PDA

View Full Version : Bachelor Cuisine



Ironduke
06 Apr 18,, 07:22
All of us guys here either are or were bachelors at some point... so I thought I might post a thread where we can share tips on food.

I like to keep it pretty healthy, and I shop mostly at Aldi. I don't do cans of ravioli, pizza rolls, etc. I just buy a little bit at a time and keep it cheap but nutritious and healthy.

That being said, I've discovered a couple new things recently.

The first is pickling. I buy jars of pickles and peppers, and after I've eaten them I re-stuff the jars with bite size pieces of fresh vegetables. I just recently stuffed a jar of pickle juice with baby carrots, and a jar of pepper juice with cloves of garlic. I think I'm just going to keep re-stuffing them with a rotating range of fresh vegetables, then top them up with new pickle/pepper juice as needed.

The vegetables also keep much longer this way, and they're much better tasting too.

I also found that sour cream is a really good sandwich spread. I use it instead of mayonnaise and other spreads and it's extremely tasty.

I heard that vanilla ice cream makes a really good coffee creamer. Never goes bad like milk, and its already got the sweetener right in it. I suppose one could go fat-free sugar-free frozen yogurt for a lower calorie cup of coffee.

Anybody else got tips/stories?

edit: any bachelorette cuisine tips are welcome as well

Bigfella
06 Apr 18,, 07:48
As a lifelong bachelor (more or less) I feel I should make a contribution. I'll throw in a few quick ones here & do some thinking. While I don't eat as healthily as I should, I get the concept. :-)

Instead of chips/corn chips to munch with salsa, chop up thick pit a bread and bake in the oven until crisp. Can spray with a bit of oil spray and sprinkle on chili or other powdered spices for added flavor, though this does up the fat content a bit.

I regularly make lean chicken rissoles with some breadcrumbs coriander, ginger, garlic, chili & spring onions. A kilo of mince will make several dozen, which can be frozen for months. I tend to cook a few each week in a frying pan and put them in my lunchbox for a bit of protein with my salad. (I can dig up a recipe if anyone is keen).

Buy a good wok - proper carbon steel, NOT non-stick (f**king white people, seriously!). Season as per instructions & you have the perfect device for a quick, healthy meal. The requisite combination of veges and meat (if desired) can be whipped up and cooked in no time. Also good for steaming and, if you don't care about calories, frying. Very healthy (mostly). Oh, and NEVER use soap etc on the wok (f**king white people, seriously!), scrub out, wipe down with kitchen paper & oil on a low heat.

Will try to think of more.

Ironduke
06 Apr 18,, 07:53
I've made croutons with dried up bread before. Dice it up into crouton-sized pieces, dip them in ranch dressing, and bake them in the oven.

I also found that I can cook rice in the microwave in a tupperware. 2 parts water, 1 part white rice for 20 minutes, brown rice, a little more water and 45 minutes. There's no fat so the tupperware doesn't melt or start on fire. I don't do this anymore really, but I'd douse it in Kikkoman soy sauce, which I hear in East Asian cuisine is very looked down upon as a condiment for rice.

I don't do this any more either, but I used to take boxes of macaroni and cheese, mix in the right amount of water and milk, then stir in a can of tuna. Takes about 10-12 minutes. Maybe a bit longer. No butter/margarine in that recipe, so no melting tupperware.

I also used to cook up 5-6 eggs at a time, sunny side up, then just go to town with organic whole grain/specialty loafs I got at an upscale grocery after 8pm for half price. Also used to go to town dipping hamburger steak and ham in those egg yolks, before I switched to the bread. The eggs were mostly there for sauce, but I'd choke down the egg whites because they have protein, of course.

Probably about 70% of my diet used to be meat, eggs, and dairy. I think I'd drink about 4-5 gallons of milk a week, but now I'm down to just 2. I also used to do about 5 lbs of cottage cheese, 2 lbs sour cream, 4 lbs of yogurt, and 2 lbs of hard cheese a week too, on top of about 3 dozen eggs.

The pickling technique has helped me get more vegetables into my diet though.

Bigfella
06 Apr 18,, 09:24
I still have the same rice cooker I bought when I was at Uni 30 years ago. Looks a bit battered, but works a treat. Pour in rice & water, turn on & go do something else. :-)

For those who like potatoes or steamed veges, put chopped up bits of one or the other in a ziplok bag with a little bit of olive oil salt, pepper, fresh rosemary & thyme. Don't peel the spuds. Good veges include string beans, broccoli/broccolini, capsicum, button squash, big bits of mushroom or pretty much anything else firm. I put some chopped onions in with the potatoes & smashed, unpeeled garlic in with both lots. put in a foil tray, cover in foil and into an oven at 180C until done (check at 30 mins for veges & 1 hr for spuds, then at 10 min intervals.

This is quick, no dishes & can be scaled up or down for number of people. Smells spectacular.

DOR
06 Apr 18,, 09:52
Throw a chopped up onion or two into a pot of water and put it on to boil.
The amount of water is double the amount of rice you put in once the water is boiling.
When the rice has almost absorbed all the water, poke 4-6 (per person) long-ish bits of vegetable into it.

Several advantages.
First, the onion gives even plain white rice a great taste.
Second, if you're sticking long-stemmed brocolli into the rice, the stems with cook more than the tops.
Third, you've got your veggies and starch cooked in one pan, so easy clean-up.
Fourth, if you're really lazy, throw some leftover chicken or whatever on top of the rice, to steam.

kato
06 Apr 18,, 10:37
I have a "bachelor's cookbook" from the late 1950s. It gushes about those fancy new "deep-frozen potatoes" that are a real staple for any bachelor household.

Any recipes in it are also mostly about how to prepare meat. Gotta have something with those french fries. If there's any vegetables it's pretty much a tomato sliced in half to place on the meat for some juice.

GVChamp
06 Apr 18,, 15:12
Stir-fry in wok+rice-cooker is stupid easy and stupid fun, per Bigfella. You can scale portions and price up or down as necessary. I'd recommend jasmine rice since the glycemic index is a lot lower from jasmine than other rices, IIRC. Oil for frying is just extra calories and extra delicious :)

I love broiled chicken. Get one of those .99/lb fryers, 3 or 4 pounds. Butterfly the chicken (google "spatchcock", it gets pretty easy after you do a couple birds), throw it under the broiler or on the grill for 40 minutes, then turn for another 40 minutes.

Enough meat for 3-4 servings, and you can make chicken broth out of the carcass/bones/giblets.

Beans are dirt-cheap lunches. If you have a pressure cooker, you don't even need to soak them. I just throw the beans in the Instant-pot at 3:1:1 volume ratio of ChickenBroth/Miller/Beans, throw in some celery/onions/carrots, and let it cook for 1.5 hrs. Toss in some red peppers from a jar or something after it's done cooking and you have lunch for a week.


Let me see if I can find my mac-and-cheese recipe when I get home...almost as easy as the stuff that comes out of the Kraft box, but tastes a lot better.

I'd definitely recommend investing in a burr grinder and a couple of french presses. Also, if you get a sink strainer like this (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01C49F4FK/ref=asc_df_B01C49F4FK5429997/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B01C49F4FK&linkCode=df0&hvadid=198079373928&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5687255688043833417&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9021755&hvtargid=pla-349152558922) you can dump your coffee grounds directly into the sink. The strainer catches it and you can dump it out from there. Takes out the worst part of the french press.

I definitely recommend some legit cast iron skillets. I have 1 Lodge and 2 Emeril-brands (from BedBathBeyond). They barely need to be cleaned and get a good sear on anything you cook.

SteveDaPirate
06 Apr 18,, 15:55
Eggs are a great cheap source of protein that goes well with a ton of different things. Potatoes, bread, rice, noodles, vegetables, meat, cheese, beans... you can bulk up almost any meal with the addition of some eggs.


45714

Gun Grape
07 Apr 18,, 17:05
First, the onion gives even plain white rice a great taste.

Am I the only guy in the world that thinks plain White rice, has a perfect clean taste all by itself?

Love going to the rice cooker and grabbing a big spoon of it right after its done. Also munching on the rice at the bottom of the cooker that gets crisp and crunchy

Gun Grape
07 Apr 18,, 17:22
Broiled Flounder takes about 10-15 min to cook depending on the size fish. A little olive oil, lemon juice salt pepper.

Blanch some spinach, use a dressing of sesame oil, garlic and pepper flakes. Less than 2 min to make. Buy a couple of bunches of spinach and keep the leftover in the fridge. Its good cold

A little pasta salad to go with it. Spiral pasta with whatever raw veggies you want int it. Tomatoes, Broccoli, sweet onion, black olives. Mix with Italian dressing. 20 min for the pasta.

XLAdept
07 Apr 18,, 18:51
Hot peanut butter sandwich - just spread toast with peanut butter, and it's good with a slice of ham:)

Ironduke
07 Apr 18,, 19:25
I used to do peanut butter and cheddar cheese sandwiches. A relative of mine would do peanut butter and meat, he called it a "double protein" sandwich.

Ironduke
07 Apr 18,, 19:29
Am I the only guy in the world that thinks plain White rice, has a perfect clean taste all by itself?

Love going to the rice cooker and grabbing a big spoon of it right after its done. Also munching on the rice at the bottom of the cooker that gets crisp and crunchy
Depends on the type of rice. I got a 20 lb bag of jasmine rice once, and it did have that perfect clean taste.

Those bags that you get for 99 cents a pound at the grocery though - they just don't have anything going on in the taste department unless it's used in a recipe or is used with flavoring/condiments.

Ironduke
07 Apr 18,, 20:55
Stir-fry in wok+rice-cooker is stupid easy and stupid fun, per Bigfella. You can scale portions and price up or down as necessary. I'd recommend jasmine rice since the glycemic index is a lot lower from jasmine than other rices, IIRC. Oil for frying is just extra calories and extra delicious :)

I love broiled chicken. Get one of those .99/lb fryers, 3 or 4 pounds. Butterfly the chicken (google "spatchcock", it gets pretty easy after you do a couple birds), throw it under the broiler or on the grill for 40 minutes, then turn for another 40 minutes.

Enough meat for 3-4 servings, and you can make chicken broth out of the carcass/bones/giblets.

Beans are dirt-cheap lunches. If you have a pressure cooker, you don't even need to soak them. I just throw the beans in the Instant-pot at 3:1:1 volume ratio of ChickenBroth/Miller/Beans, throw in some celery/onions/carrots, and let it cook for 1.5 hrs. Toss in some red peppers from a jar or something after it's done cooking and you have lunch for a week.


Let me see if I can find my mac-and-cheese recipe when I get home...almost as easy as the stuff that comes out of the Kraft box, but tastes a lot better.

I'd definitely recommend investing in a burr grinder and a couple of french presses. Also, if you get a sink strainer like this (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01C49F4FK/ref=asc_df_B01C49F4FK5429997/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B01C49F4FK&linkCode=df0&hvadid=198079373928&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5687255688043833417&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9021755&hvtargid=pla-349152558922) you can dump your coffee grounds directly into the sink. The strainer catches it and you can dump it out from there. Takes out the worst part of the french press.

I definitely recommend some legit cast iron skillets. I have 1 Lodge and 2 Emeril-brands (from BedBathBeyond). They barely need to be cleaned and get a good sear on anything you cook.
French press coffee is good, but can be a bit of a pain as far as labor goes. I picked up the French press habit from a former roommate, and I'd do 8 o'clock coffee, but I'm back to drip coffee and the terrible tasting, yet still caffeinated, tin of coffee that sells at Aldi for $5. To clean out the carafe, I'd actually just fill it up with water from the bathtub and dump the water and grounds down the toilet, taking care to avoid splashback.

For my mid-day meals, I used to follow a practice I picked up from my studies of medieval European history. Inns and taverns used to have a cauldron that was cooking year-round, topped up with what ingredients were available. The cauldron would only ever be cleaned out and started anew when Lent came, to get rid of any traces of meat.

I'd take dried beans, brown rice, barley, other healthy grains, and add in diced cuts of whatever lean meats were on sale, and have a rotating stock of 20-25 vegetables, 10-15 spices/herbs, and olive/grapeseed oil, and mix them all together. I'd aim for the full spectrum on vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and macronutrients for complete nutrition.

I'd start a crock pot on Sunday, and fill a tupperware each evening before a workday to take to work the next day. After I filled a tupperware, I'd then top up the crock pot with something a little bit different each day to change it up a bit. The fresh ingredients would then have a day to stew alongside whatever else was already in the crock pot. On Wednesday night, I'd tupperware what was in the crock pot and put two tupperwares in the fridge for the rest of the workweek, and freeze the rest. Every Sunday I'd start a new crock pot and change it up a little bit from the week before.

I had another more limited variant of this at a later time, minus the crockpot, where I'd spend 3 hours cooking on a Sunday with similar ingredients, but do a single batch with 5-6 tupperwares to last me the week, and bring along 3-4 servings of fruit to eat for snacks at work.

GVChamp
07 Apr 18,, 21:28
Am I the only guy in the world that thinks plain White rice, has a perfect clean taste all by itself?

Love going to the rice cooker and grabbing a big spoon of it right after its done. Also munching on the rice at the bottom of the cooker that gets crisp and crunchy

If you throw salt and oil in with it, I'm all with you. I can eat that up all day long.

Note to above: I said Jasmine rice had the lowest GI-boost. It's actually basmati rice.



Inns and taverns used to have a cauldron that was cooking year-round, topped up with what ingredients were available. The cauldron would only ever be cleaned out and started anew when Lent came, to get rid of any traces of meat.


I think you won bachelor cuisine, man!

Ironduke
07 Apr 18,, 21:33
Parboiled rice is good too. Uncle Ben's or the generics. Much lower GI hit than white rice. I've heard that brown rice actually does have some "anti-nutrients", in that there's some compounds that interfere with the uptake of nutrients in other foods.

With parboiling, the kernel actually gets infused with many of the nutrients that are found in the bran. You don't get the fiber when you eat parboiled rice, but for people who don't care for brown rice, parboiled is a good substitute.

tbm3fan
07 Apr 18,, 21:55
Throw a chopped up onion or two into a pot of water and put it on to boil.
The amount of water is double the amount of rice you put in once the water is boiling.
When the rice has almost absorbed all the water, poke 4-6 (per person) long-ish bits of vegetable into it.

Several advantages.
First, the onion gives even plain white rice a great taste.
Second, if you're sticking long-stemmed brocolli into the rice, the stems with cook more than the tops.
Third, you've got your veggies and starch cooked in one pan, so easy clean-up.
Fourth, if you're really lazy, throw some leftover chicken or whatever on top of the rice, to steam.

Almost sounds like jook which my friends and I would eat at 2:00 am, in Chinatown, after a long night out in San Francisco.

GVChamp
07 Apr 18,, 22:09
Parboiled rice is good too. Uncle Ben's or the generics. Much lower GI hit than white rice. I've heard that brown rice actually does have some "anti-nutrients", in that there's some compounds that interfere with the uptake of nutrients in other foods.

With parboiling, the kernel actually gets infused with many of the nutrients that are found in the bran. You don't get the fiber when you eat parboiled rice, but for people who don't care for brown rice, parboiled is a good substitute.

Ahhhh, thanks for the info! Didn't even know a product like that existed. Never seen it in the stores. Guess that's what I get for shopping at freakin' Jewel....

Gun Grape
07 Apr 18,, 22:13
French press coffee is good, but can be a bit of a pain as far as labor goes. I picked up the French press habit from a former roommate, and I'd do 8 o'clock coffee, but I'm back to drip coffee and the terrible tasting,

Get you a Bunn coffee maker. The key to great coffee is a consistent water temp going through the grounds. The home version of what every restaurant in the US uses. I've had one in the house since 1987. Gunnies know good coffee

45718

Ironduke
07 Apr 18,, 22:19
Get you a Bunn coffee maker. The key to great coffee is a consistent water temp going through the grounds. The ho,e version of what every restaurant in the US uses. I've had one in the house since 1987. Gunnies know good coffee

45718
I use just a little tiny 5 cup drip maker. Goodwill, $5. I can throw/give it away if I need to, and pick up the same thing in another city for $5.

I'm a traveling IT guy who's prepared to uproot and follow the proverbial herd as far as where the work is, and for that reason I keep personal possessions to an absolute bare minimum. A coffee maker like that is a luxury I can't afford, as stuff like that and other luxuries are a waste of money, and hampers my mobility. I have four spoons, and for me, that's three spoons too many. I'm tempted to throw them out and get a spork. Just one spork.

Ironduke
07 Apr 18,, 22:23
Ahhhh, thanks for the info! Didn't even know a product like that existed. Never seen it in the stores. Guess that's what I get for shopping at freakin' Jewel....
Parboiled rice actually solved a lot of historical malnutrition problems in the American South in the late 19th/early 20th century. Before that it was white rice without nutrients, and there were a host of epidemic B vitamin deficiency diseases prior to its invention. Corn is likewise empty starch calories, unless it's nixtalized.

Parboiling would actually be a massive boon to the nutritional profile of people living in East Asia, India, etc., but they love their white rice there. I think about 80% of the nutrients found in the bran, minus the fiber, make their way into the endosperm during the parboiling process.

Ironduke
10 Apr 18,, 07:13
I just learned a valuable lesson... something I actually already knew but hadn't given thought to before doing it.

Take lemon juice with your tea. Or take milk. But not both. It should had been obvious to me before I did it, but I now have cheese tea.

edit: yes, I drank the whole cup anyways.

DOR
10 Apr 18,, 09:12
I use just a little tiny 5 cup drip maker. Goodwill, $5. I can throw/give it away if I need to, and pick up the same thing in another city for $5.

I'm a traveling IT guy who's prepared to uproot and follow the proverbial herd as far as where the work is, and for that reason I keep personal possessions to an absolute bare minimum. A coffee maker like that is a luxury I can't afford, as stuff like that and other luxuries are a waste of money, and hampers my mobility. I have four spoons, and for me, that's three spoons too many. I'm tempted to throw them out and get a spork. Just one spork.

I have two purpose-built funnels, one large and one small (travel-size). When I'm on the road, I stick a handful of filter paper into one ziplock bag and ground coffee in another. That means there's good coffee in every hotel room that can heat water.

Ironduke
10 Apr 18,, 09:40
That's a pretty good idea. I personally travel with packets of tea and splenda packets if I need a late afternoon/evening boost. I've never considered traveling with coffee, though I'd probably do instant coffee packets if I did, to save on space, even if it tastes terrible.

Another recent discovery. Instant pudding mix + milk, drink it before it sets into pudding. Pretty much got one of those smoothie/shake drinks. Also, instant pudding + coffee + milk = coffee pudding.

GVChamp
10 Apr 18,, 16:58
I just learned a valuable lesson... something I actually already knew but hadn't given thought to before doing it.

Take lemon juice with your tea. Or take milk. But not both. It should had been obvious to me before I did it, but I now have cheese tea.

edit: yes, I drank the whole cup anyways.

Yeah, that story is not going to end well. That'd be going right into the trash.

Ironduke
11 Apr 18,, 14:02
Last decade, back during my college days, one night I came home from work and all I had to eat was rice. Just plain white rice.

I cooked it up on the stove, and 20 minutes later I doused that big bowl o'rice in Kikkoman soy sauce while browsing the WAB.

When I was down to the last few bites, I saw little black things in my rice. I thought to myself, "hmm, I don't remember putting any herbs or spices in the rice."

I looked a little more closely at the black speck. Sure enough, it was an ant. Went back and looked at the bag of rice, and it was swarming with ants.

And I thought, "eh, whatever. Some protein to go along with those carbohydrates."

GVChamp
11 Apr 18,, 18:33
And that's why all my grains are in those nice Oxo containers!

Ironduke
14 Apr 18,, 00:55
Some of my fast food tips and tricks....

Back when McDoubles were only $1, I used to buy two of them, peel off the bottom buns (where there's no messy ketchup, mustard, etc.), then mash them together to make a $2 Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese. It's the same exact amount of meat, but a little less cheese, for half the price. And it's lower carb as you're dealing with less bun if you throw away the bottom buns.

When they've got those 2/$2 specials on the straight two-slice of cheese Double Cheeseburgers, that's when you've got it made. You got yourself a Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese Deluxe Royale, but lower carb due to the smaller bun footprint.

You can do the same with a McChicken and a McDouble too, if you want a beef/chicken sandwich. Peel off the bottom buns, mash the two together.

Burger King often has 2/$5 etc. coupons for their big sandwiches. Get the Double Whopper, peel off the bottom buns, mash them together, and you got yourself a Quad Whopper. Or you can mix two different types of Whoppers together. Also lower carb because you're throwing out the bottom part of the buns.

Do you love Taco Bell but hate how it slops all over the place when you're driving? They'll grill any burrito, just ask, so instead of a sloppy, floppy burrito dripping all over your clothes and car upholstery, you got something solid to eat, and there's no mess. Actually, ordering all items grilled no matter whether you're sitting down, driving, taking it out - it makes it taste better and you might save yourself hundreds of dollars in avoiding ruined clothes, which otherwise would have been caused by Taco Bell slopping all over your clothes.

Subway... you gotta get your vegetables. Order a $5 or $6 sub with lean cuts of meat, and when they put all the vegetables you want on it, do a second round, and request they put all of those vegetables on again. Keep asking for more vegetables until they refuse. You can potentially get 2-3 pounds of vegetables on a $6 sub.

Triple C
17 Apr 18,, 06:42
IIRC, brown rice digests slowly because they are not dehusked. So the release of sugar into the system is slowed down, which is good if you sugar intake is high already. Also recommened for people with diabetes. This is more or less why our ancestors preferred refined staples, such as white rice or white bread, since they engaged in strenuous physical activity and are strapped for energy.

My college diet? Hot dogs, krauts and buns. Or pasta with sausage. With orange juice. Or a stir fry of vegetables and meat on rice. For anyone bothering to critique my diet, I told them my meals represent all the nutrition groups in the chart. The ratio might be a little off...

Ironduke
23 Apr 18,, 13:08
I also used to cook up 5-6 eggs at a time, sunny side up, then just go to town with organic whole grain/specialty loafs I got at an upscale grocery after 8pm for half price. Also used to go to town dipping hamburger steak and ham in those egg yolks, before I switched to the bread.
Next time I go to the steakhouse....

Waiter: What type of sauce would you like to go with your porterhouse, sir? We have Heinz 57 and A1.
Me: A hooker of egg yolk, please. Gently heated, not fried.

Albany Rifles
23 Apr 18,, 14:51
1. Use chicken thighs. So much more flavor for your buck.

2. Crock Pot is stupid easy way to cook some simple but good food. Sear any meat, chuck in some veggies, broth and any spice combo you can think of and you are eating well in about 4 hours.

3. Learn how to grill. Seriously, grilling is a great way to maximize flavors. NOTHING gets cooked well done! And I'm talking veggies too. Grilled romaine lettuce with some balsamic vinegar & evoo with salt in pepper is great! I grill year round in all kinds of weather.

4. Get a good selection of spices. Don't go cheap. Look at firms like Penzey's. Great selection and its fresh. Also get rid of old spices. If its a year old dump it.

5. Agree on cast iron...gotta have. Good, sharp knives. Must have. Clean properly and know how to sharpen them. Also use good cutting boards, measuring cups & spoons. I admit I eyeball most nowadays as I know what I like but if you are backing you need exact.

Cooking is art; baking is science.

6. When it comes to coffee I just want it black and hot. Currently use a Keurig as my wife and I each like a different blend...really convenient. I mostly drink Dunkin Donuts. I also have cut back to 2 cups in the AM and that's it.

7. New favorite easy dinner....buffalo chicken burgers. 1 pound ground chicken, 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs, 3 shallots chopped, 2 cloves garlic chopped. 1/3 cup wing sauce. Mix with your hands (need to keep hands wet with water or chicken will stick) and form into patties. Grill med high until centers reach 160 F. Flip once during cooking. Sprinkle with blue cheese crumbles and let melt. Serve on burger bun with ranch dressing and/or more wing sauce.

GVChamp
23 Apr 18,, 18:34
Chicken thighs are so much better than breast. I barely eat chicken breast at now. Maybe for chicken parm, or cut up to go into stir-fry. That's about it.

If you want to thicken up a liquid, the quickest option is to hit it with a slurry: mix cornstrach and cold water separately (start with a tbsp of cornstrach), and throw it right in the liquid. That should thicken it up. Good for those crock-pot dishes, since the liquids tend not to reduce much.

Good knives: definitely get a good chef's knife. The best you can afford. It keeps the edge longer! I've got a Wusthof classic that's around $200, but I haven't even needed to sharpen it. The crappy set from macy's still cuts, but I have to sharpen it once a month to keep an edge.

DOR
23 Apr 18,, 19:36
Grill carrots. Huge ones sliced thin and basted with olive oil.
Eggplant, too, but it takes a bit more prep.
Slice 1/4" thick slabs and lay on paper towel.
Salt and let sit for 30 minutes.
Then, baste and BBQ.


= = = =

You’ll never need more than one cutting board, if you’re a vegan.
If you eat beef, lamb, pork, chicken, duck, turkey, fish or anything else that isn’t vegetable matter, you’ll need more than one cutting board.
Simple hygiene.

= = = =

Wait five.
Don’t take that beautiful steak straight off the bar-b-que or grill pan and start sawing away.
Let it rest. Give it a break, and let the juice get reabsorbed into the meat.

= = = =

Decant.
If you’re drinking white wine or something really, really old, don’t. Otherwise, decant. Pouring a $5 bottle of hearty red into a decanter four hours before you drink it will easily double the value of the wine. If it’s kind of rough, decant in the morning for dinner. If you don’t have a decanter, pour one glass of wine and leave the remainder of the wine in the bottle for several hours. Several.
Not so much for pinots, though.

GVChamp
23 Apr 18,, 20:23
What does a decanter actually do? I have one, but have never used it.

+1 on eggplant recommendation. Underrated vegetable.

XLAdept
23 Apr 18,, 20:35
With a decanter, your can pour just a quart or so out of the gallon bottle!:)

Ironduke
23 Apr 18,, 20:41
Good knives: definitely get a good chef's knife.
The bachelor's version: I got a Leatherman. It has smooth, serrated, and tooth blades. I use it for everything, including culinary purposes, breaking down boxes, etc.. Just got wipe it down with a little rubbing alcohol afterward to avoid cross-contamination.

The fold-out scissors is used for everything you can imagine doing with scissors, including food preparation.

My most recent recipe: two slices of bread, smothered with half a can of baked beans in tomato sauce, Kraft cheese, 2 minutes in the microwave on a paper plate, douse it in hot sauce, eat up.

Pro bachelor tip: drink lots of water to wash all that extra sodium and MSG out of your body, to avoid kidney stones and high blood pressure.

This is also critical if you also have an uber dairy-centric diet*, as excess calcium can also cause stones.

*not my fault dairy in MN is so cheap. A gallon of milk costs less than a 20 oz. bottled water

DOR
24 Apr 18,, 09:56
What does a decanter actually do? I have one, but have never used it.

+1 on eggplant recommendation. Underrated vegetable.

Decanting adds more air, which opens up the wine (increasing flavor) and reduces the tongue-drying effects of excess tannins.

Albany Rifles
24 Apr 18,, 14:23
Decanting adds more air, which opens up the wine (increasing flavor) and reduces the tongue-drying effects of excess tannins.

Also helps if you get headaches from the tanins. Suffered for years. Learned the decanting trick about 4 years ago and now no problem.

Triple C
24 Apr 18,, 18:36
Wine needs to be in contact with oxygen for flavor. Traditionally, you should, before taking the libations, pop the cork and leave the bottle for 15-30 min. "in room temperature." But that old recommendation was written when wine was consumed only by aristocrats in drafty castles. You probably want to leave the wine in your decanter at a chilled room for 15 minutes, have a tasting, wait for another 15, repeat and compare. Once the stuff becomes delicious, have at it! Serious winos would jog notes for the best breathing time for each vintage, but that's wholly unnecessary in the spirit of the thread...

Oracle
24 Apr 18,, 19:22
This thread needs pictures.

Oracle
24 Apr 18,, 19:35
1. Use chicken thighs. So much more flavor for your buck.

2. Crock Pot is stupid easy way to cook some simple but good food. Sear any meat, chuck in some veggies, broth and any spice combo you can think of and you are eating well in about 4 hours.

3. Learn how to grill. Seriously, grilling is a great way to maximize flavors. NOTHING gets cooked well done! And I'm talking veggies too. Grilled romaine lettuce with some balsamic vinegar & evoo with salt in pepper is great! I grill year round in all kinds of weather.

4. Get a good selection of spices. Don't go cheap. Look at firms like Penzey's. Great selection and its fresh. Also get rid of old spices. If its a year old dump it.

5. Agree on cast iron...gotta have. Good, sharp knives. Must have. Clean properly and know how to sharpen them. Also use good cutting boards, measuring cups & spoons. I admit I eyeball most nowadays as I know what I like but if you are backing you need exact.

Cooking is art; baking is science.

6. When it comes to coffee I just want it black and hot. Currently use a Keurig as my wife and I each like a different blend...really convenient. I mostly drink Dunkin Donuts. I also have cut back to 2 cups in the AM and that's it.

7. New favorite easy dinner....buffalo chicken burgers. 1 pound ground chicken, 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs, 3 shallots chopped, 2 cloves garlic chopped. 1/3 cup wing sauce. Mix with your hands (need to keep hands wet with water or chicken will stick) and form into patties. Grill med high until centers reach 160 F. Flip once during cooking. Sprinkle with blue cheese crumbles and let melt. Serve on burger bun with ranch dressing and/or more wing sauce.

#1. Any meat, should be cooked with the bone. Bone (marrow) adds flavor like no other.
#2. Crock Pot is an awesome invention and makes life way easy and food great.
#3. Love fades, grilling is forever.

Cooking is art; baking is science.

Overall, top post and very good tips.

If you want to butcher your own animals/birds, you need to get your own butchers knife. Gone are the days of slaughtering goats, but I try my hands on free range chicken from time to time. The reason: shops usually throw away the head, feet etc. Makes great soup. Neck and backbone too.


Pro bachelor tip: drink lots of water to wash all that extra sodium and MSG out of your body, to avoid kidney stones and high blood pressure.

This is also critical if you also have an uber dairy-centric diet*, as excess calcium can also cause stones.

*not my fault dairy in MN is so cheap. A gallon of milk costs less than a 20 oz. bottled water

Great tip. I drink close to 4 litres of water everyday. Keeps me hydrated and fit.
In college I learnt how to finish off a 660ml bottle of strong beer in one shot, i.e, no glass nothing. Open the tip, put the bottle between the lips, and guzzle all down. Tip: Practice with a litre of water everyday, for a week.

Ironduke
24 Apr 18,, 19:47
This thread needs pictures.
Incoming.

Recipe:

Aldi's Whole Wheat Bread: 2 slices
Tomato Sauce: 4 oz
Pork and Beans: 1/2 can
Hot Sauce: Several generous dollops
2 slices of bologna
1 slice of American process cheese, torn into chunks for a lower calorie option (instead of two slices, helps keep the recipe low-fat/low-cholesterol)

Plus: the recommended amount of daily vegetables a la the Bachelor's Food Pyramid: 1 pickled baby carrot.

https://i.imgur.com/Ahos2U8.jpg

edit: just finished eating it. now i got to drink a litre of water to wash out the sodium/MSG

GVChamp
24 Apr 18,, 21:31
#1. Any meat, should be cooked with the bone. Bone (marrow) adds flavor like no other.

Flavor boost, but for certain cuts and cooking styles it really screws up with getting an even done-ness. I pretty much need to abandon bone-in rib chops because I like to fry em fast on weekdays, which means running the risk of the parts closest to the bone being a bit underdone. Fine for me, not so fine for my wife.

Oracle
25 Apr 18,, 04:52
Flavor boost, but for certain cuts and cooking styles it really screws up with getting an even done-ness. I pretty much need to abandon bone-in rib chops because I like to fry em fast on weekdays, which means running the risk of the parts closest to the bone being a bit underdone. Fine for me, not so fine for my wife.

I'm assuming the meat to be either lamb/pork, and you marinate it with pepper/salt, and maybe a little oil, and then shallow fry it?

Since time is a constraint, you need to do the marination a couple of hours before you cook. Which is to say, if you want them for dinner, marinate the meat in the morning and then go out for work. Having said that there are 2 ways to marinate them:

#1. Use a little curd in the marination and keep it in the fridge, take them out when you want to fry them.
#2. Use raw papaya paste for the marination and keep it in the fridge.

While I use the #1 step for all meat types (except beef) with Indian spices for marination, plus a little oil, the #2 step is for meat with a lot of connective tissue, such as beef or carabeef. Raw papaya paste tenderizes the connective tissues, so after you cook the meat, they don't taste like rubber and reduces the work that the teeth has to do. Don't overdo the papaya paste, it will kill your meat, and try it out on a weekend. You'll get used to it in no time.

Oracle
25 Apr 18,, 05:00
Am I the only guy in the world that thinks plain White rice, has a perfect clean taste all by itself?

Love going to the rice cooker and grabbing a big spoon of it right after its done. Also munching on the rice at the bottom of the cooker that gets crisp and crunchy

Yes. Most of us need gravy alongwith it, unless it's sticky rice or basmati rice. There should either be flavor or scent to eat white rice by itself.


Depends on the type of rice. I got a 20 lb bag of jasmine rice once, and it did have that perfect clean taste.

Those bags that you get for 99 cents a pound at the grocery though - they just don't have anything going on in the taste department unless it's used in a recipe or is used with flavoring/condiments.

Correct. Which is why I use normal rice to make Bachelors Chicken/Mutton Biryani in a pressure cooker. Restaurants though use Basmati and a heavy mix of spices.

Rice and Americans don't gel well, do they? Some of you must have worked in Asia.

Oracle
25 Apr 18,, 05:15
Incoming.

Recipe:

Aldi's Whole Wheat Bread: 2 slices
Tomato Sauce: 4 oz
Pork and Beans: 1/2 can
Hot Sauce: Several generous dollops
2 slices of bologna
1 slice of American process cheese, torn into chunks for a lower calorie option (instead of two slices, helps keep the recipe low-fat/low-cholesterol)

Plus: the recommended amount of daily vegetables a la the Bachelor's Food Pyramid: 1 pickled baby carrot.

https://i.imgur.com/Ahos2U8.jpg

edit: just finished eating it. now i got to drink a litre of water to wash out the sodium/MSG

Looks yummy. Never knew pork and bean come together in 1 can. I am guessing the cheese to be cheddar? Hot sauce is tabasco?

Talking about white rice, here is white rice and spicy chicken semi-gravy i.e., gravy without adding even a drop of water. Chicken has pieces of potatoes in it.

45818

45819

Ironduke
25 Apr 18,, 12:32
Looks yummy. Never knew pork and bean come together in 1 can. I am guessing the cheese to be cheddar? Hot sauce is tabasco?

Talking about white rice, here is white rice and spicy chicken semi-gravy i.e., gravy without adding even a drop of water. Chicken has pieces of potatoes in it.
Decades ago, there used to be big chunks of pork in the can of pork and beans. Now it's just a little chunk of porkfat, or a few little chunks. Not much at all.

The hot sauce is actually Louisiana Hot Sauce. Tastes different, much less hot, less concentrated.

American process cheese is an industrially concocted creation. Made out of milk, whey, and perhaps some cheddar cheese powder among other ingredients. It's the classic cheese used on the American cheeseburger. It comes pre-sliced, either in individually wrapped plastic sheets, or large slabs with 100s of slices.

What you got there looks pretty good... when I was in Bangalore I was eating great stuff all the time, curries, table service where you're brought whatever you want and it's served on a plantain leaf, etc. Eventually though, I switched to a very bland diet of rotis, deep-fried foods, biscuits, McDonald's etc. The real Indian food was great, but consuming too much of radically different foods than what I was accustomed to eating for however many years, threw me for a loop.

I think a lot of it had to do with the fact that in the Western diet, "complementary" flavors are used in cooking, while in Indian/Eastern cuisine, there is a preference for strongly contrasting flavors to be used. When one suddenly and abruptly eats too much of something different than what they're used to, the body is thrown into shock. I'm sure Indian travelers to the West experience this same phenomenon.

kato
25 Apr 18,, 19:19
Most of us need gravy alongwith it, unless it's sticky rice or basmati rice.
Which is a relative thing. If i absolutely have nothing else in the house i get the rice cooker going and whip up some sauce from a can of tomatoes and maybe some onions and a pretty hefty dose of spices. Depending on mood browned with a good helping of ketjap manis (indonesian soy sauce flavored syrup*) that counters the acidity of the tomatos, and if i have them around i might want to whip in some pre-boiled potatoes to give it more substance. Also works surprisingly well as a cold medicine with half a pound of ginger replacing the potatoes...

* My father got me into that. He added indonesian recipes to his cuisine as a bachelor back sometime in the early 60s, and employed them as a staple at family sunday dinners.

anil
25 Apr 18,, 19:51
Search for maggi noodles
You don't need anything else

Double Edge
26 Apr 18,, 13:12
Noodles is for teenagers. A German friend introduced me to something faster, more nutritious and no need for fire.

A bar of chocolate

A can of tuna

Scoop out tuna with bits of chocolate

Done

You can pull off an all nighter with just that

Some bread or dry fruits optional

kato
26 Apr 18,, 17:41
Some bread or dry fruits optional
Canned fish between two pieces of sandwich bread. Both obtainable in any supermarket in Germany and a pocket knife for scooping the fish onto the bread and spreading it a bit is all you need.

Personally like mackerel in tomato sauce cans for that. Which reminds me... *checks cupboard* ah, still good till August and October respectively.

Ironduke
27 Apr 18,, 01:59
Personally like mackerel in tomato sauce cans for that. Which reminds me... *checks cupboard* ah, still good till August and October respectively.
We got that at the Aldi here in the US. I've never developed a taste for strongly flavored seafood though, probably due to food poisoning from eating improperly cooked catfish at a young age. The tomato sauce/hot sauce would, I think, make it more palatable though. There's also a ton of healthy omega fatty acids in them. I might try to see if I can develop a taste for this type of stuff. I do eat tuna fairly regularly, and whitefish, lobster, shrimp, and crab on occasion when eating out.

Needless to say, those oily fish are the kind of stuff you eat at home. Then open the windows and pop in a piece of mint gum afterward.

Speaking of Aldi, I think I'm going to start making braunschweiger sandwiches with mustard, cheese, and onion again soon. There's actually a fairly decent selection of select imported German foods there. I'm a big fan of the mustards, the heavy pumpernickel/whole grain rye loaves, jaffa cakes, and some other stuff. Es schmeckt mir gut.

Ironduke
28 Apr 18,, 11:22
Just invented what I've decided to call a "Bachelor Roll-up". I took my inspiration from the food called Fruit Roll-Ups (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit_Roll-Ups).

Ingredients
1 slice of bologna (laid flat) [or any other type of thin sliced deli/sandwich meat you have on hand)
1 slice of American cheese [or any type of sliced cheese you have available]
1/2 of a beef stick

Simply place the sliced cheese on top of the sliced meat, then roll it around half of a beef stick, and voila, you've made yourself a Bachelor Roll-Up.

kato
28 Apr 18,, 12:39
I sometimes do that with pickles instead of the beef stick.

Double Edge
28 Apr 18,, 13:47
Canned fish between two pieces of sandwich bread. Both obtainable in any supermarket in Germany and a pocket knife for scooping the fish onto the bread and spreading it a bit is all you need.

Personally like mackerel in tomato sauce cans for that. Which reminds me... *checks cupboard* ah, still good till August and October respectively.

I don't get too much choice of fish in India, but fried mackerel is a favourite. Coated with a chili marinade. On the coast they sell them like that on the road.

Tuna with oil packs in more calories than in brine. Flavoured is up to you. Non flavoured can be mixed with mayo for yet more calories

In germany there are heavy breads. This bread is considered well made if you can kill someone by throwing a loaf at them.

I wish i could make this bread because nobody sells it in India. This is the best most nutritious bread i've ever had.

Until such time kerela parathas do the job. To difficult to make. I order in.

Or chappatis. Can make those.

Ironduke
28 Apr 18,, 18:11
I sometimes do that with pickles instead of the beef stick.
We do that in the part of the US where I'm from.

Thinly sliced ham, spread cream cheese (Frischkase, I suppose is the German equivalent) on the ham, wrap it around a pickle.

Cut the resulting creation into one inch tall pieces, put a toothpick in, and serve as hor d'ouevres.

It's probably a tradition that came from Germany.

kato
28 Apr 18,, 18:44
It's probably a tradition that came from Germany.
The traditional version in Germany is to just wrap up Asparagus in ham. No cheese, and not cut down. As finger food for parties became an in thing in the 50s, but apparently existed before that too.

Nowadays ham wraps as hors d'ouevres - or as part of a salad - exist with about every quirky filling you can imagine over here. The version with cream cheese you describe only really came up around here with the lowcarb movement in recent years, and was probably (re)imported from the US. The more traditional "binders" in Germany are mayonnaise (that's the 50s thing) or horseradish (mostly in the South, seems an Austrian invention).

Ironduke
01 May 18,, 21:05
Bachelor Lemonade:

1 empty Powerade/Gatorade bottle
30 oz of cold tap water
2 oz lemon juice, from the 1L bottle that can be bought at Aldi
Splenda packet (alternate sweetener/number of packets, to taste)

Shake a little bit. Put it in the fridge, then take it with you when you're on the go.

Cost: ~5 or 10 cents.

Gun Grape
01 May 18,, 23:49
It only takes about 15 min to make a 1/2 gal of fresh lemonade. And it taste a whole lot better. Plus better for you

Ironduke
02 May 18,, 00:03
It only takes about 15 min to make a 1/2 gal of fresh lemonade. And it taste a whole lot better. Plus better for you
I have nothing to juice lemons with. Nor do I have a kitchen. Nor do I want a juicer. Like the Bunn Coffee Maker - these sorts of things are deadweight to a guy like me. If I bought all these things, I'd have to rent a bigger storage locker here in town when I move to the west coast in a few months. I'm currently trying to sell everything I don't need on Craigslist, not acquire more stuff. :-)

I fill my water bottles from the bathroom sink tap. The lemon juice from Aldi and the Splenda packet makes a perfectly acceptable ersatz lemonade.

Gun Grape
02 May 18,, 01:09
I have nothing to juice lemons with. Nor do I have a kitchen. Nor do I want a juicer. Like the Bunn Coffee Maker - these sorts of things are deadweight to a guy like me. If I bought all these things, I'd have to rent a bigger storage locker here in town when I move to the west coast in a few months. I'm currently trying to sell everything I don't need on Craigslist, not acquire more stuff. :-)

I fill my water bottles from the bathroom sink tap. The lemon juice from Aldi and the Splenda packet makes a perfectly acceptable ersatz lemonade.

It takes a flat surface to roll the lemon. Cut in half, Then squeeze. You can squeeze it over a spoon to catch the seeds if you like

Ironduke
02 May 18,, 01:14
It takes a flat surface to roll the lemon. Cut in half, Then squeeze. You can squeeze it over a spoon to catch the seeds if you like
Ok, so I don't have to buy a juicer. But that still means I would have to buy a pitcher. I don't want one. :-)

I just buy liter size Powerade Zeros and that zero-cal sparkling water at Aldi, and re-use the bottles.

My entire kitchen set consists of one coffee cup, which I use for everything, a can opener, four spoons (but I only need one spork), some paper plates, and a Leatherman. I don't need bowls, because stuff you eat in a bowl comes pre-dished in a can.

Once I get the spork situation sorted out, I can throw the spoons in the trash, and my kitchen set will be complete.

Gun Grape
02 May 18,, 01:26
Get rid of the fork and knife and use metal chopsticks instead :) No need for a spoon either. Drink the soup.

The powerade bottle can be used as a pitcher.

Ironduke
02 May 18,, 01:36
Get rid of the fork and knife and use metal chopsticks instead :) No need for a spoon either. Drink the soup.

The powerade bottle can be used as a pitcher.
How do I eat pork and beans and refried beans with chopsticks?

I don't buy canned soup. I suppose though I can drink the canned peas and canned corn. There's enough water in the can where I can pour from the can directly into my mouth. Might be a few pieces that get stuck to the bottom I can't get at, but no big deal.

I might be able to drink the pork and beans too, I've never tried that, but I'm concerned about the higher viscosity of the pork and beans compared to corn/peas. There might be a whole third of a can of pork and beans that goes to waste because they got stuck to the bottom of the can. I suppose I can kind of dig out the stragglers with the chopsticks though.

I don't have a fork right now. It's one of two reasons I want to get a spork.

Wouldn't I have to get a funnel to funnel the lemon juice into the Powerade bottle? I don't want a funnel. I suppose I can take my Leatherman though, and cut the top off the Powerade bottle. That way I have an extra cup too, if I ever have company over.

To be honest though, I'd just rather suck the lemon, then eat the pulp. I used to do that with limes too.

Gun Grape
02 May 18,, 01:53
How do I eat pork and beans and refried beans with chopsticks?

The same way you eat them with a spoon or fork.


I don't buy canned soup. I suppose though I can drink the canned peas and canned corn. There's enough water in the can where I can pour from the can directly into my mouth. Might be a few pieces that get stuck to the bottom I can't get at, but no big deal.

I might be able to drink the pork and beans too, I've never tried that, but I'm concerned about the higher viscosity of the canned beans compared to corn/peas.

You eat the solids with the chopsticks. Pork pieces, beans cut corn all easy to get to with chopsticks.

Just think of chopsticks as long fingers. They are about the only thing I eat with. For some weird reason, the wife makes us use forks when eating spaghetti. All other noodle dishes we use chopsticks.

Not sure why but I noticed the same thing in both Japan and Korea. Forks for spaghetti.

Instead of a funnel, just put the edge of the spoon on the lip of the poweraid bottle

Ironduke
02 May 18,, 01:57
I know how to use chopsticks. I use them every time I go to the Chinese buffet.

Never thought to use them anywhere else though. It's a good idea.

I'll get a pair at secondhand store down the street. I suppose they'd be easy to travel with too.

Ironduke
12 May 18,, 11:46
Bachelor Ham and Cheese Sandwich

Ingredients: Ham, Cheese

If Ham > Cheese, the ham is the bread
If Cheese > Ham, the cheese is the bread

If you need some sort of sandwich spread, cream cheese or sour cream is a perfectly acceptable substitute for mayonnaise.
__________________________________________________ ____________________________________________
Edit: SITREP on the Ironduke Spork Crisis of 2018. I issued an order over the cables, and a solution is incoming, courtesy of the USPS and eBay.

After hours of searching local discount stores, I finally gave up and ordered one online.

Not having one has bothered me badly, and it was causing me too much undue stress. Once it arrives, I'll once and for all be free of all of the anxiety I was experiencing, that resulted from me not owning this vital tool.

Now I can also avoid cross-contamination from using my Leatherman Surge (https://www.leatherman.com/surge-3.html) for everything.

https://i.imgur.com/42cpKy8.jpg

Ironduke
14 May 18,, 08:30
Breakfast this morning:

2 Turkey Cheddar Brats, on whole wheat bread, with melted pepperjack cheese, pickle spears and mustard (all from Aldi)
1 Deschutes Mirror Pond Pale Ale (https://www.deschutesbrewery.com/beer/mirror-pond-pale-ale/)
10 pickled baby carrots (all from Aldi too)
1 small bar of Moser Roth 85% Dark Cacao Chocolate (https://www.amazon.com/Moser-Roth-German-Dark-Chocolate/dp/B00K09EHVE)

Wish I'd taken a picture.

DOR
14 May 18,, 09:30
I know how to use chopsticks. I use them every time I go to the Chinese buffet.

Never thought to use them anywhere else though. It's a good idea.

I'll get a pair at secondhand store down the street. I suppose they'd be easy to travel with too.

Chopsticks are the best device for getting toast out of the toaster.

Gun Grape
15 May 18,, 02:07
Chopsticks are the best device for getting toast out of the toaster.

IDK, sticking metal chopsticks in a toaster doesn't seem like a good idea to me.

Maybe I'll get the wife to try it:)

DOR
15 May 18,, 09:07
IDK, sticking metal chopsticks in a toaster doesn't seem like a good idea to me.

Maybe I'll get the wife to try it:)

I never use metal ones. Wood's fine, as long as they're sterilized.

Ironduke
16 May 18,, 03:28
Bachelor Chili

1 can of chili beans in chili sauce
1 turkey cheddar bratwurst, torn by hand into bite size chunks
1 slice of pepperjack cheese on top
1 Taco Bell Fire sauce packet
1 Taco Bell Diablo sauce packet

Microwave for 2-3 minutes.

After microwaving:

3 heavy dollops of Louisiana Hot Sauce
1 huge dollop of sour cream

Enjoy.

Gun Grape
16 May 18,, 03:59
I never use metal ones. Wood's fine, as long as they're sterilized.

Depends on what I'm eating. Flat metal Korean chopsticks are great for separating foods like kimchee or Kalbi into bite size pieces. Most of the time its Japanese style/length wooden ones though

Oracle
17 May 18,, 20:53
45943

This is what happens when you add lemon to warm milk. Indians have been using this technique for centuries to make Cottage Cheese. My mom uses alum, I use lemon. The end-product is the same. I don't like paneer=cottage cheese though. It's got no taste of its own. Bland.

Oracle
17 May 18,, 20:55
Identify the item...

45944

Gun Grape
18 May 18,, 00:28
bamboo shoots

Oracle
18 May 18,, 06:16
bamboo shoots

Close. I call it desi asparagus. Found in Bangladesh, NE India upto West Bengal. It's a delicacy, made with dry fish.

Ironduke
18 May 18,, 15:35
Ran out of coffee a couple days ago, and have forgotten to buy some more the last couple of days.

Is the solution to this problem to go to a coffeeshop this morning, and buy my cup of coffee?

Nope.

I ran some water through my 5-cup coffee maker, and am drinking cups of tea prepared with 5 bags of black tea.

Add in some whole milk and splenda, problem solved.

Ironduke
20 May 18,, 15:35
Get rid of the fork and knife and use metal chopsticks instead :) No need for a spoon either. Drink the soup.
Found a pair of wooden chopsticks.

Right now I'm eating two turkey andouillies (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andouille), cut into pieces, and smothered in spicy brown mustard.

Because the sausages were cut into small pieces, smothered in sauce, and chopsticks are being used to eat it, this is most definitely German-American-Chinese fusion cuisine (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusion_cuisine).

Also featured: my world-famous pickled baby carrots, chunks of New York sharp white cheddar, hand torn, and mild pepper rings, all courtesy of Aldi. Dessert will be a small bar of 85% Moser Roth dark chocolate (https://www.amazon.com/Moser-Roth-German-Dark-Chocolate/dp/B00K09EHVE). All will be washed down with my equally world-famous bachelor lemonade (http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/showthread.php?t=67063&page=4&p=1040412&viewfull=1#post1040412).

Gordon Ramsay (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Ramsay) should step aside, I'm going to make my own TV show, and call it... Iron (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Chef_America) Ramsay. It'll probably be on public access TV to begin with, much like Tom Green (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Green) and Stuart Smalley (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuart_Smalley) originally were, but I'm sure I can make millions if I keep at it. I might even open a chain of restaurants that serve up my increasingly world-famous recipes.

https://i.imgur.com/BTKuyGr.png

Ironduke
29 May 18,, 02:58
Switched it up from the $5 30oz tin of ground coffee from Aldi to the $1 2.82oz jar of instant coffee from my local dollar store.

Cons

tastes even worse than the terrible tasting Aldi coffee

Pros
much easier to prepare, simply microwave a cup of hot water, add instant coffee, milk, and splenda
can take some with me on the go, and make coffee wherever hot water is to be found (I'm sure cold water would work too)
less mess, no annoying coffee filters to worry about emptying into the trash
don't even have to buy coffee filters at all
don't even need a coffee maker anymore either
like the terrible tasting Aldi coffee... it still has caffeine
In other Bachelor Cuisine news, I recently had some pain in both of my kidneys. I figured it was due to the excess calcium from my massive dairy intake (~60%+ of my caloric intake), excess sodium from all the processed foods I eat, combined with a bit of dehydration.

Luckily, a cure was found. I got a $4 liter-sized bottle of 100% pure cranberry juice from Aldi, and doubled my intake of Bachelor Lemonade (http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/showthread.php?t=67063&page=4&p=1040412&viewfull=1#post1040412), and the kidney pain was gone.

My food pyramid:
https://i.imgur.com/kimetP4.png
No chips, french fries, soda, breakfast cereals, sugars (except in ice cream), or refined grain products (except as protein delivery devices), etc.

To finish up my post, I've made a recent discovery. Whole milk + instant coffee = caffeine + nutrition = absolutely delicious.

Since milk is 50% cheaper than Mountain Dew in the Midwest, and is roughly equal in price elsewhere, I highly recommend anyone who likes milk to switch from drinking caffeinated sodas to stirring however much instant coffee they like into however much milk they care to drink.

You could even grab a bottled pint of milk on the go, drop instant coffee in, shake it, and voila, you're good to go.

Let the cows turn that corn into milk, instead of having it turned into HFCS, and support America's dairy farmers.

Albany Rifles
29 May 18,, 15:51
I have to say if your restricted culinary choices are due to a lack of funds, okay.

But if you have the money you owe it to yourself to learn how to cook well and eat good food.

Life's too short to settle for crappy food.

Oracle
29 May 18,, 16:02
Switched it up from the $5 30oz tin of ground coffee from Aldi to the $1 2.82oz jar of instant coffee from my local dollar store.

Cons

tastes even worse than the terrible tasting Aldi coffee

Pros
much easier to prepare, simply microwave a cup of hot water, add instant coffee, milk, and splenda
can take some with me on the go, and make coffee wherever hot water is to be found (I'm sure cold water would work too)
less mess, no annoying coffee filters to worry about emptying into the trash
don't even have to buy coffee filters at all
don't even need a coffee maker anymore either
like the terrible tasting Aldi coffee... it still has caffeine
In other Bachelor Cuisine news, I recently had some pain in both of my kidneys. I figured it was due to the excess calcium from my massive dairy intake (~60%+ of my caloric intake), excess sodium from all the processed foods I eat, combined with a bit of dehydration.

Luckily, a cure was found. I got a $4 liter-sized bottle of 100% pure cranberry juice from Aldi, and doubled my intake of Bachelor Lemonade (http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/showthread.php?t=67063&page=4&p=1040412&viewfull=1#post1040412), and the kidney pain was gone.

My food pyramid:
https://i.imgur.com/kimetP4.png
No chips, french fries, soda, breakfast cereals, sugars (except in ice cream), or refined grain products (except as protein delivery devices), etc.

To finish up my post, I've made a recent discovery. Whole milk + instant coffee = caffeine + nutrition = absolutely delicious.

Since milk is 50% cheaper than Mountain Dew in the Midwest, and is roughly equal in price elsewhere, I highly recommend anyone who likes milk to switch from drinking caffeinated sodas to stirring however much instant coffee they like into however much milk they care to drink.

You could even grab a bottled pint of milk on the go, drop instant coffee in, shake it, and voila, you're good to go.

Let the cows turn that corn into milk, instead of having it turned into HFCS, and support America's dairy farmers.

Things that need to be corrected in your food pyramid:

Meat should replace diary products at the bottom of the pyramid. Red Meat = proteins + cholesterol. YOLO! Beef, goat meat, lamb, pork, duck (pork with wings), pigeon, rabbit, venison etc etc.

Beer should replace Meat in the pyramid. We're bachelors afterall and need to wash away our tears from time to time.

Rest is okay. :D

Ironduke
29 May 18,, 21:52
I have to say if your restricted culinary choices are due to a lack of funds, okay.

But if you have the money you owe it to yourself to learn how to cook well and eat good food.

Life's too short to settle for crappy food.
I know how to cook quite well, from scratch, and quite healthy. Used to do so when I had such phenomenal, long-forgotten luxuries as stoves, freezers, regular-sized refrigerators, a kitchen sink to rinse and wash things in, and cupboards to store things in.

I have none of these things.

In the gig economy, everything is temporary, unstable, unpredictable, and short-term. I work as an on-call dispatch technician. Trying to live the "American Dream" lifestyle is a big mistake if one has such employment. One has to keep things to the barest of essentials. Even if one could afford all of these luxuries one month, one might not be able to the next month.

I'm sure everybody in New York City, for example, would love to have a full luxurious granite-top kitchen with every amenity. But nope, half the city subsists on 99 cent pizza.

I see humor in the situation, hence the reason for these self-deprecating posts in "Bachelor Cuisine".

To be honest, I wouldn't trade what I've got right now for a $10 million mansion. I prefer this lifestyle. It's a wonderful and beautiful thing to be unburdened by material possessions and a strict schedule, and to have freedom.

Freedom > things, in my book. Even if diet has to suffer a bit for it.

Ironduke
30 May 18,, 03:03
Things that need to be corrected in your food pyramid:

Meat should replace diary products at the bottom of the pyramid. Red Meat = proteins + cholesterol. YOLO! Beef, goat meat, lamb, pork, duck (pork with wings), pigeon, rabbit, venison etc etc.

Beer should replace Meat in the pyramid. We're bachelors afterall and need to wash away our tears from time to time.

Rest is okay. :D
Cholesterol is actually a muscle-building naturally occurring steroid. Few people know this, but it's true.

Beer moves to the #2 spot on the pyramid on the weekends. Given my work schedule, a weekend can be any day of the week. I only drink 2 beers a night when I have to be to work the next day, or I have other projects to do that require sobriety.

One of the reasons I consume so much dairy is due to a plethora of injuries to my left leg. I have damage to bone, muscle, cartilage, and ligament from ankle to knee to hip. The injuries to the left leg have caused me to overcompensate with the right, and my right ankle is getting worn out.

Dairy has protein and calcium, and fat-soluble vitamins, and besides the fact that it's delicious, nutritious, and inexpensive, I eat/drink it for medicinal reasons too.

Ironduke
02 Jun 18,, 16:50
Since I've spoken so much about Quad Whoppers and McQuads, I thought I'd share a picture of one I concocted at 1am last night.

Bacon McQuad (McDonald's)

Ingredients:
2 Bacon McDoubles
minus the bottom buns
smash them together

not pictured: the Double McChicken I made much the same way, and had just eaten before I took this picture

https://i.imgur.com/Bg4B0Fs.png

Nutrition Facts:
Protein: 112%
Vitamin C: 20%
Calcium: 40%
Iron: 40%
Cholesterol (a muscle-building steroid precursor): 56%
Saturated Fat: 100%
Fiber: 16%

Not bad.

Double Edge
03 Jun 18,, 12:53
Big kahuna burger FTW : D

http://www.foodrepublic.com/recipes/big-kahuna-burger-recipe/

Oracle
03 Jun 18,, 16:19
Cholesterol is actually a muscle-building naturally occurring steroid. Few people know this, but it's true.

Oh, that's news to me. I thought excess cholesterol causes plaque that causes heart-attacks & strokes.


Beer moves to the #2 spot on the pyramid on the weekends. Given my work schedule, a weekend can be any day of the week. I only drink 2 beers a night when I have to be to work the next day, or I have other projects to do that require sobriety.

Indians drink to lose sobriety. :D

Btw, strong or lager? I have stopped drinking beer as it makes me lazy, plus I don't know why even foreign beers brewed in India has a bad after-taste. Another reason why I stopped drinking beers is that there are very few places where we get chilled beer. Feels disgusting to have warm or semi-chilled beers. But, when I do go to a pub, I drink Stella and Corona. Stella (strong) being my favourite. All lagers though and tiny bottles. :(


One of the reasons I consume so much dairy is due to a plethora of injuries to my left leg. I have damage to bone, muscle, cartilage, and ligament from ankle to knee to hip. The injuries to the left leg have caused me to overcompensate with the right, and my right ankle is getting worn out.

Dairy has protein and calcium, and fat-soluble vitamins, and besides the fact that it's delicious, nutritious, and inexpensive, I eat/drink it for medicinal reasons too.

Yes, actually everybody should have diary intake in some form everyday. I drink coffee with cow's milk, and clarified butter that's made at home. Apart from that salted butter, cheese sometimes.

Ironduke
03 Jun 18,, 17:15
Oh, that's news to me. I thought excess cholesterol causes plaque that causes heart-attacks & strokes.
Cholesterols, animal protein, cartilage, and fats gave people, and especially men, strength, muscle mass, and vitality in primitive societies, when life was physically arduous.

Excess cholesterol eaten for one's entire life might kill one at 58, but when lifespans averaged 40-50 years, few lived long enough to experience death from this. Disease or traumatic injury were far more likely causes of death than cholesterol for 99.99% of human history.

It's almost like Alzheimer's. Unheard of until modern medicine pushed lifespans into the 80s and beyond. Almost nobody lived long enough to get most cancers either, until the 20th century.

Alzheimer's, strokes, heart attacks, cancer... all First World problems (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_World_problem).

My heavy dairy/meat diet is actually working miracles as we speak on my injured left leg. I've badly injured it four times now in different locations in the last 14 years, my Achilles tendon, a badly torn calf muscle, torn anterior crucial ligament/meniscus, and was also T-boned once by an SUV whilst bicycling, etc.

I've still got a ways to go on my dairy/protein therapy, but I'll cut back on consumption as soon as it's completely healed, then eat more fresh vegetables and fruits.

You are what you eat. If you were to injure your cartilage, for example, eat animal cartilage. Damage your bones, consume dairy. Tear a muscle, eat steak.

If one is sedentary and sits in an office in front of a computer screen all day, sits in front of a computer/TV all day when you get home, and sits in a driver's chair whilst driving everywhere for errands and commuting, never gets injured, and wants to live to 100, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, or be a vegetarian.


Btw, strong or lager?
Lagers, pilsners, India Pale Ale, witbier, etc. I'm not a big fan of stouts or porters, even though they do have B-vitamins and other nutritious stuff in them. It's heavy, like a meal in a glass. If I were hungry, but all I had was a Guinness, I'd drink that for food.

Gun Grape
03 Jun 18,, 19:27
You really need to speak to a nutritionist.

There is no reason for a person to eat dairy after they are a baby.

And this whole must eat meat to repair muscle is way off. You don't need meat , you need foods high in vitamin C. That's what builds protein in your body to repair bones and cartilage. You need to be eating way more fresh green leafy veggies. Spinach, broccoli, fruits, Nuts Fresh fish for the Omega 3s.

McDonalds, milk and beer is a quick way to a short life. Or one full of pain because your injuries didn't heal right.

I've had 4 operations on my knees, broken ribs, broke collarbone among other injuries, had chronic kidney stones and at no time did the Doctor tell me I needed more meat and dairy.
And once I cut down on red meat and dairy, ( no more chilli, cheese and Sauerkraut dogs with a cup of coffee for breakfast) and started eating healthier I had less injuries and feel better.


Strokes cancer and Heart Attacks are not "first world problems". People were dying of those way back. But science and medicine wasn't advanced to a point to identify the cause. But we are finding it now

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2710914/Ancient-Egyptians-suffered-modern-diseases-CT-scans-reveal-mummies-blocked-arteries.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/02/science/mummies-smallpox-vilnius-lithuania-crypt.html



Its not just sedentary people that eat lots of fruit and veggies. (and no I'm not a vegetarian)

http://www.businessinsider.com/elite-athletes-who-are-vegan-and-what-made-them-switch-their-diet-2017-10#david-haye-boxer-5

Pedicabby
03 Jun 18,, 19:45
Another reason why I stopped drinking beers is that there are very few places where we get chilled beer. Feels disgusting to have warm or semi-chilled beers.

Really? I have never had a problem finding cold beer in India. I have had problems finding beer though.

Pedicabby
03 Jun 18,, 19:47
As for bachelor food, I am havin KD and beer for dinner. Yum yum!

Ironduke
03 Jun 18,, 20:05
you need foods high in vitamin C. That's what builds protein in your body to repair bones and cartilage. You need to be eating way more fresh green leafy veggies. Spinach, broccoli, fruits, Nuts Fresh fish for the Omega 3s.
2 liters of lemon juice per week adds up to 540% Vitamin C per day. Plenty of nuts in my diet too.

If you want to buy me a refrigerator to keep the fish and vegetables in, a stove and pans to cook the fish with, and a house to put all these things in, I'll give you payment instructions via PM. I think $150,000 ought to cover it, if you've got that kind of money to throw around. ;-)

Whenever I think someone ought to be doing something, or that they need certain things, I almost always give them the money for it, or purchase the thing and give it to them. I put my money where my mouth is. :-)

Seriously though, I'll be eating my fruits and veg though once I get my 5 cubic foot refrigerator back from where it's being stored. The one I've got, it's either 2 or 3 cu ft. I'll have 7-8 cu ft of refrigerator some time soon.


As for bachelor food, I am havin KD and beer for dinner. Yum yum!
What's KD?

Gun Grape
03 Jun 18,, 20:45
2 liters of lemon juice per week adds up to 540% Vitamin C per day. Plenty of nuts in my diet too.

If you want to buy me a refrigerator to keep the fish and vegetables in, a stove and pans to cook the fish with, and a house to put all these things in, I'll give you payment instructions via PM. I think $150,000 ought to cover it, if you've got that kind of money to throw around. ;-)

Whenever I think someone ought to be doing something, or that they need certain things, I almost always give them the money for it, or purchase the thing and give it to them. I put my money where my mouth is. :-)

Seriously though, I'll be eating my fruits and veg though once I get my 5 cubic foot refrigerator back from where it's being stored. The one I've got, it's either 2 or 3 cu ft. I'll have 7-8 cu ft of refrigerator some time soon.


What's KD?

Buy fresh fish/meat and veggies every day. You know, what people did before refrigerators were a common household object. Instead of running to McDs, go to the grocery store and buy what you need for a meal. Leftovers you take for lunch the next day
A hot plate at wallie-world runs about $12. Get a cheap flat bottom wok. It can be used to fry stuff also deep enough that you can cook pasta in it.

I didn't get married till I was 28. And I know a thing or two about moving often and sudden deployments. Eating good really doesn't take a lot of effort

Ironduke
03 Jun 18,, 20:49
Buy fresh fish/meat and veggies every day. You know, what people did before refrigerators were a common household object. Instead of running to McDs, go to the grocery store and buy what you need for a meal. Leftovers you take for lunch the next day
A hot plate at wallie-world runs about $12. Get a cheap flat bottom wok. It can be used to fry stuff also deep enough that you can cook pasta in it.

I didn't get married till I was 28. And I know a thing or two about moving often and sudden deployments. Eating good really doesn't take a lot of effort
Hot plates are banned by my lease. I only have a microwave. I also sleep in the room I prepare food and eat it in, so if I want fish or seafood I'll get some poached or broiled fish at a Chinese place.

I'm not going to cook fish in my bedroom. I'm sure you don't cook seafood in your bedroom either. ;-)

I eat fresh fruits and vegetables. Bananas, apples, avocados, and tomatoes with salt and pepper on them. Occasionally grapes and strawberries. Baby carrots too. I only buy whole grain bread, and often eat steel cut oats with raisins in it for breakfast.

I don't really eat that poorly. I just play up the bad parts of my diet for amusement. The McDonald's I ate a couple days ago was the first time I'd had fast food in 3 weeks. Other than authentic Mexican tacos that is, served on corn tortillas with some vegetables and even a lime, which are actually semi-healthy.

I walk and bike everywhere for work, errands, and when I go out, so I'm probably consuming and burning 3500 calories most days. There's plenty of room in 3500 calories a day to mostly eat dairy, meat, legumes, and nuts, and still get several servings of fruits and vegetables in.


Strokes cancer and Heart Attacks are not "first world problems". People were dying of those way back. But science and medicine wasn't advanced to a point to identify the cause. But we are finding it now
Might be a slightly hyperbolic to call it a "First World problem", but what's a greater tragedy, a man dropping dead from a heart attack at age 58, or a child starving to death before he learns how to walk? So it's kind of a "First World problem".

People were historically far more likely to die from starvation, traumatic injury, or disease than they were from problems related to cholesterol. Salt might cause high blood pressure, but it also kept people alive, due to not dying from food poisoning or starving to death because their food rotted before they could eat it.

The elaborate network of cold chains we have in this country and across the world is the major reason we can eat "healthy". Fresh vegetables and fruits were a luxury for most of human history, at least in Europe and other temperate/cold regions. You ate them when they came into season, and preserved them for the other 50 weeks a year with methods that are today considered unhealthy. Same with fish. Fish was more often dried, salted, or preserved in lye than it was eaten fresh.

Cold chains are a First World luxury. Without them, it's mostly back to salting, drying, pickling, canning, etc., except when fresh produce is in season. And one has to have sufficient refrigeration space on their end of the cold chain for many of the foods that arrive to us via the rest of the cold chain from all over the country and the rest of the world.

Ironduke
03 Jun 18,, 21:10
Another reason why I stopped drinking beers is that there are very few places where we get chilled beer. Feels disgusting to have warm or semi-chilled beers. But, when I do go to a pub, I drink Stella and Corona. Stella (strong) being my favourite. All lagers though and tiny bottles. :(
Hard Rock Cafe off of MG Road in Bangalore. That is, if you're in Bangalore, which I'm assuming you are. Western prices though.

If you have access to a clean body of water, and you're out enjoying nature or whatever, there's an old fisherman's trick. Put the beers in a sealed bucket, tie a rope to the handle of the bucket, and lower it to the bottom of the lake, or as far as the rope will let you. When you get thirsty, raise the bucket, take a beer out, and lower the bucket back down.

At least where I live, that chills the beers down to somewhere between 8 and 15 degrees Celsius (45-55F)

Oracle
04 Jun 18,, 15:33
Lagers, pilsners, India Pale Ale, witbier, etc. I'm not a big fan of stouts or porters, even though they do have B-vitamins and other nutritious stuff in them. It's heavy, like a meal in a glass. If I were hungry, but all I had was a Guinness, I'd drink that for food.

Don't know about the stuff in bold. I like my beer strong. I tasted Guinness once in London, didn't like the taste, but I'm up for Stella Artois anytime. Stella is like the father of Indian brew Kingfisher. But, nowadays I drink next to nothing of beers.


Really? I have never had a problem finding cold beer in India. I have had problems finding beer though.

Actually I should have been clear. Pubs have chilled beer, many other shops also have those. I am speaking of situations when say for e.g., I have to clean my flat or say a friend dropped in, a chilled beer makes it easy on the bones to clean the house (maid would find reasons not to come once or twice a week). For that purpose I won't go to a pub or to a mall to buy beer. Bangalore is filled with tiny/medium shops that sell alcohol, where they keep beers on the fridge. Some of those fridges are very old, some even rusting to the point where it is beyond a fix. Such shops are in the vicinity of my flat, so naturally I used to go there, buy and drink those warm bad tasting beers.

Problem finding beers in India? Where? You get alcohol even in Gujarat, black ofcourse.

Oracle
04 Jun 18,, 19:54
Hard Rock Cafe off of MG Road in Bangalore. That is, if you're in Bangalore, which I'm assuming you are. Western prices though.

If you have access to a clean body of water, and you're out enjoying nature or whatever, there's an old fisherman's trick. Put the beers in a sealed bucket, tie a rope to the handle of the bucket, and lower it to the bottom of the lake, or as far as the rope will let you. When you get thirsty, raise the bucket, take a beer out, and lower the bucket back down.

At least where I live, that chills the beers down to somewhere between 8 and 15 degrees Celsius (45-55F)

Used to frequent HRC during 2008-10, that is when it opened IIRC. Hip crowd from the call-centres of Bangalore, some college kids and us IT folks. Then it became all about rich college kids and call-centre guys and less IT folks. Legends of Rock was okay too. There was another pub that played hard rock at Jayanagar 4th block, don't remember the name - 2003-04ish was the time. Small but cozy place. Sotally Tober was good too when it opened, then it became crowded, the girls were hot - most of them from the many start-up scene of Koramangala, plus rich college kids. Then beer cafe became my mainstay. Then I stopped going to pubs as finding a companion became tough (friends raising kids and all), then I started drinking warm beer and later stopped it altogether. And no, I'm not in Bangalore right now.

I don't drink weekly now. Whenever I am in the mood, I go out, buy some rum or vodka, gulp down 3 pegs. That's it. Keeps me sober, and I wake the next morning fresh. Gone are those days of heavy drinking.

Your trick about a clean body of water, bucket etc - anybody who drinks have done it atleast once in their lifetime. When I was in school, we had a river run through the jungle. Since it was hilly, the river was shallow, and we would tuck the beer bottles at the side of the boulders/stones in the river. Good trick, though we drank to get high, not for quenching our thirst. :D

Oracle
19 Jun 18,, 20:06
Jungle Legend: Monsoon rains are the best time to catch and cook exotic meat {porcupine, wild boar, tortoise, bonroe (some animal like an ant-eater) etc}.

So went hunting with school friends deep in the jungle, with 2 barrel gun, spears and machetes. 3 days worth of walking, sleeping around the fire-place inside makeshift camps, then continuing the journey. Wasn't lucky, until the last night a friend heard some sound while he and another were drinking. It was a rat snake, big and black. They ate it for break-fast the next morning, said it tastes like chicken. I made do with Maggi noodles. Having lived in between civilisation, can't really go back to primal ways or jump so low in the foodchain.

It was a fun outing. I have a regret, now that I am back home. I should have tasted the snake. Everybody said, and repeated, it tastes like chicken. It's not everyday that one gets to taste wild chickens that slides and hisses. :D

Ironduke
20 Jun 18,, 02:05
Stella is like the father of Indian brew Kingfisher. But, nowadays I drink next to nothing of beers.
I drank quite a bit of Kingfisher lager when I was in Bangalore. The liter-sized bottles. Every night when I was in my hotel room, an Bangalore policeman would knock on my hotel room door and present me a bottle of it in a brown paper bag. I never had to pay for beer when I was in India, except when I went to the Hard Rock Cafe.


Used to frequent HRC during 2008-10, that is when it opened IIRC. Hip crowd from the call-centres of Bangalore, some college kids and us IT folks. Then it became all about rich college kids and call-centre guys and less IT folks.
I'd go there with an Aussie I'd run into randomly on MG Road. In a truly foreign country, an American and an Aussie are for all practical purposes fellow countrymen, and we'd wander around the city and do stuff.

Oracle
22 Jun 18,, 14:08
I drank quite a bit of Kingfisher lager when I was in Bangalore. The liter-sized bottles. Every night when I was in my hotel room, an Bangalore policeman would knock on my hotel room door and present me a bottle of it in a brown paper bag. I never had to pay for beer when I was in India, except when I went to the Hard Rock Cafe.


I'd go there with an Aussie I'd run into randomly on MG Road. In a truly foreign country, an American and an Aussie are for all practical purposes fellow countrymen, and we'd wander around the city and do stuff.

For 2 days I am trying to think, unable to understand why would Bangalore Police bribe you every night with a bottle of beer?

Btw, that is a 650 ml bottle, not a litre.

Oracle
22 Jun 18,, 14:22
I'd go there with an Aussie I'd run into randomly on MG Road. In a truly foreign country, an American and an Aussie are for all practical purposes fellow countrymen, and we'd wander around the city and do stuff.

I've had American clients/sometime-expat-colleagues who would request spicy Indian food all the time with a Kingfisher beer, some got invited to Indian weddings and they went in traditional Indian attire. I have to say they cornered all the attention from hot Indian girls. Mostly, my experience have been Americans are risk-takers and game for new things.

Europeans leave the star hotel they are lodged in, for work, in an AC cab. After work, they go back to the star hotel in another AC cab. Sometimes they go out for a beer. :D

Aussies & Brits demand beer as if they're working for Carlsberg. :D

My god, Japanese can drink so much. I almost passed away once drinking with them, God and a cabbie saved me.

Ironduke
22 Jun 18,, 15:11
For 2 days I am trying to think, unable to understand why would Bangalore Police bribe you every night with a bottle of beer?

Btw, that is a 650 ml bottle, not a litre.
Bin Laden got killed when I was in India. I was the only American in Shivajinagar. I obviously had nothing to do with the operation, but all the sudden I got noticed. I got invited down to have biscuits and chai at the Shivajinagar police station every day, and I'd get rides around town on the back of a police motorcycle. There'd usually be a motorcycle waiting for me in front of my hotel after I woke up, to take me down to meet the local police chief each day.

I didn't care for the attention, so I rented a hotel down on MG Road where there's more foreigners and I wouldn't stand out so much.

Really, I think they were in a celebratory mood and decided to reward the single American they came across.

Ironduke
25 Jun 18,, 20:42
Been recently making my own spiced "chai" at home instead of drinking coffee.

Ingredients:
12 oz hot water
4 bags of black tea
some milk
two sucralose packets
a dash of cinnamon

Plenty of caffeine, probably as much as a strong coffee. Tastes delicious, much better than instant coffee and the terrible tasting coffee from Aldi. The price to make a cup is very reasonable, perhaps $0.15, or even less.

Oracle
27 Jun 18,, 13:06
Bin Laden got killed when I was in India. I was the only American in Shivajinagar. I obviously had nothing to do with the operation, but all the sudden I got noticed. I got invited down to have biscuits and chai at the Shivajinagar police station every day, and I'd get rides around town on the back of a police motorcycle. There'd usually be a motorcycle waiting for me in front of my hotel after I woke up, to take me down to meet the local police chief each day.

I didn't care for the attention, so I rented a hotel down on MG Road where there's more foreigners and I wouldn't stand out so much.

Really, I think they were in a celebratory mood and decided to reward the single American they came across.

Shivajinagar? That place is not good for foreigners, particularly an American just when Laden got killed. Anyways, what you mentioned is happiness, that an A who killed innocents got killed in return.

Masala Chai Recipe for you:

#1. Whole milk, i.e. with fats
#2. Tea powder, i.e. black tea, tea bags would do too probably
#3. Ginger

Preparation:

#1. Heat milk in a vessel (if you want one cup of tea, use 1.5 cups)
#2. When milk starts to boil, add crushed ginger in the vessel (careful not to add the crushed ginger in the milk from the start, milk might go bad)
#3. Let the milk come to a boil, then let the milk simmer
#4. Add 2 tbps of tea powder, or 2 tea bags
#5. Let it boil for some more time (the idea is for the milk and ginger to boil together, so that ginger releases its flavour to the milk, and it takes approximately the same time that 1.5 cup takes to reduce to 1 cup)

Your masala chai is ready. Instead of going through all the trouble, you can simply buy ginger powder and add it at the end, like how you add cinnamon. I am old school, plus the ginger that is available here is organic and the best in India. Makes sense to add the extra effort.

If you want black tea, boil water instead of milk, with ginger. Same process, but don't boil the tea too much, else it will be too strong for you to drink. You can also add some pepper for a slight heat in your throat if you have cold, cough or in general a bad throat.

Ironduke
28 Jun 18,, 15:22
Shivajinagar? That place is not good for foreigners, particularly an American just when Laden got killed. Anyways, what you mentioned is happiness, that an A who killed innocents got killed in return.
I felt perfectly safe the entire time I was there. Lots of touters, scammers, and beggars bothered me at first in other parts of town, several times an hour. I never got bothered by anyone in Shivajinagar even once. They no doubt noticed me, but left me alone. The fact it was the only part of town open for business 24 hours a day was another major reason I started saying there. Given the tropical latitude and how I prefer the coolness of nighttime at that latitude, it was the ideal place to stay.

The only sentiments I ever heard expressed in Shivajinagar, from the Muslim shopowners and other proprietors I briefly spoke to while purchasing things, were happiness over OBL getting killed. They brought the subject up, not me. I never really initiated any conversations with anyone while I was over there, except for an Australian guy I ran into.

A week or so after OBL was killed, I decided getting bothered by touters and beggars in other parts of town was better than getting nightly room service and other "favors" from the police. When a police motorcycle is waiting for you at all hours in the day to intercept you as you leave the hotel, and you don't really have a choice but to go down to the police station and converse with the police chief and whomever else for hours on end, it's time to check out from the hotel in the middle of the night and take a rickshaw back down to MG Road or Indiranagar, where you're just another random Farang of indeterminate nationality.

Don't get me wrong - they were extremely polite, courteous, and respectful, at least overtly. It's very uncomfortable though, to put it mildly, to be the subject of attention when all you want is to go unnoticed and be left alone.

On the subject of cuisine, Shivajinagar is also one of the few parts of town where beef is available. I'd often get a kebab from a street vendor, and share it with a stray pariah dog I kind of adopted for a week or two. The Muslim doorman at the hotel wouldn't let the dog inside, but the dog would wait around the hotel until I came around again, and get another helping of beef kebab. The Muslims in the neighborhood probably thought it odd that I'd pet and feed a pariah dog, but the dog was perfectly well behaved, and probably would have been well-suited toward living with people.


Masala Chai Recipe for you:

#1. Whole milk, i.e. with fats
#2. Tea powder, i.e. black tea, tea bags would do too probably
#3. Ginger

Preparation:

#1. Heat milk in a vessel (if you want one cup of tea, use 1.5 cups)
#2. When milk starts to boil, add crushed ginger in the vessel (careful not to add the crushed ginger in the milk from the start, milk might go bad)
#3. Let the milk come to a boil, then let the milk simmer
#4. Add 2 tbps of tea powder, or 2 tea bags
#5. Let it boil for some more time (the idea is for the milk and ginger to boil together, so that ginger releases its flavour to the milk, and it takes approximately the same time that 1.5 cup takes to reduce to 1 cup)

Your masala chai is ready. Instead of going through all the trouble, you can simply buy ginger powder and add it at the end, like how you add cinnamon. I am old school, plus the ginger that is available here is organic and the best in India. Makes sense to add the extra effort.

If you want black tea, boil water instead of milk, with ginger. Same process, but don't boil the tea too much, else it will be too strong for you to drink. You can also add some pepper for a slight heat in your throat if you have cold, cough or in general a bad throat.
Just one thing wrong with that recipe - I don't like ginger. I like gingers, but consuming ginger spice has never sat well with me digestively. Not sure why.

kato
28 Jun 18,, 20:19
I like eating ginger as a vegetable. Cut it into thin slices and cook it for an hour till soft, then eat with some rice. Mixed with some hotter peppers it's really great for colds prepared that way too.

Oracle
09 Jul 18,, 16:26
I felt perfectly safe the entire time I was there. Lots of touters, scammers, and beggars bothered me at first in other parts of town, several times an hour. I never got bothered by anyone in Shivajinagar even once. They no doubt noticed me, but left me alone. The fact it was the only part of town open for business 24 hours a day was another major reason I started saying there. Given the tropical latitude and how I prefer the coolness of nighttime at that latitude, it was the ideal place to stay.

It's a crime prone area. Move around in the dark or late at night and one gets mugged. It's not about Muslims, it's about the area. There are places around IndiraNagar that is open 24*7, and some other areas.


The only sentiments I ever heard expressed in Shivajinagar, from the Muslim shopowners and other proprietors I briefly spoke to while purchasing things, were happiness over OBL getting killed. They brought the subject up, not me. I never really initiated any conversations with anyone while I was over there, except for an Australian guy I ran into.

Now you know why Indian Muslims aren't the extremist type.


A week or so after OBL was killed, I decided getting bothered by touters and beggars in other parts of town was better than getting nightly room service and other "favors" from the police. When a police motorcycle is waiting for you at all hours in the day to intercept you as you leave the hotel, and you don't really have a choice but to go down to the police station and converse with the police chief and whomever else for hours on end, it's time to check out from the hotel in the middle of the night and take a rickshaw back down to MG Road or Indiranagar, where you're just another random Farang of indeterminate nationality.

You know why you had that treatment from sick as F corrupt police? They didn't want to enter an American casulty in their books (too much pressure later). They kept an eye over you to keep you safe, and letting known rowdies know the Police are with you. You weren't living in exactly a very safe area.


Don't get me wrong - they were extremely polite, courteous, and respectful, at least overtly. It's very uncomfortable though, to put it mildly, to be the subject of attention when all you want is to go unnoticed and be left alone.

I understand that feeling. The Indian economy is booming in the metropolis. And migration takes place from remote Indian hinterlands to these metros. The people who come and make up for the Blue Collar workforce haven't seen a girl in mini-skirt, let alone an American walking down the streets. Another factor is, having a picture with a white dude is like a status symbol. Pretty sure they would get laid by claiming the white dude is his friend and he has promised a job in US/UK/West. Bla bla. It would take another 10-15 years before foreigners stop getting the stare in India. I hope it changes as soon as possible.


On the subject of cuisine, Shivajinagar is also one of the few parts of town where beef is available. I'd often get a kebab from a street vendor, and share it with a stray pariah dog I kind of adopted for a week or two. The Muslim doorman at the hotel wouldn't let the dog inside, but the dog would wait around the hotel until I came around again, and get another helping of beef kebab. The Muslims in the neighborhood probably thought it odd that I'd pet and feed a pariah dog, but the dog was perfectly well behaved, and probably would have been well-suited toward living with people.

Lol.

Beef/Mutton/Chicken for Shivajinagar. Muslims make good meat dishes. That is 100% guaranteed. And on the streets it doesn't pinch the pocket much.


Just one thing wrong with that recipe - I don't like ginger. I like gingers, but consuming ginger spice has never sat well with me digestively. Not sure why.

Okay. Ginger is good for throat. Also, any dish, veg or non-veg, throw in a little ginger paste, and it elevates the taste to a higher level. This is my experience of having cooked for myself for many many years.

Ironduke
09 Jul 18,, 16:33
You know why you had that treatment from sick as F corrupt police? They didn't want to enter an American casulty in their books (too much pressure later). They kept an eye over you to keep you safe, and letting known rowdies know the Police are with you.
I'm very confident that wasn't the case. It was a strange time. I could go into further detail, but won't.


The people who come and make up for the Blue Collar workforce haven't seen a girl in mini-skirt, let alone an American walking down the streets. Another factor is, having a picture with a white dude is like a status symbol. Pretty sure they would get laid by claiming the white dude is his friend and he has promised a job in US/UK/West.
Interesting. Maybe next time I'll find a way to leverage this to my own advantage. Nobody took a picture with me the entire time I was over there though.

I've heard in China there's jobs for white guys, acting gigs where they pretend to be the foreign business partner of Chinese businessmen. They just sit there, look important, and don't say anything.


Beef/Mutton/Chicken for Shivajinagar. Muslims make good meat dishes. That is 100% guaranteed. And on the streets it doesn't pinch the pocket much.
Indeed, that they do. Though I'd have loved to go in for a juicy steak, I could get by on beef kebab. The fried chicken was pretty good too.

New recipe:

3/4 cup of parboiled rice (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parboiled_rice)
1.5 cups water
microwave for 20 minutes on low
add diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, and a diced ready-to-eat bratwurst
microwave for 5 minutes on high
add a slice of cheese
microwave for 1 minute on high
add hot sauce, stir, and enjoy

This one ought to make Gun Grape especially proud. It's mostly non-meat based.

Gun Grape
10 Jul 18,, 03:44
New recipe:

3/4 cup of parboiled rice (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parboiled_rice)
1.5 cups water
microwave for 20 minutes on low
add diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, and a diced ready-to-eat bratwurst
microwave for 5 minutes on high
add a slice of cheese
microwave for 1 minute on high
add hot sauce, stir, and enjoy

This one ought to make Gun Grape especially proud. It's mostly non-meat based.

No.

Shitty tasting rice, processed meat and cheese.


Cheese and rice is/was Jarhead slang in the PI for food something bad.

Ironduke
10 Jul 18,, 03:47
I don't buy it for the taste. I buy it because it's nutritious as a result of the parboiling process.

Oracle
10 Jul 18,, 03:55
See this is the reason. You guys don't know how to eat rice. The best is with curries, veg or non-veg. Kato gave some rice recipes and left me wondering how on earth do people eat that. :D

Having said that I love burgers, pizzas and steaks etc. All cultures have their unique food experience and I try to blend all in. But the best curries are made by Indians, and had with rice.

Ironduke
10 Jul 18,, 04:05
See this is the reason. You guys don't know how to eat rice. The best is with curries, veg or non-veg. Kato gave some rice recipes and left me wondering how on earth do people eat that. :D
I used to douse my rice with Kikkoman soy sauce when I was in college. I'd have thought that lycopene-heavy tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, some Muenster cheese, and a diced lean turkey brat with nutritious parboiled rice would be a vast improvement over the plain white rice with soy sauce of my college days.

Oracle
10 Jul 18,, 04:07
I'm very confident that wasn't the case. It was a strange time. I could go into further detail, but won't.

Okay, great.


Interesting. Maybe next time I'll find a way to leverage this to my own advantage. Nobody took a picture with me the entire time I was over there though.

I've heard in China there's jobs for white guys, acting gigs where they pretend to be the foreign business partner of Chinese businessmen. They just sit there, look important, and don't say anything.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPW83Bzv-dA

This is a sneak peek. I can't find the full video.


Indeed, that they do. Though I'd have loved to go in for a juicy steak, I could get by on beef kebab. The fried chicken was pretty good too.

Do you get fried chicken in Shivajinagar? Must be tandoor chicken.

Oracle
10 Jul 18,, 04:10
I used to douse my rice with Kikkoman soy sauce when I was in college. I'd have thought that lycopene-heavy tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, some Muenster cheese, and a diced lean turkey brat with nutritious parboiled rice would be a vast improvement over the plain white rice with soy sauce of my college days.

Indeed, it is an improvement. Just prepare normal white rice. Then make some turkey curry. That's it. Good food right there. I am sure Gun Grape would like it too.

I don't know if parboiled rice is nutritious, but this is what is eaten in 99% of Indian home, 99% of the time.

Gun Grape
10 Jul 18,, 04:12
OK an easy one, that I had last night.

Samgyeopsal-gui

Fried pork belly

And this is a cook at the table meal using an electric skillet.

Ingredients

Sliced pork belly (or thick bacon) Not the salt or sugar cured type either. Just plain pork belly

Lettuce leaves. We use red leaf lettuce. Romaine would be good also. Iceberg lettuce should only be used as bait in a rabbit trap.
A few cloves of garlic thinly sliced
Long grain white rice. Could use Jasmine rice if you like
Salt
Pepper
Sesame Seed oil

Cut the port into bite size pieces allowing for shrinkage during cooking (make it bigger than you think)
Grill/fry the pork. No need to add oil to the pan.
When a piece gets cooked take half a lief of lettuce .Make a bed of rice in it. Place a sliver of raw garlic on the rice. Add pork

Dip in a mixture of salt pepper and sesame seed oil. Stuff it in your mouth and enjoy.

If you don't like the taste of raw garlic, you can throw it in the skillet with the pork and cook till brown

If Yeller is still lurking he will add either hot pepper paste or miso paste in with the wrap. Most people don't have that handy. But FYI I really like the miso paste on this.
Another good addition to this is to throw a little KimChee in with the pork.

And when eating pork. Drinking Soju is a must.

Its the only way I eat pork. And I do it about twice a year

Gun Grape
10 Jul 18,, 04:17
See this is the reason. You guys don't know how to eat rice. The best is with curries, veg or non-veg. Kato gave some rice recipes and left me wondering how on earth do people eat that. :D

Having said that I love burgers, pizzas and steaks etc. All cultures have their unique food experience and I try to blend all in. But the best curries are made by Indians, and had with rice.

I'm kind of partial to Chinese curries (edit) I don't like the sweetness of the coconut milk or yogurt in the Indian curries I've eaten


I used to douse my rice with Kikkoman soy sauce when I was in college.
Kikkoman is like the worst soy sauce ever

And I know, I'm the weird one that thinks plain white rice right out of the rice cooker is one of the best flavors ever

Ironduke
10 Jul 18,, 04:17
How about this?

Went to Aldi today. On sale were 1 lb. packages of Deutsche Kuche Smoked Knackwurst, and 10 oz. packages of cracker cut gouda and extra sharp cheddar slices.

Since they were each only $0.99 apiece, I got 11 of each. Cost was $21.78 total.

The Strategic Knackwurst-Gouda-Cheddar Reserve.

https://i.imgur.com/5s4qa0G.jpg

Ironduke
10 Jul 18,, 04:22
Kikkoman is like the worst soy sauce ever
Better than the LaChoy Soy Sauce made from hydrolyzed soy protein.


Do you get fried chicken in Shivajinagar? Must be tandoor chicken.
No idea what kind of chicken it was, but it was good. I was hungry and it looked good, so I ate some.

Gun Grape
10 Jul 18,, 04:22
Don't know if I posted this one yet. Simple and uses leftovers.

Fried rice omelet. Smothered in ketchup.

Put that left over takeout fried rice from last night to work. And although the ketchup sounds gross. Its really good

Gun Grape
10 Jul 18,, 04:45
Better than the LaChoy Soy Sauce made from hydrolyzed soy protein.



Yea got me there.

If you don't like the taste of plain rice. Mix it with sesame seed oil. Much better for you. And sweet. Its how my wife would get or son to eat rice when he was little.

Wrap a piece of Nori around it for an even better taste. And nutritious. Way better than soy sauce, tomato sauce or cheese

Oracle
10 Jul 18,, 05:00
OK an easy one, that I had last night.

Samgyeopsal-gui

Fried pork belly

And this is a cook at the table meal using an electric skillet.

Ingredients

Sliced pork belly (or thick bacon) Not the salt or sugar cured type either. Just plain pork belly

Lettuce leaves. We use red leaf lettuce. Romaine would be good also. Iceberg lettuce should only be used as bait in a rabbit trap.
A few cloves of garlic thinly sliced
Long grain white rice. Could use Jasmine rice if you like
Salt
Pepper
Sesame Seed oil

Cut the port into bite size pieces allowing for shrinkage during cooking (make it bigger than you think)
Grill/fry the pork. No need to add oil to the pan.
When a piece gets cooked take half a lief of lettuce .Make a bed of rice in it. Place a sliver of raw garlic on the rice. Add pork

Dip in a mixture of salt pepper and sesame seed oil. Stuff it in your mouth and enjoy.

If you don't like the taste of raw garlic, you can throw it in the skillet with the pork and cook till brown

If Yeller is still lurking he will add either hot pepper paste or miso paste in with the wrap. Most people don't have that handy. But FYI I really like the miso paste on this.
Another good addition to this is to throw a little KimChee in with the pork.

And when eating pork. Drinking Soju is a must.

Its the only way I eat pork. And I do it about twice a year

This is like a recipe in one of those Zagat/Munchies/Eater videos. Must be very good.

It's been 6 months I didn't eat pork. Talking about pork, the Portuguese used to make Pork Vin-d-ahlu, and the Goans adopted it as Vin-d-aloo. Ahlu in Portuguese stands for garlic, and aloo in India means potato. So the Goan version has potato cubes in it, while I don't put potato in my version.

Ingredients:
#1. 1/2kg pork (curry cut pieces)
#2. Vin, as in Vinegar, half a cup. Normal vinegar, nothing fancy.
#3. Freshly made ginger+garlic paste
#4. Garlic, thinly sliced, or if the pieces are small then there's no need to slice them. Do, remember this is a dish where garlic is as important as the pork.
#5. Spices - Chilli powder, tumeric powder, coriander powder, cumin powder. A small tablespoon of each would do. 2 tbps of the chilli powder for color and a little heat.
#6. Slit green chillies for more heat. Leave it if you can't handle heat.
#7. Thinly sliced raw onions. 2 medium sized should be okay.

Marination:
Take a big bowl and put the pork in it. Add the spices, ginger-garlic paste, slit green chillies, garlic (thinly sliced), and half a cup of vinegar. Mix them with your hand. Remember, do not add excess vinegar. The use of vinegar is to tenderize the meat, and add flavour, and it should be used just enough so that the spices and meat get marinated well enough to stick together.

Let it rest on the fridge for a minimum of 12 hours.

Recipe:
Take the marinated pork out of the fridge 1 hour prior to cooking.

#1. Add mustard oil in a Kadai. Kadai is an Indian cooking piece, that looks much like a wok, but is thicker. Google it.
#2. When the oil is nice and hot, add cinnamon (3 inch pieces), cardamom (4-5 large green ones), cloves (2-3), 2 dry bay leaves. Let it fry for a minute. Then, add the sliced onions and fry till it becomes pinkish/translucent.
#3. Add the marinated pork along with the spices etc, in the Kadai in full heat.
#4. Stir the pork with a spatula. Keep stirring it in high heat for about 7-8 mins, at an interval of 2 mins. Lower the heat to medium. Keep stirring at regular intervals of 4-5 mins.

** Always fry the meat well with the masalas. The taste will surprise you.**

#5. Keep frying. Total frying time should be 30-40 mins. Do remember that stirring is also necessary so that the spices don't get stuck in the bottom of the Kadai and to keep it from burning.

Add a little water, if you can't follow directions and your pork has got stuck at the bottom.

#6. Transfer the fried pork into a pressure cooker.
#7. Add 4 cups of water into the cooker.
#8. Close the lid and let it cook. Stop it, when the cooker blows 2 whistles. (Now this depends on the quality of meat. For pork found in India, I use 16-18 whistles, for the pork you guys get in your markets, 2 whistles should be enough. If not, you can close the lid and cook again.)

Enjoy with white rice.

Oracle
10 Jul 18,, 05:13
I'm kind of partial to Chinese curries (edit) I don't like the sweetness of the coconut milk or yogurt in the Indian curries I've eaten

What you guys eat in the west is not authentic Indian curry. I had this talk with the good Colonel some years back here at WAB. In India, cuisines change every 200 kms. Coconut milk is used to make curries in South India, and from what I have seen - coconut milk has fallen out of favour and cuisine nowadays even in South India.

Chicken butter masala is one dish that is kind of sweet, and a dish to die for. One can't just get enough. Punjabi dish.


And I know, I'm the weird one that thinks plain white rice right out of the rice cooker is one of the best flavors ever

Yes. But I still need a good curry.

Oracle
10 Jul 18,, 05:17
How about this?

Went to Aldi today. On sale were 1 lb. packages of Deutsche Kuche Smoked Knackwurst, and 10 oz. packages of cracker cut gouda and extra sharp cheddar slices.

Since they were each only $0.99 apiece, I got 11 of each. Cost was $21.78 total.

The Strategic Knackwurst-Gouda-Cheddar Reserve.

https://i.imgur.com/5s4qa0G.jpg

I approve. :D

The names are weird. I guess smoked sausages. Cheese and some biscuits.

kato
10 Jul 18,, 09:23
What you guys eat in the west is not authentic Indian curry.
That also depends heavily on where in the West. Pretty much all Indian restaurants around me tend to run the same menu composition - mostly tandoori meat dishes, some originally south indian vegetarian stuff reinterpreted in a New Delhi fashion, a few uh... colonial variants ("korma" in british style, vindaloos), and at best a handful of actual curries that will never contain coconut milk. The main difference between restaurants will be whether they have any paneer dishes.

Most of the owners around here tend to be North Indians with some variation (caveat: there's one guy from Kashmir that owns like a quarter of all restaurants in town, including a number of "Indian" places), and for some reason most of the cooks are Punjabis. There's one sort of South Indian owned place (owner's from Bangalore) that sells dosas and such as well as some curries that look like they're 50% coconut milk for lunch takeout.

Oracle
12 Jul 18,, 20:13
kato,

If it's not a Michelin starred restaurant, or a famous Indian chain, you simply cannot expect authentic Indian food. Anybody can open up a restaurant and name it "Taj Mahal" or "Delhi Durbar". Most, if not all, Indian restaurants are run by Pak/Bangladeshi origin immigrants.

Michelin star restaurants are outside the reach of most for weekend food, plus the food they serve is less. The food though is exotic and very good.

Look at this restaurant - Tayyabs (http://www.tayyabs.co.uk/). I have eaten there many times, and I can vouch that the food is good {Worse, Poor, Average, Good, Great (1 Michelin star), Excellent (2 Michelin stars), Heavenly (3 Michelin stars) in that order}. It's run by 2 or 3 Pakistani brothers and I've seen a lot of Brits/EU guys/families go and eat there. Well, when people don't know what good Indian food tastes like, they are bound to spend money on whatever they find in the West.

If you happen to visit India, you should make it a point to visit Bukhara and Indian Accent etc, find out what authentic and good quality Indian food is all about. Also smaller shops like the Parantha Wala galli in Chandni Chowk. Awesome food for very cheap money. I can bet West doesn't have a single Indian/IndianNamed restaurant serving such authentic Paranthas and tasty meat dishes, so friendly on the purse.

As for identities, most people fake it because Indian sells better than Pakistani (for obvious reasons) and Bangladeshi. Amongst the fake Indian restaurants, Bangladeshis tend to do a very poor job. Pakistanis are still better when they market their food as Indian - taste-wise, money-wise. Infact Pakistani restaurants are better than Bangladeshi and Indian restaurants in the west.

Ironduke
12 Jul 18,, 23:14
I don't know if parboiled rice is nutritious, but this is what is eaten in 99% of Indian home, 99% of the time.
The parboiling process infuses 80% of the vitamins and minerals found in the bran into the endosperm. So yes, it is nutritious. It also has a glycemic index of 32, compared to 50 for brown rice and 89 for white rice. The lower glycemic index means that that it digests more slowly, and blood sugar rises more slowly.

If white rice isn't fortified, it essentially has zero nutritional value, other than calories. Parboiled rice is still nutritionally superior to fortified rice. Some people might not like the taste or texture, but in an era in which B-vitamin deficiency diseases were epidemic, prior to the first half of the 20th century, parboiled rice saved many lives.

Gun Grape
14 Jul 18,, 04:50
But there is no reason to eat shitty tasting rice in the 21st century. At least not in the States. There are much better sources of B-6. Like meat,beans and veggies

Ironduke
14 Jul 18,, 05:30
As far as the taste goes, I like it better than any white rice I've ever had. That just happens to be my personal preference.

With its low glycemic index (32 vs 89 for white rice), it's also far more suitable for people who need to avoid severe blood sugar spikes (diabetics).

It's also got a broader amount of nutrients than just B-6. 1 cup, unenriched, dry:

https://i.imgur.com/ae9qxTk.jpg

Source: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5814/2

Oracle
14 Jul 18,, 05:46
Ironduke,

It was incorrect when I said parboiled rice is eaten 99% of the time in India. It seems, I was confused between names. It's white rice that is eaten. Not much is left after the removal of the bran w.r.t. nutrients, but taste-wise this is better I guess. Once, I bought a brown looking rice from Tesco (I didn't check the color while buying), and I couldn't eat it after cooking it as it seemed rubbery. Went to a Bangladeshi shop and bought white rice thereafter. My apologies.

Also explains the fact why so many people have diabetes and heart diseases in India.

Ironduke
14 Jul 18,, 05:50
I knew what you meant. I know that parboiled rice isn't eaten in India. It's popular in parts of Africa though, apparently.

Parboiled rice is chewier than white rice, because the starches have been gelatinized during the parboiling process, and the kernels don't stick together like they do with white rice, they stay separate. Parboiled rice has a yellowish-orange tint to it.

Oracle
14 Jul 18,, 06:12
I knew what you meant. I know that parboiled rice isn't eaten in India. It's popular in parts of Africa though, apparently.

Parboiled rice is chewier than white rice, because the starches have been gelatinized during the parboiling process, and the kernels don't stick together like they do with white rice, they stay separate. Parboiled rice has a yellowish-orange tint to it.

Yes.

Now, please identify the item:

46392

Oracle
20 Jul 18,, 19:57
/\/\/\ That's wild cilantro. :D

Ironduke
26 Jul 18,, 20:50
How about this?

Went to Aldi today. On sale were 1 lb. packages of Deutsche Kuche Smoked Knackwurst, and 10 oz. packages of cracker cut gouda and extra sharp cheddar slices.

Since they were each only $0.99 apiece, I got 11 of each. Cost was $21.78 total.

The Strategic Knackwurst-Gouda-Cheddar Reserve.

https://i.imgur.com/5s4qa0G.jpg
Sadly, 16 days later, I'm down to my last package of cheese, and I'm all out of knackwurst. I did give away a package of knackwurst and a container of the cheese to a friend, but I've managed to eat 50 knackwursten (10lbs/4.5kg) and nine 10 oz packages (2.55kg) of gouda and cheddar.

It was delicious, and it went a long way, for just ~$22. I'll always look back fondly at these last 16 days, and it'll be a tale to tell my future cardiologist.

On the other hand, I did manage to cut my milk consumption back from 3 gallons a week to just a half-gallon per week while the cheese lasted, and ate no sour cream, cottage cheese, or yogurt either during that time. That ought to mitigate some of the potential plaque buildup in the arteries.

Oracle
10 Aug 18,, 14:28
Cooked Chicken Biryani in a Pressure Cooker. I call it bachelor's Chicken Biryani, hassle-free and easy to make. The white looking thing is raita (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raita), goes well with the Biryani.

46597

46598

46599

I used normal sona mussorie rice. Basmati rice has a lot of starch, and is not fit to be cooked inside a pressure cooker of this type. The rick will break while cooking and make the biryani very sticky. Use Basmati rice only when cooking Biryani in the open.

Oracle
16 Sep 18,, 22:54
GG, bamboo shoots below.

46825

What kind of chilli?

46826

Oracle
16 Nov 18,, 16:13
The above is Ghost pepper. Season is here folks.

Plucked 4 from the plant today morning. Had 70% of 1 for lunch. Will eat the remaining 30% for dinner. Planning to keep the remaining 3 for seeds, will plant next year, around March. The heat is intense, but the scent is awesome. Building immunity. :D

47137

Oracle
16 Nov 18,, 16:45
Don't know how 2 pics came into being in the above post.

About a month back, i bought 250gms of this particular chilli (INR 20). I wasn't sure about the heat, so I asked the dude selling it. He said, 'it's like bullet'. I ate one raw (my usual method to check the heat), and found them to be quite good in terms of heat. Washed them, sun-dried them for 1 day to get rid of the moisture, then made 2 varieties of pickles.

47140
47141

1st variety - chilli paste in grinder, then mixed it with mustard oil, indian spices and some vinegar and salt for longevity.

47143
47144

/\/\/\ This is done, gone, kaput. I ate it with breakfast, lunch and dinner, and had to hear so many comments about getting stomach ulcer. Moms you see. I'm still fit, with an increase in bodily immunity.

Oracle
17 Nov 18,, 15:38
2nd variety - whole chilli, slit through the middle, indian spices, mustard oil, salt and vinegar.

47147

Bigfella
18 Nov 18,, 01:26
OK, here is something easy & tasty using frozen potato gems.

*Put a bunch of potato gems on a tray - about one third of a big tray or half a small one.

*Cook in the oven for 10 minutes at the indicated temperature.

*Take out, group the gems in a circle in the middle of the tray and add some toppings. The key ingredient here is shredded 'pizza cheese' from the supermarket. You could just use that, but I like more flavour. I grate some parmesan & sprinkle it on the gems first, then some shredded ham, then the cheese, and finally some chopped salami on top. Bacon bits would work just as well. You could also add spices or dried herbs (an 'italian' mix for instance).

*Back in the oven on the top shelf until the cheese is melted and the salami/bacon bits look a bit crisp. Don't overdo it or some of the gems in the middle might start to disintegrate a bit.

*Slide onto a plate. Done!

Oracle
30 Nov 18,, 18:50
47227
47230

Yum!

GVChamp
04 Dec 18,, 21:41
Sadly, 16 days later, I'm down to my last package of cheese, and I'm all out of knackwurst. I did give away a package of knackwurst and a container of the cheese to a friend, but I've managed to eat 50 knackwursten (10lbs/4.5kg) and nine 10 oz packages (2.55kg) of gouda and cheddar.

It was delicious, and it went a long way, for just ~$22. I'll always look back fondly at these last 16 days, and it'll be a tale to tell my future cardiologist.

On the other hand, I did manage to cut my milk consumption back from 3 gallons a week to just a half-gallon per week while the cheese lasted, and ate no sour cream, cottage cheese, or yogurt either during that time. That ought to mitigate some of the potential plaque buildup in the arteries.

I know this is the bachelor's cuisine thread, but do you eat anything that's green?????

We ended up getting a new stove/oven. The last one had some gas leaks in the lines that fed to the actual stove. I was interested in replacing it, but Mrs. GVChamp didn't see the point in repairing a 20 year old appliance, so we got a new one.

Tried some spatchcocked chicken last night. That broiler pumps out a lot of juice compared to the old oven. I'm guessing the old oven also had a gas leak somewhere I couldn't see....

One thing I really like is a 20k BTU front burner. You want coffee in the morning? NP, kettle is ready in about 2 minutes.