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Tamara
19 Jan 14,, 11:05
I went wine buying yesterday. Wine buying tends to relax me to a degree and it got me out of the house for a while.

We have a liquor outlet around here and yesterday's selection were rather decent. Lots of close outs. Picked up some Texas wines, various French, Spanish, Chilean or Argentinian ones. A case and a few more bottles of a domestic that I found makes a wonderful table red. Three cases, about $122.

One of the French wines I picked up was J.P. Chenet Merlot-Cabernet at $2.50 (in mass, $3.99 for 1 bottle) a bottle. It was .........interesting..........in that it was better than the standard local fare $3.33 bottle types (Cul de Sac and Oak Leaf) but no where near the outlet types of the same price, $3.33, such as Ste. Genevieve and Ryan Patrick Redhead Red.

It's not that it had a bad taste but rather just not impressive at all.

As such, I now have 5 bottles in my "cellar" that will probably only be used when the table wines are depleted and I don't want to open my more expensive wines. They sit on an upper rack, a counter style Pier 1, probably my first rack from long ago that now serves as an overflow, because it was found that it was the only rack they would fit on. It's an odd shaped bottle, like that of brandy, with a huge base.

Oh, well, live and learn and I have found out, no wine is totally worthless. If it is undrinkable, it can always be used for getting burnt food off the bottom of pots.

Doktor
19 Jan 14,, 14:07
You do realize that 99.9% of the wines are not to be cellared?

Even if you do, you have to have right conditions, not the rack in your kitchen.

Tamara
19 Jan 14,, 14:13
You do realize that 99.9% of the wines are not to be cellared?

Even if you do, you have to have right conditions, not the rack in your kitchen.

Well, everything is relative. First of all, my "cellar" are 2 44 bottle racks in the living room.

Secondly, since wine is about the only alcohol I drink, I have around, most of my wine is not destined to be around for years.

Finally, with my bitter palate, the rougher, even if somewhat spoiled, appeal to me.

Doktor
19 Jan 14,, 22:06
You might need the services of these fine men and women...

35196

:rolleyes:

Tamara
05 Feb 14,, 06:52
Well, had some of the J.P. Chenet Merlot-Cabernet today and didn't notice the mediocreness.

Maybe it was a good bottle or I am getting use to it........or perhaps the Gods are playing tricks on me to convince me to go buy a case.

Stitch
05 Feb 14,, 18:20
I don't know if you have this is Texas, but we have a liquor outlet here on the West Coast called BevMo; I know they have a "$0.05 Wine Sale" on a regular basis, you might want to check that out: BevMo! - Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel, Chardonnay, Champagne, Port, Dessert wine (http://www.bevmo.com/Shop/ProductList.aspx/Wine/_/N-13Z8y?DNID=Wine)

Dreadnought
05 Feb 14,, 20:05
Im guessing this rules out Mad Dog, Reunite, Boon Farms and several other brands of Panther Piss.:biggrin:

Stitch
05 Feb 14,, 20:27
Im guessing this rules out Mad Dog, Reunite, Boon Farms and several other brands of Panther Piss.:biggrin:

Along with California favorites Ripple and Thunderbird . . . . . :biggrin:

DOR
06 Feb 14,, 03:25
Tamara,

Try this: open one of the bottles of so-so (red, fairly heavy) wine in the morning, and drink it with dinner. Generally, it will improve the taste by a significant degree.

Tamara
06 Feb 14,, 07:39
Tamara,

Try this: open one of the bottles of so-so (red, fairly heavy) wine in the morning, and drink it with dinner. Generally, it will improve the taste by a significant degree.

Can you keep it in the frig for that? Around here, there are fruit flies and other little buggers.

DOR
07 Feb 14,, 03:23
I've been wanting to say this for a long time . . . (*Ahem*)

Put a cork in it.

Sorry.:biggrin:

Popping the cork and the putting it back in allows enough air in to do the job, particularly after 8-10 hours. If you use a decanter, slip a baggie over the top. I'd only put it in the refrigerator if the house is pretty warm. It slows the process, but over the course of an entire day not too much.

Tamara
07 Feb 14,, 08:53
I've been wanting to say this for a long time . . . (*Ahem*)

Put a cork in it.

Sorry.:biggrin:

Popping the cork and the putting it back in allows enough air in to do the job, particularly after 8-10 hours. If you use a decanter, slip a baggie over the top. I'd only put it in the refrigerator if the house is pretty warm. It slows the process, but over the course of an entire day not too much.

Okay, I'll give it a shot someday.

Stitch
07 Feb 14,, 16:50
I've been wanting to say this for a long time . . . (*Ahem*)

Put a cork in it.

Sorry.:biggrin:

Popping the cork and the putting it back in allows enough air in to do the job, particularly after 8-10 hours. If you use a decanter, slip a baggie over the top. I'd only put it in the refrigerator if the house is pretty warm. It slows the process, but over the course of an entire day not too much.

I believe that's called "letting the wine breathe", correct?

DOR
08 Feb 14,, 07:15
Yes, that's right.