05,, 00:37
Is this really a big problem for you - Getting electrocuted?

Still, an electrician who gets electrocuted all the time? Confed? :tongue:
I get hit at least twice a month. Often there are things that cannot be shut down for any reason, police switchboards come to mind. Also, it is really really hard to figure out why something does not work, if it's turned off. ;)
You guys ever play that game "Operation"? People who are good at it, make good electricians for obvious reasons. But in the end, no matter how good you are at it, the little guys nose is going to light up and buzz now and then.

Jay
09 Dec 05,, 01:37
I guess more are confused about epaper..and Parihaka has explained it well.

Some more explanation...

In a step toward electronic newspapers and wearable computer screens, scientists have created an ultra-thin screen that can be bent, twisted and even rolled up and still display crisp text.

The material, only as thick as three human hairs, displays black text on a whitish-gray background with a resolution similar to that of a typical laptop computer screen.

The screen is so flexible it can be rolled into a cylinder about a half-inch wide without losing its image quality.

Although it's not quite the dream of single-sheet, electronic newspapers or books that can display hundreds of pages of text, its creators said it's the first flexible computer screen of its kind.

"I think it's a major step forward. We have cleared a big obstacle in electronic paper development," said Yu Chen, a research scientist with E Ink of Cambridge, Massachusetts.

E Ink is one of several companies working to develop electronic "paper" for e-newspapers and e-books, and other possible applications -- even clothing with computer screens sewn into it.

The new screen is described in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

Aris Silzars, the past president of the San Jose, California-based Society for Information Display, said one of the technology's first applications could be something like an electronic tablet lawyers could use in place of bulky laptops.

But Silzars said the best uses of the new screen, which E Ink is still developing, may not be evident. "It's very hard to predict where this thing may go," he said.

Chen and his co-workers made the 3-inch-wide display screen flexible by developing a stainless steel foil topped with a thin layer of circuits that control an overlying film of electronic ink.

The "ink," developed in 1997 by a Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientist, contains tiny capsules with black and white particles with opposing electrical charges floating in a clear fluid.

When a negative voltage is run through circuits behind these capsules, the positive white particles move to the capsule's top. A positive current does the same to the negative black particles.

The human eye blends these resulting patterns of black- or white-topped capsules into text displayed in a traditional column.

Currently, information and power is fed to the screen through a wired hookup. But Chen's team is working on a self-contained system that could receive data through a wireless connection.

They also hope to boost the speed at which the screen switches to a new "page" of text, from the current quarter of a second to at least 10 times as fast, so it can display video.

Another goal is making the screen display a full range of colors.

Robert Wisnieff, senior manager of IBM's Advanced Display Technology Laboratory in Yorktown Heights, New York, said E Ink's flexible screen is something many futurists believe is crucial to making electronic screens part of every day life.

He envisions such lightweight, thin screens being used for a credit card that could display the available balance or recent purchases.

Another possible use is a jacket with a screen sewn into its sleeve to allow its wearer to read e-mail while on the run, check stock prices or access maps in an unfamiliar city.

"This is a peek at the future," Wisnieff said.

http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,1282,58765,00.html

http://www.technovelgy.com/graphics/content/epaper-diagram.gif

Some more pics..

http://www.thegreenhead.com/technology/images/seiko-epaper-watch.jpg

http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/3103/1299/1600/epaper.jpg

http://www.admiroutes.asso.fr/larevue/2003/44/epaper.jpg

Samudra
09 Dec 05,, 06:21
Wow.

Jay
10 Dec 05,, 00:51
ok, these Japs are amazing..now theyve come up with paper sized batteries :eek:


NEC has debuted some ultra-thin and flexible quick charging batteries named ORB, for Organic Radical Battery. We’re having a hard time deciding what is the coolest part about these; their 0.3mm thickness that allows them to be flexible, or the fact that they can be recharged in about 30 seconds. The organic radical materials inside the battery are in an “electrolyte-permeated gel state,” which is supposedly about halfway between a solid and a liquid. This helps ions make a smooth move (no, the other one), reducing resistance, allowing the batteries to charge faster. 1 square centimeter will give you about 1 miliwatt hour. That’s not enough to power your laptop, but according to NEC, one recharge of this battery allows an active RFID tag to transmit tens of thousands of signals. NEC plans on further developing the technology so it can one day be used in IC cards, RFID tags, electronic paper, wearable computers, and other such technologies stepping up to the plate in the coming decade.

http://www.engadget.com/entry/1234000633071576/

http://www.nec.co.jp/press/en/0512/0701.html

http://img.engadget.com/common/images/3060000000057291.JPG?0.09197331266146513

Parihaka
10 Dec 05,, 01:34
ok, these Japs are amazing..now theyve come up with paper sized batteries :eek:


NEC has debuted some ultra-thin and flexible quick charging batteries named ORB, for Organic Radical Battery. We’re having a hard time deciding what is the coolest part about these; their 0.3mm thickness that allows them to be flexible, or the fact that they can be recharged in about 30 seconds. The organic radical materials inside the battery are in an “electrolyte-permeated gel state,” which is supposedly about halfway between a solid and a liquid. This helps ions make a smooth move (no, the other one), reducing resistance, allowing the batteries to charge faster. 1 square centimeter will give you about 1 miliwatt hour. That’s not enough to power your laptop, but according to NEC, one recharge of this battery allows an active RFID tag to transmit tens of thousands of signals. NEC plans on further developing the technology so it can one day be used in IC cards, RFID tags, electronic paper, wearable computers, and other such technologies stepping up to the plate in the coming decade.

http://www.engadget.com/entry/1234000633071576/

http://www.nec.co.jp/press/en/0512/0701.html

http://img.engadget.com/common/images/3060000000057291.JPG?0.09197331266146513
If you look closely you'll see they've incorporated it in the schematic you posted above. One decade they reckon. SPLENDID.