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Doktor
20 Jul 14,, 19:40
From all the bad things occupying our day, we forget the really big ones that matter.

45 years ago today Neil Armstrong becomes the 1st human to walk on the surface of something else other than Earth. That is of course if you are not of the deniers.

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Albany Rifles
20 Jul 14,, 20:14
I was 12 years old that day. I remember running home from collecting for my paper route...everyone telling me to hurry up and get home. I can remember watching the live feed around 6 PM of the landing and how emotional Walter Schirra & Walter Cronkite were.


http://youtu.be/_3vVjyqkwrw

Listen and watch the broadcast 3:29 to 3:55 and you can see how emotional it was. And again at 7:25.

And my favorite photo...

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Double Edge
20 Jul 14,, 23:32
From all the bad things occupying our day, we forget the really big ones that matter.
No follow through. Once it was done that was it. Nobody else followed.

Its precious for a certain generation. yes its a monumental achievement but how much does that resonate nowadays. The amount of sceince that came out of that with public funding is immense.

How to get the americans to do it again. Do they remember how. manhattan project, apollo landings after that wall st took over and it was short term thinking. It was different then.

Now its international consortiums in Geneva.

zraver
21 Jul 14,, 00:03
Probalby one of the most under-rated and yet profound pictures of all time. In this picture Micheal Collins is the only person alive or dead not in the picture.

Tamara
21 Jul 14,, 00:24
Probalby one of the most under-rated and yet profound pictures of all time. In this picture Micheal Collins is the only person alive or dead not in the picture.

As far as we know, but never say never.

Given some of the great volcanic and otherwise explosions this planet has had in its history, I consider it at least plausible that anyone in the vicinity could be placed in some kind of orbit.......in some form.

Enough force to reach escape velocity? Perhaps not but once that high, other "ways away" are plausible.

Sure, that's reaching a lot......but not to consider such possibilities, with the force of Nature, is rather short sighted.

IN ANY EVENT, a great accomplishment. I saw it on live TV.

Albany Rifles
21 Jul 14,, 14:21
No follow through. Once it was done that was it. Nobody else followed.

Double Edge,

I don't agree. The space program continued but into a different form. We are placing HMMWV sized rovers on Mars.

We are learning a lot for future travel on the ISS. We proved we could build reusable spacecraft.

There was an existential threat in 1962 with the Soviet Union at the real risk of ruling space...in the minds of the US Government. And don't think that EVRYTHING to do with the manned space program had nothing to do with possible military applications.

Now to your point of today....you may recall we were on a path to return to the Moon by the end of this decade...and then the Great Recession hit coupled with the rise of the Tea Party.

So where would the money come from? The political will?

I think the Great Recession put a lot of plans on the back burner. But I bet within 10 years we are talking about upcoming trips to the Moon and beyond.

zraver
21 Jul 14,, 14:34
TP is generally pro-space program since it is one area of government spending with real civil sector rewards.

Albany Rifles
21 Jul 14,, 14:59
TP is generally pro-space program since it is one area of government spending with real civil sector rewards.

General government spending impacts...don't know too many politicians who are able to parse it that finely, Z.

SteveDaPirate
21 Jul 14,, 17:39
Until we come up with a way to sustain a long term colony of humans on another planet, I don't see much of a practical reason to send men to Mars. Robots are really more suited to exploring other worlds.

If we manage to find a reliable source of water on Mars that may change, but Mars and Earth are only "aligned" in their orbits every 26 months. Any manned expedition will either have to be very quick, or be prepared for a 2 year stay. Hauling 2 years worth of food and dry goods to Mars might be feasible, but 2 years worth of water and atmosphere doesn't seem like a very workable prospect. The unless we find water on other worlds, humans may as well stay at home.

zraver
21 Jul 14,, 23:53
Until we come up with a way to sustain a long term colony of humans on another planet, I don't see much of a practical reason to send men to Mars. Robots are really more suited to exploring other worlds.

If we manage to find a reliable source of water on Mars that may change, but Mars and Earth are only "aligned" in their orbits every 26 months. Any manned expedition will either have to be very quick, or be prepared for a 2 year stay. Hauling 2 years worth of food and dry goods to Mars might be feasible, but 2 years worth of water and atmosphere doesn't seem like a very workable prospect. The unless we find water on other worlds, humans may as well stay at home.

Depending on how efficient your recycling is, you don't need all that much water. Just need your ready use supplies plus enough extra as a reserve and to account for moisture lost through respiration and out gassing. The real problem seems to be how to create a complete viable biosphere on a small enough scale to be viable. Once we can reliably build biospheres small and light enough to send through space we can begin colonization.

Albany Rifles
22 Jul 14,, 00:04
Z,

Colonization needs a purpose other than just "being there". Otherwise a rotational base is the way forward.

zraver
22 Jul 14,, 00:12
Z,

Colonization needs a purpose other than just "being there". Otherwise a rotational base is the way forward.

base or station for any long term use we will need a viable self contained and reproducing biosphere. Which begs the question- whats the lowest gravity that honey bees can fly in?

Gun Grape
22 Jul 14,, 01:51
Buzz still throws a pretty mean punch


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wptn5RE2I-k

DOR
22 Jul 14,, 03:17
Nice clip of Buzz Aldrin signaling that enough is enough.

I was 11 years old and saw most of the early launches and recoveries on our old black-and-white RCA TV. My folks didn’t like kids watching TV, so it was pretty strongly impressed on us that This Was History In The Making. My mom even took a photo of Armstrong walking on the moon.

The reason we strive to find another planet on which to live is because it’s easier than cleaning up this one and keeping it that way. Besides, it is always smart to diversify your assets.

tantalus
23 Jul 14,, 00:37
One avenue to consider is our evolutionary drive to explore, to find new reources, lands that we can thrive in.

Studies of landscape paintings indicate a preference for landscape scenarios which imply fresh lands to travel, like a bend in a river or a path around a mountain.

Humans who explored populated the world and probably came back to beat the head in of the human that stayed in the original cave. We are the descendants of the people who most desired to seek new pastures, we will want to visit Mars and beyond, that urge exists and will continue to exist, without economic or rational justification, but as a product of our evolutionary past.

I am setting up a thread http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/ancient-medieval-early-modern-ages/65555-understanding-our-drive-explore.html to post and discuss an article that “explores “ some evolutionary research on the psychological urge for humans to explore, to try and reveal the nuanced and hidden biological forces that have driven our colourful migration across the globe, and one day may motivate us to populate our little pockmarked cousin and sunburnt neighbour, until we are halted and can only stare out with admiration at the vastness of space, from a balcony at the edge of the solar system.

Gun Grape
23 Jul 14,, 00:58
Dang you people are old. I was the tender age of 6 when this took place.

Albany Rifles
23 Jul 14,, 04:47
Dang you people are old. I was the tender age of 6 when this took place.

Bullshit Gunny! You were NEVER tender!!!

DOR
23 Jul 14,, 09:37
Dang you people are old. I was the tender age of 6 when this took place.

Tender . . . as in Tenderfoot?
Were you a Boy Scout?

gunnut
25 Jul 14,, 23:04
You guys are old. This happened before my time. :biggrin:

Also...

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