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TopHatter
26 Nov 16,, 15:06
Fidel Castro, Cuba's longtime revolutionary leader, dies at 90

(CNN)Fidel Castro, the Cuban despot who famously proclaimed after his arrest in a failed coup attempt that history would absolve him, has died at age 90.

Castro's brother and the nation's President of several years, Raul, announced his death Friday on Cuban TV.
At the end, an elderly and infirm Castro was a whisper of the Marxist firebrand whose iron will and passionate determination bent the arc of destiny.

Link (http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/26/americas/fidel-castro-obit/)

Mihais
26 Nov 16,, 15:39
Well,at least he has a warm place in hell.He has Che and a few friends who kept shoveling coal to the fire.

I imagine Miami has street celebrations.

surfgun
26 Nov 16,, 17:36
It sounds like Obama will miss him!

kato
26 Nov 16,, 17:41
I imagine Miami has street celebrations.
Well, the Batistanos anyway.

Let's remember, what came before Castro was Ceaucescu written large. And the involvement and guilt of the US in what happened in Cuba didn't suddenly start in 1957.

42666

surfgun
26 Nov 16,, 17:43
This link contains the Obama/ White House response.

http://wlrn.org/post/president-obama-offers-condolences-fidel-castros-death-trump-tweets

Doktor
26 Nov 16,, 18:32
Well, the Batistanos anyway.

Let's remember, what came before Castro was Ceaucescu written large. And the involvement and guilt of the US in what happened in Cuba didn't suddenly start in 1957.

42666

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/cuba/article117201053.html

kato
26 Nov 16,, 19:26
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/nov/26/havana-mourning-cubans-fidelista-fidel-castro

Doktor
26 Nov 16,, 19:29
We were all Tito(ists) in May 1980.

42667

They were all Stalinists, too...

42668

Mihais
26 Nov 16,, 20:15
Well, the Batistanos anyway.

Let's remember, what came before Castro was Ceaucescu written large. And the involvement and guilt of the US in what happened in Cuba didn't suddenly start in 1957.

42666

Let's not.That was 60 years ago.They had at least 25 years to set things straight.

JRT
26 Nov 16,, 20:59
It sounds like Obama will miss him!

I am no fan of Barry Obama, and certainly am no fan of Fidel Castro, but also I would not want any POTUS to display emotional weakness by publicly expressing a rhetorical piss on Castro's headstone, more especially since the US tried and failed to take him out and he instead died of natural causes at an old age many decades later. To me, the commentary released by the office of the Whitehouse press secretary seems appropriate to the event. See the press release quoted in full below.





The White House
Office of the Press Secretary
For Immediate Release
November 26, 2016

Statement by the President on the Passing of Fidel Castro (https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/11/26/statement-president-passing-fidel-castro)

At this time of Fidel Castro’s passing, we extend a hand of friendship to the Cuban people. We know that this moment fills Cubans - in Cuba and in the United States - with powerful emotions, recalling the countless ways in which Fidel Castro altered the course of individual lives, families, and of the Cuban nation. History will record and judge the enormous impact of this singular figure on the people and world around him.

For nearly six decades, the relationship between the United States and Cuba was marked by discord and profound political disagreements. During my presidency, we have worked hard to put the past behind us, pursuing a future in which the relationship between our two countries is defined not by our differences but by the many things that we share as neighbors and friends - bonds of family, culture, commerce, and common humanity. This engagement includes the contributions of Cuban Americans, who have done so much for our country and who care deeply about their loved ones in Cuba.

Today, we offer condolences to Fidel Castro's family, and our thoughts and prayers are with the Cuban people. In the days ahead, they will recall the past and also look to the future. As they do, the Cuban people must know that they have a friend and partner in the United States of America.

###

Monash
27 Nov 16,, 05:05
At 85 Raul Castro is no spring chicken himself and I believe his deputy is even older! So with all the old revolutionaries fading away fast who inherits the reigns of power once they go?

kato
27 Nov 16,, 07:22
Raul already announced a few years ago he won't be a candidate in the 2018 election. Heir apparent is Miguel Diaz-Canel (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miguel_D%C3%ADaz-Canel). He's a bit more hardline compared to Raul, probably partly because he was born after the revolution.

tbm3fan
27 Nov 16,, 08:23
Well, the Batistanos anyway.

Let's remember, what came before Castro was Ceaucescu written large. And the involvement and guilt of the US in what happened in Cuba didn't suddenly start in 1957.


Batista was one mean and nasty bastard who tortured anyone while looking for the young Fidel. Of course with US companies losing all their considerable holdings in Cuba Castro was sure to have a target on his back. Nonetheless, between US ownership of the island and Batista as a front man it was only time before someone came along.

Mihais
27 Nov 16,, 09:02
Let's cut that crap,shall we? Yes,Batista was bad.Getting him out justified a revolution.But Castro and Guevara were getting commie after they won,with all thecassorted niceties:mass killings,expropriation,forcing millions in exile.Was Batista this bad?Nope.
Is very simple.You excuse any marxist crap,you deserve to be thrown out of a helicopter,Pinochet style.The result is much improved quality of life for the rest.And that is the difference between bad killers and good killers.Some create a century of misery for their countries,in which even after relaxing of communism you get prostitution as a major source of cash.The other create a prosperous country.

Triple C
27 Nov 16,, 09:39
"And that is the difference between bad killers and good killers." Um, okay. My thoughts remain the same: better smelling a-holes still falls into the same species of being.

Mihais
27 Nov 16,, 09:52
Really think it as a joke,aren't you ? Let's clarify it.Commie scum sooner or later declare war on normal people.Circumstances differ,but if they win,genocide follows.Given that a war goes on,the most humane thing to do is to finnish it victoriously ASAP.That means killing them fast and without remorse.Same as in every war.

tbm3fan
27 Nov 16,, 10:26
Let's cut that crap,shall we? Yes,Batista was bad.Getting him out justified a revolution.But Castro and Guevara were getting commie after they won,with all thecassorted niceties:mass killings,expropriation,forcing millions in exile.Was Batista this bad?Nope.
Is very simple.You excuse any marxist crap,you deserve to be thrown out of a helicopter,Pinochet style.The result is much improved quality of life for the rest.And that is the difference between bad killers and good killers.Some create a century of misery for their countries,in which even after relaxing of communism you get prostitution as a major source of cash.The other create a prosperous country.

Off your meds again? I didn't excuse a Marxist nor will I excuse a dictator. I made no comments about him and what occurred after the revolucion only what led to it.

Now if you got information about these millions he exiled I would love to see it. Just to satisfy my curiosity as to where you exile millions on a island. Mass killings I would like sources on. Expropriation of foreign assets so what.

Frankly I could care less about both sides. Both sides were bastards as is typical of a dictator vs. so called freedom fighter. I never cared for the Cubans in Miami as I don't care to have the U.S. used by them to simply get back their holdings in Cuba rather than create a democracy.

kato
27 Nov 16,, 13:40
Off your meds again?
Next thing he'll favour Salazar, since he's already gone from Batista to Pinochet. Or maybe Duvalier.


Mass killings I would like sources on.
There's a couple anti-Castro websites out there who do that kind of thing. Usually arrive at around 240 deaths per year average for Cuba since the revolution (compared to around 280 per year under Batista before - in the same source). These typically include around 15-17% combat deaths of anti-castro guerilleros and 10-12% deaths in exit attempts for more credible sources, as well as around 35% executions by firing squad mostly in the cleanup of the Batistan regime after the revolution. Less credible sources tend to take that whole number and take it ten to twentyfold, usually by assuming anywhere from 20,000 to 100,000 rafters dieing during crossing over to Florida instead of around 1,000 actually documented cases.


Now if you got information about these millions he exiled I would love to see it.
The Cuban-American population in the US is over 2 million. This includes 2nd-generation Cuban-Americans though; half a million were born in Cuba, a quarter of which arrived in the US in a single year (1980) due to Carter's open-door policy and Fidel Castro's "go if you want to leave" statement. Guess one can see that statement by Castro as "exiling them".

Doktor
27 Nov 16,, 17:42
Funny his Pinochet is bad (he is, no doubt), but Castro is good with twice as many killed in the most conservative estimates.

Toby
27 Nov 16,, 19:02
Major tourist destination for Brits wanting a cheap holiday..Not heard anything bad said about it, only that they wouldn't want to live there.

troung
27 Nov 16,, 20:19
Stay classy Canada...

Trudeau’s turn from cool to laughing stock
Terry Glavin on how Justin Trudeau’s lament for the dictator Fidel Castro confirmed every lampoon of the prime minister’s foreign-policy vacuity
November 27, 2016

It was bound to happen sooner or later.

Ever since his election as Canada’s prime minister last October, Justin Trudeau has revelled in global tributes, raves and swoons. He’s the Disney prince with the trippy dance moves, the groovy Haida tattoo and the gender-balanced cabinet. He’s the last best hope for globalization, the star attraction at the Pride Parades, the hero of the Paris Climate Summit, the guy everyone wants a selfie with.

Trudeau made himself synonymous with Canada. He made Canada cool again. It was fun while it lasted.

By the early hours of Saturday morning, Havana time, Trudeau was an international laughing stock. Canada’s “brand,” so carefully constructed in Vogue photo essays and Economist magazine cover features, seemed to suddenly implode into a bonspiel of the vanities, with humiliating headlines streaming from the Washington Post to the Guardian, and from Huffington Post to USA Today.

It was Trudeau’s maudlin panegyric on the death of Fidel Castro that kicked it off, and there is a strangely operatic quality to the sequence of events that brings us to this juncture. When Trudeau made his public debut in fashionable society 16 years ago, with his “Je t’aime, papa!” encomium at the gala funeral of his father Pierre in Montreal, Fidel Castro himself was there among the celebrities, as an honorary pallbearer, lending a kind of radical frisson to the event. Now it’s all come full circle.

Times have changed, and the Trudeau family’s bonds with the Castro family, first cultivated while Pierre Trudeau was prime minister and carefully nurtured during the years that followed, now seem somehow unhygienic. Greasy, even. Definitely not cool.

“It is with deep sorrow that I learned today of the death of Cuba’s longest serving President,” Trudeau’s statement begins, going on to celebrate Castro as a “larger than life” personality who served his people. He was “a legendary revolutionary and orator” whose people loved him, and who worked wonders for Cuban education and health care.

A “controversial figure,” sure, but: “I know my father was very proud to call him a friend and I had the opportunity to meet Fidel when my father passed away. It was also a real honour to meet his three sons and his brother President Raúl Castro during my recent visit to Cuba. On behalf of all Canadians, Sophie and I offer our deepest condolences to the family, friends and many, many supporters of Mr. Castro. We join the people of Cuba today in mourning the loss of this remarkable leader.”

And so, from far-off Antananarivo, Madagascar, where he was attending the 80-government gathering of the Francophonie, Trudeau’s lament for the last of the Cold War dictators ended up confirming every wicked caricature of his own vacuity and every lampoon of the Trudeau government’s foreign-policy lack of seriousness.

Twitter lit up with hilarious mockeries under the hashtag #trudeaueulogies. Florida senator Marco Rubio wanted to know whether Trudeau’s statement came from a parody account. The impeccably liberal Jeffrey Goldberg, editor-in-chief of the Atlantic magazine, called Trudeau’s praise of Castro “a sad statement for the leader of a democracy to make.”

Whether or not Trudeau saw any of this coming, he didn’t appear to notice that he was delivering a speech to the Francophonie delegates in Madagascar that emphasized justice for lesbian, gay and transgender people, while from the other side of his mouth he was praising the legacy of a caudillo who spent the first decade of his rule rounding up gay people for “re-education” in labour camps. Homosexuals were irredeemably bourgeois “maricones” and agents of imperialism, Castro once explained.

To be perfectly fair, Trudeau did allow that Castro was a “controversial figure,” and nothing in his remarks was as explicit as the minor classic in the genre of dictator-worship that his brother Alexandre composed for the Toronto Star 10 years ago. Alexandre described Castro as “something of a superman. . . an expert on genetics, on automobile combustion engines, on stock markets. On everything.” As for the Cuban people: “They do occasionally complain, often as an adolescent might complain about a too strict and demanding father.”

This kind of Disco Generation stupidity about Castro has been commonplace in establishment circles in Canada since Pierre’s time, and neither Alexandre’s gringo-splaining nor Justin’s aptitude for eulogy are sufficient to gloss over the many things Cubans have every right to complain about.

Any political activity outside the Communist Party of Cuba is a criminal offence. Political dissent of any kind is a criminal offence. Dissidents are spied on, harassed and roughed up by the Castros’ neighbourhood vigilante committees. Freedom of movement is non-existent. Last year, the Cuban Commission for Human Rights and National Reconciliation (CCDHRN) documented 8,616 cases of politically-motivated arbitrary arrest. For all our prime minister’s accolades about Cuba’s health care system, basic medicines are scarce to non-existent. For all the claims about high literacy rates, Cubans are allowed to read only what the Castro crime family allows.

Raul Castro’s son Alejandro is the regime’s intelligence chief. His son-in-law, Luis Alberto Rodríguez López-Callejas, runs the Cuban military’s business operations, which now account for 60 per cent of the Cuban economy. The Castro regime owns and control the Cuban news media, which is adept at keeping Cubans in the dark. It wasn’t until 1999, for instance, that Cubans were permitted to know the details of Fidel’s family life: five sons they’d never heard of, all in their 30s.

Independent publications are classified as “enemy propaganda.” Citizen journalists are harassed and persecuted as American spies. Reporters Without Borders ranks Cuba at 171 out of 180 countries in press freedom, worse than Iran, worse than Saudi Arabia, worse than Zimbabwe.

So fine, let’s overlook the 5,600 Cubans Fidel Castro executed by firing squad, the 1,200 known to have been liquidated in extrajudicial murders, the tens of thousands dispatched to forced labour camps, or the fifth of the Cuban population that was either driven into the sea or fled the country in terror.

What is not so easy to overlook is that Fidel and Raúl Castro reneged on their promise of a return to constitutional democracy and early elections following the overthrow of the tyrant Fulgencio Batista. The Castros betrayed the revolutionary democrats and patriots who poured into Havana with them on that glorious January day in 1959. The Castros waged war on them in the Escambray Mountains until their final defeat in 1965, four full years after John F. Kennedy’s half-baked Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961.

After he solidified his base in Cuba’s Stalinist party–which had been allied with Batista, Castro’s apologists tend to conveniently forget, until the final months of 1958–Fidel Castro delivered Cuba to Moscow as a Soviet satrapy. He then pushed Russia to the brink of nuclear war with the United States in the terrifying 13-day Missile Crisis of 1962.

For all the parochial Canadian susceptibility to the propaganda myth that pits a shabby-bearded rebel in olive fatigues against the imperialist American hegemon, by the time he died on Friday night Castro was one of the richest men in Latin America. Ten years ago, when he was handing the presidency to Raúl, Forbes magazine calculated that Fidel’s personal wealth was already nearly a billion dollars.

In his twilight years, Castro was enjoying himself at his gaudy 30-hectare Punto Cero estate in Havana’s suburban Jaimanitas district, or occasionally retreating to his private yacht, or to his beachside house in Cayo Piedra, or to his house at La Caleta del Rosario with its private marina, or to his duck-hunting chalet at La Deseada.

Fidel Castro was not merely the “controversial figure” of Justin Trudeau’s encomium. He was first and foremost a traitor to the Cuban revolution. On that count alone, Castro’s death should not be mourned. It should be celebrated, loudly and happily

Toby
27 Nov 16,, 20:40
Cuba wasn't the only country treating its subjects badly in the 50's. In the UK a so called democracy, we were sending orphaned children to Australia and chemically castrating Homosexuals, for example Alan Turing.
Another country in recent times detains people on an island outside its jurisdiction with no proof of a crime or legal representation

tankie
27 Nov 16,, 23:04
Turing ??? never knew that , any links ?

JRT
28 Nov 16,, 03:30
Major tourist destination for Brits wanting a cheap holiday..Not heard anything bad said about it, only that they wouldn't want to live there.

It will be interesting to see if a new Trump resort hotel and casino opens in Cuba soon after diplomatic and trade relations are normalized with the United States.

Toby
28 Nov 16,, 13:57
Turing ??? never knew that , any links ?Yeh it's cropped up on a few programs about him. They reckon it was his reaction to the injections that made him suicidal, no proof to support that though. I'll see if I can find a link......
Here we go https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing

Toby
28 Nov 16,, 16:50
It will be interesting to see if a new Trump resort hotel and casino opens in Cuba soon after diplomatic and trade relations are normalized with the United States.

Can't see that happening anytime soon... I believe it needs massive investment, as the infrastructure is crumbling. Regardless I'm told that it's a gem of a place to visit.

Mihais
28 Nov 16,, 16:55
Off your meds again? I didn't excuse a Marxist nor will I excuse a dictator. I made no comments about him and what occurred after the revolucion only what led to it.

Now if you got information about these millions he exiled I would love to see it. Just to satisfy my curiosity as to where you exile millions on a island. Mass killings I would like sources on. Expropriation of foreign assets so what.

Frankly I could care less about both sides. Both sides were bastards as is typical of a dictator vs. so called freedom fighter. I never cared for the Cubans in Miami as I don't care to have the U.S. used by them to simply get back their holdings in Cuba rather than create a democracy.

I'm not bothering reporting you for insults,I'm just putting you on ignore list.
There are over 2 millions cubans in US alone,of whom about a third are US born.The rest are refugees.There are your millions.And I'm not counting those who fled to other countries.

At the time of the revolution,Raul Castro was a Soviet agent,as shown by the Soviet sources.The rest of the gang was busy hiding this crap to the useless idiots in the US media and in this effort they were too successfull

Batista was correct trying to find them.And those who were not fooled at the time by the Castrist charade were correct too.And I'm quite sure those who died at the hand of the commies would have preffered his effort to be more competently executed.
The likely number of Castro victims is ~100000.Batista,Salazar,Pinochet combined can't dare to compete with the commies wrt killing rate.As a bonus,commies kill the best elements of a society.The "evil dictators" only killed commies.Truth is the lefties are good at this.
You don't seem to care about expropriation.In translation you do not care about properties stolen,not only from foreigners,but natives too.
Your bla-bla about democracy is just that.Since you cannot have democracy without justice.

Toby
28 Nov 16,, 17:05
Off your meds again? I didn't excuse a Marxist nor will I excuse a dictator. I made no comments about him and what occurred after the revolucion only what led to it.

Now if you got information about these millions he exiled I would love to see it. Just to satisfy my curiosity as to where you exile millions on a island. Mass killings I would like sources on. Expropriation of foreign assets so what.

Frankly I could care less about both sides. Both sides were bastards as is typical of a dictator vs. so called freedom fighter. I never cared for the Cubans in Miami as I don't care to have the U.S. used by them to simply get back their holdings in Cuba rather than create a democracy.
Look up "Mariel boatlift"....

troung
29 Nov 16,, 13:34
If you limit yourself to only talking to people he kept on the payroll then he was a swell guy... like the Kim family or Uncle Joe...




Fidel Castro's Death


Nov 29 2016, 7:25 am ET

'We Learned a Lot from Fidel': Supporters Defend Castro's Legacy
by Tracey Eaton

HAVANA - Cubans endured grinding poverty, food shortages and crumbling streets during the rule of Fidel Castro. His critics say his legacy is a disaster, a country in ruins that will take years to repair.

Castro's die-hard supporters reject such a dire view, recalling that his government wiped out illiteracy, boosted social equality and helped turn Cuba into a powerhouse in health, education and sports.

Castro made mistakes, these loyalists say, but never stopped fighting for a better world.

"In Cuba, we'll miss him a lot, more than in any other place," said Alexis Leyva Machado, a Cuban artist better known by his nickname, Kcho. "We've learned a lot from Fidel."

Kcho, 45, stood outside his studio and exhibition hall, a former repair shop for buses in Romerillo. The neighborhood, he said, used to be one of Havana's worst. Then he and other residents got together and started cleaning it up. They built parks where trash dumps once stood.

Castro stopped by one day and wrote the artist a note: "For Kcho, genius of culture and education, for the kindness with which he dedicates his life to the happiness of others."

Kcho played down the compliment, saying, "I'll tell you one thing: The genius is Fidel."

"He went from being a lawyer to becoming a defender and savior of an entire country and an entire people," he said. "The world needs people like Fidel who have the ability to teach people to dream and to make their dreams reality."

Maria Antonia Figueroa is another unabashed Castro supporter. She said his legacy is the 1959 revolution, which distributed land to poor farmers and freed Cuba of U.S. government influence.

"We were the first free territory in Latin America," said Figueroa, whose nom de guerre during the revolution was "the Doctor." She was treasurer of the rebel organization known as the July 26 Movement.

Now 97, Figueroa lives in on the second floor of a modest apartment building in Havana. On a recent afternoon, she sat reminiscing in her living room, adorned with Castro's portrait.

She retrieved a copy of a letter of thanks that Castro wrote her from his secret hideout in the Sierra Maestra mountain range during the revolution. It was dated Aug. 30, 1958.

"It's a treasure for me because it's his handwriting and from the Sierra Maestra," she said. "When it's my time to die, I'll be happy, having given my little grain of sand for this grandeur called Revolutionary Cuba, Communist Cuba."

Cuban journalist Marta Rojas is another Castro supporter. She described the Cuban leader as a "great politician" who was well versed in law, history and science.

"Any way you look at it, he was a genius. They say that geniuses do what they can and not what they want because their minds are filled with too many ideas to carry out."

Rojas, 84, has followed Castro since July 1953 when he attacked the Moncada barracks in Santiago de Cuba, the country's second largest city.

Castro was captured after the failed attack, which marked the start of the revolution. Three months later, Rojas watched as Castro used his trial to condemn the government of then-dictator Fulgencio Batista as corrupt and unjust.

Castro spoke for four hours, ending with the words, "History will absolve me."

Rojas believes that Castro spoke the truth that day. "History has already absolved him," said the writer, who lives in Havana's Vedado neighborhood.

Rojas, who has spent the last several decades writing historical novels, pointed out that Castro's government gave free schooling to millions of Cubans.

She earned several diplomas herself, but hung only one of them on the wall.

"I don't like diplomas," she said. "I keep this one because it has Fidel's signature. The others I stuff in a suitcase."

Castro took power on Jan. 1, 1959. The U.S. wanted to oust him and sponsored the failed Bay of Pigs invasion in April 1961. Castro quickly aligned with the former Soviet Union and asked the Soviets for weapons.

The Soviets proposed equipping Cuba with medium-range ballistic missiles. That brought the U.S. and Soviet Union to the brink of nuclear war in 1962.

Photographer Ernesto Fernández, 75, recalled that Castro stopped by the Revolución newspaper in Havana and declared that he wanted to "shoot down any plane that flew over Cuba."

At dawn the next day, Fernández said he and other journalists went to an anti-aircraft site near Havana and prepared to photograph the action. Fidel was there.

Fernández said a soldier told Castro, "But commander, if the planes come this way, we can't shoot them because the barrage of gunfire will fall over Havana."

"Fidel says, 'what do you mean you can't shoot the planes?'"

The soldier replied, "Unless you give the order, I won't shoot them."

"So Fidel says, 'Let's go pick up some rocks and bring the planes down with stones,'" Fernández said.

"It was a joke, but no one could imagine that at that moment, when it seemed the world was going to end, he'd say, 'No, let's go pick up rocks.'"

The crisis subsided after the Soviets agreed to remove their missiles and the U.S. promised not to invade Cuba.

The U.S. continued trying to undermine Castro, imposing harsh economic sanctions. But the Cuban leader survived.

"He is the whole island"

Castro had a string of titles: head of state, president, chief of the Communist Party. But most Cubans simply called him "Fidel."

He had sweeping authority, but told his followers: "The leaders of this country are human beings, not gods."

Still, there was no doubt Castro ruled supreme.

"Castro is at the same time the island, the men, the cattle and the earth," French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre once wrote. "He is the whole island."

Few Cubans criticized Castro publicly while he was in power. Many spoke about him in hushed tones and avoided saying his name out loud, tugging on an imaginary beard instead.

RELATED: 'An End of An Era,' Say Cuban Americans in Miami After Fidel Castro's Death

Authorities regularly arrested Cubans who criticized the government during Castro's rule. Methods of control included beatings, detention, public shaming, and long prison sentences.

Dissident Vladimir Alejo Miranda is among those who has been arrested. His chest is emblazoned with a tattoo that reads: "Down with Murderer Fidel."

He said he got the tattoo so that whenever he's taken into custody — whether it's jail, the police station or a hospital — people will see the tattoo "and I'll show once again that I'm against the Castros."

Castro's supporters say most people supported the Cuban president. During elections, he routinely drew 96 or 97 percent of the vote. Critics say it's impossible to know how many people would have voted for Castro if they weren't pressured or if they had other choices.

What's certain is that Castro stirred deep passions. A 1998-99 U.S. government-financed survey of 1,023 recent arrivals from Cuba asked respondents to name the leader they hate the most. Castro came out on top.

"He bothers some people. Some people have a love-hate relationship with him. Not me," said Rebeca Chávez, a Havana filmmaker who has helped produce documentaries about Castro.

Alvarez was making a documentary called, "The Necessary War," which told of Castro's preparations to fight then-dictator Fulgencio Batista. Alvarez mentioned to Castro that an old man who lived nearby had met José Martí, a national hero who fought for Cuban independence, when he came ashore decades earlier.

Castro insisted on meeting the man, named Salustiano Leyva. And as the cameras rolled, Castro interviewed Leyva. The man said he was only 11 when Martí arrived, but said he remembered that day well.

Trademark cigar in hand, Castro continued asking "questions and questions and questions," Chavez said.

But Leyva had poor eyesight and didn't realize he was talking to Castro.

When the conversation turned to the revolution, Leyva said, "I'd die for Fidel."

Later, Chávez said, "Salustiano starts to realize who that man was. And he suddenly asks, "Are you Fidel?"

"Yes," Castro replied.

"It was very emotional," Chávez said.

She said the bitterness that some Cubans feel "does not allow them to see the brilliance of this man."

Castro "was not a perfect man," she said, but gave Cubans "a sense of dignity, a sense of belonging."

By 1985, Castro had given up smoking cigars, Ronald Reagan was president of the United States and the Cold War was raging. The former Soviet Union collapsed in 1991 and economic turmoil quickly hit Cuba.

Times were so tough that some people ate breaded grapefruit rinds instead of meat. Castro's critics predicted the government's fall, but it managed to stay afloat.

In July 2006, Castro fell ill after a sudden intestinal ailment and dropped out of sight. Cuban lawmakers formally transferred power to his younger brother, Raul, in February 2008.

In his letter of resignation, Fidel Castro wrote, "This is not my farewell to you. My only wish is to fight as a soldier in the battle of ideas."

After retirement, Castro was thought to spend most of his time at a comfortable, yet far from palatial home. Anti-Castro blogs published satellite photos of the home, which had a living room, dining room, kitchen, library, swimming pool and garden.

Castro's critics accused the Cuban leader of stashing money in foreign bank accounts, but his supporters denied it.

"Fidel never sought personal benefit," said Arsenio Dávila García, 79, one of only four surviving ex-combatants who are ranked as "commanders" of the revolution. The other three commanders are Ramiro Valdés, Efigenio Ameijeiras and Raúl Castro, the current president of Cuba.

Black-and-white photos on the wall of his home show Dávila Garcia and other rebels with shaggy beards. They were nicknamed the Barbudos, or Bearded Ones.

Fidel Castro was "extremely honest," Davila Garcia said.

Former Olympic athlete José Sotomayor said Castro will be remembered "as a great man, like few men are remembered in the world."

"I think Fidel —has been a man without precedent, his intelligence, his ability, his desire to unite all peoples and fight against poverty, and for brotherhood, for harmony," said Sotomayor, 47, who holds the world high jump record of 2.45 meters (8.038 feet).

"I think his example will always endure," he said. "For everything he's done for us, he'll always be in our memory."

Castro was a "political tiger" with a tremendous ability "to find a cause he believes in and fight and fight and fight," Cuban blogger Harold Cárdenas said.

His biggest weakness, his Achilles' heel, was his inability to create a prosperous economy, Cárdenas said.

Too many Cubans, he added, don't know about - or don't want to admit - mistakes that Castro made.

"Not addressing his successes and failures in an objective way hurts him. And I think that at some point, we Cubans have to look at Fidel in an objective way," said Cárdenas.

Many Cubans expect change to come with Castro's death, but Osmani Díaz, 43, said he hopes the Cuban revolution lives on.


Batista's troops killed his father in the 1950s.

"He was accused of helping Fidel, of giving food and some supplies to Fidel and he was taken and burned alive," said Díaz. Today he works as a guide at La Plata, Castro's former secret command post in the Sierra Maestra.

"I think Fidel planted the seed and the roots are there so that this goes on," he said. "The promise of the revolution is in our hands. I hope other Cubans think like I do so that the revolution can be saved
http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/fidel-castros-death/we-learned-lot-fidel-supporters-defend-castro-s-legacy-n689046



Justin Trudeau to skip Castro’s funeral amid uproar over comments

By Associated Press
November 29, 2016 | 3:32am

TORONTO — Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will not be attending the funeral of Fidel Castro amid an uproar over his comments over the weekend praising the late Cuban leader.

Andree-Lyne Halle, a spokeswoman for Trudeau, confirmed Monday that the prime minister will not attend Castro’s funeral “as his schedule does not permit it.” She added that she could not confirm yet whether another Canadian government representative would attend the funeral scheduled to be held Sunday in Santiago, Cuba’s second largest city.

Trudeau issued a statement Saturday that called Castro “a controversial figure,” but also praised him as “a legendary revolutionary and orator” and “a remarkable leader.”

Trudeau’s reaction prompted strong criticism on Twitter from two Republican U.S. senators, Marco Rubio of Florida and Ted Cruz of Texas, both Cuban-Americans. Rubio called Trudeau’s remarks “shameful” and “embarrassing” and Cruz called them “disgraceful.”

Conservative politicians had called on Trudeau to decline any invitation to Castro’s funeral.

In Parliament, Conservative lawmaker Peter Kent on Monday called Trudeau “a naive prime minister” who should not have paid tribute to a dictator like Castro.

In his statement, Trudeau noted that his father, former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, was very proud to call the Cuban leader a friend.

Castro was an honorary pallbearer at the funeral of Trudeau’s father in Montreal in 2000. Justin Trudeau noted in his statement that he had met Castro at his father’s funeral. Justin Trudeau also noted that during his visit to Cuba earlier this month he was honored to meet Castro’s three sons and his brother President Raul Castro.

In 1976, Pierre Trudeau became the first leader of a NATO country to visit communist Cuba. A shirt-sleeved Trudeau outraged many Americans when he shouted during an outdoor rally, “Viva Cuba, Viva Fidel Castro.”

Canada’s close ties to Cuba have long annoyed previous U.S. administrations and infuriated anti-Castro Cuban exiles in Florida. Canada is one of Cuba’s largest trading partners and Cuba is a popular vacation destination for Canadians.

Governor General David Johnston, Queen Elizabeth’s II representative as Canada’s head of state, will attend a commemoration for Castro in Havana on Tuesday, but not Sunday’s funeral, his spokeswoman Julie Rocheleau said.
http://nypost.com/2016/11/29/justin-trudeau-to-skip-castros-funeral-amid-uproar-over-comments/

snapper
29 Nov 16,, 14:41
My only regret is that he died naturally. Sic Semper Tyrannis.

Albany Rifles
29 Nov 16,, 16:04
Saw this on Twitter....

Castro arrives in the Greta Beyond. He is greeted by, of all people, Rasputin.

Rasputin grabs Fidel by the shoulders and holds him at arms length and exclaims: "Damn! You are one hard dude to kill!"

May he rot in hell...

troung
29 Nov 16,, 18:07
Stay classy WAPO. The man wasn't content merely oppressing Cuba, he helped set up and support vile human rights violating regimes.



Fidel Castro, African hero
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/11/28/fidel-castro-african-hero/



By Max Bearak

November 28 


Cuban President Fidel Castro speaks to South African President Nelson Mandela at the World Trade Organization in Geneva in 1998. (Patrick Aviolat/European Pressphoto Agency)

Following his release after 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela made sure one of his first trips abroad was to Havana. There, in the Cuban capital in 1991, Mandela lavished his host, Fidel Castro, with appreciation. Castro, said Mandela, was a “source of inspiration to all freedom-loving people.”

The scene might seem paradoxical in some corners of the West. How could the global symbol of African liberation and democracy say such a thing about a man whose death last Friday provoked exiles who fled repressive Cuban rule to dance in Miami's streets? How could Mandela — imprisoned by South Africa's apartheid rulers — find common ground with Castro, who cleared his way to absolute power in Cuba by jailing untold numbers of dissidents?

The answer lies in Cuba's robust, and sometimes pivotal, support for many African groups as they fought to bring the era of colonialism to an end. And now, upon Castro's death, many of the loudest and most unequivocal tributes to him have been voiced by African leaders who inherited the political movements stemming from the independence struggles spanning the 1960s to the 1980s.

[In wake of Castro’s death, his legacy is debated]

Castro and his African allies saw fertile ground for the spread of communist “revolution” in these wars for independence. In turn, the Soviets provided arms and aid — turning parts of Africa into a stage for Cold War proxy battles.

In 1988, for instance, a deployment of 36,000 Cuban troops played a decisive role in beating back U.S.-supported South African apartheid-era forces stationed in Angola. Those battles precipitated neighboring Namibia's independence from South Africa and reinvigorated anti-apartheid fighters at home. The United States, especially during the Reagan years, supported the apartheid government as a bulwark against communist expansion. All told, at least 4,300 Cubans died in the fighting in Angola.

But Castro's troops weren't just mercenaries for the Soviets. Castro intervened against apartheid largely out of his own convictions, not at Moscow's bidding, historians note.




Cuban troops, as well as technicians, teachers and doctors, would end up staying in Angola for years, to defend against the possibility of another incursion and to build the beginnings of the post-colonial Angolan state. After Castro's death, the secretary general of the Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola, which fought alongside the Cubans and has been in power since independence, said that Castro was his country's Mandela.




Fidel Castro, the Cuban dictator who led the country's communist revolution in the late 1950s, died on Nov. 25. (Jason Aldag/The Washington Post)

[Fidel may be gone, but his legacy lives on in Latin America]

In the ’60s and ’70s, Cuban troops — or African fighters trained by Cubans — also prevailed against the Portuguese in their former colonies of Guinea-Bissau and Cape Verde. They fought against Mobutu Sese Seko, who led the Congo (later Zaire, then the Democratic Republic of Congo) after the killing of the country's first prime minister, Patrice Lumumba, who was perceived in the West as leaning toward the Soviets. And in 1977, Castro sent 17,000 troops to help Ethiopia's Communist leader, Mengistu Haile Mariam, wrest control of the contested Ogaden region from neighboring Somalia. Castro would later claim that almost 400,000 Cuban troops served in Africa, “side-by-side with their African brothers for national independence or against foreign aggression.”


Fidel Castro rides with Lt. Col. Mengistu Haile Mariam in Ethiopia on Sept. 12, 1978. Castro had arrived to attend celebrations for Ethiopia's fourth anniversary of toppling the emperor. (AP)

Piero Gleijeses, author of “Visions of Freedom: Havana, Washington, Pretoria, and the Struggle for Southern Africa, 1976-1991,” said that Mandela, upon hearing of the arrival of Cuban troops in Angola in 1975, wrote from his jail cell that “it was the first time that a country had come from another continent not to take something away, but to help Africans to achieve their freedom.” And of their Angola victory in 1988 against the regime that had imprisoned him, Mandela said it “destroyed the myth of the invincibility of the white oppressor and inspired the fighting masses of South Africa.”

And, to a lesser degree, Cuba's outsized influence continues — though not on the battlefield. Rather, as it does elsewhere in the Caribbean and Latin America, Cuba continues to send doctors from its nationalized health system to Africa. At one point during the beginning of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa two years ago, Cuba had the largest contingent of foreign doctors in the region. As of two years ago, more than 50,000 Cuban doctors work around the world, including in 32 African countries.




Today, the many failures of Castro's revolution at home have left it resembling many of the African countries where it intervened. Like in Cuba, one-party-rule is common across many so-called democracies, and the revolutionary ideals that Cuba helped engender decades ago have been often consumed by greed and incompetence.

It was not surprising to see presidents like Paul Kagame of Rwanda and Pierre Nkurunziza of Burundi offer solemn tributes to Castro. They, too, have inherited his penchant for brutally stifling dissent, and staying in power at all costs.

But Castro will live on in Africa as an icon of freedom and struggle. In 1998, four years after Mandela became South Africa's first black president, Castro flew to the city of Durban and was given a hero’s welcome on the streets. He delivered a speech to a packed meeting of the African National Congress, Mandela's party.

Once reaching the podium, it was several minutes before Castro could begin his address, as the legislature thundered with cheers of “Cuba, Cuba,” and “Fidel, Fidel.”

kato
29 Nov 16,, 18:31
he helped set up and support vile human rights violating regimes.
Umm... let's say he wouldn't be the only political leader of a country to have done that. And leave it at that.

troung
30 Nov 16,, 18:13
...
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-goldberg-castro-useful-idiots-20161128-story.html

Column Fidel Castro died as he lived — praised by useful idiots

Remembering Fidel Castro 1926-2016

Within half an hour of the Cuban government's announcement Saturday of the death of the 90-year-old revolutionary leader, cheers were heard in Miami's Little Havana.

By Jonah Goldberg•Contact Reporter
November 28, 2016, 11:40 AM

Fidel Castro died as he lived: to the sound of useful idiots making allowances for his crimes. (That’s not my term: It was Lenin who called liberal apologists for Communism “useful idiots.”)

The gold medal in the Useful Idiot Olympics should probably go to Justin Trudeau, the prime minister of Canada. In a statement, he expressed his “deep sorrow” upon learning that “Cuba’s longest serving president” had died.

One can only imagine what George Orwell could do with that one word, “serving.” Castro did not serve, he ruled a nation of servants, often cruelly, while making obscene profits for himself and his family.

“To listen to some Castro defenders, you’d think the scales of justice can balance out any load of horrors, so long as the substandard healthcare is free.

“Fidel Castro was a larger than life leader who served his people for almost half a century,” Trudeau continued, repeating that word. “While a controversial figure, both Mr. Castro’s supporters and detractors recognized his tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people who had a deep and lasting affection for ‘el Comandante.’”

Again, where is Orwell’s red pen?

“El Comandante”: The term drips with affection, doesn’t it? Castro’s “detractors”? Would those be the families of the thousands he had executed? The survivors of Castro’s Caribbean gulag? Those who didn’t drown trying to escape?

Trudeau’s expression of “deep sorrow” was typical of a whole genre of Castro eulogies. His apologists have tended to romanticize the “revolution” and parrot Cuban state propaganda – literacy rates! Free healthcare! – while dispensing antiseptic euphemisms for the brutal reality of what the revolution wrought.

At least when people note that Hitler built the autobahn and Mussolini made the trains run on time, they’re usually being ironic. To listen to some Castro defenders, you’d think the scales of justice can balance out any load of horrors, so long as the substandard healthcare is free and the schools (allegedly) teach everyone to read.

As much of the American left is openly mooting whether or not the American president-elect is a dictator in waiting, one has to wonder whether they would take that bargain: No more elections, no more free speech, no more civil liberties of any kind, but socialized medicine and literacy for everyone! American political dissidents, homosexuals, journalists and the clergy, just like in Cuba, can languish in prison or internal exile, but at least they’ll be able to read the charges against them.

Such un-nuanced arguments always make leftist eyes roll. As University of Rhode Island professor Eric Loomis put it, “Castro: It’s Complicated!” cautioning against thinking “in terms of simplistic moral judgments.” It seems to me that when people want to ban simplistic moral judgments, it’s usually because simple morality is not on their side.

Here’s my Fox News colleague Geraldo Rivera on Twitter: “Conservatives mocking nuanced view of #FidelCastro make me gag-What do they say about @realDonaldTrump? #RonaldReagan? RichardNixon? #Elvis?

Orwell’s red pen is too good for such asininity. Lest there is something I don’t know about Elvis, none of these figures were brutal unelected despots responsible for the murder of their own people (10 times as many deaths as those credited to Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet).

One hint as to why Rivera and so many others were smitten with Castro: he was an international celebrity. Rivera even tweeted a picture of himself grinning broadly in “el Comandante’s” presence along with his condolences. “RIP #FidelCastro Yes, a despot who ruthlessly suppressed dissidents. But he defeated a dictator & was the premier revolutionary of his time.”


“Premier revolutionary of his time.” It’s as if Rivera thinks this title provides moral cover. This is the thinking that allows vacuous hipsters to unselfconsciously shrug when you tell them that the Che Guavara on their T-shirt was a sadistic murderer. “Yeah, but he was cool.”

But among serious leftists, Castro’s radical chic is secondary. For them, Fidel’s revolution provided the slender hope that America was on the wrong side of history. It was a symbol of resistance – intellectual, political and spiritual – to Western yanqui hegemony. They loved Cuba for many of the reasons they hate Israel (despite its exemplary literacy rate and universal healthcare system). They think – wrongly – that Israel is an extension of Western colonialism while Cuba was a rejection of it.

Castro understood this better than anyone, which is why he was able to “serve” his people for so long.

jgoldberg@latimescolumnists.com

tankie
01 Dec 16,, 21:27
Left 900 million , over 20 large properties , he really served his people did this POS and of course our labour leader , Corbin , thinks he was a veritable fine chap , mind tho , corbin breaks bread with the scum from the IRA adams n mcguiness etc etc .

Parihaka
05 Dec 16,, 05:43
Says it all really


42768

JAD_333
06 Dec 16,, 04:55
Says it all really


42768

Yes, sir. Venezuela closed the tap.

kuku
06 Dec 16,, 05:10
In 1988, for instance, a deployment of 36,000 Cuban troops played a decisive role in beating back U.S.-supported South African apartheid-era forces stationed in Angola.
Cuba, USA, Apartheid South Africa and Angola.
All of us are murderer
This world i tell you.....

FORMBY
30 Dec 16,, 20:50
Fidel Castro was a good man. HIS CRIME? He was naďve. He thought by ridding his island nation of the American Mafia he would be applauded by Washington. He was fond of the US and I'm sure he was confused by America's campaign against him. Cuba (like Iran during the Mossedeq Democratic government) was left for dead and had no other option (again like Iran) but to make friends with the Soviet Union.

Castro was played like a pawn between Kennedy and Kruschev over the Soviet's missile «knight to E-6» move, forcing America to dismantle its own missiles on the Turkish-Soviet border. Although the US has been keeping up the pressure to this very day, the settlement over the missiles and "The Bay of Pigs" fiasco meant that Cuba would not be invaded again. That agreement must have been written in blood.

The strain was great, of course, and Fidel had to make some drastic decisions that might not have always been the best ones to make.

TopHatter
30 Dec 16,, 21:30
Fidel Castro was a good man. HIS CRIME? He was naďve.

You certainly going to make a lot of friends here. Here, let me Google that for you https://www.google.com/#q=Human+rights+violations+of+fidel+castro

FORMBY
31 Dec 16,, 03:38
You certainly going to make a lot of friends here. Here, let me Google that for you https://www.google.com/#q=Human+rights+violations+of+fidel+castro
I do not see anything in your link that disproves anything I've written. That was your purpose, yes?

snapper
31 Dec 16,, 12:21
Yea he was so 'mis-understood' by his own people that thousands of them took to anything that would float to try to make it to Florida.

Doktor
31 Dec 16,, 12:33
Yea he was so 'mis-understood' by his own people that thousands of them took to anything that would float to try to make it to Florida.

Those that were not shot you mean?

JAD_333
31 Dec 16,, 20:28
Fidel Castro was a good man.


For me, Castro lost all claim to being a good man when enabled a scenario that could have led to nuclear war. He did just that when he invited the USSR to station nuclear missiles in his country.

TopHatter
31 Dec 16,, 20:47
For me, Castro lost all claim to being a good man when enabled a scenario that could have led to nuclear war. He did just that when he invited the USSR to station nuclear missiles in his country.

We'll gloss over the fact that Castro was enraged by the Soviet decision to withdraw those missiles and demanded to know why they weren't being used.

That's right, his reaction was "Why in the hell did you bring them here in the first place if not to launch them??"

TopHatter
31 Dec 16,, 20:55
I do not see anything in your link that disproves anything I've written. That was your purpose, yes?

Ok, we'll go back to förskola if you insist.

You said:

Fidel Castro was a good man.

HIS CRIME? He was naďve.

You used the word "crime", singular, meaning his only crime was, in your word, naiveté.

So, having looked at my link, you didn't find the following to be of any significance, apparently:


"thousands of Cubans were incarcerated in abysmal prisons, thousands more were harassed and intimidated, and entire generations were denied basic political freedoms."

“Over more than five decades documenting the state of human rights in Cuba, Amnesty [International] has recorded a relentless campaign against those who dare to speak out against the Cuban government’s policies and practices”

Upon establishing his provisional government in 1959, Castro organized trials of members of the previous government that resulted in hundreds of summary executions. In response to an international outcry and amid accusations that many of the trials were unfair, Castro responded:

"Revolutionary justice is not based on legal precepts, but on moral conviction... we are not executing innocent people or political opponents. We are executing murderers and they deserve it."


But, presumably to justify all that, you added the caveat of "The strain was great, of course, and Fidel had to make some drastic decisions that might not have always been the best ones to make"

So, drastic decisions..."might" not have always been the best ones to make...like hundreds of summary executions? "Might"?

I can do this all day long.

JAD_333
31 Dec 16,, 21:28
We'll gloss over the fact that Castro was enraged by the Soviet decision to withdraw those missiles and demanded to know why they weren't being used.

That's right, his reaction was "Why in the hell did you bring them here in the first place if not to launch them??"

Indeed. Maybe he was just "naive"... lol

FORMBY
31 Dec 16,, 22:28
Castro isn’t the only naďve person in the world, I see.

42975

Doktor
31 Dec 16,, 23:45
[QUOTE=FORMBY;1019080]Castro isn’t the only naďve person in the world, I see.

42975

Right, Stalin was naive, too. He trusted Hitler.

Unless you put names, I can go on like forever.

FORMBY
01 Jan 17,, 00:00
Castro isn’t the only naďve person in the world, I see.

42975

Right, Stalin was naive, too. He trusted Hitler.

Unless you put names, I can go on like forever.
Actually, when I said that Castro isn’t the only naďve person in the world I wasn't speaking about a particular celebrity past, present, or future. I was referring to the comments on this thread by a sort of a naďve 'follow the leader' tempo.

42976

TopHatter
01 Jan 17,, 02:34
Actually, when I said that Castro isn’t the only naďve person in the world I wasn't speaking about a particular celebrity past, present, or future. I was referring to the comments on this thread by a sort of a naďve 'follow the leader' tempo.

Right, much easier than actually responding to the posts.

Face it, you tried to defend one of the 20th Century's more notorious dictators as a "good man" who was merely "naive", got called out on your bullshit and you don't have diddly shit in response.

Gun Grape
01 Jan 17,, 03:18
42985

FORMBY
01 Jan 17,, 04:16
Right, much easier than actually responding to the posts.

Face it, you tried to defend one of the 20th Century's more notorious dictators as a "good man" who was merely "naive", got called out on your bullshit and you don't have diddly shit in response.

I am talking about Fidel Castro. You’d rather play the Obama game: Never mind the deeds by the subject, let’s slander the messenger and absurdly select what to spin from his words. If that’s your preferred style that’s OK, but it’s not mine. I’ve got children of my own and have no responsibility for anyone else’s education. Carry on as you like. Have a nice day and a ............
42986

Parihaka
01 Jan 17,, 08:06
42987

FORMBY
01 Jan 17,, 08:32
42988

YellowFever
01 Jan 17,, 16:38
42990

Doktor
01 Jan 17,, 17:09
Just admit it that you miss the Col.

FORMBY
01 Jan 17,, 18:09
Kfc?

YellowFever
01 Jan 17,, 18:23
Just admit it that you miss the Col.

I do miss the Colonel.

I'm hoping this is a Zero Day chewtoy launched by the Admins of WAB to draw him out and get him to engage again.

Doktor
01 Jan 17,, 18:51
I do miss the Colonel.

I'm hoping this is a Zero Day chewtoy launched by the Admins of WAB to draw him out and get him to engage again.

Same here on both accounts.

TopHatter
01 Jan 17,, 19:07
I do miss the Colonel.

I'm hoping this is a Zero Day chewtoy launched by the Admins of WAB to draw him out and get him to engage again.

No, you were right the first time. Either a troll or a complete idiot. In any case, Open Season has been declared. The Chew Toy lamp is lit.

Enjoy him while he lasts...he's got a limited shelf life.

tankie
01 Jan 17,, 21:34
Kfc?

No , a well respected member of WAB an allied Colonel ,whose monicker is OOE , which stands for , officer of engineers , an ex mod on here and not a guy to fuck around with , unfortunately his health is not too good and hes on a sabbatical , maybe he will pay a visit to the forum now n again , if he does , pay homage and close attention , and perhaps try a good single malt in his revered direction , ttfn .

bewerbung
21 Feb 17,, 14:43
Rasputin grabs Fidel by the shoulders and holds him at arms length and exclaims: "Damn! You are one hard dude to kill!"

tankie
25 Aug 17,, 14:44
I do miss the Colonel.

I'm hoping this is a Zero Day chewtoy launched by the Admins of WAB to draw him out and get him to engage again.

Damn ,,,never worked .