PDA

View Full Version : How would a dog fight an armed intruder?



hboGYT
24 Jun 18,, 12:40
This is my feasibility study for using dogs as a deterrence to home invasions. I live in Australia, so the legality is also an issue, but that's another topic.

Let's say it's during the day, no one is home beside 2 German shepherds. A thief breaks into my home and is armed with a knife. Assuming neither side is well trained, who wins?

Edit: has anyone tried making lacquered armour for their dogs?

Ironduke
24 Jun 18,, 13:00
The dogs alone ought to be enough. Thieves will typically choose the easiest target, the one that requires the least amount of effort, with the least amount of risk. Unless you're being specifically targeted, a thief will burgle your neighbor who doesn't have any dogs rather than burgling you.

Oracle
24 Jun 18,, 14:05
hboGYT, 2 German Shepherds are enough for even the para-military to take notice. Knife or a gun, 2 German Shepherds would keep most intruders away, as long as they know the mess they would be getting at. Do keep a signboard that says - Ever wondered what life is after death, intrude and find out with my 2 German Shepherds. :D

My house was robbed in 2000 during the night. I was away then, attending my pre-final year of Engineering. My mom lost a gold necklace and some petty cash. The thief(s) who we've assumed knew ins and outs, was probably one (or more) of the labourer working at our home, the month prior to the robbery.

So I bought a German Shepherd, and made it grow un-social. No contact with anyone else other than me and my parents. That's it. No one, not even my relatives could come home to pay a visit without it barking continuously. It bit many people too. People were scared and it gained enough notoriety in my small town. No incidents happened thereafter. It bit my mom too once, when she was screaming at me for using her towel. Then job happened, and I would visit home once in 2-3 years, but even then it knew me. He could smell me when I opened the gate, it knew the exact sound and type of 'pressing' of the door-bell and would make different sounds that my mom came to know was either me or my dad.

He was my best pal. Always gave unconditional love, never took anything other than some petting. Ate everything - mangoes, apples, even Paan, pork, chicken, mutton, milk etc. He died in 2009 of old age and genetic disease. Now that we have shifted town, the scourge of robbery is again an issue. I am thinking of buying another German Shepherd puppy. But, I am also thinking of the sadness that comes along-with having a dog and the attachment that develops, knowing fully well that it would leave one day.

You can have a dog and intruders would think 10 times before entering your property. You will grow an ever-lasting bond with it. And the day he finally dies, it would break your heart. So think clearly before bringing a dog home. And yeah, a German Shepherd puppy comes with a lot of responsibilities and some spending too.

hboGYT
24 Jun 18,, 14:35
How do you prevent it from liking every human it meets?

Oracle
24 Jun 18,, 14:59
Simple. You keep it isolated. I kept mine at the backyard of my house. But do remember to spend time with it everyday, or it will become so aggressive that it won't listen to you. You can also train it in isolation by rewarding it for simple tasks such as sitting/standing up etc. Make it learn your commands from an early age, probably from 1.5-2 months. This will develop bonding between you and your dog. They chew a lot, so if you make a wooden kennel, be ready to shell out some more money and get a steel one by the time it is a year old.

Big dogs need to exercise, that is they need to run a lot, so you don't keep it caged all day and night. If you don't have a big enough backyard, develop a habit to walk the dog atleast twice a day and also let it walk freely inside the house. German Shepherds are disciplinarians, so if you give breakfast at 7AM for 5 days, it would expect the same for the 6th day. How in the hell they keep track of time I don't know.

Ironduke
24 Jun 18,, 15:22
German Shepherds are disciplinarians, so if you give breakfast at 7AM for 5 days, it would expect the same for the 6th day. How in the hell they keep track of time I don't know.
Animals are able to keep track of time without having to consciously think about it. Circadian rhythms. We have the natural ability to do the same, the brain has an organic built-in biological clock. However, as a complex society, we have defined time and assigned numbers to it, and rely on timekeeping devices to be able to co-ordinate our activities with a higher degree of accuracy.

Anybody ought to be able to look at the Sun at any time of year, at virtually any latitude, and be able to intuit what time it is, give or take 10 or 15 minutes from the system we have devised to officially keep time. Dogs can do the same without even thinking about it.

There is likely <100 million years since humans and dogs split from our most recent common ancestor, and while each species has since evolved certain specializations, our other innate abilities are much the same.

WABs_OOE
28 Jun 18,, 19:13
This entire premis is wrong. If the bark does not deter the intruder from entering your property, then you can be sure that the intruder knows about the dogs and is ready to deal with them. At that point, you cannot and must not assume that the intruder is not trained nor have a methodology of eliminating the dogs.

Double Edge
28 Jun 18,, 20:51
Ate everything - mangoes, apples, even Paan, pork, chicken, mutton, milk etc.

How do you train it not to take food from others ?

Has to be well fed or it will take food from strangers as well

Double Edge
28 Jun 18,, 20:55
Animals are able to keep track of time without having to consciously think about it. Circadian rhythms. We have the natural ability to do the same, the brain has an organic built-in biological clock. However, as a complex society, we have defined time and assigned numbers to it, and rely on timekeeping devices to be able to co-ordinate our activities with a higher degree of accuracy.

Anybody ought to be able to look at the Sun at any time of year, at virtually any latitude, and be able to intuit what time it is, give or take 10 or 15 minutes from the system we have devised to officially keep time. Dogs can do the same without even thinking about it.

There is likely <100 million years since humans and dogs split from our most recent common ancestor, and while each species has since evolved certain specializations, our other innate abilities are much the same.

If you keep a regular schedule, you sleep, wake up and feel hungry on the dot or very close to. I've often woken up a few minutes before the alarm clock went just like that. Interrupt that schedule and things get out of whack quick

Ironduke
28 Jun 18,, 21:55
If you keep a regular schedule, you sleep, wake up and feel hungry on the dot or very close to. I've often woken up a few minutes before the alarm clock went just like that. Interrupt that schedule and things get out of whack quick
The last office job I had (or ever will), I even had my gastrointestinal tract scheduled.

Oracle
30 Jun 18,, 03:06
This entire premis is wrong. If the bark does not deter the intruder from entering your property, then you can be sure that the intruder knows about the dogs and is ready to deal with them. At that point, you cannot and must not assume that the intruder is not trained nor have a methodology of eliminating the dogs.

Correct. I am thinking that German Shepherds are way more adapt in dealing with intruders with knives, not with guns. And where I lived (live), intruders are petty thieves, they might come with a rod or a knife, but they don't have a gun.

Oracle
30 Jun 18,, 03:16
How do you train it not to take food from others ?

Has to be well fed or it will take food from strangers as well

Yes, well fed. But then, when it was a puppy and my friends would visit me home and give it, say a cookie, I would be telling it not to eat it. Sometimes it did eat when small, then with continued persistence, I made him just sniff and go away. Later, it became very aggressive, that no one would think of giving it a cookie, lest they lose an arm.

One incident among many that I remember is, 3 labourers working at my home to build a bathroom. Now, they have all heard rumours about my dog like how big it is, and that it bites, but they haven't seen it. So they decide they will just have a glance and go. So they open a very narrow door (we had 3 entrances to the dog-house), and my dog who was hiding behind the door (it does that, and then bites the person) suddenly got loose and came inside the house. I was not at home, only my mom was. Among the 3 labourer, 1 went up a betelnut tree, another climbed a wall to get to the roof, and the last was not lucky. His leg still has scar.

What I have said is not the best way to train a dog (I was young and didn't know about training and such stuff), so you need to get a professional.

WABs_OOE
30 Jun 18,, 03:42
Correct. I am thinking that German Shepherds are way more adapt in dealing with intruders with knives, not with guns. And where I lived (live), intruders are petty thieves, they might come with a rod or a knife, but they don't have a gun.The point is that those willing to risk the dogs will be prepared to take on the dogs and it doesn't have to be guns. Poison sprays would be just as effective and worst comes to worst, a spear is a good way to put them down.

Double Edge
30 Jun 18,, 08:00
This is my feasibility study for using dogs as a deterrence to home invasions. I live in Australia, so the legality is also an issue, but that's another topic.

Let's say it's during the day, no one is home beside 2 German shepherds. A thief breaks into my home and is armed with a knife. Assuming neither side is well trained, who wins?

Edit: has anyone tried making lacquered armour for their dogs?

Have you considered surveillance. Cameras?

Oracle
30 Jun 18,, 14:32
The point is that those willing to risk the dogs will be prepared to take on the dogs and it doesn't have to be guns. Poison sprays would be just as effective and worst comes to worst, a spear is a good way to put them down.

Sir, I think we're thinking too much. Gun laws are stricter in commonwealth countries, and if there is a break-in or unlawful entry into a house - 2 German Shepherds can absolutely tackle that part where those who enter carries a poison spray or whatever. German Shepherds are the deterrence here. Before both the dogs go down, they would have done their work with their barking and biting. If however Roman legionaries are out hunting dogs, then we can dig deeper. :D

WABs_OOE
30 Jun 18,, 15:38
Sir, I think we're thinking too much. Gun laws are stricter in commonwealth countries, and if there is a break-in or unlawful entry into a house - 2 German Shepherds can absolutely tackle that part where those who enter carries a poison spray or whatever. German Shepherds are the deterrence here. Before both the dogs go down, they would have done their work with their barking and biting. If however Roman legionaries are out hunting dogs, then we can dig deeper. :DLet's put it this way. If it was me, your dogs would be dead and I would have no bites on me.

Ironduke
30 Jun 18,, 15:47
The point is that those willing to risk the dogs will be prepared to take on the dogs and it doesn't have to be guns. Poison sprays would be just as effective and worst comes to worst, a spear is a good way to put them down.
If the dogs are inside, one could just open up a window a crack, toss the dogs some poison-laced meat, and wait a few minutes. Or if they're outside, toss it over the fence as one is walking by the residence, and come back later.

Dogs are really only good for deterring opportunistic thieves, who are looking for low-risk paydays that involve the least amount of effort.

I'm being Captain Obvious here, but generally speaking, a sizeable dog can be a great force multiplier in an interpersonal combat situation. The first people to domesticate dogs tens of thousands of years ago had a distinct advantage over peoples who did not, which is why dogs spread so far and wide throughout the Old World in relatively short order. In the ten or twenty thousand years before recorded history began, either you had dogs, and if you didn't, you found yourself conquered by a tribe who did.

Anyone determined enough though will deal with the dogs. If someone is the target of a determined person(s), they've got problems that go far beyond simply not having dogs, or not having enough home security. At which point, other actions are necessary to deal with the problem.

Double Edge
30 Jun 18,, 15:57
If the dogs are inside, one could just open up a window a crack, toss the dogs some poison-laced meat, and wait a few minutes. Or if they're outside, toss it over the fence as one is walking by the residence, and come back later.
This is why i asked about not taking anything from strangers. The dogs have to be well fed and disciplined or they will be vulnerable.

Ironduke
30 Jun 18,, 16:03
This is why i asked about not taking anything from strangers. The dogs have to be well fed and disciplined or they will be vulnerable.
If one were to toss the dog poison-laced meat, and walk away for half an hour, the dog will likely forget it was given to them by a stranger, at which point it's just a chunk of meat, and they'll start chowing down. Then the determined intruder can return to the scene and do whatever it is they intended to do, unmolested.

WABs_OOE
30 Jun 18,, 17:32
If the dogs are inside, one could just open up a window a crack, toss the dogs some poison-laced meat, and wait a few minutes. Or if they're outside, toss it over the fence as one is walking by the residence, and come back later.That is what's wrong with this entire premis. The people with the dogs assume that the intruder would walk in against a fully alert and ready dog. Why would the intruder not use a barrier, walls or fence, to stop the dog's weapons and eliminate the dogs before entry?

Oracle
30 Jun 18,, 17:42
If one were to toss the dog poison-laced meat, and walk away for half an hour, the dog will likely forget it was given to them by a stranger, at which point it's just a chunk of meat, and they'll start chowing down. Then the determined intruder can return to the scene and do whatever it is they intended to do, unmolested.

Incorrect. If one knows how to discipline his/her dog, it would never eat anything, even chunks of meat thrown by strangers. My dog wouldn't since he became a year old. And, btw, Cesar Milan (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cesar_Millan) would disagree.

Oracle
30 Jun 18,, 17:51
Let's put it this way. If it was me, your dogs would be dead and I would have no bites on me.

Absolutely. Having had dogs for close to 12 years, a Bhutia dog before the German Shepherd, I can say with confidence, that if I want to rob a house with dogs, I can. Most people have dogs for show. A lady friend of mine too bought a German Shepherd after I bought mine. Whenever I would visit her, and I would visit her often, the dog would take a peek at me from behind the curtains, and walk away. Depends a lot on the owner. She made it look and behave like a lady, not as a guard dog.

Ironduke
30 Jun 18,, 17:51
Incorrect. If one knows how to discipline his/her dog, it would never eat anything, even chunks of meat thrown by strangers. My dog wouldn't since he became a year old. And, btw, Cesar Milan (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cesar_Millan) would disagree.
I'd wager that less than 1 in 10,000 dogs in this world would resist the meat. What you're describing sounds like something that's ideal and theoretical, but wouldn't hold up in practice. You may have had dogs that had been behaviorally conditioned to refuse food from strangers in your presence, but when a dog is not in the presence of its owner, a lot of things go right out the window.

If I were to observe how you fed your dogs, and placed the meat where you put their food, after I make myself absent, the dog will likely forget how to meat got there, and even come to believe that you had put that meat there, and the dog had simply forgotten to eat the rest of the breakfast you gave it.

Oracle
30 Jun 18,, 17:57
I'd wager that less than 1 in 10,000 dogs in this world would resist the meat. What you're describing sounds like something that's ideal and theoretical, but wouldn't hold up in practice. You may have had dogs that had been behaviorally conditioned to refuse food from strangers in your presence, but when a dog is not in the presence of its owner, a lot of things go right out the window.

If I were to observe how you fed your dogs, and placed the meat where you put their food, after I make myself absent, the dog will likely forget how to meat got there, and even come to believe that you had put that meat there, and the dog had simply forgotten to eat the rest of the breakfast you gave it.

Sorry, don't agree at all. We lived in Government quarters. Adjacent to our house was a XXX family, they had connection with terrorists. These guys tried all methods to tame my buddy, without success. They would throw raw meat, cooked meat, even bones, to no effect. It's how one trains his/her dogs.

Once the para-military raided their house at around 9:45 PM, my GS started barking so loud, I got a warning the next day. In response, I said I can't help my dog barking. It's exactly the purpose why I have my GS in the first place.

Oracle
30 Jun 18,, 18:01
That is what's wrong with this entire premis. The people with the dogs assume that the intruder would walk in against a fully alert and ready dog. Why would the intruder not use a barrier, walls or fence, to stop the dog's weapons and eliminate the dogs before entry?

Who's coming to get me? John Wick? I'd agree if a SF operative turned professional mercenary is looking for me. In normal neighbourhoods and times, 2 GS are more than enough. That too in Australia. We're are thinking way too much.

Oracle
30 Jun 18,, 18:14
If I were to observe how you fed your dogs, and placed the meat where you put their food, after I make myself absent, the dog will likely forget how to meat got there, and even come to believe that you had put that meat there, and the dog had simply forgotten to eat the rest of the breakfast you gave it.

It's the smell my friend. It's the smell of my hand, that touched the meat. I am assuming you never had a German Shepherd.

Oracle
30 Jun 18,, 18:29
This is why i asked about not taking anything from strangers. The dogs have to be well fed and disciplined or they will be vulnerable.

What do you mean by a well fed dog? A well fed dog is one that eats all the time, is obese, and will be dying shorty. A well fed dog is same as a duck or a rabbit that eats all day. Discipline is all that matters. Your dog might be on an empty stomach, but it will not accept any food from strangers if disciplined well enough.

Ironduke
30 Jun 18,, 18:38
It's the smell my friend. It's the smell of my hand, that touched the meat. I am assuming you never had a German Shepherd.
It's easy enough to impart your odors onto the meat, while not imparting any of mine, if that's what getting the dog to eat the meat truly hinged upon.

The Stasi used to place absorbent fabric on chairs while interrogating citizens of the DDR, and crank up the heat in the room a bit and make the interrogee nervous to get them to sweat. When the interrogation was over, they would gingerly take the odor-infused fabric from the chair, and seal it in a bag. That way, they'd have the person's scent if they ever needed to track the person down with dogs. One could simply find a way to swipe someone's towel, underwear, or a shirt for the same purpose.

But you're right, we're overthinking it. It's just as easy to drop a 20 kilogram stone on the dog's head from atop a fence or a wall. Or spear it down the throat through a fence or a gate while out of reach of its teeth. It all depends on whether being more or less noticeable is important or not.

Gun Grape
30 Jun 18,, 20:16
As far as training dogs not to eat/accept food from strangers, the US military tried that. That's why nuclear installations are/were protected by geese during the cold war. They make one hell of a noise.

Against the opportune intruder, the noise will scare them away. Especially in the urban environment. Out in the country, not so much.

With more than one person attempting to break in, One distracts the animals at the opposite side of the house while the other enters. Then its a matter of closing doors and isolating the dogs in one area. Or I just beat the dogs to death/cut their throat/stab their neck as they try to bite me. Zapp them with a stun gun, Hit them with pepper spray I bought at the local market. Spray them in the face with an ammonia based cleaner/oven cleaner if the other options are illegal to buy

Because if its a deliberate robbery, vice one of opportunity, I've cased your house and know about the dogs. I've come prepared

bonehead
30 Jun 18,, 23:26
How do you train it not to take food from others ?

Has to be well fed or it will take food from strangers as well


Some people do train their dogs to only take food from them. At some point in time the owner dies, spends a lot of time in a hospital, etc and the dog starves to death.

bonehead
30 Jun 18,, 23:48
This is my feasibility study for using dogs as a deterrence to home invasions. I live in Australia, so the legality is also an issue, but that's another topic.

Let's say it's during the day, no one is home beside 2 German shepherds. A thief breaks into my home and is armed with a knife. Assuming neither side is well trained, who wins?

Edit: has anyone tried making lacquered armour for their dogs?

My mother has a pair of shepards. They know who belongs at her home and who doesnt and act accordingly. One is damned smart. He opens the front door, uses mirrors in the house to see who is in the next room, etc. He is also Schutzhund trained. The other one is a 130 pound freight train that looks like a junk yard dog. They do work in tandom. If you run the first dog will trip you and the second will be on you before you can get up. They have 8 acres to patrol and do it well. They have discouraged many looking for an easy score. However, they have not met with a determined and prepared intruder. They are suspicious enough of strangers not to take food from them and with an intruder with only a knife I would put my money on the dogs, though I dont for a second think they would survive the encounter unscathed. Facing one dog is one thing. Facing 2, 3, 4 is a whole other matter. For all the effort to take them on, moving to another home to invade would be better effort spent.
Now back to your premise as both sides are "not well trained". That really can not be explored fairly because like humans dogs have different personalities. Some dogs are naturals when it comes to protecting the home. Other dogs think every stranger is a friend. That is a variable you need to pin down.

hboGYT
01 Jul 18,, 02:30
The point is that those willing to risk the dogs will be prepared to take on the dogs and it doesn't have to be guns. Poison sprays would be just as effective and worst comes to worst, a spear is a good way to put them down.

What if I have my dogs hide inside the house and zerg rush you from all directions when you enter, with home-made leather armour?


Have you considered surveillance. Cameras?

I have, but cameras can be destroyed.

At the moment, I'm only worried about thieves who try to break into the house during the day when there's no one home.

WABs_OOE
01 Jul 18,, 02:36
What if I have my dogs hide inside the house and zerg rush you from all directions when you enter, with home-made leather armour?Flashbangs.

Oracle
01 Jul 18,, 02:43
Some people do train their dogs to only take food from them. At some point in time the owner dies, spends a lot of time in a hospital, etc and the dog starves to death.

This is true and sad at the same time.

Oracle
01 Jul 18,, 02:47
It's easy enough to impart your odors onto the meat, while not imparting any of mine, if that's what getting the dog to eat the meat truly hinged upon.

The Stasi used to place absorbent fabric on chairs while interrogating citizens of the DDR, and crank up the heat in the room a bit and make the interrogee nervous to get them to sweat. When the interrogation was over, they would gingerly take the odor-infused fabric from the chair, and seal it in a bag. That way, they'd have the person's scent if they ever needed to track the person down with dogs. One could simply find a way to swipe someone's towel, underwear, or a shirt for the same purpose.

But you're right, we're overthinking it. It's just as easy to drop a 20 kilogram stone on the dog's head from atop a fence or a wall. Or spear it down the throat through a fence or a gate while out of reach of its teeth. It all depends on whether being more or less noticeable is important or not.

A person who is determined to break-in will get his way, dog or no dog. And the methods you've mentioned is most likely to be used by the Russians to kill one of their own moles in a western country. :D

Oracle
01 Jul 18,, 03:00
As far as training dogs not to eat/accept food from strangers, the US military tried that. That's why nuclear installations are/were protected by geese during the cold war. They make one hell of a noise.

By geese you mean, this (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goose)?

Gun Grape
01 Jul 18,, 03:06
By geese you mean, this (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goose)?

Yes. No better alarm system.

Oracle
01 Jul 18,, 03:12
Yes. No better alarm system.

Alarm system I can understand, but how can Geese be trained? My neighbour has Gesse and all it wants is to bite me. They are a nuisance. Can you tell me more?

Gun Grape
01 Jul 18,, 03:19
I have, but cameras can be destroyed.

At the moment, I'm only worried about thieves who try to break into the house during the day when there's no one home.

High crime area? Close by neighbors? or worried about the random burglar because home is isolated?

Own or rent?

There are things that a homeowner can do to lessen the chances of a break in, but if someone is determined to get in your house they will. You just have to make it hard for them.
Cameras are a good start. Visible with a sign in the yard noting that the home is under video surveillance.

Gun Grape
01 Jul 18,, 03:26
Alarm system I can understand, but how can Geese be trained? My neighbour has Gesse and all it wants is to bite me. They are a nuisance. Can you tell me more?

No training necessary. They make lots of noise when you enter their territory. And there is nothing you can do to shut them up.

Same as a dog. Designed to get someones attention. Neither are meant to stop a break in. They give the people with guns time to orient on the threat.

Its a tripwire

hboGYT
01 Jul 18,, 05:15
High crime area? Close by neighbors? or worried about the random burglar because home is isolated?

Own or rent?

There are things that a homeowner can do to lessen the chances of a break in, but if someone is determined to get in your house they will. You just have to make it hard for them.
Cameras are a good start. Visible with a sign in the yard noting that the home is under video surveillance.

Well technically, the high crime suburb is across the street. Not really high-crime, but definitely not a savoury place. That area has lots of public housing.

I own a house.

WABs_OOE
01 Jul 18,, 05:24
Well technically, the high crime suburb is across the street. Not really high-crime, but definitely not a savoury place. That area has lots of public housing.

I own a house.I know a guy who lived in in a bad part of town. He put up a sign, Beware of Boa Constrictor, and bought a fake snake that he leaves visible somedays and other days not. Never had a break in while those around him were not so lucky.

But as the GS says, if your house has been cased ... have good insurance.

Double Edge
01 Jul 18,, 14:24
I have, but cameras can be destroyed.

At the moment, I'm only worried about thieves who try to break into the house during the day when there's no one home.

A laser may do it. But cameras can be made inconspicuous and even decoys could be mixed in


What do you mean by a well fed dog? A well fed dog is one that eats all the time, is obese, and will be dying shorty. A well fed dog is same as a duck or a rabbit that eats all day. Discipline is all that matters. Your dog might be on an empty stomach, but it will not accept any food from strangers if disciplined well enough.

I meant to say regularly fed. One that isn't hungry.

Ironduke
01 Jul 18,, 14:42
What if I have my dogs hide inside the house and zerg rush you from all directions when you enter, with home-made leather armour?
I think you've been playing too much StarCraft. Few video game concepts have real-world applications. :-)

Dogs alone ought to be enough to deter an opportunistic thief. The only situation I can think of where dogs would be useful in the manner you're asking about is if you've got a drug-addicted, brain damaged, semi-retarded thief out to commit a crime of opportunity, who is dumb enough to break in despite the dogs, but is too stupid to fend them off and gets mauled by them.

There was a thief some years ago who broke into someone's home through a skylight, and fell on a kitchen counter with knives on it, and ended up getting stabbed by those knives. What you're proposing might work against guys like that.

WABs_OOE
01 Jul 18,, 17:11
Another thing. A dog costs $10K a year in food and vet bills. Your house contents better be worth that if all you want is prevent breakins.

Look, if you want to get a dog, get a dog and be prepared to baby it night and day because that is what dogs are. They demand your attention. If you are not willing to put up the expense nor the time you need with the dog, then don't get it.

A wifi-internet surveillance system both in and outside your home might be your better option.

Oracle
02 Jul 18,, 04:11
OR, get 2 pairs of Geese. One pair for the frontyard, and another pair for the backyard. When they grow up, slaughter and roast them, invite friends and ask them to bring beers, and then get some more Geese to guard the home. This seems to be the cheapest and the most effective solution for handling petty thieves. Geese = guards + meat.

Triple C
06 Jul 18,, 19:43
Ask any poultry farmer. Geese are naturally aggressive. As mother is wont to say, the one they kept "near bit your uncle's rear off and he walked funny for weeks."

Oracle
07 Jul 18,, 05:15
The person who first thought of using Geese for security of nuclear installations is a genius. It's cheap, highly effective, and if the early warning radar starts to blip, collect all Geese and go underground. Then spend those last days roasting the Geese and partying inside the blast-proof silos. What a way to welcome the end of the world.

hboGYT
08 Jul 18,, 13:37
Geese are too loud. My council does not allow them probably. I know chickens are not allowed for sure.

Gun Grape
08 Jul 18,, 18:31
Geese are too loud. My council does not allow them probably. I know chickens are not allowed for sure.

Then just follow basic home security practices.

Put pins in the tracks of all the windows that keep them from being opened. Removable of course if you need to escape from a fire.
Either have no shrubbery near the house ( place for people to hide) Or use something decorative but thorny. I don't know what plants are native in your area. Here, for example, we would plant roses or holly bushes. Plant these under windows, and up against the house.

Use deadbolts with a long shaft on all doors. And replace half of the screws on the hinges with screws that are at least 3 inches long. Both should get the door secured to the house framework proper instead of just the door casing.

Keep the yard clean and make sure you don't leave tools outside that will aid in breaking into your house. Things like ladders and pry bars.

That's going to stop the majority of opportunist break-ins.

Double Edge
08 Jul 18,, 21:35
The person who first thought of using Geese for security of nuclear installations is a genius. It's cheap, highly effective, and if the early warning radar starts to blip, collect all Geese and go underground. Then spend those last days roasting the Geese and partying inside the blast-proof silos. What a way to welcome the end of the world.

Was not aware until it was mentioned here but the idea has been around for a long while..


Guard geese have been used throughout history, and in modern times. In ancient Rome, geese are credited by the historian Livy for giving the alarm when Gauls invaded (see Battle of the Allia).

On modern farms, geese are said to be good deterrents to predators of other domestic fowl, and snakes. A handbook on industrial security recommends them for protecting warehouses and other isolated physical assets. They are reported to have been used to guard United States Air Defense Command installations in Germany; as the Scotch Watch at Ballantine's Distillery in Dumbarton, Scotland; and to protect a police station in Xinjiang, China.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guard_goose

Double Edge
08 Jul 18,, 21:40
Keep the yard clean
Great suggestion

Or how to make it harder to quickly spot a house that is vacant

Ironduke
08 Jul 18,, 21:46
Use deadbolts with a long shaft on all doors. And replace half of the screws on the hinges with screws that are at least 3 inches long. Both should get the door secured to the house framework proper instead of just the door casing.
I'd also recommend guard plates/reinforcers for the doorknobs and deadbolts.

Examples: https://www.amazon.com/slp/door-reinforcement-plate/7egxg4qeenfu3zw

Not having windows in your entryway doors is a good idea too. Easy to just break the glass and reach around and unlock the deadbolt.