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bonehead
02 Mar 14,, 07:44
I know there are some WABBERS that visited the U.S. Do your impression mirror these? What else can you add?




Yahoo! (http://travel.yahoo.com/blogs/compass/don-t-drink-water-visitors-travel-tips-coming-194949993.html)

Travelers love coming to America, a land many of them have seen via exports from Hollywood. They rave about the landscapes, the recreational opportunities, the vibrant cities and the culture.
But like international travelers anywhere, foreigners visiting the United States from other countries can be flummoxed by some of what they encounter. Fortunately, their fellow travelers have plenty of advice. The picture they paint portrays Americans as relentlessly cheerful yet sensitive folks who just might raid your fridge.

What outsiders say about the U.S. will strike an American as very true, very strange, or both. Here (with some help from Google Translate) are some travel advice gems from around the world.



(Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)
From Latin America:
It’s probably best not to drink the water. “There are strict laws regarding Hygiene eating places that must be met, so that restaurants and even street stalls are safe. In some areas you can take the tap water. Bottled water is available everywhere and is most recommended.”

From Germany:

Americans’ social boundaries are very inconsistent. “Things like “We should get together sometime” doesn’t really mean anything, unless the same people keep mentioning it to you."

“During a party at your house, don’t be surprised if Americans will just walk up to your fridge and help themselves.”

From Switzerland:

Forget public nudity, intoxication or urination. "The legal system can be very different from one state to another and is often inspired by moral principles stiffer than in Switzerland. For example it is forbidden to bathe topless or without shirt (kids), urinate on public roads or photograph partially unclothed children (even at home). It is forbidden for people under 21 to drink alcohol. Similarly, people who drink alcohol in public or carry alcoholic beverages without concealing from the eyes are guilty of an offense."

From France:

Do take a road trip across the West, but don’t be weird about American Indians or cops. “Do not miss and be certain to visit driving in a country that venerates it, but scrupulously respect the speed limits, the constabulary of the United States not kidding ... Remember that Indian reserves in the western United States are economic and human realities, not museums."



(Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
From Italy:
Tipping is fraught with misunderstanding. Q. Is it true that I have to "force" to tip at all? A. It is not mandatory to tip, however, it is strongly recommended, because in many cases it is the only entry of workers. Generally in a restaurant, in the cab, and in many places where there is a service gratuity is 15%. Since the bill that will take you specify the city tax of 8.875%, is sufficient to double that sum, without bothering to do the calculations. In the hotel you leave two dollars per day per person cleaning. Obviously you do not leave tips in places like McDonalds or Starbucks.”

From Australia:

You will probably get sucked into a political discussion. “Americans are REALLY opinionated. And they want to know what you think about the government, about politics, about current issues. A typical conversation might go like this: ‘Hi I’m Matt. Nice to meet you.’ ‘The name’s Bob. Where you from Matt?’ ‘Sydney, Australia.’ ‘Oh I see. You’ve come a long way. So what’s your take on Obamacare?’”

Did we mention the violence of U.S. toilets? “A veritable swimming pool of water greets you when you open the toilet lid and when you flush, it all goes down the drain in a huge rotating whirlpool.”

From the UK:

America might give you fever. “There are occasional outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases, including West Nile virus, eastern equine encephalitis and dengue fever.”



(Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
Americans are proud of their Old World connections, no matter how tenuous. “When an American announces that they’re part Irish, part Polish and part Moldovan because their great-great-grandparents hailed from these far-off lands, you might find yourself snorting dismissively. Try to hold off until they’re out of earshot.”
From India:

The U.S. doesn’t offer much in terms of shopping. “Based on my experience everyone need to bring almost every basic thing you need on a daily basis.”

From China:

Americans love to follow rules, even when no one is looking. “Americans are such strict rule followers. I witnessed this once sitting on the sidelines of a high school dodge ball game. To me, it was goofy, a little violent, and very American. It struck me that my classmates followed the rules of the game so strictly. Even when no one noticed that a person had been hit and he could have kept playing, he voluntarily gave himself up and left the game. I was deeply impressed by how much people honored the rules even when they are not seen."

From Russia (via Mental Floss):

Gifts are not a big deal. And did you know bribery was illegal? “Gifts: Americans do not expect them. On the contrary, an unexpected gift while conducting business can put an American in an awkward position. Such things for Americans suggest reciprocity.

“Business gifts in the U.S. are not acceptable. Moreover, they often cause suspicion. Americans fear that they could be construed as a bribe, and in the United States that is strictly punishable by law.”



(Photo by Jason Kempin/WireImage)
Socializing with Americans can be tricky. Sports help. “Showing up at a business associate’s home uninvited in the United States is not acceptable. You may be invited to a picnic — if you’ve known each other for several years and are social outside the office.
"As a rule, the invitation will be only on a weekend, and you don’t have to prepare for something extravagant. Everything is the same as ours, only with far less booze. Bring something sporty — ball, badminton, Americans are certainly fervent fans of these things.”

"Phone etiquette in America usually involves the gradual end of the conversation, confirmation agreements and standard closing remarks. By the way, 'see you later' should not be taken literally. That is a courtesy, and no more... Russian conversational patterns often sound harsh to Americans. Statements such as, 'You’re wrong,' can be offensive. This can be interpreted as 'You are telling lies!' Therefore it is better to say, 'I do not think I can agree with this.'"



(Photo by Chris Trotman/Getty Images)
Americans really are as cheerful as they seem. “Americans and Russians say different things when faced with the same situation. Seeing the man who had fallen in the street, an American asks, 'Are you all right?' Russians will inquire: 'Are you ill?' We see a victim of the incident; they see survivors. Survivors are perceived as heroes. Where we 'aren’t sick,' they 'stay well.' We discuss the problem. They discuss issues and items on the agenda."
“Americans: they are a nation that truly feels happy. These people get used to smiling from the cradle onwards, so they do not pretend to be cheerful. The desire for a successful happy life is inculcated from childhood.”

The women are a little uptight, and they don't appreciate chivalry. “US etiquette prohibits flirting with a woman who is not your girlfriend or wife. If you are not acquainted with a woman, whether she be in a restaurant, on the street, or on the subway, do not look at her legs, etc. Americans could easily call the police on you, even for just ogling her.”

“Welcome and introductions: men and women tend to shake hands. Mutual kissing and kissing ladies' hands is not accepted. Also, women play a greater role in business. Often they insist to be treated exactly as an equal and not as a lady. In this regard, it is not acceptable to be excessively gallant, and you should avoid personal questions (do not find out whether she is married).”

From Japan (via Mental Floss):



(Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
American food is not subtle. American food is about big, bold taste, and is indifferent to subtleties. Hence "hidden ingredients" are seldom seen. Sugar, salt, pepper, oils, and routine spices are used for family meals. There is no such thing as purely U.S. cuisine, except the hamburger, which isn’t made at home so much. There is no such thing as purely U.S. cuisine, except for maybe the hamburger, and not many varieties that can be cooked at home. There’s not much emphasis on seasonal foods. Basically, they like sweet tasting foods, as well as foods that are high in fat and calories.
Watch out where you wear hip-hop clothes. “In Japan, hip hop clothes are considered stylish. But in the United States, it is wise to avoid them, as you might be mistaken for a member of a street gang.

Nobody is impressed by how much you can drink.“In the U.S., they do not have a sense of pride if they drink a large amount. Rather, if you drink a lot, there is a sense that you cannot manage yourself, and you can lose respect from those around you. Being drunk doesn't excuse your actions, and to drink alcohol habitually is a sign of alcoholism. Alcoholics are seen as mentally weak, and are ostracized by society due to their inability to have self control."



(Photo by Michael N. Todaro/Getty Images)
They tend to laugh out loud, even the women. It’s how they show they’re honest. “In Japan, when most woman laugh, they place their hand over their lips so it does not show their mouth. It is disgraceful to laugh by loudly opening the mouth. In reality, many adult males do not laugh. There is the saying, ‘A man should not show his teeth so much when laughing.’

“In America, when men or women laugh, they do not turn away. In general, they face front, open the mouth, and laugh in a loud voice. This is because in America if you muffle your laugh or turn away while laughing, you give the impression that you are talking about a secret or name-calling. It comes across as vulgar and insidious. ”
Below: Bostonians react to being declared America's third snobbiest city (after San Francisco and New York).

Tamara
02 Mar 14,, 09:17
Curious.....I wonder where in the country they were.

No one mentioned guns, pickup trucks, or even cowgirls!

YellowFever
02 Mar 14,, 10:03
From Latin America:
It’s probably best not to drink the water. “There are strict laws regarding Hygiene eating places that must be met, so that restaurants and even street stalls are safe. In some areas you can take the tap water. Bottled water is available everywhere and is most recommended.”

:biggrin:

The funniest thing I heard today, especially from someone down south.

Tamara
02 Mar 14,, 10:28
Well it does sort of remind me of what messages a time traveler from the 60's would go back with had he visited in the past couple of years.

"Protect your hearing! In the future, everyone is walking around with boxed hearing aids!"

tankie
02 Mar 14,, 13:41
Cant be all bad , fact is , superman / batman / spiderman etc all live there , and the water never harmed them now did it , huh . :whome:

lemontree
03 Mar 14,, 09:31
From India:

The U.S. doesn’t offer much in terms of shopping. “Based on my experience everyone need to bring almost every basic thing you need on a daily basis.”
What the hell was my compatriot talking about?...he/she makes it look like they imported their daily items from a one horse grocery store from back home in India :slap:

Tamara
03 Mar 14,, 09:50
What the hell was my compatriot talking about?...he/she makes it look like they imported their daily items from a one horse grocery store from back home in India :slap:

Yes, perhaps you an explain what that is suppose to mean.

I'll admit that a lot of people in the US don't seem to know how to cook so.............................OH WAIT A MINUTE! You don't think your compatriot was mistaking the convenience store for the main grocery, do you?

Bigfella
03 Mar 14,, 09:56
What the hell was my compatriot talking about?...he/she makes it look like they imported their daily items from a one horse grocery store from back home in India :slap:

I used to work with a Vietnamese girl whose mother would load her up with all manner of food items every time she was leaving again for Oz. it took years to convince the well meaning mum that not only would most of this get confiscated at customs, but every single item was available either in the Asian food stores that dot most Melbourne suburbs or even in many supermarkets.

lemontree
03 Mar 14,, 10:04
Yes, perhaps you an explain what that is suppose to mean.

I'll admit that a lot of people in the US don't seem to know how to cook so.............................OH WAIT A MINUTE! You don't think your compatriot was mistaking the convenience store for the main grocery, do you?

I'm just as foxed as you are.
I don't think my sister who lives in NJ "buys stuff on a daily basis" as mentioned by that chap.:rolleyes:

lemontree
03 Mar 14,, 10:06
.... but every single item was available either in the Asian food stores that dot most Melbourne suburbs or even in many supermarkets.

I guess the same is true in the US too, at least in the states with large Asian populations.

Tamara
03 Mar 14,, 10:16
Well, looking at this gifs-that-perfectly-sum-up-being-single (http://www.buzzfeed.com/kristinchirico/gifs-that-perfectly-sum-up-being-single), I noticed that there is a lot of pizza involved in that with most of it being delivery. Hence my conclusion that most people in America don't know how to cook and to a foreigner, that could lead to the view of shopping being without much selection.

Reminds me of a Nat'l Geo article I read a few decades back of a pair that were, essentially, kayaking the Northwest Passage. They made land fall in Alaska, are taken to a company town (oil) to buy supplies and can't find any food in the supermarket. It's all things like chips and baseball hats. When they ask the manager where's the food, they get an answer like, "No one around here cooks. When people eat, they either order out or go to a restaurant." As it was, they found a restaurant cook who set them up with supplies.

Me, being able to cook, using raw goods, I probably make out like a bandit. Admittedly, I, too, was tempted with pizza on Friday. I was too tired to make it from scratch and while I wasn't going to submit to ordering out, I was very ready to buy crusts or frozen from the store. As it was.....I thought of all the different kinds of noodles I have at home, and cooked those up instead with some canned salmon.

Ah, life in the kitchen......this weekend, it was something like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cmh-abe-1_U&feature=player_detailpage#t=467
(about at 7:45)

Tamara
03 Mar 14,, 10:26
I'm just as foxed as you are.
I don't think my sister who lives in NJ "buys stuff on a daily basis" as mentioned by that chap.:rolleyes:

I tend not to. I tend to try to keep to buying once a month, stock piling, like a forest ranger. Romaine is the tough one to try to do the once a month trip on. The catch is, whenever I go in the store, there are various aisles I will check on to see what is on sale, what more I might want to have in stock. Croutons are a biggie for me since I use them in so many things, from salads to stews to pasta.

BUT the thing is, a lot of people do visit the grocery store often during the month. A lot of people don't cook. A lot of people probably use a lot of the frozen selection.

On the down, side point: I wasn't happy to see that brisket when up by 30 cents a pound. It's still the cheapest way to get great meat if you have the patience and kitchen to cook it, but for 16-20lbs, that's $5-7ish more.

But I suppose that makes an interesting point.......around the world, what nationalities approach cooking like the way I do it?

sated buddha
03 Mar 14,, 11:24
I've been travelling to the US for business for more than a decade now. Some impressions, in no particular order or connection -

1) New York was my first American city. My first reaction / impression was being very intimidated by the armed police guys at Immigration. No smiling. Hands on hips near their guns. Belts with enough stuff to break open a vault or start a war.

2) Second impression was in the taxi from the airport to mu hotel in New Jersey. And the sheer thrust of the acceleration and the speed he was doing in heavy traffic. Plus the fact that I could not communicate with him because of the cage type partition thing between us.

3) I next was a bit off put by the eye contact, how you doings, smiles by complete strangers. Indians don't do that. Indians also don't bum cigarettes from strangers off the street, but seeing as the guy asking was African-American and about twice my size, I let him have two.

4) No water in the toilets to wash your bums. That is a serious issue. Also the WCs are half full of water. I initially wondered if my hotel WC was blocked or malfunctioning, then quickly realized that al American toilets have so much water. Brings toilet water a little too close for comfort to splash creating plopping turds .....

5) Industrial quantity and size in everything. Ice cream does not come in cups. It comes in tubs. And one person has to eat it all. yes sir. Coffee is not in mugs or cups. It is in cups that can swallow a small animal. And everyone is holding one. All day. Pizza is not shared. When you order pizza what comes in front of you is not a Dominos or Pizza Hut sized pizza. Its more like the tyre size of a car. And each guy eats it all. Man! Parking lots are like football fields. Ditto malls and SUVs.

6) Loved the dress sense and style and the sense of purpose of the crowd walking purposefully in downtown Manhattan. All black. Very New York.

7) People are friendly, extremely polite, but one gets the impression that the actual genuine human interest side and warmth is some way under the surface (again as opposed to India - where we are into each other's lives and personal space 24x7 365). Socializing and dining out is again pretty regimented, and over quickly.

8) Could never get used to the time people eat dinner. In near broad daylight outside, and people are eating dinner. At home, have rarely if ever eaten before 8 or 9 p.m. Here its 6-7 p.m. latest.

9) Trains and subways people are more likely to start a conversation and there one gets a real feel for the general lay public (as opposed to upper crust white collar corporate types one is in meetings with all day otherwise).

10) Americans over the last 10 years are more aware and clued in on an average to and of the outside world. There is a distinct perceivable shift I have noticed as an outsider. And they want to learn. Again different from the past where they were comfortable either way, one way or the other.

11) They love ice with everything. Again, large quantities of it. Water is never water. It comes with ice (and being from India, one has a healthy suspicion of any outside ice). And again, as an Indian, I just cannot learn or teach myself to drink from a tap. Which whenever I ask someone, is pretty commonplace (never heard anyone suggesting bottled water).

Bigfella
03 Mar 14,, 12:26
A few observations of my own:

*The water runs down the sink the wrong way.

*All food servings are too big. My Thai curry came in a soup bowl. Enough to feed a whole family in Thailand.

*Americans LOVE Australians. Don't know why, but its great. Pleased to say that unlike the early 80s nobody complimented me on how good my English was when I was there in 2011.

*Most people are very polite & friendly - even the dreaded TSA folks.

*If you want serious love, wear a Bob Marley shirt (this actually works pretty much everywhere except East Asia).

*There isn't much Americans won't fry & serve as a snack - including fat.

*Punjabis are taking over the world. Apparently the plan involves Taxis & men's tailors. On the upside, if you need a chat about cricket in the US get into a cab. ;)

*Americans are really good at creating monuments.

*Apparently Australia is further from America than America is from Australia. That is the only explanation for the constant refrain of 'I'd love to visit Australia but it is so far away'. Seemed an odd thing to say to someone who had managed to get to the US from Australia.

*America seems strangely free of deadly wildlife. Didn't spot a single thing that could kill me, apart from Americans themselves, in three lengthy trips. Few weeks in Ethiopia were packed with potentially deadly animals. Pull your finger out America.:biggrin:

Tamara
03 Mar 14,, 12:39
.......*America seems strangely free of deadly wildlife. Didn't spot a single thing that could kill me, apart from Americans themselves, in three lengthy trips. Few weeks in Ethiopia were packed with potentially deadly animals. Pull your finger out America.:biggrin:

You must have missed the rattlesnakes, fire ants, and yellow jackets.

About early dinners. In college and on ship, it was like that. On land and for many years on midshift, it was "late". These days, I've been pulling the clock to around "6 PM" (my equivalent). That's when I start or so. To give me time to cook it, leisurely enjoy it, and not rush my wine into the detox time limits. Also, for myself, there is a matter of not eating right before one goes to bed (unless one is in COLD environments, that is).

As far as travel goes, well I did that when I was a child and in the Navy. Been as far east as Tehran, as far west as New Delhi. As far north on land as Germany (London in the air) and as far south as Addis Ababa or Mindanao (I was a child then and don't know far south in those countries we actually went). Colombia comes close to the southern "travel", but again, I was more concerned with my work than looking at the chart to see how far south I was.

Bigfella
04 Mar 14,, 08:18
You must have missed the rattlesnakes, fire ants, and yellow jackets.

Oh, I'm not saying they don't exist, just that you seem to put them out of the way. I live about 30 minutes walk from the centre of Melbourne, a city of 4 million. I live in a very small house with a back yard smaller than most people's lounge room. I have found Redback spiders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redback_spider) and European wasps (http://museumvictoria.com.au/wasps/) on my property, both of which can kill. I've had flying foxes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey-headed_flying_fox) in the trees outside my house - known carriers of deadly Hendra virus. The factory next door has large populations of Eastern Brown snakes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_brown_snake) and Tiger snake (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger_snake), respectively the 2nd & 6th most venomous land snakes (we also have 1, 4 and 9 on the list plus the most venomous sea snake :eek:).

Keep in mind this is near the middle of one of our largest cities. Things get MUCH scarier in the suburbs & even worse in rural areas. At least there are no Drop Bears in the cities! :biggrin:

Tamara
04 Mar 14,, 08:35
Oh, I'm not saying they don't exist, just that you seem to put them out of the way. I live about 30 minutes walk from the centre of Melbourne, a city of 4 million. I live in a very small house with a back yard smaller than most people's lounge room. I have found Redback spiders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redback_spider) and European wasps (http://museumvictoria.com.au/wasps/) on my property, both of which can kill. I've had flying foxes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey-headed_flying_fox) in the trees outside my house - known carriers of deadly Hendra virus. The factory next door has large populations of Eastern Brown snakes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_brown_snake) and Tiger snake (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger_snake), respectively the 2nd & 6th most venomous land snakes (we also have 1, 4 and 9 on the list plus the most venomous sea snake :eek:).

Keep in mind this is near the middle of one of our largest cities. Things get MUCH scarier in the suburbs & even worse in rural areas. At least there are no Drop Bears in the cities! :biggrin:

Well, to each their own I suppose.

They've found baby rattlers and I've seen scorpions at a shop I do work for. The shop is on the outskirts of town. The scorpions may not kill ya, but the rattlers will.

The ranch sits 25 minutes out of town. The curious thing is that the country/town transition is so abrupt. The nearest gas, convenience store is at that limit and one moment you are in the country and then you are in town.

Seen foxes and birds of prey out there, the fire ants are everywhere, and I'm sure more nasty things that sting and bite are around as well. One of the reasons why I have a huge insurance policy on my land, should someone trespass, step on a snake, and then try to sue me for it.

In town, while it shouldn't kill ya, we do have some huge snapping turtles.

I suppose it goes with what kind of life one leads.

Parihaka
04 Mar 14,, 08:58
Observations on America. Venice beach is nice, LAX isn't, the black girl in the bodyshop in Santa Monica was the hottest thing ever.
The 'scary' places weren't, the restaurants almost paid me to eat there, I could go anywhere as long as I looked like I belonged there.
Everyone on the freeways are so polite I wondered if you were required to take prozac before driving.
I had to teach the girl at Starbucks how to make a flat white but she was enchanted to know such a thing existed. We became friends.
The pubs were nice and everyone told me they loved my accent, so of course I fell in love with the place.

Bigfella
04 Mar 14,, 10:07
Observations on America. Venice beach is nice, LAX isn't, the black girl in the bodyshop in Santa Monica was the hottest thing ever.
The 'scary' places weren't, the restaurants almost paid me to eat there, I could go anywhere as long as I looked like I belonged there.
Everyone on the freeways are so polite I wondered if you were required to take prozac before driving.
I had to teach the girl at Starbucks how to make a flat white but she was enchanted to know such a thing existed. We became friends.
The pubs were nice and everyone told me they loved my accent, so of course I fell in love with the place.

Clearly they thought you were Australian. :biggrin:

Bigfella
04 Mar 14,, 10:21
They've found baby rattlers and I've seen scorpions at a shop I do work for. The shop is on the outskirts of town. The scorpions may not kill ya, but the rattlers will.

The ranch sits 25 minutes out of town. The curious thing is that the country/town transition is so abrupt. The nearest gas, convenience store is at that limit and one moment you are in the country and then you are in town.

Seen foxes and birds of prey out there, the fire ants are everywhere, and I'm sure more nasty things that sting and bite are around as well. One of the reasons why I have a huge insurance policy on my land, should someone trespass, step on a snake, and then try to sue me for it.

Grew up in the 'bush'. Scorpions, snakes around the house & the school (killing snakes was the groundskeeper's job), the very large & nasty bull ant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrmecia), regular foxes, flying foxes, the huge Wedge-tailed Eagle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedge-tailed_Eagle)(the only eagle known to attack hang gliders!!!!:eek:), huge Goannas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goanna), clumps of stinging caterpillars, huge hornets & lord knows what else.

Trust me Tamara, you live in a paradise by comparison. ;)


In town, while it shouldn't kill ya, we do have some huge snapping turtles.

The most dense population of foxes in my home state is, you guessed it, in the middle of Melbourne! :)


I suppose it goes with what kind of life one leads.

I live in the middle of the city. Short of living in a high rise apartment nowhere is safe. :biggrin:

sated buddha
04 Mar 14,, 11:10
Nothing very exotic at my place. Some cobras during the monsoon months (a couple of times we've had to call the snake guys to catch "babies" that have gotten inside). A mongoose couple that comes across the road from the property opposite mine from time to time. Bandicoots as big as full grown cats. A few eagles and owls. Loads of bats that start darting around at dusk. Dogs, cats galore (in addition to my own rotts). The neighbors have geese, ducks, 3 hens and a rooster, 7 dogs, a tortoise, some rabbits, a couple of goats, and a horse. Yup, they have the snakes as well. Not counting normal household stuff such as lizards, frogs, mice, fireflies, bees, etc. And yes, we have mosquitos too. Can't forget those buggers, however small.

Bigfella
04 Mar 14,, 11:14
Americans don't know how good they have it. :biggrin:

Tamara
04 Mar 14,, 11:19
........Trust me Tamara, you live in a paradise by comparison. ;)
........
Not saying my place is meaner than yours.

Just saying we have things around here that will kill ya, too.

Regardless whether is keeling over from a Blue Ring Octopus in a few minutes or waiting several hours for the rattler to add you to his rings, face it, DEAD IS DEAD.


Americans don't know how good they have it. :biggrin:

Oh, I don't know. Why do you think I haven't left the country since 1986, haven't left Texas since 2001.

Bigfella
04 Mar 14,, 11:28
Not saying my place is meaner than yours.

Just saying we have things around here that will kill ya, too.

Regardless whether is keeling over from a Blue Ring Octopus in a few minutes or waiting several hours for the rattler to add you to his rings, face it, DEAD IS DEAD.


Thanks for reminding me. I've found blue ringed octopuses at suburban beaches in Melbourne. :biggrin:

Beautiful looking things but tiny. You could easily step on one or get one caught in your clothing without realising. I actually caught one once when I was a kid. Lord knows why my mother let me do it. Would never happen with today's over protective parents....which might not be the worst thing. It DID NOT like being caught. Little rings glowed electric blue. If I had miscalculated a bit I could have been killed on the spot. The joy of being young - no concept of consequence.



Oh, I don't know. Why do you think I haven't left the country since 1986, haven't left Texas since 2001.

Good idea. Wise woman.

sated buddha
04 Mar 14,, 11:38
Land is at such a premium in big cities that most kids today grow up in huge apartment societies and townships that are overdosed with concrete everywhere. Great for skateboarding and rollerblading though. The kids have this new thing which look like skateboards but only two wheels instead of 4 - hugely popular here among the little kamikazes. My girls want them too but the wheels do not go well over mud and gravel as they do on concrete.

Tamara
04 Mar 14,, 11:43
Thanks for reminding me. I've found blue ringed octopuses at suburban beaches in Melbourne. :biggrin:

Beautiful looking things but tiny. You could easily step on one or get one caught in your clothing without realising. I actually caught one once when I was a kid. Lord knows why my mother let me do it. Would never happen with today's over protective parents....which might not be the worst thing. It DID NOT like being caught. Little rings glowed electric blue. If I had miscalculated a bit I could have been killed on the spot. The joy of being young - no concept of consequence.

As a diver, it's part of my world to know about such things......such as sea wasps. Know about them but don't see myself being around the world having to "worry" about them like Michele Hall or Valerie Taylor. I wouldn't quite say my traveling days are over, just that I have other things to do now.


Good idea. Wise woman.

Why, thank you kind sir!


Land is at such a premium in big cities that most kids today grow up in huge apartment societies and townships that are overdosed with concrete everywhere. Great for skateboarding and rollerblading though. The kids have this new thing which look like skateboards but only two wheels instead of 4 - hugely popular here among the little kamikazes. My girls want them too but the wheels do not go well over mud and gravel as they do on concrete.

SIGH!

and I remember traveling in India in the 70's, being amazed by the wide open spaces (of sand) and old forts everywhere!

sated buddha
04 Mar 14,, 12:03
SIGH!

and I remember traveling in India in the 70's, being amazed by the wide open spaces (of sand) and old forts everywhere!

That's Rajasthan. Sand remains sand. But the cities have exploded. Not just big cities. But smaller ones, towns, big villages, all of it. But the good part about it is that a short drive out of the city and you'll still see lovely country. But the kids live and grow up in concrete. None of my kids have climbe a tree for instance. Nor gone to a stream and fished for guppies. Nor made gulels (home made catapaults) for firing at crows (ok they are girls ..... but still). In my own lifetime I have seen a species almost go extinct ..... sparrows.

P.S. Rajasthan and the 70s. Was it work/business or were you on the hippie boom shiva trail? :)

Tamara
04 Mar 14,, 12:19
........P.S. Rajasthan and the 70s. Was it work/business or were you on the hippie boom shiva trail? :)

Neither!

My father was MACV, we lived at Clark AFB and it was vacation time.

sated buddha
04 Mar 14,, 12:43
Neither!

My father was MACV, we lived at Clark AFB and it was vacation time.

I did not know India ever had a US airforce base on Indian soil.

Tamara
04 Mar 14,, 12:56
I did not know India ever had a US airforce base on Indian soil.

Nor do I.

Clark AFB was in the PR on Luzon.

Doktor
04 Mar 14,, 13:03
...the black girl in the bodyshop in Santa Monica was the hottest thing ever...

I see the story. You knocked her out, brought her to Kiwiland, introduced her to your wife, the later filed for divorce and now you are grumpy semi-old fella with a hot black girl next to you.

tankie
04 Mar 14,, 13:58
That's Rajasthan. Sand remains sand. But the cities have exploded. Not just big cities. But smaller ones, towns, big villages, all of it. But the good part about it is that a short drive out of the city and you'll still see lovely country. But the kids live and grow up in concrete. None of my kids have climbe a tree for instance. Nor gone to a stream and fished for guppies. Nor made gulels (home made catapaults) for firing at crows (ok they are girls ..... but still). In my own lifetime I have seen a species almost go extinct ..... sparrows.

P.S. Rajasthan and the 70s. Was it work/business or were you on the hippie boom shiva trail? :)

Strange about the sparrows , its the same here in the UK , and starlings are becoming scarce as well ??

tankie
04 Mar 14,, 14:04
I see the story. You knocked her out, brought her to Kiwiland, introduced her to your wife, the later filed for divorce and now you are grumpy semi-old fella with a hot black girl next to you.

Roy Orbison wrote a song about this ,,,in dreams its called :biggrin:

Doktor
04 Mar 14,, 14:11
Roy Orbison wrote a song about this ,,,in dreams its called :biggrin:

I said "I see the story", not I see what happened next ;)

tankie
04 Mar 14,, 15:05
I said "I see the story", not I see what happened next ;)

But it didnt happen , did it :Dancing-Banana:

Albany Rifles
04 Mar 14,, 17:34
Oh, I'm not saying they don't exist, just that you seem to put them out of the way. I live about 30 minutes walk from the centre of Melbourne, a city of 4 million. I live in a very small house with a back yard smaller than most people's lounge room. I have found Redback spiders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redback_spider) and European wasps (http://museumvictoria.com.au/wasps/) on my property, both of which can kill. I've had flying foxes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey-headed_flying_fox) in the trees outside my house - known carriers of deadly Hendra virus. The factory next door has large populations of Eastern Brown snakes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_brown_snake) and Tiger snake (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger_snake), respectively the 2nd & 6th most venomous land snakes (we also have 1, 4 and 9 on the list plus the most venomous sea snake :eek:).

Keep in mind this is near the middle of one of our largest cities. Things get MUCH scarier in the suburbs & even worse in rural areas. At least there are no Drop Bears in the cities! :biggrin:

Bigfella,

I believe the Kiwis planted them there when the Hobbits drove them out of NZ a la Ireland, snakes & ST Patrick.

Albany Rifles
04 Mar 14,, 17:36
Americans don't know how good they have it. :biggrin:

They won't kill you but ticks and chiggers can make you wish you were dead...

Albany Rifles
04 Mar 14,, 17:37
haven't left Texas since 2001.

Then why do you fly a French flag?

Stitch
04 Mar 14,, 17:42
Well, to each their own I suppose.

They've found baby rattlers and I've seen scorpions at a shop I do work for. The shop is on the outskirts of town. The scorpions may not kill ya, but the rattlers will.

The ranch sits 25 minutes out of town. The curious thing is that the country/town transition is so abrupt. The nearest gas, convenience store is at that limit and one moment you are in the country and then you are in town.

Seen foxes and birds of prey out there, the fire ants are everywhere, and I'm sure more nasty things that sting and bite are around as well. One of the reasons why I have a huge insurance policy on my land, should someone trespass, step on a snake, and then try to sue me for it.

In town, while it shouldn't kill ya, we do have some huge snapping turtles.

I suppose it goes with what kind of life one leads.

Yeah, Texas is probably the most "dangerous" state in the Union; between the rattlers, the fire ants, and the occasional Gila monster, there are more "deadly"animals in Texas than probably all of the other states combined (with the possible exception of Florida; water mocassins, alligators and stingrays). My wife lived in Texas for a while, and the thing she hated the most were the fire ants, because they would actually invade her home during the dry season (which is most of the year in Texas!).

Here in California, the worst thing we have to worry about are rattlesnakes (rare; I've only seen two or three in my entire 50 years of living in CA) and Black Widows (lots of those; two summers ago at night, my son and I counted 30 of them around our house, and those are just the ones we could see!); but 99.9% of the time, if you leave them alone, they'll leave you alone.

Tamara
04 Mar 14,, 17:46
haven't left Texas since 2001.

Then why do you fly a French flag?

Beats me!

The system puts that to me, don't know why.............................I don't even like the Coneheads!

Albany Rifles
04 Mar 14,, 18:08
An American abroad....(not to be confused with Ricky Gervais Idiot Abroad series...)

Some of my observations while travelling to some "other" places.

1. In Europe, why is it neccessary to have a shelf in the toilet where I get to exam my pooh after evicting it from my body?

2. In Italy why do I have to feel threatened if I am ONLY driving 50 kph over the posted limit...in the slow lane?

3. If you look like an American in Paris (hard for me not to) it is difficult to get served at a lot of establishments. Conversely, if you look like an American and are in Normandy, the Ardennes, and/or Verdun people will invite you into their homes at the drop of the hat because you are an American.

4. In Holland, everyone speaks English...better than they do in large swaths of the USA.

5. Making an innocent comment anywhere in the world about not really liking soccer/football will get you hung, shot, drawn, quartered, set on fire, cursed for 7 generations and impaled on a pike....and then they will start in on your family.

6. Unless you say you really like rugby/cricket/hockey/skiing/track and field.

7. I know why the British Empire grew to be so large. They were searching for a toilet paper that does not double as a delaminator. Don't think they ever found it (got kicked out of the US too soon!)

8. Germans are the coldest, most distant people on Earth. Until you get to know them and you have a friend for life (still do Christmas cards with Johann and Sammi....since 1984) .

9. Rural Poles are the hardest working people I have ever met. Period. And they REALLY hate Germans. Kept getting stopped by the policja in my German rental car in Western Poland on a business trip. Then I taped a paper American flag in the window and all was good!

10 It is amazing how many different vegetables can be pickled.

11. Beer can be made from an awesome variety of sources, most damn good. Except Rauchbier...like drinking a charcoal briquest mixed with a bottle fo liquid smoke.

12. There is Germany and there is Bayern....and never the twain shall meet.

13. The Turks and Egyptians will try to kill you with their coffee.

14. An OSHA inspector would have his head explode within 30 seconds of walking by a workzone in Spain.

15. Canadians are the safest drivers in the world.

16. Except for Quebecois....those guys would make a kamikaze shit himself!

17. Mexicans, Columbians, Venezulans, Guatamalans, Panamanians, Brazilians, etc., all extremely different, unique and diverse cultures....who all do amazing things with corn, beans, rice, peppers and tomatoes....and can be molified about that soccer thing by bringing up baseball.

18. Did I mention every country has some awesome beer?

Stitch
04 Mar 14,, 20:22
Everyone on the freeways are so polite I wondered if you were required to take prozac before driving.

You most obviously have NOT driven in LA during commuter hour (which, in LA, is practically the whole day). Or anywhere else in California, for that matter (yes, the Bay Area is bad, too, but it doesn't hold a candle to LA; as Sammy Hagar so eloquently put it, "What used to take two hours now takes all day, Huh, it took me 16 hours to get to L.A." Also reminds me of the scene in Steve Martin's comedy "LA Story": "Open season on the LA freeway!"). The only place I know of (in CA) where the drivers are "polite" is Willits (look it up).

Bigfella
04 Mar 14,, 20:45
They won't kill you but ticks and chiggers can make you wish you were dead...

Got those too, but not this far south. Our ticks can kill you I'm afraid. Like I say, this place is brutal. :biggrin:

YellowFever
04 Mar 14,, 20:46
You most obviously have NOT driven in LA during commuter hour (which, in LA, is practically the whole day). Or anywhere else in California, for that matter (yes, the Bay Area is bad, too, but it doesn't hold a candle to LA; as Sammy Hagar so eloquently put it, "What used to take two hours now takes all day, Huh, it took me 16 hours to get to L.A." Also reminds me of the scene in Steve Martin's comedy "LA Story": "Open season on the LA freeway!"). The only place I know of (in CA) where the drivers are "polite" is Willits (look it up).


Well, in defense of Pari, he was in Venice so he must've been in traffic on the 405, which is horrible.


On the other hand, he actually liked Venice with all those weirdos so....

Damn, he must've fit right in.

Officer of Engineers
04 Mar 14,, 21:24
16. Except for Quebecois....those guys would make a kamikaze shit himself!We've received an American Colonel arriving in YUL who commented, "we have bumper to bumper traffic too but this is the first time I've seen it at 60 mph."

Parihaka
04 Mar 14,, 21:30
Alas whilst she was uber hot, (think Beyonce but more petite) I was otherwise attached. Stitch, I'm sure you all regard yourselves as hot and heavy on the motorways, but trust me, driving in Wellington or anywhere in NZ would scare your shit white. Imagine loosely sealed goat tracks with a whole lot of nutters who each have their own view on the road code, and who all think they're Sebastian Vettel.

Albany Rifles
04 Mar 14,, 22:09
We've received an American Colonel arriving in YUL who commented, "we have bumper to bumper traffic too but this is the first time I've seen it at 60 mph."

Colonel, where was that wimp from?

Officer of Engineers
04 Mar 14,, 23:02
Colonel, where was that wimp from?Can't remember. That night was kinda of hazy. It was a scotch tasting event in Montreal.

Stitch
04 Mar 14,, 23:10
Can't remember. That night was kinda of hazy. It was a scotch tasting event in Montreal.

Are you sure you were in Montreal?

Officer of Engineers
04 Mar 14,, 23:30
Yes, because our wives were in Ottawa.

Gun Grape
05 Mar 14,, 01:55
Yeah, Texas is probably the most "dangerous" state in the Union; between the rattlers, the fire ants, and the occasional Gila monster, there are more "deadly"animals in Texas than probably all of the other states combined (with the possible exception of Florida; water mocassins, alligators and stingrays). My wife lived in Texas for a while, and the thing she hated the most were the fire ants, because they would actually invade her home during the dry season (which is most of the year in Texas!).

Oh Florida has all the things you mentioned, plus all the things that Texas has (-gila monsters) Black Widows, Brown Recluse Spiders, don't forget the Lion Fish and we have snakes that reach 18ft , 150lbs and eat alligators.

Bigfella
05 Mar 14,, 07:58
Oh Florida has all the things you mentioned, plus all the things that Texas has (-gila monsters) Black Widows, Brown Recluse Spiders, don't forget the Lion Fish and we have snakes that reach 18ft , 150lbs and eat alligators.

You guys would be right at home in Oz.:biggrin: