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WildLomcevak
02 Jul 05,, 06:43
Hi guys
I am wondering if I just got lucky, or if- like with many things- there is just a lot of hype floating around out there.
A little background. I'm (ugh) nearly 40 years old, with an extensive firearms background. I grew up on a ranch in west Texas- which explains that, lol- and spent almost 7 years as an air force pilot. After seperating from the service, I was a police officer in Texas during the Great Aviation Slump of the late 80's/ early 90's. Although I'm back with an airline these days, my background and job history combined to cause a large number of firearms to apparently breed wantonly in my cabinets. (At least, that's what I tell my wife).
I'm a fairly competent gunsmith, and due to my love for the M1, I have purchased several mini 14's over the years. I avoided the -30 since I heard quite a few folks badmouthing them- I own two AR's aquired at dirt-cheap prices through department letterhead, so I really saw no need, anyway, for yet another "sporting rifle".
A while back, however, my godfather decided he was too old to keep his gun collection, so he gave it to me- quite a haul, he had a beautiful, and extensive, collection of both old and new firearms. Christmas came early for me!
Included in this mother lode was a practically new mini-30. (Serial number is 181+)
To date, I've put about 3000 rounds through it, using both cheap Ruskie ammo purchased at a flea market, and quality ammo. I have yet to have a single feed problem of any type, no misfires...and reliable 2.5" groups at 150 yds.
I hear people comparing the mini's to the AR's...this is ridiculous. It's like comparing a Mustang to a Lamborghini. I can build a Mustang that will snap your head back- but no matter what I do, it will never be a Lambo...nor will it cost me $250,000.
So, did I just get lucky? I did tune it just a bit, just polishing the action to get rid a a slightly gritty trigger, but essentially it's bone-stock. I think it will be perfect for these little hill country white tails- and 2.5" at 150 yds is better than I can shoot offhand, anyway. Before I run out and buy my wife another one (She loves it) I want to hear from some other owners.
Please keep the "it ain't no AR" comments to yourself- obviously it isn't. If you knew my wife, you wouldn't want to hand her anything pricey- she's likely to drop it in a creek, or run over it with a car, or...well, you get the idea. Hope she doesn't read this...she IS a great shot.
Thanks, guys- I look forward to your replies!

Jamie

Bill
02 Jul 05,, 15:50
IMO the Mini-30 is a very good firearm whose only crime is that it is chambered in the 7.62x39 caliber.

Beaugeste93
02 Jul 05,, 16:27
I can't claim much experience with them, but i always heard that the problems originated in the chambers being made to US spec, not warsaw pact. US-made ammo would work, but wolf and other eastern bloc stuff didn't function well because the chambers are a little tight for them. I don't know if this is true, but i've heard it from several gunsmiths.

Glad you got a good one.

highsea
02 Jul 05,, 16:59
Beaugeste, I was going to mention that also. American ammo uses a .308 bullet, and the mini-30's bore is sized for that diameter. The Warpact ammo use a .311 bullet, which is matched to the AK/SKS barrels.

WildLomcevak- I would not want to shoot too much Russky ammo in a Mini-30 for fear of excessive erosion. I don't know if it is really a serious problem, but between the corrosive primers and the larger bullet, I would be shooting mostly Federals/ Remingtons if it were my gun. The Milspec ammo is no good for hunting anyway.

You can send some of those extra guns my way, I will give them a good home... :biggrin:

sniperdude411
03 Jul 05,, 01:22
"You can send some of those extra guns my way, I will give them a good home... "
But you'd choose a wonderful, smart, gun-loving 14-year-old over Highsea, right:)?:)?:)?

I think the Mini-30 is a great gun for short-range shooting and hunting, but I wouldn't go more than 350 yards.

Beaugeste93
03 Jul 05,, 03:19
Beaugeste, I was going to mention that also. American ammo uses a .308 bullet, and the mini-30's bore is sized for that diameter. The Warpact ammo use a .311 bullet, which is matched to the AK/SKS barrels.

WildLomcevak- I would not want to shoot too much Russky ammo in a Mini-30 for fear of excessive erosion. I don't know if it is really a serious problem, but between the corrosive primers and the larger bullet, I would be shooting mostly Federals/ Remingtons if it were my gun. The Milspec ammo is no good for hunting anyway.

You can send some of those extra guns my way, I will give them a good home... :biggrin:


You are correct, sir. It is bullet diameter not chamber dimensions. I hate misremembering facts, especially after I've already posted them.

Confed999
03 Jul 05,, 04:06
It's a Ruger, 'nuff said... ;)

bonehead
03 Jul 05,, 06:17
It sounds that that rifle is a keeper. Most newer mini's need quite a bit of tinkering and tuning to shoot that well. I have never had a reliability problem with my mini-14, but I'm not that happy with the groups either. I'm looking to get a mini in a 6.8 REM to augment my mini 14 ranch. It would be well worth it to buy a second for your wife. Just be prepared to do some work on it to tighten the groups. An SAR 3 , an AK derivitive that shoots .223, is cheaper and uglier than a mini, but would take more abuse and shoots as well as a mini (out of the box)

sniperdude411
03 Jul 05,, 20:40
You can get a used mini stainless, with scope rings and folding stick for $499 at my local gun store.

WildLomcevak
05 Jul 05,, 03:20
I appreciate all of the feedback- yes, I'm aware of the corrosive primers in foreign ammo particularly...I just wanted to run the gamut of available rounds to see what was what.
I sized the bore, and you are all quite correct- I'm very suprised that the russian ammo grouped as well as it did. In fact, I couldn't tell any difference in group size.
I went to police sniper school when I was a police officer- although I never acted as a sniper- and I learned two important facts...one, sniper work is all about patience, which I don't have much of, and two, it's a damned good thing I grew up in Texas, where game shots are typically under 300 yards. I can shoot fine in a no-wind situation, but when it comes to dialing in per-shot windage, and cold barrel/warm barrel differences, and all of the other things that we learned in sniper school...well, as a sniper I make a damned fine whitetail hunter, lol. I have an old high school buddy who joined the Army, and eventually the Rangers, at the same time I joined the Air Force- he is currently a sniper with them. I have a hell of alot of respect for anyone who can spend the hours- and days- it can take to get one good kill shot. It certainly isn't me! I spent a few years teaching newbie pilots how to fly formation, instruments, and ACM...which used up every bit of patience I had and then some. Lying under a bush for three days, or spending 12 hours crossing 100 feet of open space on your belly...ouch. Not in my genes.

Sorry, off topic there a bit, lol. Back to the -30. I use a 7mm mag for Alaskan Caribou/Moose, or for any Colorado Elk trips- the -30 is purely a shorter range whitetail killer in my stable. Anyone know how well it travels through brush? Ballistically, I wouldn't expect it to perform very well, but other calibers have suprised me...although I always seem to return to the 30-30 when I'm in Texas scrub. My preferred caliber is 30.06, but it doesn't take much of a twig to send it spinning off into the netherlands. 30-30 rounds just seem to plow on through.

Again, much thanks- what did we do before the internet? I guess we hung around the local gun shop drinking coffee and telling lies...hmm.

JJ

ak-dave
05 Jul 05,, 23:04
Now we just sit at home drinking coffee and telling lies on the Internet. :biggrin:

The Mini-30 is comparable to most .30-30 levers and they make a pretty good brush gun too. Take it out hunting a couple of times to see how you like it. If what she really likes, let her have one. The only feed problems I have heard about were Mini-14ís and reloaded ammo, case length is a critical item with them.

sniperdude411
05 Jul 05,, 23:13
Now we just sit at home drinking coffee and telling lies on the Internet. :biggrin:

The Mini-30 is comparable to most .30-30 levers and they make a pretty good brush gun too. Take it out hunting a couple of times to see how you like it. If what she really likes, let her have one. The only feed problems I have heard about were Mini-14ís and reloaded ammo, case length is a critical item with them.

Isn't it a problem with all semi-auto rifles???

leib10
05 Jul 05,, 23:13
I'd much rather go deer hunting with a Mini-30 than a Mini-14.

ak-dave
05 Jul 05,, 23:20
Snperdude: Yes it is. More accurately would have been to say the bullet seating depth is the issue.

Liebstandarte: I donít know of any place that .223 is legal for deer. Thatís why some people have been looking at the 6.8 SPC uppers for their ARís.

sniperdude411
05 Jul 05,, 23:23
I never knew you couldn't hunt deer with certain ammo. In PA, you can hunt deer with a .22 if you wanted.

ak-dave
05 Jul 05,, 23:34
The idea is using a caliber large enough for a clean kill. Here the smallest is .243/6mm.

bonehead
06 Jul 05,, 01:42
Oregon allows a .223 or larger centerfire rifle caliber for deer.

Bluesman
06 Jul 05,, 02:18
Jamie -

Are you a member of the IAC? The Dallas Chapter, perhaps?

We may know some of the same people...

leib10
06 Jul 05,, 02:51
Down here, we hunt anything with pretty much whatever we want. It's still a bit like the Wild West when it comes to hunting down here. I haven't heard of anybody getting in trouble for using a weapon too low-powered, and I don't even know if there's a law against it. For instance, in Culberson County, we have precisely one game warden to patrol at least a hundred square miles of desert wilderness. Naturally, we always use enough gun for our targets, but that doesn't mean everybody does... ;)

sniperdude411
06 Jul 05,, 16:03
Down here, we hunt anything with pretty much whatever we want. It's still a bit like the Wild West when it comes to hunting down here. I haven't heard of anybody getting in trouble for using a weapon too low-powered, and I don't even know if there's a law against it. For instance, in Culberson County, we have precisely one game warden to patrol at least a hundred square miles of desert wilderness. Naturally, we always use enough gun for our targets, but that doesn't mean everybody does... ;)

I wouldn't see why someone would want to pump a deer full of 50 .22s.

sw55
06 Jul 05,, 20:51
I have one. Not real accurate, but enough for hunting at 100 yds. Newer Wolf ammo has newer, non laqour painted shells, and yes it is 311 instead of 308, but I called the people at Ruger on that question and they said bullet diameter issue was ok. Wolf ammo has non-corrosive primers, but like the earlier painted shells, they seemed to misfire a lot, say one in 20. Again, the newer Wolf ammo has a more sensitive primer because I havent had a problem with it since. Stay away from the "Bi-metal" rounds though. Copper is what you want there. I am no salesman, but Wolf won't hurt your gun if Copper, and it is cheap. Hi cap mags that work are hard to come by. If you want one of those just keep buying USA mags until you get one that works. You may find that you will need a recoil buffer to damp the bolt hitting the reciever, since I have gone through about three scopes before I learned that was destroyiing them. Nice gun though, and I am not selling it ever.

bonehead
07 Jul 05,, 00:55
I wouldn't see why someone would want to pump a deer full of 50 .22s.

It happens often. This usually happens at night, involves one or two rounds, and a flashlight. It is called poaching.

sniperdude411
07 Jul 05,, 01:46
It happens often. This usually happens at night, involves one or two rounds, and a flashlight. It is called poaching.

Sickos.

leib10
07 Jul 05,, 02:43
Ah yes, we have plenty of instances of that down here. Only about a tenth of offenders are actually caught, usually because they drive down county roads and a sheriff surprises them in the night. I've done it but with jackrabbits, which as far as I know isn't illegal if it's on private property.

sniperdude411
07 Jul 05,, 03:09
I say if they're pests, go ahead and shoot them as much as you want. Just try to kill them as fast as possible.

leib10
07 Jul 05,, 03:39
My brother was a bit of a sadist when it came to killing rabbits. When wounded, he liked to shoot them to bits, smash them with a large rock, let my German Shepherd have its way with them, stomp them, kick them, stab them, stretch them, even burn them. It was disturbing.

Bluesman
07 Jul 05,, 04:46
My brother was a bit of a sadist when it came to killing rabbits. When wounded, he liked to shoot them to bits, smash them with a large rock, let my German Shepherd have its way with them, stomp them, kick them, stab them, stretch them, even burn them. It was disturbing.

That behavior is to be watched. A common thread among violence-prone people - and serial killers, of particular note - is sadism to animals.

WildLomcevak
07 Jul 05,, 05:12
Well, I've been hunting in Texas all of my life- and spent awhile as a cop in San Antonio, and the only limitation I'm aware of is that regular .22's cannot be used to hunt deer- a larger case pushing a .22 caliber bullet is fine, the laws just apply to 22LR (and of course longs and shorts) .223/.243 were the preferred calibers for kids when I was growing up- although my bore-crazy father strapped me to a 30.06 from the time I was old enough to sit in his lap and squeeze a trigger, lol. He gave me a semi-auto 30.06 (which I still have) that certainly left some large bruises on my 6-year old shoulder. Personally, I think it's a little much for Texas white tail, but still within the reasonable range...we had a deer lease down near Cotulla when I was a young teenager, and several of the other hunters on the lease were doctors- too much money, not enough sense. They'd show up with 7mm mags or 416 weatherby mags, and just blow fist sized holes in the poor little buggars...and of course, the secondary wound cavity would be much larger, resulting a alot of bruised and ruined meat. I'm a pilot for a living, and I've noticed that doc's do the same thing with personal aircraft...must be something they learn in med school.
Again, thanks for the great info, guys- you provided just what I was looking for.

Carpe Diem,

JJ

sniperdude411
07 Jul 05,, 05:44
You should post more often here; I've learned more from these people in two months than I have watching documentaries in two years.

bonehead
09 Jul 05,, 18:03
Well, I've been hunting in Texas all of my life- and spent awhile as a cop in San Antonio, and the only limitation I'm aware of is that regular .22's cannot be used to hunt deer- a larger case pushing a .22 caliber bullet is fine, the laws just apply to 22LR (and of course longs and shorts) .223/.243 were the preferred calibers for kids when I was growing up- although my bore-crazy father strapped me to a 30.06 from the time I was old enough to sit in his lap and squeeze a trigger, lol. He gave me a semi-auto 30.06 (which I still have) that certainly left some large bruises on my 6-year old shoulder. Personally, I think it's a little much for Texas white tail, but still within the reasonable range...we had a deer lease down near Cotulla when I was a young teenager, and several of the other hunters on the lease were doctors- too much money, not enough sense. They'd show up with 7mm mags or 416 weatherby mags, and just blow fist sized holes in the poor little buggars...and of course, the secondary wound cavity would be much larger, resulting a alot of bruised and ruined meat. I'm a pilot for a living, and I've noticed that doc's do the same thing with personal aircraft...must be something they learn in med school.
Again, thanks for the great info, guys- you provided just what I was looking for.

Carpe Diem,

JJ

I know people who hunt antelope with a barrett .50cal. With that rifle, the old guys do not have to do much walking/stalking. (it is tough to get close to an antalope.) The fifty does a wonderful job of reaching out and dropping the animal from astounding ranges and the bullet passes through the animal with relitively little secondary damage unless a bone is hit.

sniperdude411
09 Jul 05,, 18:10
But if it's okd guy that are hunting, how can they take the recoil?
I'd probably go with the 338 Lapua if I were them. Much cheaper, too.

bonehead
09 Jul 05,, 18:40
Sickos.

Just to set the record straight, I have never poached in that mannor. The only time I took an animal "out of season", was when a buck jumped out in front of my truck. The deer had a broken neck and I had a dent in my front bumber. I saw no sence in wasting the meat so I did what I believed to be the right thing to do, but it was not legally correct.

Out here there are two kinds of poachers. The first kind do so because there is nothing left in the kitchen to eat. Poach or starve. I empethize with them so they do not bother me so much as there are plenty of deer around (many of which wander in the roadways and are mowed down by vehicles and left to rot on the side of the road.) These are usually the type of people who use a .22 and a flashlight at night. They do not want to disurb anyone( the crack of a .22 goes all of fifty feet in the woods), nor do they want to get caught. They just want to eat.

The second variety of poachers use $40,000 trucks and expensive weapons and lighting so they can kill for fun, then leave the animals to rot because they do not want to get their expensive trucks dirty. These guys also indiscriminately wound thousands of animals per year. Others who have tagged the first animal, then see one with a better rack so they shoot the second animal and abandoned the first. These are the people who piss me off the most as they are giving all hunters a bad name and they have perverted the concept of hunting which is so much more than just killing an animal.

ak-dave
09 Jul 05,, 20:32
He gave me a semi-auto 30.06 (which I still have) that certainly left some large bruises on my 6-year old shoulder. Personally, I think it's a little much for Texas white tail, but still within the reasonable range...
The fist time I went deer hunting out side of SA, Tx in the late 70ís I had a .303 Brit and thought they were tall dogs. Was afraid to shoot one, would just about gut and clean it in one shot. :biggrin: :biggrin:


Out here there are two kinds of poachers. The first kind do so because there is nothing left in the kitchen to eat. Poach or starve. I empathize with them so they do not bother me so much as there are plenty of deer around (many of which wander in the roadways and are mowed down by vehicles and left to rot on the side of the road.) These are usually the type of people who use a .22 and a flashlight at night. They do not want to disturb anyone (the crack of a .22 goes all of fifty feet in the woods), nor do they want to get caught. They just want to eat.
So true brother! I knew a guy who was stationed at Ft. Hood and would take deer from the game reserve at night. He was a Private had a wife and five kids to feed, living on the economy because he hadnít been in the two years to get base housing. He was a bigggg olí southern boy, bag a deer with his .22, flip it over his shoulder and go. There were many nights he played hide-and-seek with the Game Warden, never got caught. My closest assignment to Ft. Hood was a set of orders that I did everything I could to get out of, ended up out in the Presidio of San Francisco. :cool:

bonehead
10 Jul 05,, 00:50
But if it's okd guy that are hunting, how can they take the recoil?
I'd probably go with the 338 Lapua if I were them. Much cheaper, too.

The semi-auto's really do not kick that hard, much like a 12 gauge. Most of them ( the old guys)are deaf as a post so the noise does not bother them either. I always got a kick knowing their rifles cost twice as much as their trucks.

sniperdude411
10 Jul 05,, 20:48
"Just to set the record straight, I have never poached in that mannor. The only time I took an animal "out of season", was when a buck jumped out in front of my truck. The deer had a broken neck and I had a dent in my front bumber. I saw no sence in wasting the meat so I did what I believed to be the right thing to do, but it was not legally correct. "

I take animals out of season all the time, but only pests aka groundhogs, crows (in PA you can only shoot crows on fri-sun), muskrats (we've got about 200 of them on an 83-acre property), squirrels, and rabits. They endanger my crops, so I actually have a reason to kill them.
Dopn't take me wrong, though. I don't shoot more than three animals per day (no more than one of each kind, three total), and always give them a proper burial.

If I mamed a deer on accident, I would definitely put it out of its misery. You did the right thing; sometimes the law isn't morally correct.

WildLomcevak
13 Jul 05,, 06:56
These posts made me remember something that used to just piss me off. Back in the late 80's/early 90's, aviation was in a slump, so, fresh out of the USAF, I took a job as a police officer and helo pilot here in south Texas. We used to have to work deer/auto accidents all the time- in a single district, as many as 8 or 10 each week in Fall. The law, at the time- did not allow us to do anything with the freshly killed deer except dispose of it. Then they passed a law that allowed us to give it to the homeless shelters- but to do so, we had to call a game warden to come collect it, and they were often tied up (esp in Fall!) and the paperwork was intense- plus, not many homeless shelters were set up to accept unprocessed deer! So essentially, the law was a bust...I don't know if anything has changed in the last 10 years in this regard, but back then most cops covertly found someone who hunted, who would voluntarily come out illegally and get the deer, process it, and deliver it "on the sly" to homeless shelters. It's a damned shame- and hard to stomach- to throw away that much meat when people just a few miles away are literally starving to death. Ain't the government wonderful?

uzitiger
03 Jun 06,, 21:32
The biggest weakness the Mini 14 and Mini 30 have are the aftermarket magazines. If you can get factory mags then you have a reliable shooter otherwise reliability goes down the drain. The only aftermarket mags for the Mini 14 that worked well for me were the Pro Mag although I heard that PMI are also good. Pro Mag recently came out with a 30 round polymer mag for the Mini 30. I believe this will be a good magazine from my experience with Pro Mag's magazines and their reliability.

Sandman
06 Jun 06,, 16:41
I have a Mini-30 and love it. I have wondered what to do about accuracy though, and think I may glass bed the barrel. USA mags work, on a hit or miss basis, and you just have to keep buying them until you find a good one. I have tried to bend the feeder lips to get a good feed, but not much success. I wish someone made a mag with a little thicker metal that would fit, feed and not be worthless if you drop it on a hard surface. AK mags are the model here, since I could probably drive my truck over one and it would probably still work.

leib10
06 Jun 06,, 17:54
I don't care what anybody says, AK mags are some of the sturdiest and most reliable and effective ever designed.

Triple C
09 Jun 06,, 16:41
I don't care what anybody says, AK mags are some of the sturdiest and most reliable and effective ever designed.

I heard an AK loaded bandolier is used as a substitute for a ballistic vest in some parts.

leib10
09 Jun 06,, 18:03
LOL, never heard of that. But I suppose it's plausible, if somewhat crude and dangerous to the user. They're certainly tougher than the aluminum M16 mags and the polymer mags that are becoming popular.

Triple C
11 Jun 06,, 11:14
Yes, the idea is that it's a "well, Achmed, it's better than nothing" solution.

2DREZQ
16 Jun 06,, 23:33
I have a Mini-30 and love it. I have wondered what to do about accuracy though, and think I may glass bed the barrel. USA mags work, on a hit or miss basis, and you just have to keep buying them until you find a good one. I have tried to bend the feeder lips to get a good feed, but not much success. I wish someone made a mag with a little thicker metal that would fit, feed and not be worthless if you drop it on a hard surface. AK mags are the model here, since I could probably drive my truck over one and it would probably still work.

Glass bedding the Mini-30 won't do a lot of good. The problem with the it is that, in order to digest .311 dia AK ammo as well as .308 US ammo, they made the chamber throat long to basically swage the bullet down to the .308 of the bore- not a recipe for accuracy-having the bullet jump that far.

Sandman
17 Jun 06,, 03:17
Glass bedding the Mini-30 won't do a lot of good. The problem with the it is that, in order to digest .311 dia AK ammo as well as .308 US ammo, they made the chamber throat long to basically swage the bullet down to the .308 of the bore- not a recipe for accuracy-having the bullet jump that far.

Just as I thought. It sounds like the answer to my Mini accuracy problem is not glass bedding but perhaps a Rock River M-4, huh?

My wife will not be happy.

Oh well. Sacrafices must be made. It sounds like I will have to play up Fathers Day for all it's worth.

2DREZQ
19 Jun 06,, 02:24
Just as I thought. It sounds like the answer to my Mini accuracy problem is not glass bedding but perhaps a Rock River M-4, huh?

My wife will not be happy.

Oh well. Sacrafices must be made. It sounds like I will have to play up Fathers Day for all it's worth.

I've always intended to get a new barrel custom made for mine. It would be fun to show up at the range with a mini that can do MOA work.

Sandman
19 Jun 06,, 16:37
I definately have a 'love/hate' relationship with my Mini-30. I love it for it's looks, utility, diversity of function, compact size, finish and cheap ammo that is a pretty hard hitting round. You can hunt with it, and is legal in Michigan for deer hunting. (5.56 is not legal from what I understand) An AR or an AK will get you in trouble with more than a 5 round mag, as well as a lot of strange looks from your hunting peers.
I hate it for not being able to hit the broad side of a barn, jamming (hi-cap) mags, misfires with foreign ammo, complexity in cleaning, and being so hard on scopes (the reciever shock has killed three scopes, until I got a "buffer" to relieve a little of the shock, and I hope will stop killing scopes now). Really, I could live with the rest, but the accuracy really bothers me, and at 100 yards with cheap ammo I am getting 12 inch groups. Honestly, my son's 10/22 has two inch groups at 100 yards!!! Maybe I should switch to American made ammo, and I will keep the gun, but I long for something a little more accurate.

leib10
19 Jun 06,, 18:35
It's the ammo you're using. It seems that American-made guns just don't like the Wolf or other Russian commercial ammo. I've got an SAR-1 that is just fine with either though. Very, very few misfires and more than acceptable accuracy under 200 yards.

My advice is to use American ammo, even though it is far more expensive. It has a .308 diameter bullet instead of the .311 bullet the Russian ammo has, so that might make a difference.

Sandman
19 Jun 06,, 19:23
Thanks, I will give that a try and see how it compares.

Mikej21
09 Sep 06,, 20:27
Everyone's always told me not to shoot Russian ammo thru my Mini-30 because the American ammo was microed at .308 and Russian was .311.

I've mesured Remington, Winchester, Federal, PMC, South African, Golden Bear and Wolf and they all Mic in at .310-.311. I have yet to find any ammo that mics in at .308.

I've searced Midway and all they offer is 7.62X39 @ .310-.311. As far as I'm concerned there is no mfg. ammo that mics in at .308 for the 7.62x39 ammo.

As for needing a chome lined barrel for shooting bi-metal bullets because the crome is harder than bi-metal? A regular barrel is harder than a bi-metal bullet, that's why it's bi-metal and not steel. Any chrome lined barrel is going to make a barrel last longer no matter what you shoot thru it.

My mini 30 is the 180 series and with a slight throating/ramping of the barrel it has never failed me and has been just as reliable as my Garand. Hitting a 2" pattern at 100 yards is no sweat.

FOG3
10 Sep 06,, 23:20
While _I_ don't technically own one I've certainly used one quite a bit. It's your usual Ruger product, and all that implies for both good and bad.

One thing about the Russian ammo I haven't scene a comment on that we found was that apparently our civilian springs and firing pin don't deliver the same kind of force that Russian military rifles do. Needless to say this results in something of a safety hazard, although we haven't had one of the misfires detonate after ejection, yet. Just as well we just use handloads now.

highsea
11 Sep 06,, 23:54
...I've mesured Remington, Winchester, Federal, PMC, South African, Golden Bear and Wolf and they all Mic in at .310-.311. I have yet to find any ammo that mics in at .308.From the 26th edition Hodgdon Data Manual:
Standard groove diameter of foreign military rifles in 7.62 x 39mm is .311", and most factory ammunition is loaded with bullets near that diameter. The Ruger Mini-30, the first U.S. commercial rifle to be produced in this caliber, has a groove diameter of .308". The design of it's chamber throat enables it to handle bullets of .308" and .311" diameters.So I think you are correct- new factory loads will have .310 or .311 dia. bullets since they expect them to be fired in AK's.

leib10
12 Sep 06,, 02:36
Since a lot of the tooling used in civilian-manufactured ammo is identical to Russian mil-spec, the .311 diameter would make sense.