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Parihaka
18 Dec 14,, 18:58
Norks Nix Yanks' Pix :: SteynOnline (http://www.steynonline.com/6713/norks-nix-yanks-pix)


Free speech is in retreat around the world. Twenty-five years ago, through all the violent demonstrations and murders of associated figures, The Satanic Verses remained in print and in almost every bookstore. Were it a new book being pitched today, no publisher would take it. I see that, following the disappearance of The Interview, a Texan movie theater replaced it with a screening of Team America. That film wouldn't get made today, either.

Hollywood has spent the 21st century retreating from storytelling into a glossy, expensive CGI playground in which nothing real is at stake. That's all we'll be getting from now on. Oh, and occasional Oscar bait about embattled screenwriters who stood up to the House UnAmerican Activities Committee six decades ago, even as their successors cave to, of all things, Kim's UnKorean Activities Committee. American pop culture - supposedly the most powerful and influential force on the planet - has just surrendered to a one-man psycho-state economic basket-case that starves its own population.

Kim Jong-won.

U.S. Should Make North Korea Pay for Sony Hack - The Daily Beast (http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/12/17/u-s-should-make-north-korea-pay-for-sony-hack.html)

The New York Times today reported that the American intelligence community has determined that the regime of Kim Jong Un was “centrally involved” in the unprecedented hacking campaign against Sony Pictures Entertainment. CNN reports that the Justice Department will announce, perhaps as early as tomorrow, that hackers working for North Korea were behind the attacks, apparently intended to stop the release of The Interview, the Seth Rogen-James Franco comedy about the assassination of the regime’s supremo.

Why would the White House delay an announcement? The administration, the Times reports, “was still debating whether to publicly accuse North Korea of what amounts to a cyberterrorism campaign.” The concern is that a public accusation would result in an escalation.

North Korea, however, will escalate no matter what. If the administration tries to avoid a confrontation, Pyongyang’s leaders will of course be emboldened. They undoubtedly are pleased that they were able to get Sony today to announce the indefinite delay of the opening of the film after theater chains, intimidated by Tuesday’s threats of 9/11-type attacks, refused to show it.


'The Interview' Falls Apart: Theater Chains Pull Film, NY Premiere Canceled, Stars Scrap Promotional Duties - Breitbart (http://www.breitbart.com/big-hollywood/2014/12/17/the-interview-falls-apart-theater-chains-pull-film-ny-premiere-canceled-stars-scrap-promotional-duties/)

According to TheWrap, both Carmike Cinemas and ArcLight Cinemas have decided to pull the film from their theaters in the wake of a new “9/11-style” terror threat issued by the Guardians of Peace hacker group this week against theaters that have committed to screen the film.

The threat read, in part:

We will clearly show it to you at the very time and places “The Interview” be shown, including the premiere, how bitter fate those who seek fun in terror should be doomed to.

Soon all the world will see what an awful movie Sony Pictures Entertainment has made.

The world will be full of fear.

Remember the 11th of September 2001.

We recommend you to keep yourself distant from the places at that time.

The Hollywood Reporter reported late Tuesday night that due to security concerns, the film’s premiere, originally scheduled for Thursday at Landmark’s Sunshine Cinema in New York, has been canceled. Sony was going to go ahead with its plans for the premiere, but Landmark eventually decided against it, a source told THR. The film is currently slated for wide release on Christmas Day.

The New York premiere’s cancellation comes on the heels of stars Seth Rogen and James Franco canceling all promotional activities for the film on Tuesday and Wednesday. A representative for Rogen told THR that the actors would “reassess Thursday” to decide whether or not to conduct press events as normal.


Obama: 'My Recommendation Would Be that People Go to the Movies' - Breitbart (http://www.breitbart.com/video/2014/12/17/obama-my-recommendation-would-be-that-people-go-to-the-movies/)

Obama explained that the cyber-attack was “serious,” but he encouraged people to go to the movies despite the threats on theaters that would have shown the now-canceled Christmas Day release of the film.

“Well, the cyber-attack is very serious,” Obama said. “We’re investigating it. We’re taking it seriously. You know, we’ll be vigilant. If we see something that we think is serious and credible, then we’ll alert the public, but for now, my recommendation would be that people go to the movies.”

TopHatter
18 Dec 14,, 19:04
The hackers and Hollywood, both gutless cowards.

citanon
18 Dec 14,, 19:46
And also morons. This was the perfect opportunity for Sony to make a killing on their film. They'd easily get an extra $100 mil just from Americans going to see the movie as a big FU to kju. Social media promotions with hashtag #FUKimJungUn of course obligatory. The sequel, complete with cameos by jilted celebrities and execution of the hackers in NK, will practically write itself.

But no, Sony instead acts spineless on every front. Their employees called it right. On top of being gutless, they are unoriginal and just bad at the business.

tuna
18 Dec 14,, 20:29
Add Paramount to the list of the spaghetti spined. After the theater in Texas said FU, and said they'd run "Team America", another movie that made fun of NK, Paramount now won't let it run.

The movies, especially Sony, really porked it away. I'm not a big Seth Rogan fan, and don't really want to waste my time at watching his crap on TV - but I would have gone to see this, just because.

I'm waiting for the "Hollywood strong" stickers to come out anytime now...

cirrrocco
18 Dec 14,, 22:27
The USG govt should effectively now start jamming the signal every time dear leader does a live conference. or fly a B2 right over the parade grounds in bright red US flag and show all the followers that the US has the reach to take out dear leader

Again all this based on the fact that it was the Nk's who did it. Could also be Russia / China doing psyops

troung
18 Dec 14,, 23:37
The USG govt should effectively now start jamming the signal every time dear leader does a live conference. or fly a B2 right over the parade grounds in bright red US flag and show all the followers that the US has the reach to take out dear leader

Over hacking a Japanese company over a cheesy movie?

A big who cares.

TopHatter
18 Dec 14,, 23:56
Over hacking a Japanese company over a cheesy movie?

A big who cares.

This is also an American company that just suffered the most devastating cyberattack upon a commercial company.

It's a big deal. And it goes far deeper than one cheesy movie.

citanon
19 Dec 14,, 03:24
It goes to the heart of defending free speech. A foreign government thought it had a 21st century way of assaulting our constitutional rights without cost, now thanks to Sony's obsequiousness the hit has just landed with full effect. This needs a response.

Officer of Engineers
19 Dec 14,, 03:29
Hve we come this far that a stupid company can't just pull the plug on her website servers and just reboot? It's a freaking website for fuck sites!

Officer of Engineers
19 Dec 14,, 03:32
For fuck sakes, every engineer on earth knows when things go wrong, turn the damned thing off and turn it back on. Then go start looking for what else is wrong. We don't call it an engineering reset for nothing.

bfng3569
19 Dec 14,, 03:43
It goes to the heart of defending free speech. A foreign government thought it had a 21st century way of assaulting our constitutional rights without cost, now thanks to Sony's obsequiousness the hit has just landed with full effect. This needs a response.

how?

is anyone actually stopping them from releasing the film?

troung
19 Dec 14,, 04:09
This is also an American company that just suffered the most devastating cyberattack upon a commercial company.

They prodded a known crazy regime with a B-movie about murdering its public face. This wasn't an attack on my freedom of speech or an act of war. No one died and the company got humiliated for having some offensive views.

Media takes this more serious then an attack on the South, I wonder why.

Officer of Engineers
19 Dec 14,, 04:11
Someone please explain this to me. None of Sony's financial systems were attacked. Just their puplicity websites. So, how was this devastating?

citanon
19 Dec 14,, 04:23
how?

is anyone actually stopping them from releasing the film?

Only Sony's cowardice and stupidity. Now regimes like NK are itching to test how many other American media firms are cowardly and stupid.

citanon
19 Dec 14,, 04:33
Someone please explain this to me. None of Sony's financial systems were attacked. Just their puplicity websites. So, how was this devastating?

Col,

1. Most devastating to them: the hackers got into their private emails. Hollywood is a business based on hypocritical relationships where people are completely in love with one another in public and more than a little nasty with backs turned. The release of these emails put the nastiness of Sony execs on full display (with studio head Amy Pascal calling Angelina Jolie a talentless camp act, etc) directly threatens the maintenance of these relationships by the heads of the studio, and thereby, its future business prospects. The solution for this is simple. Fire the studio heads and bring in someone else. Trouble is, the studio heads are not so keen on this simple plan and are apparently desperate to prevent it.

2. Confidential documents regarding Sony's legal battles vs. Google and others, plus confidential financial documents regarding payment were taken. This could be a significant loss for them. On the other hand, it's probably not fatal to their business prospects.

3. They got four of Sony's unreleased movies. On the face of it this should be devastating to Sony's business if you believe the MPAA's exaggerated claims on the harms of piracy. However, people who go into theaters to see movies will probably go see these movies anyways.

4. Employee financial information was hacked. In theory Sony's employees are now more vulnerable to identity theft and physical violence. On the other hand, the studio can and has provided employee's with identity theft insurance. As for physical violence, are Sony employees so secret in the first place? Doubtful.

5. The hackers threatened physical violence. The studio claims this is why they cancelled the film (not delayed, cancelled entirely). How nerds in NK could physically attack American movie theater chains remain unexplained.

IMHO, it all goes back to one, or, more precisely, looking out for numero uno on the part of Amy Pascal and other top studio execs.

Officer of Engineers
19 Dec 14,, 04:52
Col,

1. Most devastating to them: the hackers got into their private emails. Hollywood is a business based on hypocritical relationships where people are completely in love with one another in public and more than a little nasty with backs turned. The release of these emails put the nastiness of Sony execs on full display (with studio head Amy Pascal calling Angelina Jolie a talentless camp act, etc) directly threatens the maintenance of these relationships by the heads of the studio, and thereby, its future business prospects. The solution for this is simple. Fire the studio heads and bring in someone else. Trouble is, the studio heads are not so keen on this simple plan and are apparently desperate to prevent it.

2. Confidential documents regarding Sony's legal battles vs. Google and others, plus confidential financial documents regarding payment were taken. This could be a significant loss for them. On the other hand, it's probably not fatal to their business prospects.

3. They got four of Sony's unreleased movies. On the face of it this should be devastating to Sony's business if you believe the MPAA's exaggerated claims on the harms of piracy. However, people who go into theaters to see movies will probably go see these movies anyways.

4. Employee financial information was hacked. In theory Sony's employees are now more vulnerable to identity theft and physical violence. On the other hand, the studio can and has provided employee's with identity theft insurance. As for physical violence, are Sony employees so secret in the first place? Doubtful.

5. The hackers threatened physical violence. The studio claims this is why they cancelled the film (not delayed, cancelled entirely). How nerds in NK could physically attack American movie theater chains remain unexplained.

IMHO, it all goes back to one, or, more precisely, looking out for numero uno on the part of Amy Pascal and other top studio execs.This is devastating? All I read is embarrasement.

citanon
19 Dec 14,, 05:03
This is devastating? All I read is embarrasement.

Exactly sir. But with their stupid response, they are now turning embarassing into devastating:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/19/business/media/sony-attack-is-unraveling-relationships-in-hollywood.html?_r=0

The long term damage is going to be 80% self inflicted. Unfortunately, the magnitude of the stupidity is so extreme, the rest of America just got caught in the blast zone.

tuna
19 Dec 14,, 19:52
Again, this is only "devastating" because it happened to Hollywood, and for some reason we're supposed to care what they think. And the media will keep telling us how bad it is.

They are circus acts, there to amuse us - when they have opinions, they should keep them to themselves, but because we see them in roles where they are significant (Morgan Freeman and George Burns only PLAY God, they are not really divine, no matter what they think) the idiot masses begin to actually care about their opinions.

Of course, because the media will keep talking about this - the entire country will continue to look stupid.

bfng3569
19 Dec 14,, 20:01
Only Sony's cowardice and stupidity. Now regimes like NK are itching to test how many other American media firms are cowardly and stupid.

exactly.

its got nothing to do with defending free speech or our constitutional rights

were the f***k is all this outrage coming from with people and the media?

how much of the F-35/F-22 and other military secrets have been compromised from state sponsored hackers?

and people are going to get there panties in a bunch over Sony's internal dirty laundry getting exposed?

Julie
21 Dec 14,, 07:43
Cowards. I was looking forward to seeing that movie.

Triple C
21 Dec 14,, 17:14
I would wait awhile until this shakes out. There are quite a bit of contradictory information, the most cynical version of which is that Sony laid off a large number of employees who are best equipped to hack the company's exceedingly weak systems, and they decided to embarrass the company by pretending to be North Korea.

Julie
21 Dec 14,, 20:36
North Korea has of course denied the allegations, and asked for a joint inquiry/investigation into the matter havn't they?

FJV
21 Dec 14,, 21:35
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhKjY1bJK24

Julie
21 Dec 14,, 23:37
Sony claims they did not pull the movie, but that theaters were refusing to show it.

Samuels creek
21 Dec 14,, 23:53
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hiRacdl02w4

This is the hackers message to the FBI

‘We congratulate you success!’ – SONY hackers MOCK ‘excellent’ FBI investigation, threaten more attacks » The Right Scoop - (http://therightscoop.com/we-congratulate-you-success-sony-hackers-mock-excellent-fbi-investigation-threaten-more-attacks/)

tbm3fan
22 Dec 14,, 03:31
Our toughest counteraction will be boldly taken against the White House, the Pentagon and the whole U.S. mainland, the cesspool of terrorism," the report said, adding that "fighters for justice" including the "Guardians of Peace" -- a group that claimed responsibility for the Sony attack -- "are sharpening bayonets not only in the U.S. mainland but in all other parts of the world.

That's bold talk from a two-eyed fat man...

tbm3fan
22 Dec 14,, 22:49
North Korea hacked...

North Korea's Internet is being disrupted - CNN.com (http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/22/world/asia/north-korea-internet/index.html?hpt=hp_t2)


(CNN) -- North Korea's Internet is experiencing a major disruption and could be the target of an attack, according to a company that monitors Internet performance.

"After 24hrs of increasing instability, North Korean national Internet has been down hard for more than 2hrs," Dyn Research posted on Twitter on Monday.

The reported outage comes amid an escalating war of words between the United States and North Korea over a massive cyberattack on Sony Pictures.

"Usually there are isolated blips, not continuous connectivity problems. I wouldn't be surprised if they are absorbing some sort of attack presently," said Doug Madory, director of Internet analysis at Dyn Research.

Matthew Prince, president of CloudFlare, a performance and security company, described the disruption as if "all the routes to get to North Korea just disappeared.

"It's as if North Korea got erased from the global map of the Internet," he said.

Prince told CNN it's well within the realm of possibility that a single individual could be behind the interruption but said he can't conclude at this point an attack is actually taking place.

"If it is an attack, it's highly unlikely it's the United States. More likely it's a 15-year-old in a Guy Fawkes mask," he said.
Photos: Kim Jong Un\'s military Photos: Kim Jong Un's military
The things that annoy North Korea The things that annoy North Korea
Expand: The photos N. Korea banned Expand: The photos N. Korea banned

The United States blames North Korea for the Sony hack; North Korea denies it was involved.

The regime is upset over Sony's controversial comedy, "The Interview," which follows a plot to assassinate its leader, Kim Jong Un.

The studio decided to pull the film amid threats to moviegoers.

U.S. President Barack Obama told CNN on Sunday that the hack was "an act of cybervandalism that was very costly, very expensive" but that he didn't consider it an act of war.

He had previously said that the United States would "respond proportionally" to the attack on Sony, without giving specifics.

A spokeswoman for the National Security Council declined to comment on the reported outage.

A State Department spokeswoman similarly deflected a question about the disruption.

"We aren't going to discuss -- you know -- publicly, operational details about the possible response options or comment on those kind of reports in any way, except to say that as we implement our responses, some will be seen, some may not be seen," Marie Harf told reporters.

zraver
22 Dec 14,, 23:58
Bahahaha....

troung
23 Dec 14,, 00:27
All ten of their internet users must be alarmed

gunnut
23 Dec 14,, 01:39
All ten of their internet users must be alarmed

Well shit...how can Kim Jung Un browse youporn now?

TopHatter
23 Dec 14,, 02:18
All ten of their internet users must be alarmed

Pretty close. A grand total of 1034 IP addresses.

Squirrel
23 Dec 14,, 04:19
Pretty close. A grand total of 1034 IP addresses.

And probably close to all military/regime maintained.

troung
26 Dec 14,, 21:53
FBI faces skepticism over claim that N. Korea hacked Sony
Judson Berger

By Judson Berger
Published December 26, 2014
FoxNews.com
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It's been a week since the U.S. government blamed North Korea for the cyber-attack against Sony Pictures Entertainment -- and many security experts still aren't convinced Kim Jong-un is the culprit.

The FBI's announcement, rather than settle the debate, has only fueled widespread speculation over the source of the attack.

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Skeptics claim the evidence the FBI cited is flimsy and inconclusive. They question whether Pyongyang really had the motive, or the ability, to scramble Sony's systems.

And they're pushing a range of alternative theories.

Could it have been a disgruntled former Sony employee? Another, more technologically savvy, foreign government? A private band of hackers?

"I think we definitely jumped the gun," David Kennedy, CEO of information security firm TrustedSec, told FoxNews.com on Friday. "A lot of [the evidence is] very circumstantial."

Kennedy, who testified on Capitol Hill last year on security concerns with HealthCare.gov, said he still believes an angry insider at Sony was behind it.

"They were going for destroying the company," he said.

The FBI has not edged off its assertion last Friday that North Korea is to blame. The bureau, after staying mum for days about the source of the attack, was definitive in declaring that "the North Korean government is responsible for these actions."

As a caveat, the bureau noted it could not share all the evidence it has. This leaves open the possibility that the FBI is sitting on a smoking-gun piece of evidence that links the hack to Pyongyang beyond the shadow of a digital doubt.

The evidence the FBI did share was this:

Analysis of the malware "revealed links to other malware that the FBI knows North Korean actors previously developed."
The FBI observed "significant overlap between the infrastructure used in this attack and other malicious cyber activity" previously linked to North Korea, like North Korea-tied IP addresses that allegedly communicated with IP addresses tied to the Sony attack.
The "tools" used in the Sony attack were similar to an attack in March 2013 by North Korea against South Korean companies.

Outrage over the claims of a North Korean attack fueled a patriotic show of support this past week for "The Interview," the comedy where Seth Rogen and James Franco play two reporters hired to take out North Korea's leader -- and helped bring it back to select theaters after Sony initially pulled it.

In a detailed rebuttal published this week, though, cyber-security expert Marc Rogers picked apart the FBI's case as "weak."

Rogers, who works at mobile security firm CloudFlare and runs security operations for an annual hacker conference, argued that the same piece of malware showing up in the Sony hack is "far from being convincing evidence" of North Korean involvement.

In a column posted on The Daily Beast, he speculated that the FBI was probably referring to two pieces of malware -- Shamoon, which hit energy companies and was found in 2012, and DarkSeoul, which hit South Korea last year.

But Rogers noted the Shamoon source code has already leaked. "Just because two pieces of malware share a common ancestry, it obviously does not mean they share a common operator," he wrote.

He made a similar argument about the FBI's claims on the IP addresses.

Skeptics, including Rogers and Kennedy, also question the idea that the hack was North Korean retaliation for "The Interview." Though North Korea had objected to the film, skeptics say the initial messages from the apparent hackers did not cite the movie. That connection came later.

"It was more of an extortion case beforehand," Kennedy said.

North Korea, for its part, denies responsibility for the attack.

But Dmitri Alperovitch, with security firm CrowdStrike, backed up the FBI, telling Wired that the U.S. has more evidence proving North Korean involvement, and the government can't release it yet.

His company has been tracking the group behind DarkSeoul. Alperovitch told Wired the network is probably North Korean, and the attackers previously used search terms related to U.S. and South Korean military plans.

"Who else would it be that would hit both Sony over the movie and South Korea and U.S. military networks looking for that type of info?" he told Wired.

An FBI spokeswoman declined to comment for this article, citing the ongoing investigation.

An intelligence source previously told Fox News that the evidence in the case raises the possibility that a country like Iran, China or Russia could have been involved along with North Korea.

Others speculate North Korea wasn't even part of it.

[B]Kurt Stammberger, with the cybersecurity firm Norse, told CBS News that Sony was "essentially nuked from the inside," possibly by a former employee.

Kennedy said it's possible North Korea was involved, but the insider knowledge used still points to a former employee. He noted Sony had massive layoffs earlier this year, "a lot of them in the systems administrator field."

One other potential hole was poked in the government's claims this week when Taia Global, a cybersecurity consultant, analyzed the hackers' messages "in an attempt to scientifically determine nationality." The firm said the "preliminary results" showed the attackers were "most likely" Russian. The company said it's possible the attackers were Korean but "not likely." FBI faces skepticism over claim that N. Korea hacked Sony | Fox News (http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/12/26/fbi-faces-skepticism-over-claim-that-n-korea-hacked-sony/)