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commander
21 May 14,, 10:09
Pakistan PM Nawaz Sharif invited to Modi's swearing-in ceremony IndiaToday.in New Delhi, May 21, 2014 | UPDATED 12:56 IST Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has been invited to attend India's PM-elect Narendra Modi's swearing-in ceremony. It is likely that the Pakistan PM will accept the invitation. Modi has also invited leaders of SAARC nation in the function. Modi had been tough on Pak sponsored cross-border terrorism during his election campaign, invoking the case of beheading of Indian soldier in Kashmir, to attack the Congress party. He had alleged that the Congress-led government was soft on terrorists. However, Modi became soft on Pakistan when it started becoming clear that he will become the prime minister. In various television interviews he said he will like to have friendly relations with India's neighbours. Nawaz Sharif was the first state head to congratulate Modi soon after the results were declared in Modi's favour. During his conversation, Sharif invited Modi to visit Pakistan. Modi will be sworn-in as India's 14th Prime Minister on May 26. So I was wondering , what does this mean for India. Can Modi effectively manage a peace border and at the same time try to position India as a power center in SE Asia and try to counter China's aggression both Economical and militarily ? Interesting times indeed :biggrin:

Source (http://indiatoday.intoday.in/story/pakistan-pm-nawaz-sharif-invited-for-modi-swearing-in-ceremony/1/362848.html)

Update: Thanks TopHatter for editing the thread title :)

sated buddha
21 May 14,, 10:18
The Pakistanis are playing good cop, bad cop.

Their PM says one thing. And their High Commissioner has a very different tone.

The idea is to send a message to India that they are not cowed. So be it.

Modi ji has been very clear on this. And I do not believe that anybody or anything is going to cow him. :)

commander
21 May 14,, 10:31
The Pakistanis are playing god cop, bad cop.

Their PM says one thing. And their High Commissioner has a very different tone.

The idea is to send a message to India that they are not cowed. So be it.

Modi ji has been very clear on this. And I do not believe that anybody or anything is going to cow him. :)

I agree , Pakistani's play this game a lot. But what makes me get excited is maybe under Modi , India can emerge as a strong player with a quiet neighborhood and a strong counter balance to China in our region and even maybe upto an extent reduce the presence of USA in this region.

sated buddha
21 May 14,, 10:35
I agree , Pakistani's play this game a lot. But what makes me get excited is maybe under Modi , India can emerge as a strong player with a quiet neighborhood and a strong counter balance to China in our region and even maybe upto an extent reduce the presence of USA in this region.

All in good time. All our pockets need Modi ji's immediate attention first. With that will come a lot of strength and respect and positive attention automatically.

P.S. Btw, you need to correct the title of the thread - from CM to PM. :)

commander
21 May 14,, 10:45
All in good time. All our pockets need Modi ji's immediate attention first. With that will come a lot of strength and respect and positive attention automatically.

P.S. Btw, you need to correct the title of the thread - from CM to PM. :)

Yeah noticed it thanks. Tried it myself could seem to do so :(

Double Edge
21 May 14,, 12:56
So I was wondering , what does this mean for India. Can Modi effectively manage a peace border and at the same time try to position India as a power center in SE Asia and try to counter China's aggression both Economical and militarily ? Interesting times indeed.
You asked a lot in there.

Afghanistan is the wild card. They're going through their elections currently and are at the runoff stage. If a stable govt emerges there and remains that way it means the Pak west flank is quiet. This is good for them.

However if the elections fail and the new afghan govt is incapable of maintaining stability then all bets are off. The paks with a western border they cannot police are vulnerable and will try to bait us. It's up to Modi not to fall for that ruse simply because any confrontation costs India more.

When Modi visited China, they gave him almost a head of state welcome when he was still the CM. Gujurat has some agreement with Yunan province. So Modi's relations with China should be better than past leaders.

Since his plank is development Modi wants to build and increase business ties between the two and i cannot see the Chinese being averse to it. Also the Chinese are more preoccupied with developments on their eastern seaboard than their western side. We're not going to give them an excuse to get jumpy.

to become a power center that the world gives a damn about we need to get our asses into gear and stick to it for the next two decades. Then we will be in a position to make deals on our own terms. I think we're off to a good start, let's not fumble the ball.

sated buddha
21 May 14,, 13:03
When Modi visited China, they gave him almost a head of state welcome when he was still the CM. Gujurat has some agreement with Yunan province. So Modi's relations with China should be better than past leaders.

Since his plank is development Modi wants to build and increase business ties between the two and i cannot see the Chinese being averse to it. Also the Chinese are more preoccupied with developments on their eastern seaboard than their western side. We're not going to give them an excuse to get jumpy.

to become a power center that the world gives a damn about we need to get our asses into gear and stick to it for the next two decades. Then we will be in a position to make deals on our own terms. I think we're off to a good start, let's not fumble the ball.

The Chinese like Modi. Respect him. They are already hailing him as India's Nixon.

Modi more like Nixon than Abe: Chinese media - The Hindu (http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/world/modi-more-like-nixon-than-abe-chinese-media/article6031240.ece)

A 'Nixon', Modi can resolve border row: Chinese daily | Business Standard (http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ians/a-nixon-modi-can-resolve-border-row-chinese-daily-114052000746_1.html)

And the US .....

Obama's Former Aide Calls For Softer Stance On India's Modi As China Forecasts Stronger Ties With Subcontinent Under 'India's Nixon' (http://www.ibtimes.com/obamas-former-aide-calls-softer-stance-indias-modi-china-forecasts-stronger-ties-1587555)

sated buddha
21 May 14,, 13:12
Yeah noticed it thanks. Tried it myself could seem to do so :(

PM a mod. Whichever green ID you see active on the home page at the time. :)

Bigfella
21 May 14,, 13:29
The Chinese like Modi. Respect him. They are already hailing him as India's Nixon.

We'll see. China likes playing games. The proof will be in what actually happens. China wants what it wants & is happy when it gets what it wants. Vietnam thought they had established pretty good relations with China.....until a great big oil drilling platform appeared over the horizon.

Double Edge
21 May 14,, 13:34
Mr. Liu, a scholar at the Shanghai Institute for International Studies, even suggested that Mr. Modi may be able to make headway on the deadlocked boundary dispute as he would “have no historical burden” over the issue which “was generated under the leadership of then Congress leader Jawaharlal Nehru.”
Interesting, so the potential to resolve long standing issues exists.

It took 35 years to formally get the US out of the Indian axis of evil.

anil
21 May 14,, 13:40
Modi again http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/images/smilies/ashamed0005.gif. Where pro-modi supporters go, the anti-modi supporters go with them

This thread might end predictably

sated buddha
21 May 14,, 13:45
Interesting, so the potential to resolve long standing issues exists.

It took 35 years to formally get the US out of the Indian axis of evil.

LOL I like your style man.

Maybe 3000 posts later I'll be able to put my point across as well ..... why use a sledgehammer when a flyswatter is overkill?

But seriously, I am relishing the prospect of divvying up Asia (resource and influence wise I hasten to add) between Russia, China and India. Peacefully.

Double Edge
21 May 14,, 13:50
Anish Goel, who advised Obama on regional issues as senior director for South Asia in the White House's National Security Council for three years, said that the relationship between a Modi-led Indian government and the U.S. could improve over the coming years, and urged that the issue over Modi’s visa be dropped.
The US-India bilateral relationship could do with more work. The momentum was lost after Bush left and India has not done much to improve matters.

Richard Rossow at CSIS had this (https://csis.org/publication/indian-election-results-opposition-bjp-poised-single-party-majority) to say..


Q4: What does this mean for U.S.-India commercial relations?

A4: U.S. business can expect a more stable, friendly environment and will be quick to grow. Lots of potential direct investment has been on the sidelines in the last few years, hoping for a more friendly business environment. Institutional investors have already been jumping back into India, with the expectation of a BJP victory. But it is unclear if the BJP will roll back some of the specific policies (tax, patents, local manufacturing mandates) that have angered a vocal minority of U.S. companies.

Q5: What does this mean for the U.S.-India bilateral relationship?

A5: Government-to-government relations will start slowly—particularly those involving the U.S. Department of State, due to the visa denial “hangover.” But we can expect a renewed interest in defense collaborations, combined with renewed business interests, which will, once again, drag the U.S. government’s attention back toward India. The major bilateral forum, the U.S.-India Strategic Dialogue—involving the State Department and India’s External Affairs Ministry—typically meets in June; getting a date set for this forum (maybe in July) will be a major priority and set the trajectory of the relationship during the remainder of President Obama’s second term.

sated buddha
21 May 14,, 14:39
Narendra Modi: what does his victory mean for America, China and Pakistan?

He has swept to power with the first majority the Indian parliament has seen in 30 years. But for many he remains a polarising figure. How will his triumph affect neighbouring countries and global powers?

When Narendra Modi, 63, formally assumes the highest executive office in this simultaneously troubled, joyous, chaotic democracy of 1.25bn people, he will have to reconcile the ideological and the pragmatic.

His campaign has already achieved this. Throughout India's protracted five-week election, his Bharatiya Janata party (BJP) carefully blended promises of economic development – reforms, better services, more jobs and security for all – with references that were both religious and cultural.

These ideas were rarely explicitly articulated, but were nonetheless clear in Modi's choice of Varanasi, the holy city on the Ganges, as a seat to contest and the occasional deity that appeared, in contravention of electoral codes, behind the stage at meetings. There were a series of statements by local BJP officials that appeared deliberately aimed at exploiting tensions between specific communities. There were also more assertive statements directed at neighbours Pakistan – with which India has fought four wars – and China – with which India has had one conflict – and a promise that Modi in power would create an India that no one could talk down to on the international stage. There was even an apparent threat to revise India's "no first strike" nuclear weapons policy .

All came together in the slogan "India First", which apparently resonated with 180 million people tired of an uninspiring and apparently uncertain Congress party-led coalition government and its dynastic leaders. It got Modi to power, with the first majority seen in the Indian parliament for 30 years. But no one is quite sure what it means in terms of this huge and often fabulously insular country's relations with the region, and the rest of the world.

Modi is a polarising figure. He has emerged from, and is supported by, the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), the hardline Hindu nationalist organisation. The BJP is intimately linked to the RSS, which has been banned three times by Indian authorities. The RSS is deeply distrusting (and worse) of other religious minorities in India, suspicious of former colonial powers and the US, and committed to economic self-sufficiency for India.

And while his supporters see a man with an established record of honest, efficient and effective government, critics accuse Modi of harbouring deep sectarian prejudices and of allowing, or even encouraging, violence in which 1,000 people, largely Muslims, died while he was in power in Gujarat state in 2002. Though a supreme court investigation has found insufficient evidence to support the charges – which Modi has always denied – concerns remain.

His foreign affairs in-tray is overflowing. There are major multilateral issues such as climate change to get to grips with. An election is underway in Afghanistan, with 2014 a critical year for Indian interests there. To the east, political strife in Bangladesh is subsiding but few believe any calm will last long. India has proved unable to protect its businesses even in the tiny Maldives and in Burma. Further afield, the whole aftermath of the Arab Spring presents huge difficulties. India needs lots of fossil fuels, and huge quantities of imported oil. Iran is a long-term ally but demanding. The history of the Gujarat riots and the RSS connection is not going to simplify diplomacy anywhere in the Islamic world. The relationship with Europeans is underperforming, with negotiations on a trade agreement taking so long they have become a stock joke of ambassador's receptions in Delhi. British ministers keep turning up, keen to stress how much they admire all things Indian, especially large contracts. With all his interactions internationally, there is one obvious questions: which will triumph? The job-creating, wealth-building pragmatist or the ideologue? The three big tests, experts agree, will be relations with Pakistan, the US and China.

Sitting in the back room of the BJP headquarters as the scale of Modi's win became clear, is Ravi Shankar Prasad, an ebullient lawyer turned politician whose vociferous style of argument is well-suited to the noisy shouting matches that pass as debates on Indian television. Prasad, deputy leader of the BJP in India's upper house and a key campaign strategist, is in a very good mood. India will be an "assertive power", he says, but one "with dignity, with responsibility and constitutional integrity".

However, Prasad explains, though India wants to dismantle the "wall of terrorism" that has separated Pakistan and India since partition, "the Pakistanis" need to be aware that "terrorism promoted from their soil" would no longer be tolerated.

The outgoing Congress government has struggled with the question of Pakistan. Manmohan Singh, the technocrat prime minister, was born in the neighbouring country before partition. But the attacks on Mumbai in 2008, when militants from the Pakistan-based Lashkar-e-Taiba group killed 166 people in India's commercial capital, sent a relationship that was already cool into deep freeze.

Some now say Modi, who has no need to prove his conservative credentials, could bring about a breakthrough. Pakistan, also a nuclear power, is currently run by a conservative, pro-business government under veteran politician and industrialist Nawaz Sharif. His brother, Shahbaz, in a recent interview with the Guardian, blamed his nation's powerful military for the failure to generate greater commerce between the two nations. Modi's commitment to economic development could see him push hard to broaden these commercial links – or even attempt a more radical gesture.

"It could be that Modi is Nixon in China for India and Pakistan," says Professor Ashutosh Varshney, of Brown University in the US. "Hindu nationalist visionaries have typically been better in dealing with Pakistan."

Varshney's hopes are echoed by some Pakistani diplomats too. The precedent is the previous BJP administration of Atal Bihari Vajpayee, who travelled to Pakistan in 1999 to sign a peace deal, a year after ordering nuclear tests that brought about international sanctions.

The other sticking point for Pakistan is the disputed territory of Kashmir, where a low-level separatist insurgency continues. The BJP is committed to withdrawing the special constitutional provisions that guarantee Kashmir a degree of autonomy within India. Concessions on this would be tough for Modi to envisage, let alone enact, experts say. On top of that, the region is evolving rapidly as the US and other remaining international combat troops are withdrawn from Afghanistan by the end of this year. Indian security officials fear this could result in a small army of unemployed militants who will head, or be directed, towards Kashmir or India itself, with the support of some elements of Pakistan's security establishment.

Even optimists such as Varshney admit that a major terrorist incident traced back to, or blamed on, Pakistan, could derail even the most committed effort to make peace. "Another Mumbai [attack] – which is unlikely but not impossible – would create serious pressure," he says.

Rivalling the relationship with Pakistan for complexity and potential for misunderstanding is that with the US. As protocol demands, Barack Obama called the Indian prime minister elect over the weekend to express his hope that his win would help "fulfil the extraordinary promise of the US-India strategic partnership". Crucially, and here no one would have missed the significance, "the president invited Narendra Modi to visit Washington at a mutually agreeable time to further strengthen our bilateral relationship," said a government spokesperson. This could occur as soon as the UN General Assembly in New York in September, when Modi could also visit Washington. The visit is likely to be an extraordinary event with Modi – a teetotal, celibate, ascetic outsider who has shunned the sophisticated salons of India's power elite – suddenly pushed on to the world stage, and into a gruelling round of diplomatic engagements.

The public boilerplate, as it so often does, hides a difficult and often acrimonious relationship. If he has been happy to welcome US investors to Gujarat over the 13 years he has governed the state, there has been little love lost between Modi and Washington. The administration of President George W Bush denied Modi a visa in 2005 under a 1998 US law barring entry to foreigners who have committed "particularly severe violations of religious freedom". A boycott by senior US officials was only lifted earlier this year, when the US ambassador to India finally travelled to Gandhinagar, the state capital of Gujarat, to meet its chief minister. This, witnesses say, was a frosty occasion.

"I spoke to [Modi] a few years back about the boycott and whether he wanted me to push for it to be lifted," said one Modi aide, with international connections, last week. "He said: 'No, let them come to me. They will,' and he was right. They did."

Though Rajnath Singh, the powerful BJP president who is also close to the RSS, told the Guardian as the campaign opened, of the party's wish for better relations with the US, there is much repair work to be done. Trade is still significant. Last month, Nisha Biswal, the top US diplomat for South Asia, said that the US wants bilateral trade of $500bn a year, up from about $100bn currently.

But, after an improvement a decade ago, and a controversial nuclear deal, relations between Delhi and Washington hit a new low five months ago when Devyani Khobragade, the Indian deputy consul general was arrested for visa fraud in New York, strip-searched and held in police custody. She was eventually released and flew back to India but the affair prompted a vitriolic reaction to what Indians saw as disrespectful bullying by the "Ugly American". This in turn prompted US commentators to accuse India of oversensitivity and behaviour unbecoming of an aspirant future power.

Still, some experts are optimistic. Michael Kugelman, at the Woodrow Wilson International Centre in Washington says Modi may get a warmer welcome than some predict. He points out that the only US government agency to be critical of Modi for some time is the US Commission on International Religious Freedom, which warned of the impact a Modi-led government might have on minorities in India.

"Washington doesn't know him very well and I think that's the major concern. There was never any real hostility," Kugelman says. Indeed, Modi's backstory, the former tea seller who "pulled himself up by his bootstraps and then embraced capitalism and the free market and became seen as a decisive and confident leader", has much appeal in the US. "There are a lot of tensions in the relationship but they tend to revolve around economics and I could see him as a pro-investor and pro-trade leader saying: 'Let's try and make some progress'," Kugelman adds.

Perhaps the biggest challenge for Modi on the world stage will be China. Few in India, where annual economic growth has dropped to less than 5% in recent years, now talk of catching up their neighbour. Indeed, for Modi, China may appear to be less a rival than an opportunity. He has been there four times on official visits – more than any other country – and, aides say, admires what has been achieved in the country. On his last five-day tour, Modi carried red business cards printed in Chinese.

Modi is also said to feel more at home among the technocrats of Beijing than in the west. Critics frequently accuse him of authoritarian instincts in his career so far, of muzzling the press, of creating a "climate of fear" and of sidelining those who disagree with him. If Washington sees a Horatio Alger, Beijing may see a figure who represents less an American dream and more an East Asian one.

But Modi will still come up against the fundamental tension between his nationalism and his desire to accelerate economic development. He may want to see Chinese investment in India's insufficient infrastructure – in trains, roads, power stations – but China has already proclaimed its ownership of the 21st century and Modi's victory speech pronouncement that the coming decades would constitute "India's century" is unlikely to have been well received in Beijing. Nor his attack, while on the campaign trail, on the Chinese "expansionist mindset".

The two countries frequently dispute their Himalayan border. "There is a transgression every two days and some [such incidents] are critical," says Professor Srikanth Kondapalli, a China expert at Delhi's Jawaharlal Nehru University. "A BJP prime minister will have a hard job to explain to the people why border transgressions are happening and he cannot do anything about it. As a nationalist leader, this sovereignty dispute will really test Indo-Chinese relations."

[B]Kondapalli's prediction is that, for at least the first years of his term in power, Modi will put development before ideology but warns, as others warn of Pakistan, that the big test will come when India is seen to be provoked.

This week, Modi will form his government and pick his foreign ministers. His choice will be a key early indication of which way the man, who until two years ago was boycotted by the US and most of Europe, is leaning. Will it be ideology or pragmatism? Nationalist pride and sovereignty first, or jobs and growth? Or perhaps a clever blending of both, like his campaign rhetoric?

Varshney believes Modi's landslide win will give him both a "long honeymoon" with voters and the legitimacy to hold the hardline nationalists at bay. He says: "So long as it is Modi's ambition to rise – not only on an Indian stage, but on a world stage – that drives him, he will discipline and restrain the extreme wing of the party. And as long as his driving force is the desire to reshape India and be remembered as the greatest prime minister since [independence leader] Jawaharlal Nehru, you will see a more pragmatic Modi."

But no one can be sure: either of Modi, or of his environment. In an unstable region, and in a vast country that is undergoing rapid social, political and cultural change, there are too many possibilities for anyone to be overly optimistic. The consensus among analysts is that it is not Modi's policy-making that could give cause for concern, but his potential response to a crisis – particularly if that crisis prompted a wave of nationalist indignation or anger.

After all, there are many in India who see Modi's victory as a sign of greater changes to come. One is Anuraj Dikshit, 40, a marketing executive who splits his time between Mumbai and Gurgaon. He talks of not of India but Bharat, a Sanskrit-origin word describing a Hindu civilisation.

"This is not about warmongering but about this country's culture," he says. "India has been there since 1947. Bharat has been there since time immemorial. Now Bharat has come back, validated and endorsed by the voters of this country."

Narendra Modi: what does his victory mean for America, China and Pakistan? | World news | The Guardian (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/may/19/narendra-modi-india-election-victory-america-china-pakistan-world)

sated buddha
21 May 14,, 15:05
Narendra Modi not keen about US trip, priority China, Russia, Japan

New Delhi: Is new Prime Minister Narendra Modi trying settle score with the United States of America (USA) by not feeling enthusiastic about a visit to America? The USA has extended an official invitation to Modi to visit Washington but Modi does not seem very enthusiastic about the trip.

According to top sources, he is not in hurry to visit America and does not want the trip to be put on the top of his priority list. Modi has still not made up his mind on accepting US invite for an official visit to Washington.

People close to him claim that Modi is likely to visit America in September to address the United Nations General Assembly in New York. His first travel abroad after taking charge as PM would be in July where he will be travelling to Brazil to participate in the BRICS Summit.

Modi is said to be more enthusiastic about improving relations with China, Russia and Japan. He wants to give them preference over the United States of America.

Taking to twitter, Modi has warmly accepted the wishes from the World leaders on the social networking site. However, he thanked Obama for his congratulatory wishes 48 hours after call from White House.

US is also reportedly disappointed with India's slow pace on Defence deals and Nuclear agreement implementation.

Indo-US relations had hit a low following diplomat Devyani Khobragade's arrest controversy had been escalated.

Sources also say that Modi has sent across invitations to all SAARC nations to attend his swearing in on May 26. This includes Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan.

The USA repeatedly denied him official Visa holding him responsible for the 2002 Gujarat riots and started mending its relations with him only recently. The US Ambassador to India Nancy Powell met him in Ahmedabad two months before the Lok Sabha election. Modi was said to be very cold even during that meeting.

Narendra Modi not keen about US trip, priority China, Russia, Japan - IBNLive (http://ibnlive.in.com/news/narendra-modi-not-keen-about-us-trip-priority-china-russia-japan/473307-37-64.html)

I think Modi ji needs to tread a thin line on this one. One way of looking at things could also be wait out the 2 odd years Obama has left to send an Indian message as his send off. And then make overtures to the new US President, most likely Hillary. Modi ji has enough to keep him busy for a couple of years without really exerting much on the US side. Either way, I would not lose the opportunity to send a message. Definitely state visits to China, Russia, and Japan first.

commander
21 May 14,, 16:05
My bet is on Russia. Reasons : 1. Since he is being viewd as a Hindu nationalist leader he will not have easy times with the Arab countries or Iran for Oil, so possibly Russia could fill the gap. 2. To send a message to the Obama administration for denying him VISA and holding him accountable for the 2002 riots.

We might see a shift in power and the pull other countries have in Indian power corridors.

antimony
21 May 14,, 16:24
Great gesture on inviting the SAARC leaders. But is this feasible from a logistics POV? Modi is asking Heads of Government to drop by at a moment's notice

commander
21 May 14,, 16:55
Great gesture on inviting the SAARC leaders. But is this feasible from a logistics POV? Modi is asking Heads of Government to drop by at a moment's notice

Antimony, I dont think he would expect them to be present. It is a gesture signalling towards a healthy relationship and a willingness to initiate talks, lets see how this all works out.

Double Edge
21 May 14,, 17:41
1. Since he is being viewd as a Hindu nationalist leader he will not have easy times with the Arab countries or Iran for Oil, so possibly Russia could fill the gap.
Why ? are the arabs going to stop selling to us. India is a major customer, what problems are you thinking of.

US LNG will be coming over to India in about 3-4 years.

Russia is about defence, Russians are the only ones who will sell us a nuclear sub.


Is new Prime Minister Narendra Modi trying settle score with the United States of America (USA) by not feeling enthusiastic about a visit to America?
No, the US has yet to send over an ambassador. Besides we haven't even picked a cabinet yet.

Things will move slowly on the state level because its been some time since the NDA was in power and the state department officials have to get to know a new administration. They won't have too many left over from the Clinton era that would be more familiar. None from the Bush era.

Remains to be seen how well Kerry will manage this relationship.


US is also reportedly disappointed with India's slow pace on Defence deals and Nuclear agreement implementation.
They lost the jet fighter deal and we gutted the meaning of the nuke deal. One that govt almost fell to get(!)

They built a dozen power stations in the 90s and did not get paid. Do not expect the US to take much interest in infrastructure rollout unless there are some payments guarantees in place.


Definitely state visits to China, Russia, and Japan first.
Don't leave out singapore & israel.

Japan because they can help us with high speed rail.

Singapore because they know a thing or two about building cities.

Israel because they can make the desert bloom, besides arms and internal security.

Double Edge
22 May 14,, 00:30
We'll see. China likes playing games. The proof will be in what actually happens. China wants what it wants & is happy when it gets what it wants. Vietnam thought they had established pretty good relations with China.....until a great big oil drilling platform appeared over the horizon.

If you are in Beijing’s shoes, you would not want to antagonise a Modi government needlessly. The smart thing to do would be extending an olive branch and maintaining at least superficial cordiality. China has already made the huge strategic mistake of fighting the equivalent of a two-front war: ratcheting up pressures on its eastern and southern neighbours at the same time. Adding a third front would be madness

and


we can expect near-term tranquillity in Sino-Indian relations. In practical terms, Beijing will likely be far more prudent than usual in handling ties with Delhi. Provocative border incursions, such as the incident that involved thousands of Chinese troops in April last year, are unlikely to occur. On the trade and investment front, China would use its proven playbook, promoting bilateral economic relations as incentives for the Modi government to reciprocate its goodwill.

Behind such a friendly face, however, lies cold strategic calculations. The Chinese government would be watching Modi carefully and trying to decipher his strategic intentions towards China. If there is enough evidence to lead them to conclude that Modi’s China policy is fundamentally antagonistic, they would respond in kind. But before that happens, they will do their best to avoid any overt display of hostility — however concerned they may be with Modi’s stance on China.

Source (http://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/deciphering-modi-2/99/)

“listening to what he says and watching what he does” (or tingqiyan guanqixin in Chinese)

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 08:51
Meanwhile ....

U.S. hopes for Pacific cooperation with India navy under Modi

(Reuters) - The United States hopes to be able to expand naval cooperation with India once a new government is in place in New Delhi, the chief of U.S. naval operations said on Monday.

Admiral Jonathan Greenert said the United States would like to see this cooperation extend to India's participation in exercises in the Western Pacific region, where an increasingly powerful China is becoming more assertive.

"There’s a strategic partnership and opportunity up there with India that is emerging," Greenert told a Washington think tank. "My goal would be to get back to where we were in mid-2000s."

"We were doing very, very comprehensive events. We were doing carrier operations together, very, very complex, integrated ... and I think it would be great if we could get back to that level," he said.

"Then maybe India would be willing to come over to Western Pacific ... we will just have to see what the political ramifications are and where they are willing to go."

U.S. officials say plans to expand naval cooperation with India ended up on a back burner during a long-running row between New Delhi and Washington over the treatment of an Indian diplomat in New York and in the run-up to India's election earlier in May.

Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party won a resounding victory in the election.

The scale of the win, which gave Modi India's strongest mandate in 30 years, will assure him greater control over the country's security agenda, and analysts say India may finally be able to deal with overseas rivals from a position of strength.

India's state-run energy company, Oil and Natural Gas Corp (ONGC), has a stake in a gas field in the South China Sea, a region where China, Vietnam, the Philippines and Malaysia have competing claims.

India has sparred diplomatically with China in the past over this exploration block, and in late 2012, India's navy chief said India was prepared to deploy vessels to the South China Sea to protect its energy interests.

China claims virtually the entire South China Sea and there were confrontations between Chinese and Vietnamese ships this month after Beijing deployed an oil drilling rig in disputed waters 150 miles (240 km) off Vietnam's coast.

Vietnam has broadened its military relationships in recent years in response to China's assertiveness, including with India and the United States.

Last week, the U.S. Seventh Fleet, which guards U.S. interests in the Pacific, renewed a call for more ship visits to Vietnam.

Greenert said he was not familiar with the specifics of the negotiations on increased cooperation with Vietnam, but he added: "I would like to see it increase in a deliberate manner."


(Reporting by David Brunnstrom; Editing by Steve Orlofsky)

U.S. hopes for Pacific cooperation with India navy under Modi | Reuters (http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/05/19/usa-india-pacific-modi-idINKBN0DZ1YY20140519)

Doktor
22 May 14,, 11:37
^^^ What it has to do with Pakistani PM invitation?

If you like to take a diary on Modi open a separate thread, or better yet a blog.

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 11:47
^^^ What it has to do with Pakistani PM invitation?

If you like to take a diary on Modi open a separate thread, or better yet a blog.

As mentioned in the past by another member, are you the self appointed referee here Doktor? There are 20 posts on this thread. All of them on Pakistan?

Give the unsolicited sanctimoniousness a rest please? It gets tiring. Especially from someone whose here 24x7. Lets allow the mods to do their job, and/or wait patiently till when you become one.

Doktor
22 May 14,, 11:50
I fail to see any connection between USN and Pakistani PM's visit. Hence my question.

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 11:51
I fail to see any connection between USN and Pakistani PM's visit. Hence my question.

Did you see a connection earlier when we were speaking of the SAARC, Russia, China, the US, Japan, Singapore, Israel?

How come your question comes in now?

Doktor
22 May 14,, 11:56
Did you see a connection earlier when we were speaking of the SAARC, Russia, China, the US, Japan, Singapore, Israel?

How come your question comes in now?

Everything before was a reply. You are the only one posting a random news article. Told you, open a thread or a blog related to your new PM's activities. Why you burst onto me for a fair suggestion?

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 11:59
Everything before was a reply. You are the only one posting a random news article. Told you, open a thread or a blog related to your new PM's activities. Why you burst onto me for a fair suggestion?

I do not think the news article was random at all, insofar it dealt with engagement with one of the important countries we have been talking about right here on this very thread.

Are you making up the rules here as we move along. That certain things can be posted as replies and responses and certain things need to go elsewhere or as a blog?

Seriously, give it a rest. I think I am well aware of how to post what on a forum without needing a tutorial ..... or your popcorn.

And boss lets stop this here now. There is a report triangle on the left below each post. Use it.

Doktor
22 May 14,, 12:05
I am not giving a rest since you are derailing every single thread with Modi remarks.

Also, I am not making up rules (http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/wab-information-center/2232-forum-guidelines-revised-03-13-11-a.html). Unless you think I am Ironduke's alter ego and that i have a time machine:

15. make sure your post is relevant to the thread you are posting in, please try not to post off-topic comments, make tangential remarks, or otherwise derail a discussion.

As I told you, open yourself a thread and carry on, like this, you derail like 8th thread. It was a friendly comment, and look where it went.

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 12:14
I am not giving a rest since you are derailing every single thread with Modi remarks.

Also, I am not making up rules (http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/wab-information-center/2232-forum-guidelines-revised-03-13-11-a.html). Unless you think I am Ironduke's alter ego and that i have a time machine:

As I told you, open yourself a thread and carry on, like this, you derail like 8th thread. It was a friendly comment, and look where it went.

Use the Report button.

Do not take on a mantle that is not yours.

Translation. Leave the moderation to the mods.

And this thread is about India inviting heads of state to the swearing in of our new PM. Who happens to be Modi ji.

Who would you like me to discuss instead? Jerry Seinfeld?

Doktor
22 May 14,, 12:19
Use the Report button.

Do not take on a mantle that is not yours.

Translation. Leave the moderation to the mods.

And this thread is about India inviting heads of state to the swearing in of our new PM. Who happens to be Modi ji.

Who would you like me to discuss instead? Jerry Seinfeld?

This is highly self-regulated forum.

Oh, and don't try to be witty on me. I did nothing but to tell you to open another thread, since the mods are still busy clearing the mess in the last 2 threads they closed.

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 12:24
This is highly self-regulated forum.

So take care of your own posts, and leave others to take care of theirs.

I repeat. You do come across at times as a busybody. Its irritating. Not "friendly". Please don't do it.


Oh, and don't try to be witty on me. I did nothing but to tell you to open another thread, since the mods are still busy clearing the mess in the last 2 threads they closed.

You think the BJP Nuclear thread was closed because of off-topic posts?

I still do not know why the other one was closed. Maybe both of us should wait for a word from Gary or another mod before jumping to conclusions?

Either way, I do not take orders, suggestions, or otherwise from you buddy. Please look for another more amenable/easier recipient for that.

Doktor
22 May 14,, 12:26
So take care of your own posts, and leave others to take care of theirs.

I repeat. You do come across at times as a busybody. Its irritating. Not "friendly". Please don't do it.



You think the BJP Nuclear thread was closed because of off-topic posts?

I still do not know why the other one was closed. Maybe both of us should wait for a word from Gary or another mod before jumping to conclusions?

Either way, I do not take orders, suggestions, or otherwise from you buddy. Please lok for another more amenable recipiennt for that.

I will not let you do what you do, so be it. I am not reporting you, but will call you BS anytime you go off topic. Take it or leave it.

OTOH, since you are very special, I might give you that and make you the #1 on my ignore list. It's empty since 2008.

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 12:27
OTOH, since you are very special, I might give you that and make you the #1 on my ignore list. It's empty since 2008.

Like I care. It would actually be a favor, coming from you.

Oracle
22 May 14,, 12:28
SB, the Dok is correct. Let's all have some beer and cool off. :)

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 12:29
SB, the Dok is correct. Let's all have some beer and cool off. :)

You're here as a cheerleader again or a neutral this time? I see you thanked two of his posts so that should be my answer on that one?

Double Edge
22 May 14,, 12:37
I fail to see any connection between USN and Pakistani PM's visit. Hence my question.
Guess the thread title could be changed to increase the scope.

Foreign relations with the new administration and their expected contours.

Seems to be the general theme.

Doktor
22 May 14,, 12:39
Like I care. It would actually be a favor, coming from you.

You are not into taking favors. So on every derailed post you gonna get me :biggrin:

Besides, like many times before you haven't told me what's wrong in my suggestion to open a thread and keep a diary on Modi?

Going ballistic on poor ole dok wont take me off. Just saying.

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 12:39
A thread evolves. Its a living thing. It grows from one thing into another.

Take the BJP Nuclear thread and see the vast depth and breadth of topics we covered there. Was anyone the loser for the same?

Dokto is acting like a busybody here. It was not appreciate and I am sorry I snapped. But busybody he was.

Doktor
22 May 14,, 12:41
Guess the thread title could be changed to increase the scope.

Foreign relations with the new administration and their expected contours.

Seems to be the general theme.

The thread title has been changed once. That's not the issue. Unless you make it "Modi - The new PM of India", it will get derailed :) This is what I have an issue with it.

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 12:41
Sorry buddy. Beer's on me when you come to India. :)

Dancing girls too. In exotic costumes.

Doktor
22 May 14,, 12:44
Now this is a trap!

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 12:45
Its all very professional and discreet.

Exotic flowers and aromatic oils too.

Double Edge
22 May 14,, 12:46
A thread evolves. Its a living thing. It grows from one thing into another.
Not in this place. The preference is to keep things tight and focused. Instead of general catch all threads which quite frankly can be a pain to navigate if you want something specific.

Though i find the OT discussions, those off the beaten path to be exciting. Still takes a disciplined and informed membership to pull it off though.

Doktor
22 May 14,, 12:47
Can't make it on a such a short notice for the inauguration.:Dancing-Banana:

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 12:47
Not in this place.

Hmmmmm

Double Edge
22 May 14,, 12:57
Can't make it on a such a short notice for the inauguration.:Dancing-Banana:
Now there's a surprise.

sated buddha
22 May 14,, 13:02
I just noticed I've completed 1000 posts.

Does this mean that antimony, oracle, bolo, and LT give me a party at home?

I prefer Chivas or Jameson.

Oracle and Bolo can get me some Amrut too.

antimony
22 May 14,, 15:13
Moving on...

As expected, Pakistan and Bangladesh seem to be holding back while the other Heads of State accepted. The ceremony coincided with the BD PM's Japan visit, so perhaps there could have been a bit of homework done before these invites went out.

On NDTV BJP shill Chandan Mitra said that Sharif's non attendance would be a very big negative sign. this is exactly the thinking that we don't need going forward.

Albany Rifles
22 May 14,, 15:40
Okay, I am a moderator so I will weigh in here.

SB, stay on topic. If you want to expand the thread to all emerging foreign policy then do as Double Edge proposed...notify a moderator. If not, open a new thread for new topics. All threads will wander but we all should work to keep them on a common path.

Dok, don't be so antagonisitc. Not your place to moderate....contact the staff.

All, its the INTERNET! People are occasionally wrong or disagree with you. If this is news to you then I suggest you move along...you don't belong here.

Keep it off the guardrails, guys.

commander
22 May 14,, 15:44
Moving on...

As expected, Pakistan and Bangladesh seem to be holding back while the other Heads of State accepted. The ceremony coincided with the BD PM's Japan visit, so perhaps there could have been a bit of homework done before these invites went out.

On NDTV BJP shill Chandan Mitra said that Sharif's non attendance would be a very big negative sign. this is exactly the thinking that we don't need going forward.

Maybe it's a political trap ? Either way it's a win-win for Modi and could be a win-win for Pakistan if it plays along,

1. If Sharif/Pakistan does indeed visits the ceremony then Modi/India will be praised to be someone who doesn't hesitate to work with solving the tensions with it's neighbours.

2. If Sharif/Pakistan declines the invite or sends an envoy then this might be seen as Pakistan being not interested with peace talks.

Either way it's a win for India and if Pakistan does something provocative then India is still at benefit.

Bigfella
22 May 14,, 15:55
I just noticed I've completed 1000 posts.

Does this mean that antimony, oracle, bolo, and LT give me a party at home?



No, it means you are spending WAY too much time on the internet.

Double Edge
22 May 14,, 16:00
As expected, Pakistan and Bangladesh seem to be holding back while the other Heads of State accepted. The ceremony coincided with the BD PM's Japan visit, so perhaps there could have been a bit of homework done before these invites went out.
They will meet at the side of many multilateral summits to come. Had we clinched the teesta sharing agreement last time things might have been different.

Not a big deal.


On NDTV BJP shill Chandan Mitra said that Sharif's non attendance would be a very big negative sign. this is exactly the thinking that we don't need going forward.
Very big negative sign, lol.

antimony
22 May 14,, 19:21
Maybe it's a political trap ? Either way it's a win-win for Modi and could be a win-win for Pakistan if it plays along,

1. If Sharif/Pakistan does indeed visits the ceremony then Modi/India will be praised to be someone who doesn't hesitate to work with solving the tensions with it's neighbours.

2. If Sharif/Pakistan declines the invite or sends an envoy then this might be seen as Pakistan being not interested with peace talks.

Either way it's a win for India and if Pakistan does something provocative then India is still at benefit.

Exactly the wrong attitude, assuming we are in this for more than scoring points.

Making Sharif look bad in Pakistan does not solve anything for India. He is the best bet if we need to get something done. He is not in a good position back home then it does not help us

Firestorm
22 May 14,, 22:17
Exactly the wrong attitude, assuming we are in this for more than scoring points.

Making Sharif look bad in Pakistan does not solve anything for India. He is the best bet if we need to get something done. He is not in a good position back home then it does not help us

Do you think being in India's good graces will help Sharif score points back home?

It is solely in the hands of the Pakistanis to ensure that their democratically elected leader is the absolute boss in Pakistan instead of the Army chief or the mullahs. There is nothing that India can realistically do to tilt the balance in Sharif's favor.

Anyway, Sharif isn't the only one invited. All SAARC leaders are. Modi couldn't very well decide to invite everyone else but him. That is the only reason for the invitation. No need to look for any deeper meaning.

Double Edge
22 May 14,, 22:31
Sharif nor Hasina will visit because there is nothing they can take back to their people is there. What reason can they give for the visit.

All those visiting are expecting and have a good chance to take relations further and have no outstanding issues with us.

We won't talk to Pakistan unless there is progress on the 26/11 issue. Nothing has moved in that regard.

antimony
23 May 14,, 00:12
Do you think being in India's good graces will help Sharif score points back home?


Putting this color would ensure that Nawaz is seen as trying to get into India's good graces. We need to avoid this. Instead, if he rejects, which he might, we can be gracious and say that we still look forward to future meetings



It is solely in the hands of the Pakistanis to ensure that their democratically elected leader is the absolute boss in Pakistan instead of the Army chief or the mullahs. There is nothing that India can realistically do to tilt the balance in Sharif's favor.


Come on, aren't you laughing as you write this- that the Pakistani people will choose their absolute boss?



Anyway, Sharif isn't the only one invited. All SAARC leaders are. Modi couldn't very well decide to invite everyone else but him. That is the only reason for the invitation. No need to look for any deeper meaning.

I would say that the other SAARC leaders were invited as an excuse to invite Sharif and Hasina

Bigfella
23 May 14,, 02:41
Do you think being in India's good graces will help Sharif score points back home?

No, but being made to look bad will lose him points. Paradox? maybe, but the way these things sometimes work. New governments often provide new opportunities. Inviting Sharif was a good move - polite without committing to anything much. He wasn't expected to come at relatively short notice.

India doesn't have to bend over backwards to make him look good, but neither will it gain much by point scoring. Not at this point anyway. Political capital is something you have a lot of at the start of a term and usually lose as you go along. How fast is the only issue. Going out of your way to burn it up early is not a good idea.

Double Edge
23 May 14,, 02:47
Come on, aren't you laughing as you write this- that the Pakistani people will choose their absolute boss?
No, this is the only way. That's how it is every where.

Officer of Engineers
23 May 14,, 03:31
Come on, aren't you laughing as you write this- that the Pakistani people will choose their absolute boss?Well, they would be the first.

Double Edge
23 May 14,, 03:41
Hah! i'll settle for just boss :)

sated buddha
23 May 14,, 08:46
Chandan Mitra seriously sucks as a BJP representative on prime time national TV man.

Smriti Irani - class. Meenakshi Lekhi - class and sexual tension for an uncle like me. Ravi Shankar Prasad - too big and too important for nightly TV duty now. Chandan Mitra - reaching for the barf bag. Seriously.

Please Modi ji.

ambidex
23 May 14,, 13:24
Indian Consulate Attacked in Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai Calls Narendra Modi | NDTV.com (http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/indian-consulate-attacked-in-afghanistan-hamid-karzai-calls-narendra-modi-529414?pfrom=home-lateststories)

Indian consulate attacked. Most likely the same old Pakistani establishment want to stay relevant thus hell bent on sabotaging any peace initiative civilian authorities of India and Pakistan may venture. Last time they had excuse that the transgression has been committed by both sides on LOC. But this time they want to sabotage it big time amid rumours that Nawaj Sharif is likely to visit India

Mr. Hardeep Puri already warned that now Pakistanis (Army+ISI+fanatics) are going to test new government in India.

antimony
23 May 14,, 19:47
Chandan Mitra seriously sucks as a BJP representative on prime time national TV man.

Smriti Irani - class. Meenakshi Lekhi - class and sexual tension for an uncle like me. Ravi Shankar Prasad - too big and too important for nightly TV duty now. Chandan Mitra - reaching for the barf bag. Seriously.

Please Modi ji.

I agree, he is a loudmouth with a serious lack of understanding of issues. He is easy to call out if he would just listen to others

Same with that guy Hardeep Puri. He has the finesse of a rhibnocerous with piles; wonder who made him a diplomat. his own IFS colleagues deride his viewpoints

sated buddha
24 May 14,, 07:49
Don't ask me how or why, but I have a feeling today that Shazia Ilmi is going to resign from AAP and join the BJP. She would make a great twosome with Meenakshi Lekhi, but I guess I'm not only talking politics there ....

36919

Double Edge
25 May 14,, 03:50
Indian Consulate Attacked in Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai Calls Narendra Modi | NDTV.com (http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/indian-consulate-attacked-in-afghanistan-hamid-karzai-calls-narendra-modi-529414?pfrom=home-lateststories)

Indian consulate attacked. Most likely the same old Pakistani establishment want to stay relevant thus hell bent on sabotaging any peace initiative civilian authorities of India and Pakistan may venture. Last time they had excuse that the transgression has been committed by both sides on LOC. But this time they want to sabotage it big time amid rumours that Nawaj Sharif is likely to visit India

Mr. Hardeep Puri already warned that now Pakistanis (Army+ISI+fanatics) are going to test new government in India.
Yeah, they got a twofer. This is the ninth attack since 2007 on our diplomatic missions in Afghanistan. No casualties on our side.

People say its only going to increase after ISAF leaves. They will have to do more than nine in seven years then.


Chandan Mitra seriously sucks as a BJP representative on prime time national TV man.
He edits the Pioneer, you'd think he could do a better job on TV.


Smriti Irani - class.
Smarting after losing to Rahul in Amethi.

Double Edge
25 May 14,, 13:58
Can't make it on a such a short notice for the inauguration.:Dancing-Banana:
Stop the press!

Sharif will attend :Dancing-Banana:

Pak People won this round.

Over to the PA for round 2.

Must do something to anger the Indian people again.

sated buddha
26 May 14,, 07:40
Smarting after losing to Rahul in Amethi.

Always beware a very smart woman who's smarting.

Double Edge
26 May 14,, 10:10
Ilmi lost her deposit when she contested against General VK Singh.

Ilmi's more dangerous :biggrin:

sated buddha
26 May 14,, 10:40
Ilmi lost her deposit when she contested against General VK Singh.

Ilmi's more dangerous :biggrin:

Dangerous and curently unattached. An admirable combination.

Double Edge
26 May 14,, 17:54
Sharif can attend but the CM's of Kerela, TN & Karnataka are unable. They have other engagements.

Jaya to a certain extent i can understand as she opposes normalisation with Sri Lanka due to the tamil problem.


CM's of Kerela & Karnataka are being petty.:rolleyes: