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zraver
23 Sep 17,, 14:10
3 weeks in the Houston, Orange area... Glad to be back from the stink and heart break. These 4 pics show how bad it is, how fast the water came up. People could barely save themselves, let alone save life dreams. The pic of the home was taken with permission. An entire neighborhood of 500+ homes a total and complete loss as surely as if hit with artillery. Under 7-9' of water for a week. Every bit of structural wood is warped, soaked in raw sewage and covered in mold. The rescue marking were written by a rescuer standing in a boat.

Double Edge
23 Sep 17,, 15:15
Super Z

Always there to help : )

TopHatter
23 Sep 17,, 19:51
Welcome back Z

I was fortunate not to be in a flood zone for Irma, but others were not as lucky.

zraver
24 Sep 17,, 00:00
Welcome back Z

I was fortunate not to be in a flood zone for Irma, but others were not as lucky.

Glad you are Ok. I was in the Houston area. Almost went down as part of a boat team but the county judge wouldn't pull the trigger, got deployed 24 hours later anyway with my tow truck. While I was gone my fridge went out, so I came back to near the same smell I left. Go that handled today. Glad to be back with my son and animals. Hope my deathrow kitty is especially glad I am home. She was boarded with a friend but is a true one person cat and was deeply depressed until I got home, now she is glued to me. Animals area great way to clean the disaster zone out of the mind. For three weeks i had the most toxic job in America (Chevron 4 car hauler). Every time I loaded the top deck TFW that had been petri-dishing in flooded cars rained on me. It was by far the nastiest thing I have ever done. My boots did not survive the trip.

The real hereos are the locals who pitched in, and of course the FEMA and SUSAR teams. Some are still in Operation in Mexico and Puerto Rico. During Harvey, parts of all 28 FEMA USAR teams, 8 SUSAR teams and a huge number of county level water rescue teams from around the South plus the locals and the Cajun Navy were working as fast as they could too evac people. At least 2 rescuers died due to electrified water.

Double Edge
24 Sep 17,, 00:36
Out of curiosity what does the rescue marker say on that first pic ?

zraver
24 Sep 17,, 02:39
Out of curiosity what does the rescue marker say on that first pic ?

Too the trained rescuer it says ametuer. Top quadrant- person or unit doing the search. BB is pretty generic should be something like OVFD (Orange Volunteer Fire Department) or TX-TF2 (Texas Task Force 2) but should be in the Left quadrant. What should be there is the date/time the search was completed, right quadrant- date. Should be a list of hazards ie TFW (toxic flood water), rats etc. Bottom- 0 zero live, zero dead can also be listed as 0-0. or if there are victims 2-0 etc. Left quadrant- unit making search and date and time completed. The quadrants are made by 1 slash (search under way if another search team comes up and doesn't see any body it cues them to an emergency where rescuers need rescuing or an unduly dangerous hazard like an IDLH gas exists. You note date/time and unit at entry. Second line of the X means search completed and information can be noted. If you box the X then it means do not enter, structure unsafe or a deadly hazard exists. Circling the X means a new search was conducted and original findings confirmed.

Bigfella
24 Sep 17,, 09:38
Glad you are OK Z & well done yet again. Difficult work.

Double Edge
24 Sep 17,, 09:43
Cheers Z, quite informative at a glance.

citanon
24 Sep 17,, 19:48
Good job Z. Too bad they didn't let you keep the Maserati as a suvenior.

zraver
27 Sep 17,, 00:59
Good job Z. Too bad they didn't let you keep the Maserati as a suvenior.

I'd take the 64 ss Impala any day. She was a rare gem.

WABs_OOE
27 Sep 17,, 01:27
Good show

citanon
27 Sep 17,, 04:03
I'd take the 64 ss Impala any day. She was a rare gem.

"Coincidentally" it was the one on a tow truck.

xerxes
27 Sep 17,, 04:53
A++

Albany Rifles
27 Sep 17,, 18:46
Well done to you and your peers.

Glad to see some of my CFC money being put to good use!

zraver
01 Oct 17,, 03:58
"Coincidentally" it was the one on a tow truck.

My truck...

zraver
01 Oct 17,, 03:59
Well done to you and your peers.

Glad to see some of my CFC money being put to good use!

Nah, I was down there for IAA this (disaster) go round. If you have car insurance though.... I think everyone is going to see rates go up.

zraver
01 Oct 17,, 04:00
Good show

Colonel?

WABs_OOE
01 Oct 17,, 20:12
Long time, Jason. I see you're still doing us proud.

citanon
01 Oct 17,, 20:47
My truck...

That car still looks amazing on the outside. Was it salvageable? I can't imagine the owner would part with it but if the interior has been soaking in sh*t water for 3 days.....

zraver
01 Oct 17,, 20:54
That car still looks amazing on the outside. Was it salvageable? I can't imagine the owner would part with it but if the interior has been soaking in sh*t water for 3 days.....

Honestly, I don't think water ever got in it, think the owner just wanted the check for the ACV. Hagerty has those things at about $54k.

zraver
01 Oct 17,, 20:54
Long time, Jason. I see you're still doing us proud.

Too long sir, I was rather worried about you.

zraver
29 Jan 18,, 01:24
Just got done re-certifying as a wilderness first responder (WFR). Its why my posts this weekend were early morning.

At least there wasn't six to eight inches of snow on the ground this time. Since the entire class was outdoors in the Quachita National Forest the lack of snow was welcome.

Unwritten rule, if you pack in 200lbs of gear, you'll packout 390lbs of patient and gear..... That whole ounces equal pounds, and pounds equal pain taken to a whole new level.

Its an extremely useful class not just for wilderness search and rescue,but any thing where definitive care is not close at hand. boaters, back pakers, expeditions, 4x4/4wheeling and disasters. It has 6 protocols that are specific to a setting where definitive care will be delayed including anaphlaxis, wound management,cpr, spine injuries, reducing dislocated joints, and severe asthma. Besides the obvious wilderness injuries like hypothermia there is a lot more about longer term patient care with a wide variety of illness and injuries. What works when the ambulance is 15 minutes away may not work when you have to move someone with a spinal injury several miles over broken terrain or manage someone with a severe trauma for several days. Way more intense than my normal emergency medical responder or farm medic certs.

Double Edge
29 Jan 18,, 18:18
Its an extremely useful class not just for wilderness search and rescue,but any thing where definitive care is not close at hand. boaters, back pakers, expeditions, 4x4/4wheeling and disasters. It has 6 protocols that are specific to a setting where definitive care will be delayed including anaphlaxis, wound management,cpr, spine injuries, reducing dislocated joints, and severe asthma. Besides the obvious wilderness injuries like hypothermia there is a lot more about longer term patient care with a wide variety of illness and injuries. What works when the ambulance is 15 minutes away may not work when you have to move someone with a spinal injury several miles over broken terrain or manage someone with a severe trauma for several days. Way more intense than my normal emergency medical responder or farm medic certs.

How many patients we talking about here ?

Was about to ask where are the air ambulances ? and then have to stop to consider how big the country actually is

Albany Rifles
29 Jan 18,, 21:14
When I was in college I was on a mountain rescue crew in West Virginia. Most of the time it was an injured hiker or climber who were ambulatory or who we carried out on a Stokes litter. We had one time where we didn't have a Stokes (don't ask) and I had to buddy carry the patient 3/4 of a mile down a mountain to the ambulance. For many parts it was a rappel down the trail because it was so steep. At the end I was so beat I couldn't climb the steps to the suspension bridge over the North Fork of the Shenandoah River so I just walked through the ford.

I more than understand how much "fun" that can be.

And thanks for doing this tough but vital work.

zraver
30 Jan 18,, 05:03
How many patients we talking about here ?

Was about to ask where are the air ambulances ? and then have to stop to consider how big the country actually is

It was training so we usually had multiple victims so everyone acting as rescuer had someone to treat. The final sim included one patient who had to be transported. The other victims retconned as arriving rescuers to help with the evac since it is physically intensive to move someone with a sine injury across broken terrain safely.

No air ambulance since it was training and even in a RL situation Arkansas doesn't have much in the way of helicopters equipped with lifts. We still have to get them to a LZ.

Alby,

we have a mule for our stokes. Its easier than doing a 2, 4 or 6 person carry on narrow trails but still physically demanding.

Albany Rifles
30 Jan 18,, 16:55
It was training so we usually had multiple victims so everyone acting as rescuer had someone to treat. The final sim included one patient who had to be transported. The other victims retconned as arriving rescuers to help with the evac since it is physically intensive to move someone with a sine injury across broken terrain safely.

No air ambulance since it was training and even in a RL situation Arkansas doesn't have much in the way of helicopters equipped with lifts. We still have to get them to a LZ.

Alby,

we have a mule for our stokes. Its easier than doing a 2, 4 or 6 person carry on narrow trails but still physically demanding.

Would have loved that...but I did it in the 1970s and I don't think that stuff had been invented yet!

Glad the gear keeps getting better.

Triple C
30 Jan 18,, 21:51
Z, with all this recent political disagreements and unpleasantness, I am deeply grateful that you are the the same good man who charge to the sounds of the guns to help people and hope I am still thought of by as a friend. Well done.

zraver
31 Jan 18,, 05:10
Z, with all this recent political disagreements and unpleasantness, I am deeply grateful that you are the the same good man who charge to the sounds of the guns to help people and hope I am still thought of by as a friend. Well done.

My political hat doesn't go into the field. A victim is a victim period full stop. You are, all here are, family can disagree.

zraver
31 Jan 18,, 05:15
Would have loved that...but I did it in the 1970s and I don't think that stuff had been invented yet!

Glad the gear keeps getting better.

You should see some of the advances in rope gear and trauma care. The effectiveness of tourniquets in Iraq and Afghanistan was so decisive in saving lives it has radically altered how we approach bleeding in a civilian emergency. Direct pressure is a dying method, now its put the CAT on early and simply stop the bleed fast to prevent volume shock.

BTW, if any non-military ever get the chance to take a LEFR-TCC class (Stop the bleed) take it. Its the civvie version of TCC.

Double Edge
31 Jan 18,, 06:17
No air ambulance since it was training and even in a RL situation Arkansas doesn't have much in the way of helicopters equipped with lifts. We still have to get them to a LZ.

Right and multiply that across many states

All the best, Z

Bigfella
31 Jan 18,, 07:35
Fine work Z. Hope you never need to use it, but glad you know how.