PDA

View Full Version : Watch out for the other guy



Tamara
04 Feb 14,, 14:23
Monday, when I was pulling out of my home parking lot to get back to the university, the traffic was loaded, but it looked like enough room for the oncoming traffic either to slow down or weave around me.

Get out on the road and the next thing I know a car behind me is slamming on his breaks, close enough to make me curse. I guess for a few critical seconds, he wasn't paying attention to his driving and was busy with something else.

The point is, that is often how people "drive" these days. Not driving but paying more attention to their phones. So we need to be ready for them, give that extra couple of seconds to wait, not rush it because in a perfect world it would work......and the world is so far from perfect.

Something else I need to keep in mind in this college town is at night, people who may be riding bikes are not lit up. So when I am slowed at the yield sign, looking for oncoming lights (and the Charlie behind me is leaning on his horn for me to move), I ought to take a few more moments to see if there are any shadows in the night..............................

..............................as I'm cursing the Charlie (ie, like the bloke in Diamonds are Forever) behind me leaning on his horn.

Doktor
04 Feb 14,, 14:50
Imagine the pain here (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25944792).

sated buddha
04 Feb 14,, 15:59
Imagine the pain here (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25944792).

We use our horns as a means of communication here (better than fists and guns ..... though the former is common as well, and in the bigger cities like Delhi, increasingly the latter). A set of factory fitted horns would typically last around 60,000 kms of road usage before they go bad from overuse and need replacement (I just changed a set on my Suzuki Baleno after around 8 years and 60,000 kms). There is unwritten protocol about what the horn sounds indicate. Two sharp toots means I'm there (FYI), two sharp toots followed a split second later by a longer toot means I'm here and you're in my way, that followed by a really long toot means you're now really pissing me off, or a really long toot is followed by pulling around and obscene hand signals and a discourse on the origins of parentage or otherwise if someone just cut you off, a short toot followed by inching forward till you are a few microns of paint away from the bumper of the guy ahead is customary a few seconds before the light turns green and he's not yet rolling, on the highways and expressways its a toot and a series of double flashes to overtake, followed by leaning on the horn and going on to high beam if the moron is in the fast lane doing 80 and develops deafness and refuses to move (then you pull around him and slow him down to a crawl for the next couple of kms, refusing to let him by till he gets really frustrated and gets a taste of his own medicine - keep metal pipe ready in case this leads to an intersection or toll where both of you need to stop). There's a lot more, but you get the drift.

bonehead
04 Feb 14,, 17:56
We use our horns as a means of communication here (better than fists and guns ..... though the former is common as well, and in the bigger cities like Delhi, increasingly the latter). A set of factory fitted horns would typically last around 60,000 kms of road usage before they go bad from overuse and need replacement (I just changed a set on my Suzuki Baleno after around 8 years and 60,000 kms). There is unwritten protocol about what the horn sounds indicate. Two sharp toots means I'm there (FYI), two sharp toots followed a split second later by a longer toot means I'm here and you're in my way, that followed by a really long toot means you're now really pissing me off, or a really long toot is followed by pulling around and obscene hand signals and a discourse on the origins of parentage or otherwise if someone just cut you off, a short toot followed by inching forward till you are a few microns of paint away from the bumper of the guy ahead is customary a few seconds before the light turns green and he's not yet rolling, on the highways and expressways its a toot and a series of double flashes to overtake, followed by leaning on the horn and going on to high beam if the moron is in the fast lane doing 80 and develops deafness and refuses to move (then you pull around him and slow him down to a crawl for the next couple of kms, refusing to let him by till he gets really frustrated and gets a taste of his own medicine - keep metal pipe ready in case this leads to an intersection or toll where both of you need to stop). There's a lot more, but you get the drift.

Definitely a cultural thing.In the U.S. a short toot is ok in some instances but leaning on the horn without an imminent accident and you are not going to like what the other guy does.

bonehead
04 Feb 14,, 18:01
Monday, when I was pulling out of my home parking lot to get back to the university, the traffic was loaded, but it looked like enough room for the oncoming traffic either to slow down or weave around me.

Get out on the road and the next thing I know a car behind me is slamming on his breaks, close enough to make me curse. I guess for a few critical seconds, he wasn't paying attention to his driving and was busy with something else.

The point is, that is often how people "drive" these days. Not driving but paying more attention to their phones. So we need to be ready for them, give that extra couple of seconds to wait, not rush it because in a perfect world it would work......and the world is so far from perfect.

Something else I need to keep in mind in this college town is at night, people who may be riding bikes are not lit up. So when I am slowed at the yield sign, looking for oncoming lights (and the Charlie behind me is leaning on his horn for me to move), I ought to take a few more moments to see if there are any shadows in the night..............................

..............................as I'm cursing the Charlie (ie, like the bloke in Diamonds are Forever) behind me leaning on his horn.

Sometimes bikers are simply suicidal. You do need to look out for them but when they blow by stop signs/lights and ride at night w/o lights (illegal BTW) you have to wonder if they want to live at all. Just remember that as long as you are driving legally you don't have to let the bully behind you influence you in any way.

sated buddha
04 Feb 14,, 18:27
Definitely a cultural thing.In the U.S. a short toot is ok in some instances but leaning on the horn without an imminent accident and you are not going to like what the other guy does.

You drive per the customs of the place. Even in India, all cities are not alike, and each has a particular "flavor" to its traffic which is a learning curve for someone from outside.

You drive without tooting in India, and its not that you won't like what the other guy does. You will likely be too busy trying not to get run over from behind. I've seen it happen to goody two shoes who wait obediently at the line waiting till the last moment for the lights to turn green. Its really not worth the hassle and the expense.

You don't politely exchange contact details of insurance carriers after a fender bender here. Both parties deal with it themselves, neither wanting the police to get involved.

Stitch
04 Feb 14,, 19:13
You drive per the customs of the place. Even in India, all cities are not alike, and each has a particular "flavor" to its traffic which is a learning curve for someone from outside.

You drive without tooting in India, and its not that you won't like what the other guy does. You will likely be too busy trying not to get run over from behind. I've seen it happen to goody two shoes who wait obediently at the line waiting till the last moment for the lights to turn green. Its really not worth the hassle and the expense.

You don't politely exchange contact details of insurance carriers after a fender bender here. Both parties deal with it themselves, neither wanting the police to get involved.

Sounds like a good place to own an APC . . . . .

chanjyj
04 Feb 14,, 20:25
Sounds like a good place to own an APC . . . . .


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZh5V7vcLLQ

Captain Worley
04 Feb 14,, 21:02
Monday, when I was pulling out of my home parking lot to get back to the university, the traffic was loaded, but it looked like enough room for the oncoming traffic either to slow down or weave around me.

If they have to slow down or weave around you, you should wait to pull out.

Just sayin'...

Doktor
04 Feb 14,, 23:17
Sounds like a good place to own an APC . . . . .

They have horns?

sated buddha
05 Feb 14,, 01:30
I would not like to have one of those things coming up big in my ORVMs man! LOL

Here when tanks come on to our city roads, the tarmac just gets shredded by the tracks, leaving twin zipper like trails behind them.

Sounds pretty refined for a big diesel actually.

chanjyj
05 Feb 14,, 09:54
I would not like to have one of those things coming up big in my ORVMs man! LOL

Here when tanks come on to our city roads, the tarmac just gets shredded by the tracks, leaving twin zipper like trails behind them.

Sounds pretty refined for a big diesel actually.

For it to be road legal they use rubber tracks AFAIK.

lemontree
05 Feb 14,, 11:33
Monday, when I was pulling out of my home parking lot to get back to the university, the traffic was loaded, but it looked like enough room for the oncoming traffic either to slow down or weave around me.

Get out on the road and the next thing I know a car behind me is slamming on his breaks, close enough to make me curse. I guess for a few critical seconds, he wasn't paying attention to his driving and was busy with something else.

The point is, that is often how people "drive" these days. Not driving but paying more attention to their phones. So we need to be ready for them, give that extra couple of seconds to wait, not rush it because in a perfect world it would work......and the world is so far from perfect.


We have enough of those idiots here. You cannot help what others do, I listen to blues to calm me down as it commute daily to work and home.

Doktor
05 Feb 14,, 11:45
We have enough of those idiots here. You cannot help what others do, I listen to blues to calm me down as it commute daily to work and home.

When I was taking driving lessons this was precisely what my instructor told me. Do what you can and don't care for the other people's gesticulations.

Well... sometimes it's stronger then me.

Like that one time when a lady crossed my road when she clearly had no right to do it. She even got out of the car, uber-pissed yelling that the "Triangle was opening for her and therefor she had right of way".

The sign she saw...
35418

Oh well... radio to the max, first gear, gas pedal... solid gone.

Stitch
05 Feb 14,, 17:33
For it to be road legal they use rubber tracks AFAIK.

I know Western armies have rubber cleats on their tank treads just so they DON'T tear up the street; don't know about other nation's tanks, but I suspect they may just be straight-up steel treads with no cleats.

bonehead
05 Feb 14,, 18:10
When I was taking driving lessons this was precisely what my instructor told me. Do what you can and don't care for the other people's gesticulations.

Well... sometimes it's stronger then me.

Like that one time when a lady crossed my road when she clearly had no right to do it. She even got out of the car, uber-pissed yelling that the "Triangle was opening for her and therefor she had right of way".

The sign she saw...
35418

Oh well... radio to the max, first gear, gas pedal... solid gone.

I used to get that all the time when I drove an old Ford F250. You would think it was invisible. I got rear ended 4 times and there was countless times when they would see me coming from a mile away but would sit on some side road and wait until they could pull out right in front of me….making me stand on the brakes. I solved the rear ended problems by installing a 3/16" diamond plate bumper with a hitch made from 3/4" metal. After that people would go un the sidewalk to stop or even opposing traffic but they no longer wanted any part of my rear bumper. I always wanted to put a "cow catcher" on the front of the truck. That way whenever they pull out in front of me, instead of standing on the brakes, I could roll them off the road and into the ditch where they belong.

From what I have seen about driving in India I wouldn't get behind the wheel unless I had a cow catcher on the front of my truck. Oh and a good set of ear plugs.

Tamara
06 Feb 14,, 09:25
We have enough of those idiots here. You cannot help what others do, I listen to blues to calm me down as it commute daily to work and home.

Right now, it's 80's Stevie Nicks for me right now. I had loaded my car up with tapes for a long trip (that I cancelled) and haven't unloaded it yet. And quite frankly, I'm happy that I'm going back to listening to my tapes more in the car instead of the radio.


I used to get that all the time when I drove an old Ford F250. You would think it was invisible. I got rear ended 4 times and there was countless times when they would see me coming from a mile away but would sit on some side road and wait until they could pull out right in front of me….making me stand on the brakes. I solved the rear ended problems by installing a 3/16" diamond plate bumper with a hitch made from 3/4" metal. After that people would go un the sidewalk to stop or even opposing traffic but they no longer wanted any part of my rear bumper. I always wanted to put a "cow catcher" on the front of the truck. That way whenever they pull out in front of me, instead of standing on the brakes, I could roll them off the road and into the ditch where they belong.

From what I have seen about driving in India I wouldn't get behind the wheel unless I had a cow catcher on the front of my truck. Oh and a good set of ear plugs.

My F250 is something else; I'm still learning to drive it. I'm no longer afraid to drive it, am able to use to the mirrors (took a while to get use to them), but I still treat it with a velvet glove, give it a lot of leeway, between how much distance I put between me and others, and how fast I'll push it, let it stay on cruise control.

It is a HUGE thing, at least to me. I suppose it really isn't that big, from the outside, but driving it, feels like it. At stop lights, the car immediately infront of me or behind me can be invisible unless I look for them using the different features of the truck, like it's trailer mirrors for those behind me. (reminds me of a 50's armor commander where one of his tanks was stopped at a RR crossing. A German civilian in a VW parked right behind the tank so to the commander in the turret, it was hidden by the hull. Well, on start up of movement, the tank went half a foot in reverse first.)

It has a huge brush guard up front but so far, a standard bumber. All those accessories we want that we have to find the money and time for.....like finding someway to load the bed of heavy stuff by little ole me. Work out a ramp system? Crane? Learn now to do the trailer since sooner or later, I will probably need that anyhow?

One thing is to have a trailer rig. When my Forester got rear ended a decade ago, they hit the mounted bike rack. I took some body skin damage but that was it, believe the impact on the bike rack transferred the force to the car's towing rig. A woman diver I once worked with commented of a time one of her students was following too close, and there was a squell of tires from them when traffic was suddenly stopped. Right or wrong, she wasn't worried because their impact would have been on her huge mover's towing rig.

I've never hitched the Forester and have yet to put a trailer on the truck but it seems like a wise thing, the towing rig, to have around.

bonehead
06 Feb 14,, 16:31
Right now, it's 80's Stevie Nicks for me right now. I had loaded my car up with tapes for a long trip (that I cancelled) and haven't unloaded it yet. And quite frankly, I'm happy that I'm going back to listening to my tapes more in the car instead of the radio.



My F250 is something else; I'm still learning to drive it. I'm no longer afraid to drive it, am able to use to the mirrors (took a while to get use to them), but I still treat it with a velvet glove, give it a lot of leeway, between how much distance I put between me and others, and how fast I'll push it, let it stay on cruise control.

It is a HUGE thing, at least to me. I suppose it really isn't that big, from the outside, but driving it, feels like it. At stop lights, the car immediately infront of me or behind me can be invisible unless I look for them using the different features of the truck, like it's trailer mirrors for those behind me. (reminds me of a 50's armor commander where one of his tanks was stopped at a RR crossing. A German civilian in a VW parked right behind the tank so to the commander in the turret, it was hidden by the hull. Well, on start up of movement, the tank went half a foot in reverse first.)

It has a huge brush guard up front but so far, a standard bumber. All those accessories we want that we have to find the money and time for.....like finding someway to load the bed of heavy stuff by little ole me. Work out a ramp system? Crane? Learn now to do the trailer since sooner or later, I will probably need that anyhow?

One thing is to have a trailer rig. When my Forester got rear ended a decade ago, they hit the mounted bike rack. I took some body skin damage but that was it, believe the impact on the bike rack transferred the force to the car's towing rig. A woman diver I once worked with commented of a time one of her students was following too close, and there was a squell of tires from them when traffic was suddenly stopped. Right or wrong, she wasn't worried because their impact would have been on her huge mover's towing rig.

I've never hitched the Forester and have yet to put a trailer on the truck but it seems like a wise thing, the towing rig, to have around.



Mine was a beat up 1972 vintage with a 360. Rock solid when I dropped the hammer and cruised well above highway speeds. At speed it rode better than many cars. It gulped gas like an alcoholic at an open bar though. I am guessing yours is a bit newer. Once you start towing you will appreciate the bigger mirrors as they will help you see what is behind you. If you haven't towed yet you have a learning curve ahead of you. Pay attention to the truck first as towing will add some stress to it. Focus on the transmission, brakes, and coolant capacities. The motor and transmission are going to run hotter when towing. If you are lucky your truck already has a towing package so oil coolers and transmission coolers are already installed. You also have a lot more weight to stop so the brakes have to be up to snuff. Many trailers that are made to haul a bunch of weight have their own brakes but you will have to get a device in your truck that modulates the brakes. Then there is the hitch. "Anti sway", "Load equalizing" etc are terms you need to familiarize yourself with. and get what is most appropriate for what you are planing to haul. a "fifth wheel" may be an option as well. Some people really like them but it eats up your bed space. Lastly there is the actual hooking up the bad boy and dragging it all over the county. You learn to take the corners a bit wider and you look ahead more to see if you can actually get in and out of places. I do recommend a small trailer, about the size of a small pick up bed for hauling stinky stuff in. Nothing like hauling manure/fertilizer one day in the bed of the pick up and having that smell follow your truck for the next 3 weeks. Much better to unhitch the trailer somewhere down wind and let the smell fade.

Tamara
07 Feb 14,, 09:28
Mine was a beat up 1972 vintage with a 360. Rock solid when I dropped the hammer and cruised well above highway speeds. At speed it rode better than many cars. It gulped gas like an alcoholic at an open bar though. I am guessing yours is a bit newer. Once you start towing you will appreciate the bigger mirrors as they will help you see what is behind you. If you haven't towed yet you have a learning curve ahead of you. Pay attention to the truck first as towing will add some stress to it. Focus on the transmission, brakes, and coolant capacities. The motor and transmission are going to run hotter when towing. If you are lucky your truck already has a towing package so oil coolers and transmission coolers are already installed. You also have a lot more weight to stop so the brakes have to be up to snuff. Many trailers that are made to haul a bunch of weight have their own brakes but you will have to get a device in your truck that modulates the brakes. Then there is the hitch. "Anti sway", "Load equalizing" etc are terms you need to familiarize yourself with. and get what is most appropriate for what you are planing to haul. a "fifth wheel" may be an option as well. Some people really like them but it eats up your bed space. Lastly there is the actual hooking up the bad boy and dragging it all over the county. You learn to take the corners a bit wider and you look ahead more to see if you can actually get in and out of places. I do recommend a small trailer, about the size of a small pick up bed for hauling stinky stuff in. Nothing like hauling manure/fertilizer one day in the bed of the pick up and having that smell follow your truck for the next 3 weeks. Much better to unhitch the trailer somewhere down wind and let the smell fade.

I'm pretty sure it has the towing package. One of the transmission selections is for more traction when towing. As far as those mirrors go, yes, I've been using them to see who is directly behind me and the long range ones for getting on the highway. It may seem minor use, mirror wise, but as you said, learning curve.

A fifth wheel? Well, I don't quite think I'm going the direction of a goose neck yet......but you never can tell what may be down the road. I think it is a toss up between not liking to be limited.......and finding that what you thought would work isn't enough at all..........or finding out you don't know what you are talking about.

That was one thing, early on in my truck hunting days. I go around, asking about a pickup truck I can put a pallet of bricks in the back of and tow a fork lift on a trailer behind it in order to do it. Only to find out that I didn't really know how fork lifts work, how heavy those things actually are.

Oh, well, live and learn!

Nice advice on the trailer for smelly things. Me, I'm picturing that with a trailer, it will be less complex such as worrying how to lift bricks or furniture or whatever into the back of the truck. Just push it into a trailer instead, push it out.........I suppose I ought to be thinking about at least making a brick drive way on my ranch so I can at least have a place to haul truck and trailer in and out.

Anyhow, part of the plans for the new year, trailer training missions. Rent or borrow (if I am lucky) a trailer for the day, practice using it, rinse, and repeat.

bonehead
07 Feb 14,, 16:46
I'm pretty sure it has the towing package. One of the transmission selections is for more traction when towing. As far as those mirrors go, yes, I've been using them to see who is directly behind me and the long range ones for getting on the highway. It may seem minor use, mirror wise, but as you said, learning curve.

A fifth wheel? Well, I don't quite think I'm going the direction of a goose neck yet......but you never can tell what may be down the road. I think it is a toss up between not liking to be limited.......and finding that what you thought would work isn't enough at all..........or finding out you don't know what you are talking about.

That was one thing, early on in my truck hunting days. I go around, asking about a pickup truck I can put a pallet of bricks in the back of and tow a fork lift on a trailer behind it in order to do it. Only to find out that I didn't really know how fork lifts work, how heavy those things actually are.

Oh, well, live and learn!

Nice advice on the trailer for smelly things. Me, I'm picturing that with a trailer, it will be less complex such as worrying how to lift bricks or furniture or whatever into the back of the truck. Just push it into a trailer instead, push it out.........I suppose I ought to be thinking about at least making a brick drive way on my ranch so I can at least have a place to haul truck and trailer in and out.

Anyhow, part of the plans for the new year, trailer training missions. Rent or borrow (if I am lucky) a trailer for the day, practice using it, rinse, and repeat.

Depending on how far out in the boonies you are some companies will deliver and they have their own forklift. Some tractors like Kubota have forklift attachments as well. I am not fond of gooseneck trailers myself as I use the bed too often for other things but when hitching the trailer solo they do have advantages.

Tamara
07 Feb 14,, 16:52
Depending on how far out in the boonies you are some companies will deliver and they have their own forklift. Some tractors like Kubota have forklift attachments as well. I am not fond of gooseneck trailers myself as I use the bed too often for other things but when hitching the trailer solo they do have advantages.

We-ll, most of the stuff I am currently looking at is free on Craigs List and auctions.....so they don't deliver.

As far as tractors....and Bobcats.....that's another item on my get aquianted list, just not yet.

I can see it now, when I pass on, my heirs are going to have this ranch with all these odds and ends of equipment on it to figure out what to do with it.

bonehead
07 Feb 14,, 18:07
We-ll, most of the stuff I am currently looking at is free on Craigs List and auctions.....so they don't deliver.

As far as tractors....and Bobcats.....that's another item on my get aquianted list, just not yet.

I can see it now, when I pass on, my heirs are going to have this ranch with all these odds and ends of equipment on it to figure out what to do with it.



OK then…I see an orange tractor in your future.


I had a philosophy professor that is doing what you are about to do. He is burying odd items in his dirt basement in the hopes that a thousand years from now archeologist will dig them up and go WTF???? In the mean time he is also acquiring things not normal so when he dies his family will be scratching their heads and thinking they really didn't know him at all.

Tamara
07 Feb 14,, 19:46
OK then…I see an orange tractor in your future.


I had a philosophy professor that is doing what you are about to do. He is burying odd items in his dirt basement in the hopes that a thousand years from now archeologist will dig them up and go WTF???? In the mean time he is also acquiring things not normal so when he dies his family will be scratching their heads and thinking they really didn't know him at all.

An orange tractor? I don't understand.......I think Oliver in "Green Acres" drove a green one.

As far as what I leave behind, I think it is more the odds and ends of my life of things I need that I keep forever. Some of it will be junk to the next person. Others will be antiques and history that they won't know what to do with except possibly sell. And then there will be the things where they find out how far extended I was (at least in my dreams). A small cabin cruiser here, a Piper Cub in a barn there, etc..

Now, as far as my diaries go.........anyone who reads those who doesn't understand that I write in abstract is going to think that I was a fully fledged broom riding witch!

..........................................assuming , that is, that they can read my hand writing.

Stitch
07 Feb 14,, 20:44
An orange tractor? I don't understand.......I think Oliver in "Green Acres" drove a green one.

Orange tractor = Kubota
Green tractor = Deere (John Deere)
Blue tractor = New Holland
Red tractor = Massey-Ferguson (MF for short)

Tamara
10 Feb 14,, 02:00
Orange tractor = Kubota
Green tractor = Deere (John Deere)
Blue tractor = New Holland
Red tractor = Massey-Ferguson (MF for short)

Oh!

That makes a little bit more sense now. One of my girlfriends is also building her ranch in east Texas and she has pics of her orange tractor.

Of course, as things go, are places are just slightly different. Hers is about twice as big, flattish, with more dirt, and a house in place. Mine slopes down to a wet weather creek, a lot of rock, and I'm building from scratch.

Oh, life! Went out taking photos yesterday and while I managed to gather together enough things to be able to do it, took off with less than was comfortable. I think I have 4 camera power cells but could only find 2. As it was, was very conservative on how I took pictures and didn't even exhaust the first one but I would have been more comfortable with 3; had plenty of data cards.

But the thing is, there are so many little components to life and where do we put them all, how do we keep track of them? It is tempting, since there are so many out there, to get another desk...and another....and another, to be able to store them all. They are out there on Craigs List for free.....you just have to come get it. Like this one (http://austin.craigslist.org/zip/4317364406.html). But two things at least. First of all, while I have the truck, there is that question of how to get it in and out. Secondly, where would I put it (and as the little voice would say what do I need another desk for? You already have three!). First desk is a field desk that my parents gave me, then something like a rolltop (but the writing area folds down) desk that I inherited from a grand Aunt, and then my father's huge desk.

True enough, I should manage those spaces better. Before one says that a card catalog would be a great way, those things are expensive auction items these days. I am thinking more, though, of just going with bags, bags, bags. A back pack for the active cameras, camera bags for the older systems, perhaps another camera bag for all those hand held tape recorders, stop watches, and whatever else one uses for testing, etc, etc, etc. There are, though, at least two problems.

First of all, how does one categorize it all and secondly, when something needs to be pulled from the pack for a special purpose (like making voice notes out on a site but not needing a stop watch), how long does it remain "task forced"? Then there are other items as well such as do you keep inventory lists, where do you keep all these bags, boxes, etc, etc, etc.

It's curious. I see all these minimal impact houses, apartments and they are great, I suppose, but these places, those people, have nothing that requires storage. No tools, no books, no pets, no wine, no nothing. They are a counter to the slogan of one of those container stores: Life is Messy! Clean it up!

SIGH....the end of the Sunday rant, we now return you to our regularly scheduled program.

bonehead
10 Feb 14,, 02:20
Oh!

That makes a little bit more sense now. One of my girlfriends is also building her ranch in east Texas and she has pics of her orange tractor.

Of course, as things go, are places are just slightly different. Hers is about twice as big, flattish, with more dirt, and a house in place. Mine slopes down to a wet weather creek, a lot of rock, and I'm building from scratch.

Oh, life! Went out taking photos yesterday and while I managed to gather together enough things to be able to do it, took off with less than was comfortable. I think I have 4 camera power cells but could only find 2. As it was, was very conservative on how I took pictures and didn't even exhaust the first one but I would have been more comfortable with 3; had plenty of data cards.

But the thing is, there are so many little components to life and where do we put them all, how do we keep track of them? It is tempting, since there are so many out there, to get another desk...and another....and another, to be able to store them all. They are out there on Craigs List for free.....you just have to come get it. Like this one (http://austin.craigslist.org/zip/4317364406.html). But two things at least. First of all, while I have the truck, there is that question of how to get it in and out. Secondly, where would I put it (and as the little voice would say what do I need another desk for? You already have three!). First desk is a field desk that my parents gave me, then something like a rolltop (but the writing area folds down) desk that I inherited from a grand Aunt, and then my father's huge desk.

True enough, I should manage those spaces better. Before one says that a card catalog would be a great way, those things are expensive auction items these days. I am thinking more, though, of just going with bags, bags, bags. A back pack for the active cameras, camera bags for the older systems, perhaps another camera bag for all those hand held tape recorders, stop watches, and whatever else one uses for testing, etc, etc, etc. There are, though, at least two problems.

First of all, how does one categorize it all and secondly, when something needs to be pulled from the pack for a special purpose (like making voice notes out on a site but not needing a stop watch), how long does it remain "task forced"? Then there are other items as well such as do you keep inventory lists, where do you keep all these bags, boxes, etc, etc, etc.

It's curious. I see all these minimal impact houses, apartments and they are great, I suppose, but these places, those people, have nothing that requires storage. No tools, no books, no pets, no wine, no nothing. They are a counter to the slogan of one of those container stores: Life is Messy! Clean it up!

SIGH....the end of the Sunday rant, we now return you to our regularly scheduled program.



It kinds of depends on what kind of person you are. You can label each and every bag and note the contents inside Type "A" OCD anal, or you can just throw it all together and pretend its Christmas every time you have to go foraging….more of a type "B" who has all day to find items.

Tamara
10 Feb 14,, 08:33
It kinds of depends on what kind of person you are. You can label each and every bag and note the contents inside Type "A" OCD anal, or you can just throw it all together and pretend its Christmas every time you have to go foraging….more of a type "B" who has all day to find items.

Probably more of a Type C.......for any task at hand, throw this and that bag into the Forester or truck, be able to accomplish the task with bits and pieces from them.

It can't always work like that, such as with the camera. That is one thing that over the decades as gotten increasingly specialized, focused on carrying fewer components. It doesn't seem that long ago to me (but I guess it is since it was 20+ years), but gone is the time of carrying a rucksack full of lenses, housings, flashes....and lots and lots of film! Now, for me, it's one housing, one flash, one lens, and all the rolls have been replaced by 4 data cards. Good thing, too, since when I am taking pictures, I am often in costume or otherwise at a disadvantage to be loaded down with anything but the active rig.

As far as the power cell goes, I guess, SIGH, I'll order another one. They aren't that cheap, sort of like the cost of a good rifle or pistol magazine. Of course, you know what would happen....as soon as I do, when there is no turning back, the other two will show up.

BUT.....this is all rather related to the ranch, anyhow. In that, having around what I need, with enough room to store it, because out in the country, need to be ready, if from odds and ends, to handle just about anything. On that point, there is both a lot of things I need to get......and figure out places to store it. Some can be easy like hose clamps, rubber sheets (my orange tractor girlfriend had a leak in her well piping that might have been fixed by that); others, I might need an infrastructure building, soon, to store it in, like garden and fire hoses.

Oh, details, details, details................

sated buddha
10 Feb 14,, 08:48
I must say that in general cagers like to bash bikers and blame them for all the mayhem on the roads. While in my experience, some of the biggest morons I have encountered on our roads are actually guys in cars rather than on bikes.

Saturday night I was to meet two of my friends at our normal tea place. One of my friends had just bought a new bike. I reach the rendezvous point and do not find them there. Then I get a call from one of my friends (the one with the new bike) to come to xyz place quickly because there's been a crash. Rush to the place to find my other friend sitting on the pavement holding his ankle in pain, his shoes off. The bike does not look too bad (a Ninja 650R - also almost brand new sadly).

Turns out both guys were heading in the direction of the teea place with headlights on and doing slow speeds. A moron in a red Swift FACING in their direction on the opposite side of the road, parked near a cigarette shop, does a sudden sharp U turn right in front of them, in their path. My friend panic braked to avoid T boning the Swift, and low sided, with the 220 kilo bike mashing his ankle As (bad) luck would have it, that night he was not wearing his riding boots (while the two of us were) because he thought it was just a short ride for tea and back.

Managed to get him on behind me and take him to the hospital. X-rays revealed 5 fractured small bones in his foot. We managed to get the major part of the number of the red Swift, and now we are going to hunt him down and make him real sorry he drove like a turd and scrammed after causing the spill.

Tamara
12 Feb 14,, 07:52
Well, that's an act of brilliancy!

As I was coming into work tonight, there in the middle of the road (left turn lane) was a bicyclist walking her bike, no lights on. At least her top was light colored.

I know that some cyclists think the left turn lane is their bike lane (I don't). I know a lot of cyclists don't know the rules of the road (I do).

But this seems like a grand example of "Go ahead, Hit me!".

bonehead
12 Feb 14,, 13:13
I use bikers universally. I don't much care if they are peddle powered or motorized. College towns are usually the worse as those peddling think they are above the rules of the road or simply don't know them but they sure get pissed when they blow by a stop sign and you nearly hit them.