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sparten
25 Aug 05,, 16:24
800,000–1,600,000 - Battle of Stalingrad (1942–1943)
670,000–1,500,000 - Siege of Leningrad (1941–1944)
700,000 - Battle of Moscow (1941–1942)
400,000–680,000 - Battle of Kiev (1941)
500,000 - Battle of Smolensk (1941)
370,000 - Battle of Voronezh (1942)
370,000 - Battle of Belarus (1941)
175,000–350,000 - Operation Bagration (1944)
230,000–350,000 - Battle of Kursk (1943)
300,000 - Battle of the Somme (1916)
270,000 - Second Rzhev-Sychevka Offensive (1942)
270,000 - Battle of West Ukraine (1944)
260,000 - Battle of Verdun (1916)
260,000 - Battle of the Caucasus (1942)
165,000–300,000 Battle of Chalons (451)
230,000 - Battle of Berlin (1945)
200,000 - Siege of Tenochtitlan (1520–1521)
190,000 - Battle of West Ukraine (1941)
180,000 - Battle of France (1940)
170,000 - Battle of the Lower Dnieper (1943)
170,000 - Battle of Kφnigsberg (1945)
150,000 - Battle of Rostov (1941)
150,000 - Battle of Okinawa (1945)
150,000 - Battle of Passchendaele (1917)
132,000 - Battle of Normandy (1944)
130,000 - Battle of Gallipoli (1916)
130,000 - Battle of Budapest (1945)
125,000 - Third Battle of Nanking (1864)
125,000 - Battle of Lemberg (1914)
115,000 - Battle of the Frontiers (1914)
100,000 - Battle of Chernikov-Poltava (1943)
100,000 - Battle of Smolensk (1943)
90,000 - Battle of the Aisne (1917)
83,000 - Battle of the Baltic (1941)
80,000 - Battle of the Somme (1918)
80,000 - Battle of the Marne (1918)
74,000 - Battle of Polyarnoe-Karelia (1941)
72,000+ - Battle of Belgorod (1943)
70,000 - Second Battle of the Atlantic (1939–1945)
70,000 - Second Battle of Anchialus (917)
69,000 - Battle of Leyte (1944)
66,000 - Battle of Donbass (1943)
56,000–66,000 - Battle of Cannae (216 BC)
65,000 - Battle of Lvov-Sandomir (1944)
64,000 - Battle of the Aisne (1918)
62,000 - Battle of Artois (1915)
61,000 - Battle of the Baltic (1944)
60,000 - Battle of Basra (1985–1988)
60,000 - Battle of Monte Cassino (1944)
60,000 - Battle of Arras (1917)
60,000 - First Battle of Ypres (1914)
60,000 - Battle of Champagne (1915)
40,000–56,000 - Tet Offensive (1968)
55,000 - Korsun Pocket (1944)
55,000 - Battle of Voronezh (1943)
50,000 - Meuse-Argonne offensive (1918)
50,000 - Eleventh Battle of the Isonzo (1917)
50,000 - Battle of Hsuchow (1927)
30,000–50,000 - Battle of Naissus (268)
45,000 - Fourth Battle of Kharkov (1943)
44,000 - Battle of the Crimea (1944)
42,000 - Battle of the Seelow Heights (1945)
40,000 - Battle of Imphal (1944)
38,000 - Battle of the Bulge (1944–1945)
37,000 - Battle of Tannenberg (1914)
36,500 - Battle of the Ebro (1938)
35,000 - Battle of Mukden (1905)
30,300–34,000 - Battle of Thermopylae (480 BC)
32,000 - Battle of Lepanto (1571)
31,000 - Battle of Thapsus (46 BC)
31,000 - Battle of Taierzhuang (1937)
30,000 - Battle of Saipan (1944)
30,000 - Battle of Konotop (1659)
30,000 - Battle of Marignan (1515)
30,000 - Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (9)
20,000–30,000 - Battle of Munda (45 BC)
29,000 - Battle of Iwo Jima (1945)
25,000 - Battle of Pydna (168 BC)
26,000 - Katyn Massacre (1940)
22,500 - Battle of Leipzig (1813)
20,000 - Battle of the Trebia (218 BC)
18,500 - Battle of Borodino (1812)
16,500 - Battle of Halhin Gol (1939)
15,000 - Battle of Waterloo (1815)
15,000 - Battle of Lake Trasimene (217 BC)
11,000 - Battle of Heraclea (180 BC)
11,000 - Siege of Petersburg, Virginia (1864–1865)
7,000–11,000 - Battle of Pharsalus (48 BC)
10,500 - Battle of Asculum (279 BC)
10,360 - Battle of Mons Graupius (83 or 84)
10,000 - Battle of the Metaurus (207 BC)
10,000 - Battle of Celaya (1913)
8,700 - Battle of Cynoscephalae (197 BC)
7,058 - Battle of Gettysburg (1863)
6,592 - Battle of Marathon (490 BC)
5,350+ - Battle of Suomussalmi (1939–1940)
5,000+ - Battle of Dara (530)
5,000+ - Battle of Dyrrhachium (1081)
4,808 - Battle of Antietam (1862)
4,360 - Battle of Chickamauga (1863)
4,329 - Battle of Isandlwana (1879)
4,175 - Battle of Leuthen (1757)
3,477 - Battle of Shiloh (1862)
3,205 - Second Battle of Bull Run (1862)
200–2,850 - Battle for Fallujah (November 8–November 14, 2004)
2,800 - Battle of Midway (1942)
2,400 - La Noche Triste (1520)
2,000+ - Battle of Manzikert (1071)
1,705 - Battle of Cold Harbor (June 1-3, 1864)
1,700 - Battle of Vicksburg (1863)
1,000+ - Battle of Dyrrhachium (48 BC)
868 - First Battle of Bull Run (July 21, 1861)
622 - Jamestown Massacre (1622)
567 - Battle of Rorke's Drift (1879)
495 - Battle of Monongahela (1755)
383 - Battle of the Alamo (1836)
366 - Battle of Bunker Hill (1775)
350 - Battle of Spion Kop (1900)
302 - Battle of Little Bighorn (1876)


If you will notice the most bloodiest seem to be from the Eastern Front.

Dreadnought
25 Aug 05,, 17:44
Wow look at those numbers and to think as humans we still havent learned :frown:

sparten
25 Aug 05,, 18:15
A nuclear war will make those numbers seem meaningless.

lwarmonger
26 Aug 05,, 04:42
A nuclear war will make those numbers seem meaningless.

Very true.

I think that the battle of Chalons should be taken off the list though. From everything I've read regarding the fall of the Roman Empire, most of the "hundreds of thousands" given for various sides were simply exaggeration. By 451 Rome was incapable of fielding large armies (like over 30,000), and most of the barbarian hordes didn't really number more than 100000 in their entirety, much less in terms of warriors. Even assuming that the Huns had a number of their vassal peoples (Germans, mostly), it is doubtful they and the Romans could have raised an army the size of the reported casualties... much less suffered that many.

Same holds true for the Siege of Tenochtitlan. The estimates I've heard have put Tenochtitlan's population at around 100,000. Even assuming bringing in other warriors and Spanish native allies, that is quite a stretch.

Officer of Engineers
26 Aug 05,, 04:51
Alot of battles didn't make the list. Vimy Ridge, Oratona, Dieppe, Canae, Carthage, Baghdad, Jerusalem, anything by old Genghis or Tammerlane.

leib10
26 Aug 05,, 05:31
Notice how many took place on the Eastern Front.

sparten
26 Aug 05,, 06:59
Alot of battles didn't make the list. Vimy Ridge, Oratona, Dieppe, Canae, Carthage, Baghdad, Jerusalem, anything by old Genghis or Tammerlane.

Here you go sir. some of them at least

30,000,000–60,000,000 - Mongol Conquests (13th century)
33,000,000–36,000,000 - An Lushan Rebellion (756–763)
25,000,000–Manchu Conquest of Ming China (1616–1644)
17,000,000 - Timur Lenk's conquests (1370–1405)
3,000,000–8,000,000 - Thirty Years War (1618–1648)

250,000–800,000 - Sack of Baghdad by Hulagu Khan (1258)
50,000–350,000 - Rape of Nanking, China (1937)
60,000–100,000 - Sack of Jerusalem, First Crusade (1099)
70,000 - Sack of Merv by Genghis Khan (1221)
70,000 - St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre (France, 1572)
30,000–40,000 - massacred in Novgorod by Ivan the Terrible
25,000 - Sack of Magdeburg (Thirty Years War, Germany, 1631)
20,000 - Sack of Baghdad by Timur (1401)

As for Dieppe, I think you would have better sources than I.

Baghdad's been sacked, twice

Maybe you should show these figures to the anti-war lobby.

Praxus
28 Aug 05,, 22:58
All three battles against Persia by Alexander should be on the list, as well as the Battle of Platea, the Battle of Salamis, the Battle of Zama, Utica(more of a Massacre then a battle), et al. Not to mention numerous other battles in the 2nd Punic War alone.

For the time, these battles were absolutely massive. This is a time when the whole population of the earth was around 500 million (or less).

canadian boy
15 Dec 05,, 04:56
here's another war list for you

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_toll

it includes many types of distasters as well

The Chap
12 Feb 06,, 04:18
Lepanto:

Largest material naval loss in numbers ever. In toto. :)

Addition:

"Battles" and "conflicts" seem to be muddled (sorry).

Thence; the tai'ping rebellion ( one incident noted above ). Altogether 30,000,000

Min. :frown:

Dreadnought
13 Feb 06,, 16:48
The Bulge must be right up there with the rest. :redface:

The Chap
14 Feb 06,, 08:06
If we were to consider "class war" and/or the entire Marxist +spawn varients part of all of this then all mutations of communism (including the proto-moaist tai'ping jobby) , Then the ongoing war between the working class and their capitalist slave masters seems to take the Grand Prix.

To save any bother regarding defs:

Working Class = anyone who works for a wage
Capitalist = anyone who controls financial and therefore fiduciary power over erm, presumably the former.

Well I work (as infrequently as pos.) and I own stocks etc. Anyone with a pension fund has/does.

So why is China smiling now alongside Vietnam (would add Russia but smiling is a cultural taboo) vs Cuba where as I have stated before they smile for the camera but in private ... :frown:

ASG
26 Jun 06,, 18:24
ANcient & medieval battles:

Battle of Catalunia, between The Huns & The Romans.

leib10
26 Jun 06,, 18:42
IIRC, the United States suffered more casualties (KIA, wounded, and captured) during the Battle of the Bulge than any other battle we've engaged in (except for Civil War battles, which don't really count).

sparten
26 Jun 06,, 19:34
I think the whole Okinawa Campaign exceeded that.

gunnut
27 Jun 06,, 00:26
Are these "battles" or are they more like "campaigns?"

Stalingrad and Leningrad were more like campaigns in that they took so long.

If I remember correctly, Somme was much shorter. So by the average death count per day, Somme should be much closer to the top of the list.

And how much can we be sure of the numbers from antiquity? Things could have been exaggerated or records were poorly kept and someone decided to make up a number.

sparten
27 Jun 06,, 05:43
Thats true. Certainly the Greco-Persian Wars and their casualty rates are to put it bluntly, wrong.

xerxes
26 Jan 07,, 02:57
On the subject of the Greco-Persian wars do we have any sources that are other than Greeks??

sparten
26 Jan 07,, 05:19
On the subject of the Greco-Persian wars do we have any sources that are other than Greeks??

Well we have Hellenistic sources, who would have had acsess to Persian sources.

xerxes
26 Jan 07,, 07:05
One of the most credible source in my mind is the great historian Edward gibbons. I finished reading all this six volumes and i can tell you that eventhough he lived long time ago during colonial age his view is extremely unbiased and non-racist. In his books he goes over the fall of the roman empire from Marcus Aurelias to the fall of Constantinople to Mahmut the Second in 1453. I have notice that in his books as he goes through the ages he always compare the size of invading army to the number of the invading macedonian army during Alexander the Great.

For example, he compares the 100,000 crusader army sent to conquer jersulem (a single city) to the 30,000 macedonian under Alexander that conquered the empire of Darius III. He does that occaisonnaly with Julien - Caesar of Rome and others. Julien with an army of 70,000 Romans did not achieve what aimed for and infact he himseld died.

Now personnaly I always questioned the Hellenistic figure that was given to the Persian armies and the macedonian forces. It is clear that the persian army was much larger. However, numbering an army in millions in shear delusional fantasy. I believe it was not till the invasion of Napoleon in 1812 when such large expedition - 650,000-men - were possible and even controlling that was a disatrous before the invention of wireless communication. Only after the use of wireless communication, did the size of the armies increased close to over a million. I could be wrong ...

my point is that there a huge exageration from the Greeks about the subject of Persian wars.

durtyburd
27 Jan 07,, 08:31
The Battle of Navas de Tolosa (July 16, 1212)-about 100,000 killed.

I think it's kind of messed up to overlook Navas de Tolosa.

MarquezRazor
27 Jan 07,, 10:26
How authentic are those figures for the battles which took place very long time ago like Tamerlane,Alexander etc.

Shipwreck
27 Jan 07,, 11:47
Battle of the Somme, July-November 1916 : 145,000 MIA/KIA for the Allies, 165,000 MIA/KIA for the Germans.

deadkenny
27 Jan 07,, 16:26
Of course it comes down to how you define 'bloody' (i.e. is it total casualties? relative losses or some combination of the two?) and 'battle' (an entire extended campaign? or a more limited 'event'). Of course, anything that involved what is considered a prolonged continous 'battle' (e.g. Verdun) would tend to be high on the list. Such being fought in an urban area (e.g. Stalingrad) would necessarily add to the carnage.

neilmpenny
28 Jan 07,, 02:23
Notice how many took place on the Eastern Front.

In the course of 1,320 days of active military operations (93 percent of the entire wartime period) the Red Army destroyed or disabled 506.5 German divisions in the east, while Germany's sullen satellites lost a further 100 divisions as the price of participating in the war against the Soviet Union. Out of the grand total Germany's losses of 13,600,000 killed, wounded, missing and made prisoner, Soviet military statisticians rekon that no less than 10,000,000 met a grim fate on the Eastern Front.

The Road To Berlin. John Erickson.

Btw, the number of weapons both created for this campaign and ulimately destroyed is pretty impressive.

zraver
28 Jan 07,, 16:45
Ceaser Augustus defeat of mark Atony's fleet at Actium Antony lost 220 quinquiremes each wih 500 men 110,000 men killed or captured in a single day and becuase mark Antony's retreat cause dhis land based army to defect it in effect ended the last vestiges of the Roman Republic and Egyptian Pharohonic rule.

xerxes
28 Jan 07,, 22:24
I guess Battle of Somme and Verdun are very decisive in a way because their outcome sealed the fate of the British and the French in the begening of the next war

Blackleaf
17 Oct 07,, 21:33
Here's another list from Wikipedia:

The following is a list of the most lethal battles in world history. This list will include both sieges (not technically battles but usually yielding similar combat-related deaths) and civilian deaths during the battles.

These refer to battles in which armies met on a single field of battle and fought, generally for one to several days. With more advanced weapons, military formations lost their impact and this type of battle died out in favor of grander military operations. As a general rule, this happened in the late 19th / early 20th century. The last war to have been fought on a battle-by-battle as opposed to campaign basis is generally held to be the Second Boer War between Britain and the South African Republic (1899-1902).

Many of these battles are ancient, and in many cases, the few historical records differ, sometimes wildly, on casualties. The figures used are what the contributors believe to be the most plausible compromise estimate.

Top 15 bloodiest battles

1) Battle of Yarmouk (Muslim conquest of Syria) - 120,000 casualties - 636AD
2) Battle of Las Navas de Talosa (Reconquista) - 102,000 casualties - 1212
3) Battle of Canae (Second Punic War) - 92,000 casualties - 216BC
4) Battle of Salsu (Goguryeo-Sui Wars) - 80,000 casualties - 612AD
5) Battle of Arausia (Cimbrian War) - 80,000 casualties - 105BC
6) Battle of Wagram (Napoleonic Wars) - 79,000 casualities - 1809
7) Battle of Plataea (Greco-Persian Wars) - 77,000 casualties - 479BC
8) Third Battle of Panipat (Imperial Maratha Conquests) - 75,000 casualties - 1761
9) Battle of Ullais (Muslim conquest of Persia) - 71,000 casualties - 633BC
10) Battle of Alba (Ottoman wars) - 70,000 casualties - 1476
11) Battle of Guandu (Three Kingdoms) - 70,000 casualties - 200BC
12) Battle of Pliska (Byzantine-Bulgarian Wars) - 70,000 casualties - 61AD
13) Battle of Watling Street (British warrior queen Boudicca takes on Roman Empire) - 70,000 casualties - 61AD
14) Battle of Siffin (First Islamic War) - 70,000 casualties - 657
15) Battle of Anchialus (Byzantine-Bulgarian Wars) - 70,000 casualties - 917

Canmoore
22 Oct 07,, 03:12
The early days of the First World War, are by far the most bloodiest in human history. Old military tactics met Modern Tactics.. thousands of men would be killed within hours.. the fields of France became the worst meat grinder the world ever seen, and perhaps will ever see again.

Blackleaf
06 Mar 08,, 18:43
I'm surpised the Battle of Towton isn't on the list of bloodiest battles.

This battle took place on 29th March 1461 between the House of York and the House of Lancaster (two main houses of the Plantagenet Royal Dynasty) during the Wars of the Roses.

It is the bloodiest battle ever to have taken place on British soil.

As many as 32,000 people may have perished, which would put the Battle of Towton between the Battle of Mukden (1905) and the Battle of Thermopylae (480 BC) in that large list at the beginning of this thread. Roughly 1% of the entire British population died at that battle.


Here's the story of the Battle of Towton...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/80/Roses-York_victory.svg/300px-Roses-York_victory.svg.png
House of York (white rose) VS House of Lancaster (red rose)



Commanders:
Yorkists - King Edward IV (who, along with Henry VI, is the only English monarch to have reigned more than once)
Lancastrians - Henry Beaufort, 3rd Duke of Somerset

Strength:
Yorkists - 20,000-36,000
Lancastrians - 25,000-42,000

Casualties and Losses
Yorkists - 5,000-12,000
Lancastrians - 8,000-20,000

Result: A decisive Yorkist victory.

The Battle of Towton in the Wars of the Roses was the largest and bloodiest ever fought on British soil.

Roughly 1% of the entire English population at the time died at Towton (1 in every 100). The battle took place on a snowy 29 March 1461 (Palm Sunday) on a plateau between the villages of Towton and Saxton in Yorkshire (about 12 miles southwest of York and about 2 miles south of Tadcaster).

It is thought that 50,000, or perhaps even 100,000 men fought, including 28 Lords (almost half the peerage), mainly on the Lancastrian side. The numbers often given are 42,000 for the Lancastrians and 36,000 for the Yorkists.

Part of the reason that so many died is because both sides resolved that no quarter would be given.


How did the Wars of the Roses start?

http://www.weaponrystore.com/acatalog/images/tow-30.jpg
With the wind and driving snow at their backs, the Yorkist archers shoot their final deadly volleys of armour piercing arrows into the advancing Lancastrian army while Edward IV and his knights and men-at-arms move through the ranks to meet their oncoming foe.


The Wars of the Roses first broke out in 1455, between the supporters of King Henry VI (the Lancastrians), and those of Richard, Duke of York (the Yorkists), who was out of favor with the court and had been seeking a role in government for the preceding five years. Henry, who had been an infant upon ascending the throne, placed all his reliance in his majority on a clique of nobles, leading to severe inequity of government even by the standards of the age. He was also afflicted by bouts of insanity. His Queen, Margaret of Anjou became the most determined opponent of York and anyone else who threatened the birthright of her son, the infant Edward of Westminster.

In the year 1460, the war intensified, and there were several rapid reversals of fortune. At the Battle of Northampton, Henry had been captured. In the aftermath, Richard had attempted to gain the throne, but his supporters were not prepared to take this step, and instead they enforced the Act of Accord, by which Henry's son was disinherited, and Richard would become King on Henry's death. In response, Margaret began gathering an army of York's opponents in the north of England. York took an army to the north to deal with this threat, but fatally misjudged the strength of his enemies. At the Battle of Wakefield he was killed and his army was destroyed.

Margaret's large army began marching south, looting as it went. At the Second Battle of St Albans, they defeated the Yorkist army of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick (later known as "the Kingmaker"). Warwick had brought the captive King Henry to the battlefield, and in the aftermath of the battle, Henry was recaptured by the Lancastrian army.

Margaret now had a chance of entering London, the capital, but the mayor and citizens feared being plundered by her undisciplined army, and refused her entry. While negotiations continued, Margaret learned that York's eldest son Edward, Earl of March, had destroyed another Lancastrian army at the Battle of Mortimer's Cross on the borders of Wales, and had linked up with Warwick's surviving forces. With this threat to the rear of her army, Margaret began to retreat northwards.

Warwick now proclaimed Edward as King Edward IV. On March 4, Edward was crowned in a hasty ceremony in London. The next day, Edward himself decided to take the military initiative and march north in the hope of inflicting a final defeat on Henry's supporters.


The Battle

On March 29, the Yorkist army began pressing forward across the repaired bridge at Ferrybridge. The weather was very bad, with cold winds and snow showers.

Edward led the Yorkist centre, Warwick the right and Fauconberg the left. A further Yorkist contingent from the Eastern counties under the Duke of Norfolk had been delayed and was still approaching the battlefield.

The Lancastrian army occupied a plateau of high ground, with its right flank covered by a stream, the Coc k Beck. The army was led by the Duke of Somerset, who commanded the centre himself, with the Earl of Northumberland commanding the right and the Duke of Exeter the left.

Although the Lancastrians occupied a strong position, with good fields of fire for their archers and with the Yorkists forced to advance uphill to attack them, they had not bargained for the foul weather. The Yorkist archers had the wind behind them, and therefore outranged their Lancastrian opposite numbers, who were also blinded by the snow. Several companies of archers loosed volleys into the Lancastrian ranks, and then fell back out of range when the Lancastrian archers tried to reply. They then advanced again and gathered up the enemy arrows which had fallen short before repeating the manoevre. In several places the Lancastrian men-at-arms advanced to seek hand-to-hand combat rather than endure the showers of arrows, losing the advantage of the high ground.

Once close-quarters fighting began, it was intense. Several times, the combatants had to pause and pull the dead bodies out of the way before they could get at their opponents. Fighting swayed back and forth for several hours, with neither side gaining any decisive advantage, until the early afternoon, when Norfolk's contingent arrived, and extended the Yorkist right flank. The Lancastrian left was outnumbered and outflanked, and the rout began in this section of the battlefield. Some Lancastrians tried to flee north to Tadcaster, but most of the Lancastrians were now pushed to their right into the Coc k Beck.


The Rout

http://www.weaponrystore.com/acatalog/images/rout-17.jpg
The defeated Lancastrian army flees from the battlefield, down Towton Dale towards the River Coc k, pursued and cut down by the victorious Yorkists.


Open Edition Print

It is supposed that far more men died in the rout than in the battle. Several bridges over neighbouring rivers broke under the weight of the armed men, plunging many into the freezing water. Those stranded on the other side either drowned in the crossing or were cornered by their pursuers and killed. Some of the worst slaughter was seen at Bloody Meadow, where it is said men crossed the River Coc k over the bodies of the fallen. All the way from Towton to Tadcaster the fields were full of bodies. The fleeing Lancastrians made easy targets for Yorkist horsemen and footsoldiers, who killed many men who had dropped their weapons and thrown off their helmets to breathe more freely as they ran. At Tadcaster some men made an unsuccessful stand and were killed.

The rout lasted all night and into the morning, when remnants of the Lancastrian army stumbled into York in total panic. Margaret, Henry and Somerset fled north to Scotland, while those Lancastrian lords who were not killed or dispossessed were forced to make peace with Edward IV.

Most of the senior Lancastrian commanders managed to escape the battlefield, although the Duke of Northumberland and one prominent commander from the borders, Ralph, Lord Dacre, were killed.

wikipedia.org

Pioneer
05 Apr 08,, 09:03
800,000–1,600,000 - Battle of Stalingrad (1942–1943)
670,000–1,500,000 - Siege of Leningrad (1941–1944)
700,000 - Battle of Moscow (1941–1942)
400,000–680,000 - Battle of Kiev (1941)
500,000 - Battle of Smolensk (1941)
370,000 - Battle of Voronezh (1942)
370,000 - Battle of Belarus (1941)
175,000–350,000 - Operation Bagration (1944)
230,000–350,000 - Battle of Kursk (1943)
300,000 - Battle of the Somme (1916)
270,000 - Second Rzhev-Sychevka Offensive (1942)
270,000 - Battle of West Ukraine (1944)
260,000 - Battle of Verdun (1916)
260,000 - Battle of the Caucasus (1942)
165,000–300,000 Battle of Chalons (451)
230,000 - Battle of Berlin (1945)
200,000 - Siege of Tenochtitlan (1520–1521)
190,000 - Battle of West Ukraine (1941)
180,000 - Battle of France (1940)
170,000 - Battle of the Lower Dnieper (1943)
170,000 - Battle of Kφnigsberg (1945)
150,000 - Battle of Rostov (1941)
150,000 - Battle of Okinawa (1945)
150,000 - Battle of Passchendaele (1917)
132,000 - Battle of Normandy (1944)
130,000 - Battle of Gallipoli (1916)
130,000 - Battle of Budapest (1945)
125,000 - Third Battle of Nanking (1864)
125,000 - Battle of Lemberg (1914)
115,000 - Battle of the Frontiers (1914)
100,000 - Battle of Chernikov-Poltava (1943)
100,000 - Battle of Smolensk (1943)
90,000 - Battle of the Aisne (1917)
83,000 - Battle of the Baltic (1941)
80,000 - Battle of the Somme (1918)
80,000 - Battle of the Marne (1918)
74,000 - Battle of Polyarnoe-Karelia (1941)
72,000+ - Battle of Belgorod (1943)
70,000 - Second Battle of the Atlantic (1939–1945)
70,000 - Second Battle of Anchialus (917)
69,000 - Battle of Leyte (1944)
66,000 - Battle of Donbass (1943)
56,000–66,000 - Battle of Cannae (216 BC)
65,000 - Battle of Lvov-Sandomir (1944)
64,000 - Battle of the Aisne (1918)
62,000 - Battle of Artois (1915)
61,000 - Battle of the Baltic (1944)
60,000 - Battle of Basra (1985–1988)
60,000 - Battle of Monte Cassino (1944)
60,000 - Battle of Arras (1917)
60,000 - First Battle of Ypres (1914)
60,000 - Battle of Champagne (1915)
40,000–56,000 - Tet Offensive (1968)
55,000 - Korsun Pocket (1944)
55,000 - Battle of Voronezh (1943)
50,000 - Meuse-Argonne offensive (1918)
50,000 - Eleventh Battle of the Isonzo (1917)
50,000 - Battle of Hsuchow (1927)
30,000–50,000 - Battle of Naissus (268)
45,000 - Fourth Battle of Kharkov (1943)
44,000 - Battle of the Crimea (1944)
42,000 - Battle of the Seelow Heights (1945)
40,000 - Battle of Imphal (1944)
38,000 - Battle of the Bulge (1944–1945)
37,000 - Battle of Tannenberg (1914)
36,500 - Battle of the Ebro (1938)
35,000 - Battle of Mukden (1905)
30,300–34,000 - Battle of Thermopylae (480 BC)
32,000 - Battle of Lepanto (1571)
31,000 - Battle of Thapsus (46 BC)
31,000 - Battle of Taierzhuang (1937)
30,000 - Battle of Saipan (1944)
30,000 - Battle of Konotop (1659)
30,000 - Battle of Marignan (1515)
30,000 - Battle of the Teutoburg Forest (9)
20,000–30,000 - Battle of Munda (45 BC)
29,000 - Battle of Iwo Jima (1945)
25,000 - Battle of Pydna (168 BC)
26,000 - Katyn Massacre (1940)
22,500 - Battle of Leipzig (1813)
20,000 - Battle of the Trebia (218 BC)
18,500 - Battle of Borodino (1812)
16,500 - Battle of Halhin Gol (1939)
15,000 - Battle of Waterloo (1815)
15,000 - Battle of Lake Trasimene (217 BC)
11,000 - Battle of Heraclea (180 BC)
11,000 - Siege of Petersburg, Virginia (1864–1865)
7,000–11,000 - Battle of Pharsalus (48 BC)
10,500 - Battle of Asculum (279 BC)
10,360 - Battle of Mons Graupius (83 or 84)
10,000 - Battle of the Metaurus (207 BC)
10,000 - Battle of Celaya (1913)
8,700 - Battle of Cynoscephalae (197 BC)
7,058 - Battle of Gettysburg (1863)
6,592 - Battle of Marathon (490 BC)
5,350+ - Battle of Suomussalmi (1939–1940)
5,000+ - Battle of Dara (530)
5,000+ - Battle of Dyrrhachium (1081)
4,808 - Battle of Antietam (1862)
4,360 - Battle of Chickamauga (1863)
4,329 - Battle of Isandlwana (1879)
4,175 - Battle of Leuthen (1757)
3,477 - Battle of Shiloh (1862)
3,205 - Second Battle of Bull Run (1862)
200–2,850 - Battle for Fallujah (November 8–November 14, 2004)
2,800 - Battle of Midway (1942)
2,400 - La Noche Triste (1520)
2,000+ - Battle of Manzikert (1071)
1,705 - Battle of Cold Harbor (June 1-3, 1864)
1,700 - Battle of Vicksburg (1863)
1,000+ - Battle of Dyrrhachium (48 BC)
868 - First Battle of Bull Run (July 21, 1861)
622 - Jamestown Massacre (1622)
567 - Battle of Rorke's Drift (1879)
495 - Battle of Monongahela (1755)
383 - Battle of the Alamo (1836)
366 - Battle of Bunker Hill (1775)
350 - Battle of Spion Kop (1900)
302 - Battle of Little Bighorn (1876)


If you will notice the most bloodiest seem to be from the Eastern Front.

Impressive work on your behalf

Pity for all those poor bustards though!

Regards
Pioneer

sparten
28 May 08,, 20:02
Thanks.

zraver
28 May 08,, 22:32
I still think Actium belongs on the list, it might even be number 1 for most losses suffered in a single day.

Dago
29 May 08,, 04:14
4,808 - Battle of Antietam (1862)

-

I thought nearly double died at Antietam?

sparten
29 May 08,, 05:47
4,808 - Battle of Antietam (1862)

-

I thought nearly double died at Antietam?


Double would be total casualties, meaning killed and wounded. This is justfatalities

Albany Rifles
29 May 08,, 19:49
IIRC, the United States suffered more casualties (KIA, wounded, and captured) during the Battle of the Bulge than any other battle we've engaged in (except for Civil War battles, which don't really count).

Why not? No one has been better at killing Americans than Americans.


Shiloh...27,000 (2 days)
Antietam....23,000 (1 day)
Gettysburg...53,000 (3 days)
Wilderness (Union only)....17,660 (2 days)


Here is an interesting comparison

Fox's Regimental Losses, Chapter V, Casualties Compared with European Wars (http://www.civilwarhome.com/foxs.htm)

Squall
29 May 08,, 20:52
I do not know with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.
--Albert Einstein

sparten
30 May 08,, 08:15
Why not? No one has been better at killing Americans than Americans.


Shiloh...27,000 (2 days)
Antietam....23,000 (1 day)
Gettysburg...53,000 (3 days)
Wilderness (Union only)....17,660 (2 days)


Here is an interesting comparison

Fox's Regimental Losses, Chapter V, Casualties Compared with European Wars (http://www.civilwarhome.com/foxs.htm)


Thats killed, wounded, missing and captured not just fatalitys.

Albany Rifles
03 Jun 08,, 14:21
Understand...didn't realize it was just killed. Thouhgt you were looking for total casualties.

astralis
03 Jun 08,, 16:03
that list above is sort of inaccurate, there is NO way the numbers were that high at the battle of chalon, not when the entire roman army (spread across the entire empire) numbered about 350,000.

sohamsri
07 Jun 08,, 05:29
Is the air-force and the navy counted in this ? Or is it only casualties ? If yes then certainly one of the many Indo-pak wars should come into account...or maybe not.

Good work sparten.... You did do a lot of tedious research.