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Dreadnought
15 Nov 05,, 17:10
An interesting page that depicts designs for Battleships, Carriers and Battlecruisers the U.S. had in mind 1928-1948 but never built.

http://wolfsshipyard.mystarship.com/Misc/NeverWeres/united.htm

At the bottom of the page if you click "back" It will take you to
a page of drawings and links based on "never were" designs
for a few countries and some good links for drawings.

Horrido
16 Nov 05,, 00:03
A truly awesome website, and immediately added to my "Favorites" list. Thank you!

Dreadnought
16 Nov 05,, 06:34
A truly awesome website, and immediately added to my "Favorites" list. Thank you!

Not a problem :)

sparten
17 Nov 05,, 16:11
did you see the sextepulete Turret design :eek: :eek: !
Would that even be possible?, somebody in the know, an engineer for instance (OOE!!!) plese elaborate.

Look at the original designs for the North Carolina, 14"'s eh? Well she would have been just like the KGVs then (an additional couple of guns not withstanding)). Wonder how that would have effected Washington at Guadacanal? Though since she was at point blank range probably not much.

Intesting to see the "cruiser killer" Iowa design. Iowa's hull shape is esentially that of a cruiser, so is it really a battlship in the proper sence of the word.

Dreadnought
17 Nov 05,, 18:54
did you see the sextepulete Turret design :eek: :eek: !
Would that even be possible?, somebody in the know, an engineer for instance (OOE!!!) plese elaborate.

Look at the original designs for the North Carolina, 14"'s eh? Well she would have been just like the KGVs then (an additional couple of guns not withstanding)). Wonder how that would have effected Washington at Guadacanal? Though since she was at point blank range probably not much.

Intesting to see the "cruiser killer" Iowa design. Iowa's hull shape is esentially that of a cruiser, so is it really a battlship in the proper sence of the word.

According to Iowa's design criteria she represented a cross between battleship and battle cruiser combining superior armor, extrordinary firepower with accuracy and high speed. The U.S. recognized its aging fleet and ordered the four Iowa class battleships pre Pearl Harbor in 1939. They would not join the fleet until mid 1943. As you may notice her max beam is not amid ship as normal it is slightly aft.
This gives way to her bow and explains how they achieved such a speed.

sparten
17 Nov 05,, 19:49
This gives way to her bow and explains how they achieved such a speed
There have been occasion when I have looked at a pic of an Iowa from a weird angle and having no size reference, thought, cruiser. Wonder if any Japanese Sub skipper ever make that mistake? :confused:

TopHatter
18 Nov 05,, 03:18
There have been occasion when I have looked at a pic of an Iowa from a weird angle and having no size reference, thought, cruiser. Wonder if any Japanese Sub skipper ever make that mistake? :confused:
Umm....I suppose anything is possible. Bear in mind that, even without a size reference, even a semi-experienced sub skipper would look through his periscope reticle at an Iowa and know this was, at the very least, an enemy battlecruiser, if not a full blown dreadnought.

sparten
18 Nov 05,, 05:41
Umm....I suppose anything is possible. Bear in mind that, even without a size reference, even a semi-experienced sub skipper would look through his periscope reticle at an Iowa and know this was, at the very least, an enemy battlecruiser, if not a full blown dreadnought.
Wrong identification is all too common. Remember the Rueben James, the guy thought he was looking at a merchantman. Even today I have read of exercizes where a sub captains mistook one ship type for another.

Listen, if he saw her out on her own, like say the Indianapolis, then the point is moot, he will open fire, but say during a battle he might say, "I think thats a cruiser, no find a BB or a CV". Camoflauge did not exactly make life easier.

Dreadnought
18 Nov 05,, 16:24
Wrong identification is all too common. Remember the Rueben James, the guy thought he was looking at a merchantman. Even today I have read of exercizes where a sub captains mistook one ship type for another.

Listen, if he saw her out on her own, like say the Indianapolis, then the point is moot, he will open fire, but say during a battle he might say, "I think thats a cruiser, no find a BB or a CV". Camoflauge did not exactly make life easier.

All to true I believe three of the Iowas carried camo throughout the war years Iowa, Missouri and New Jersey. I couldnt find any images of Wissconsin with a camo pattern but this is one the three all used at one point another factor on them was their cruiser stern instead of the classic battleship stem stern

smilingassassin
18 Nov 05,, 16:37
Wolfs shipyard is hosted by a gentleman named David aka CanisD.

He is part of a naval web simulation called Wesworld

http://www.wesworld.jk-clan.de/main.php?sid=f594c091849c84771c61af20feb9db96

There are more drawings of various ships from real and fictional country's.

Dreadnought
18 Nov 05,, 16:38
Wolfs shipyard is hosted by a gentleman named Davis aka CanisD.

He is part of a naval web simulation called Wesworld


http://www.wesworld.jk-clan.de/main.php?sid=f594c091849c84771c61af20feb9db96

He has a really cool site :)

smilingassassin
18 Nov 05,, 16:40
Fixed the link by the way, check our site out!

The Chap
14 Dec 05,, 08:37
Many thanks for the heads up.

Does any-one recall that many moons ago, when WAB was little more than a glint in the milkmans eye, I mentioned that some buddies had purchased a PS2 for my birthday along with a title "Naval ops. Commander"? Sorry to re-hash, but you can design your own ships and then go thrash it out!

That done... everyone should at least have a peek at the wonderful renditions on the page. :)

RustyBattleship
14 Jan 06,, 05:30
Whether by design or by accident, the Iowa class Battleships look smaller than they really are. Or rather, a land-based OP may estimate their distance further away than they really are. Therefore the first rounds from shore batteries would be "over". By the time they get "under" may be too late since a 16"/50 can be loaded in 30 seconds (with crew already at GQ).

This was most noticable when I took some family and guests out for a family day sea trial on the New Jersey. As we are walking down the pier, she doesn't look very big at all. But as soon as you step off the brow onto the main deck, it's "Gawd this thing is big".

While I was still in High School, my step-father worked at the shipyard and took the family down for an open house. The Wisconsin was in and that was the first active Navy ship I ever boarded (besides some museum demos in Milwaukee). I wish I saved the handouts that we were given as we boarded. I remember distinctly that they discribed the Battleships as "Super Cruisers" because of the Cruiser proportioned hull and the high speed and manueverability.

I must have been born for those ships. Thirty years later I was in charge of their structural modifications for modernization and reactivation.

Yes, the picture in the upper left is yours truly in 1982 aboard New Jersey as she was returning from a gunnery trial.

Defcon 6
18 Jan 06,, 03:21
Many thanks for the heads up.

Does any-one recall that many moons ago, when WAB was little more than a glint in the milkmans eye, I mentioned that some buddies had purchased a PS2 for my birthday along with a title "Naval ops. Commander"? Sorry to re-hash, but you can design your own ships and then go thrash it out!

That done... everyone should at least have a peek at the wonderful renditions on the page. :)

What page is it on?