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Albany Rifles
16 May 13,, 21:41
Rather than psoting a bunch of separate threads I figured I would just use this as a catch all.

Today 16 May 1863 was the Battle of Campion's Hill, the largest and bloodiest of the battles of the Vicksburg Campaign.

Battle of Champion Hill - Northern Portion (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/championhill/maps/championhillmap.html)

Doktor
16 May 13,, 21:53
Suggestion: Start a "This day in history" thread.

Albany Rifles
17 May 13,, 14:02
Suggestion: Start a "This day in history" thread.

I'm not that ambitious!!!

Feel free, though!

Albany Rifles
17 May 13,, 14:35
1863 Battle of Bug Black River part of the Vicksburg Campaign. Last battle prior to Confederates pulling back into their defenses.

Battle of Big Black River Bridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Big_Black_River_Bridge)

1864 Battle of Adairsville part of the Atlanta Campaign

Battle of Adairsville - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Adairsville)

Albany Rifles
22 May 13,, 01:28
Shek's Facebook post reminded me to post these amazing photos.

At Massaponax Church in Spotsylvania County Sam Grant has a meeting with his senior officers.

I love the relaxed atmotsphere, and the casual way Grant leans over Meade's back in the second photo to discuss the plan. Also in the first photo Grant is sitting right under the tree between Charles Dana and John Rawlins.

An amazing scene.

3296132962

S2
22 May 13,, 15:10
Commander's call has come a loooong way...

astralis
22 May 13,, 15:54
"now, lt col custer will give a briefing on motorcycle safety, followed by a reminder by our first shirt on sexual assault prevention..."

tuna
22 May 13,, 16:10
"now, lt col custer will give a briefing on motorcycle safety, followed by a reminder by our first shirt on sexual assault prevention..."

And don't forget, we're now entering the "101 Critical Days of Summer"

Officer of Engineers
22 May 13,, 20:11
I blame Powerpoint.

Albany Rifles
23 May 13,, 01:16
Do you think they are addressing drownproofing as they approach the North Anna, Pamunkey, Tottopottamy and the James?

Shek
23 May 13,, 01:44
Do you think they are addressing drownproofing as they approach the North Anna, Pamunkey, Tottopottamy and the James?

No, they're trying to figure out the nearest computer lab so they can complete their online training before the HHC 1SG pulls their pass.

S2
23 May 13,, 01:53
Do you think they are addressing drownproofing as they approach the North Anna, Pamunkey, Tottopottamy and the James?"

Hope they've got it down by that point. OTOH, I'd like to know why the sergeant major or topkick isn't raising hell about officers pulling their heads out of their azzes and dispersing those damned horses? And whose idea was it to hold a staff briefing right next to the trains? And tell that fcukin' mess sergeant to get coffee up here pronto.

That's one slack-azzed bunch of yellow-bellied yanks...:bang:

Albany Rifles
23 May 13,, 03:09
That's one slack-azzed bunch of yellow-bellied yanks...

Who kicked ass as the year ahead would show.

S2
23 May 13,, 03:25
I'm certain you'd not find a greater collection of seasoned, cold-calculating, hard eyed senior officers (and TROOPS) anywhere in the world at that time.

Albany Rifles
23 May 13,, 15:05
I'm certain you'd not find a greater collection of seasoned, cold-calculating, hard eyed senior officers (and TROOPS) anywhere in the world at that time.

Except perhaps for a group bearing down on Atlanta at the same time.

astralis
23 May 13,, 15:26
a great point. some parts of the AOP command structure were quite touchy when Grant (and some of his subordinates from the West) came over; a bad mix of 'What do they know about Bobby Lee' on one side and 'Past Gettysburg, what do they know about WINNING' on the other.

took grant and meade working in conjunction to quiet it down.

doppelganger
23 May 13,, 20:12
I just saw a cool movie on the 54th Massachusetts, the first colored regiment in the Union army, and their assault on Fort Wagner. Amazed how they stand facing each other and coolly firing and getting hit, no cover, standing in plain sight.

I wanted to ask you guys this thing. Dont know if this is a delicate topic. I am a farm boy thousands of miles away so please excuse if it is.

Its been around 150 odd years right? So is there still some invisible tension between the states that were the South versus the Union states? Some no go, no cross lines?

I am asking both from a intra and inter-racial standpoint. Hope that's ok.

Albany Rifles
23 May 13,, 20:28
Battle of Front Royal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Front_Royal)

23 May 1862 was the middle battle in Jackson's Valley Campaign.

3 Years later to the day was the first day of the Grand Review....Army of the Potomac first and the Armies of the West the next day.

Grand Review of the Armies - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Review_of_the_Armies)

The AOP was smart and precise and the AOT/AOG were more ragged and sun burnished but there was much pride for all.

Side note: My beloved VI Corps, AOP, did not participate in the Grand review. They stayed behind in Appomattox to guard all the arms and equipment surrendered by the ANV and made sure all the the paroled soldiers were processed properly. They had a mini review of their own on 23 June 1865.

tbm3fan
23 May 13,, 22:30
I just saw a cool movie on the 54th Massachusetts, the first colored regiment in the Union army, and their assault on Fort Wagner. Amazed how they stand facing each other and coolly firing and getting hit, no cover, standing in plain sight.

I wanted to ask you guys this thing. Dont know if this is a delicate topic. I am a farm boy thousands of miles away so please excuse if it is.

Its been around 150 odd years right? So is there still some invisible tension between the states that were the South versus the Union states? Some no go, no cross lines?

I am asking both from a intra and inter-racial standpoint. Hope that's ok.

There are those from the South that would need to answer you.

From what I have seen and that is there are still those in the South who call those from the North, Yankees, and we are not talking baseball. Yet I have not heard anyone in the North use the term Johnny Reb or Rebels for those from the South.

Maybe in California but I was born in NYC in 1953 and spent the last fours years back east in Maryland from '62-66. While there I did detect and hear certain comments directed towards my family as Yankees especially one directed towards my mother. I understand my mother put that woman in her place after I was out of earshot. No way a New Yorker born and bred is going to keep their mouth shut.

Maryland is also the first place I ever came into contact with a black person. We had a maid come in once a week to clean and her name was Virgie. A very nice woman towards us kids.

Shek
24 May 13,, 01:46
a great point. some parts of the AOP command structure were quite touchy when Grant (and some of his subordinates from the West) came over; a bad mix of 'What do they know about Bobby Lee' on one side and 'Past Gettysburg, what do they know about WINNING' on the other.

took grant and meade working in conjunction to quiet it down.

What is interesting is that it's just after Massapponax that Grant and Meade's staffs have at it, so to speak.

Albany Rifles
24 May 13,, 16:30
What is interesting is that it's just after Massapponax that Grant and Meade's staffs have at it, so to speak.

And just two weeks after Grant sided with Sheridan over Meade on the raid which resulted in Yellow Tavern and the loss of Stuart.

I sometimes wonder of there might have been some different outcomes if Sheridan had been with the AOP as Spotsylvania was ending and could have interposed between Lee and the North Anna....

Albany Rifles
24 May 13,, 16:38
24 May 1861 Union troops occupy Alexandria, resulting in the death of Colonel Elmer Ellsworth commander of the 11th NYVI (Fire Zouaves) when he tore tear down a 1st National Confederate flag from the Marshall House Inn. The innkeeper killed Ellsworth and was immediately shot himself.

24 May 1864 James Ledlie would disgrace himself during the Battle of North Anna. This would not be the last time he would be the cause of the needless death of many Union soldiers.

Albany Rifles
24 May 13,, 16:57
Doppelganger,

There is still a LOT of resentment/tension in some areas and in some population groups.

Follow these 2 blogs to gain insight

DR Brooks Simpson's excellent Crossroads Blog

Crossroads | Where history, scholarship, the academic life, and other stuff meet. (http://cwcrossroads.wordpress.com/)

and Kevin Levin's equally good Civil War Memory Blog

http://cwmemory.com/blog/

But there are huge swaths of our country and population where it barely registers.

astralis
24 May 13,, 17:00
24 May 1864 James Ledlie would disgrace himself during the Battle of North Anna. This would not be the last time he would be the cause of the needless death of many Union soldiers.

when i read his bio several years ago i was outraged across the distance of 150 years. good god, he was -promoted- after he all but murdered the troops under his drunken command, and it took another massive f*ck up at the crater to get him cashiered. i'm surprised one of his troops didn't "accidentally" bump him off either before or after.

Albany Rifles
25 May 13,, 17:31
1862. Stonewall Jackson won the First Battle of Winchester


1863. Congressman Clement Vanlandingham, leader of the Copperheads, was exhiled to the Confederacy.

Albany Rifles
26 May 13,, 18:10
1865 Kirby Smith would surrender the Confederate Trans-Mississippi The formal surrender came on June 2. It was the last major Confederate surrender.

Shek
26 May 13,, 23:56
24 May 1864 James Ledlie would disgrace himself during the Battle of North Anna. This would not be the last time he would be the cause of the needless death of many Union soldiers.

Talk about chance . . . there's no clearer rearing of its ugly head during the saddest affair.

Albany Rifles
28 May 13,, 00:03
1863 Nathaniel Banks begins the siege of Port Hudson.

The Supreme Court issues a decision against Abraham Lincoln regarding the suspension of habeus corpus.

Albany Rifles
29 May 13,, 15:15
1865: President Andrew Johnson proclaims amnesty for most ex-Confederates with an exception for property owners whose holdings total $20,000 dollars.

Doktor
29 May 13,, 15:31
Those would be only one of the exceptions, no?

Albany Rifles
29 May 13,, 19:46
Those would be only one of the exceptions, no?

It also included most senior commanders but they were not granted amnesty immediately. In fact the general officers and colonels captured at Saylors Creek on 6 April 1865 were kept in prison until November of 1865. They had surrendered on the battlefield and were not part of the ANV when it was paroled at ANV.

So senior officers received paroles but not amnesty. They all had to apply for it on a case by case basis.

Albany Rifles
30 May 13,, 15:20
1862 Confederates evacuate Coronth, MS.

1863 In the wake of Stonewall Jackson's death Lee complete's the reorganization of the ANV, with Longstreet retaining the Ist Corps and Richard Ewell and AP Hill being promoted from division commands to command the IInd & IIrd Corps.

Albany Rifles
31 May 13,, 18:53
1862 The Battle of Seven Pines/Fair Oaks, the culminating event of the Union attack (if you want to call the slow pace an attack) up the Peninsula. After this the Confederates would push the AOP back during the Seven Days Battles. The Battle of Seven Pines Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/seven-pines.html)

Albany Rifles
02 Jun 13,, 03:06
1862. Robert Edward Lee took command if the ANV.

1864. The battle of Cold Harbor began.

1864. Sturgis went after Forrest from Memphis.

Albany Rifles
03 Jun 13,, 20:50
1864. The large scale Union assault occurs in the Battle of Cold Harbor.

dave lukins
04 Jun 13,, 00:36
1865: President Andrew Johnson proclaims amnesty for most ex-Confederates with an exception for property owners whose holdings total $20,000 dollars.

What was the reason for that, and why that amount?

Albany Rifles
04 Jun 13,, 01:31
What was the reason for that, and why that amount?

They were the men with the largest plantations and holdings. Once their slaves were gone their worth were based on land and other holdings. It was this group which pushed for seceding in the first place. They had to apply for the parole. Also Johnson grew up dirt poor in the South and he kind of had a special place in his heart for pay back.

Albany Rifles
05 Jun 13,, 17:28
1864 The Battle of Piedmont. The middle battle of the Lynchburg Campaign. David Hunter defeats Grumble Jones.

Battle of Piedmont - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Piedmont)

Albany Rifles
06 Jun 13,, 19:55
1862 The Battle of Memphis. A crushing Union victory which swept the Confederate naval forces from the Mississippi River. Only single vessel raids occurred after that.

Battle of Memphis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Memphis)

Albany Rifles
07 Jun 13,, 16:11
1863. The Battle of Milliken's Bend, part of the Vicksburg Campaign. It wa an attempt by troops of the Department of the Trans-Mississippi to destroy Grant's supply base.

Battle of Milliken's Bend - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Milliken's_Bend)

Albany Rifles
09 Jun 13,, 13:58
1863 The Battle of Brandys Station, the largest cavalry battle I the Western Hemisphere. It was the opening round of the Gettysburg Campaign and was the coming of age for the Union cavalry.

Albany Rifles
09 Jun 13,, 21:47
I also discovered through some research (thanks Eric Wittenberg) that the Union had 2 brigades of Infantry along. They were brigades composed of regiments which were known for their fast marching and hard fighting skills and were formed only for this battle.

Never knew this but it would make sense. A good combined arms fight.

Albany Rifles
10 Jun 13,, 16:21
1864 Forrest defeats Sturgis at the Battle of Brice's Crossroads

The Battle of Brice's Cross Roads Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/brice-s-cross-roads.html)

Albany Rifles
11 Jun 13,, 14:17
1864 Battle of Trevilian Station. Sheridan is not the greatest cavalry commander there ever was and Custer has his First Last Stand.

The Battle of Trevilian Station Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/trevilian-station.html)

Skirmish at Pine Mountain, GA. this was a precursor as Confederate cavalry skirmished with their Union counterparts and allowed the Confederate to establish a defense line. the Battle of Pine Mountain would follow 3 days later.

Albany Rifles
12 Jun 13,, 15:21
1862 JEB Stuart begins his ride around McClellan....which had not great operational impact but made for great press.

Albany Rifles
15 Jun 13,, 21:49
1864.

The IX Corps AOP crosses the James River on a 2100 long float bridge, the longest in warfare and would remain that until WW2. 3 steamers were used to help hold it in place against the current. The AOP would march within a 1/2 mile of my house on the way to Petersburg.

At Petersburg Baldy Smith's corps of the AOJ would conduct the first attack on the city, initiating the 10 month campaign.

Edwin Stanton would sign the order establishing Arlington National Cemetary on the grounds of the R. E. Lee's estate.

Albany Rifles
16 Jun 13,, 16:01
1862 The Battle of Secessionville, SC.

The Battle of Secessionville Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/secessionville.html)

Albany Rifles
18 Jun 13,, 15:23
1864. At Petersburg, Union forces conduct disjointed attacks against the reconstituted Confederate works resulting in high casualties. Perhaps the most infamous was the assault by the 1st Maine Heavy Artillery. The assualt resulted in the greatest single loss of life in a Union regiment to occur in the war, with 7 officers and 108 men killed, and another 25 officers and 464 men wounded. These casualties constituted 67% of the strength of the 900-man force.

Charge of the 1st Maine Heavy Artillery (http://www.civilwar.org/video/charge-of-the-1st-maine-heavy.html)

33162

FYI, Jimmy Blankenship runs the archeology program at Petersburg NBP and also is considered the foremost authority on the US Military Railroads in the ACW.

And he also frequents my favorite bar in Petersburg!

astralis
18 Jun 13,, 18:29
AR,


1st Maine Heavy Artillery.

were these the boys that were originally in the forts protecting DC until Grant had them pulled out for his '64 offensives?

gotta suck to go from a REMF to tip of the front line just like that.

Albany Rifles
18 Jun 13,, 19:37
AR,



were these the boys that were originally in the forts protecting DC until Grant had them pulled out for his '64 offensives?

gotta suck to go from a REMF to tip of the front line just like that.

First Maine Forward: The Battle of Harris Farm Then and Now!!! (http://maineheavies.blogspot.com/2006/05/battle-of-harris-farm-then-and-now.html)

Yup. Their first engagement was the Battle of Harris Farm at the tail end of the Spotsylvania Campaign. They were in a new division formed by the 2nd NY, 4th NY, 7th NY, 8th NY and 1st Massachusetts Maine Heavy Artillery Regiments.

The MA & ME regiments both took veru heavy casualties that day. The 1st ME HA was to have 23 officers KIA, the highest number of any regiment in the ACW.

gunnut
18 Jun 13,, 19:53
I will be at Gettysburg for the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg next week. I don't know anything about the Civil War. Someone help me!!!

Albany Rifles
18 Jun 13,, 22:17
I will be at Gettysburg for the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg next week. I don't know anything about the Civil War. Someone help me!!!

Better you than me!!!!

I am going nowhere near that zoo this year!

Go to civilwar.org, search on Gettysburg and enjoy.

Tons of great info there.

JAD_333
18 Jun 13,, 22:29
Gunnut:

I'll be 20 miles from Gettysburg this weekend (Chambersburg area). I was over at the battlefield a few weeks ago. It's huge. Just be sure you take it all in. Parts you can drive through. Stop often and study the terrain and look at the monuments. In the town of Gettysburg there are some historic places, like the house Lincoln stayed in the night before he gave his Gettysburg address. The local libraries are stuffed with books on the battle.

You won't have time to learn much about the war before next week, but perhaps you can find a book that touches on the main points. Make sure you get a reputable book. There are a lot of bad ones out there.

Albany Rifles
19 Jun 13,, 03:06
Gun nut,

If you can afford it it you may want to get one of these guys.



The Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides (http://www.gettysburgtourguides.org/)

Albany Rifles
19 Jun 13,, 03:12
1863. Grant relieves McLernand

Albany Rifles
19 Jun 13,, 20:03
Gunnut,

This video may help as well.

Minecraft Animation -- The Battle of Gettysburg - YouTube (http://youtu.be/ljOf5ksa_UQ)

Enjoy!

Albany Rifles
19 Jun 13,, 20:12
1862 Lincoln signs a law prohibiting slavery in the Western territories.

1864 The Kearsage sank the Alabama off Cherbourg

Battle of Cherbourg (1864) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Cherbourg_(1864))

gunnut
19 Jun 13,, 20:17
My friend's wife booked us this tour:

Gettysburg Tours - Bus tours from Washington DC to Gettysburg PA (http://www.dctours.us/?event=offer.detail&offerId=3910)

Now I need a crash course on the battle itself. That Minecraft animation should help.

It's pretty amazing what people do with Minecraft. I've seen a full size model of the Starship Enterprise (with corridors to navigate through and working doors) and a scale model of an 8-bit processor (working).

Albany Rifles
19 Jun 13,, 20:57
The Battle of Gettysburg Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/gettysburg.html)

Actually the minecraft was tongue in cheek.

Hit this link instead.

Good tour also.

dave lukins
19 Jun 13,, 23:01
1863. Grant relieves McLernand

An interesting read on Gen Mc. Was he incompetent or was he side tracked?

Albany Rifles
20 Jun 13,, 01:24
Dave he was a politician who was made a general because his influence was useful in raising volunteers. He was not grossly incompetent but his skills were limited to there is the enemy so I will attack. He was no coward but he was a political schemer. He worked behind Grant's back to replace him and gain the political laurels for himself.

Until Vicksburg fell Grant's best friend, after Sherman, was Lincoln. Most knew not to doubt him after that.

Albany Rifles
20 Jun 13,, 16:11
1863. West Virginia became the 35th State....and home to my alma mater!

2 great traditions were born.

This we sing before every home football game...


http://youtu.be/yDYXx1q_YFw

And this what we do when we win a big game!!!


http://youtu.be/q_oQIGSzADw


WVU, where scholars be learnin' and couches be burnin'!

Albany Rifles
21 Jun 13,, 16:36
1863 Heavy skirmishing around Uppersville and Haymarket and Thoroughfare as the 2 armies move northward into Maryland.

JAD_333
21 Jun 13,, 16:47
1863 Heavy skirmishing around Uppersville and Haymarket and Thoroughfare as the 2 armies move northward into Maryland.

I am headed to Dranesville (Great Falls) today, via Upperville, Middleburg, and Aldie. As always I'll be imagining the scene back then.

By the time I get to Aldie, Thoroughfare Rd and Haymarket will be to my southeast, say 15-20 miles. That being the case, the skirmishing must have covered a fairly large area. I haven't exactly pinned down where Lee crossed over the river. Which invasion was afoot on this date? The one that ended at Gettysburg?

Doktor
21 Jun 13,, 17:47
1863. West Virginia became the 35th State....and home to my alma mater!

2 great traditions were born.

This we sing before every home football game...

And this what we do when we win a big game!!!

WVU, where scholars be learnin' and couches be burnin'!

AR,

What is the connection between blazing couches and becoming 35th state?

I tried to google it and only found articles that Morgantown is now considering it a felony.

Albany Rifles
22 Jun 13,, 20:27
AR,

What is the connection between blazing couches and becoming 35th state?

I tried to google it and only found articles that Morgantown is now considering it a felony.


Drunk college students. What can I say?

Albany Rifles
22 Jun 13,, 20:28
1864. The First Battle of Reams Station...the ignoble end to the Wilson-Kautz Raid.

Albany Rifles
23 Jun 13,, 19:19
1863. The Tullahoma Campaign...Rosecrans finest hour.

1865. Stand Watie surrenders in the Oklahoma Indian Territory the last Confederate general officer to surrender in the field.

Albany Rifles
24 Jun 13,, 18:13
1864. Maryland abolished slavery. The Battle of Jerusalem Plank Road ended.

Albany Rifles
26 Jun 13,, 16:17
1862

25 June The Seven Days Campaign begins with the Battle of Oak Grove.

26 June Battle of Beaver Dam Creek. Poor planning and execution has 15,000 Confederates attack dug in Union troops to no avail and high casualties.

1864

25 June Battle of Staunton River Bridge. Part of Wilson-Kautz Raid.

Albany Rifles
27 Jun 13,, 16:11
1862 The Battle Gaines Mills (also called 1st Cold Harbor)

1864 The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain

Albany Rifles
28 Jun 13,, 20:50
1862: Passage of Vicksburg batteries by Flag Officer D.G. Farragut's deep water fleet
1862: Action at Garnett's and Golding's Farms, Virginia
1863: U.S. Maj. Gen. George Meade replaces Joseph Hooker as head of the Army of the Potomac

Albany Rifles
29 Jun 13,, 16:04
1862: Battle of Savage's Station, Virginia

1864: Battle of First Ream's Station

Albany Rifles
30 Jun 13,, 19:15
1862. Battle of Frayser's Farm/Glendale

1863. Battle is Sporting Hill and Hanover as Union and Confederate cavalry skirmished NE of Gettysburg. Buford's Division moves into Gettysburg.

1865. The 8 Lincoln assassination conspirators as convicted.

Albany Rifles
01 Jul 13,, 15:44
1846: 21 Civil War generals graduate from West Point
1862: Battle of Malvern Hill, Virginia
President Lincoln signs the Pacific Railway Act, incorporating the Union Pacific Railroad and subsidizing it with federal funds.

1863: Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania begins

Albany Rifles
02 Jul 13,, 13:05
A very busy date

1861 General Robert Patterson crosses the Potomac at Williamsport, Maryland and moves towards Harpers Ferry.

1862 Earl Van Dorn is given command of the Military District of Mississippi
Morrill Land Grant Act approved by President Lincoln
Lincoln issues a call for 300,000 3-year enlistments

1863 Morgan's raiders cross the Cumberland River near Burkesville, Kentucky
Second day of the Battle of Gettysburg

1864 Joe Johnston evacuates his Kennesaw Mountain position and moves to the Smyrna Line
U. S. Senate grants a charter to the Northern Pacific Railroad

1989 Albany Rifles married the woman of his dreams on a sweltering day in upstate New York.

Doktor
02 Jul 13,, 13:08
1989 Albany Rifles married the woman of his dreams on a sweltering day in upstate New York.

Happy anniversary.

Is it considered a start of the civil war?

Albany Rifles
02 Jul 13,, 13:17
Happy anniversary.

Is it considered a start of the civil war?

More the Entente Cordial.

Doktor
02 Jul 13,, 13:18
Poor neighbors ;)

Albany Rifles
03 Jul 13,, 14:20
1862 Confederate General Sterling Price assumes command of the Army of the West

1863 John Pemberton, commander of Confederate forces at Vicksburg asks Ulysses S. Grant for terms. Grant demands an unconditional surrender. Pemberton refuses. Late in the evening, Grant offers excellent terms and Pemberton accepts.

Day 3 of Gettysburg. Fighting begins before first light and rages for 7 hours on Culp's Hill. Longstreet commands 3 divisions (1 ea from his, Ewell's and Hill's corps) in a failed assault on the Union center. Union cavalry defeats a flanking attempt from Confederate Cavalry 3 miles east of Gettysburg. The hottest day of the year in Pennsylvania would peak at 93 degrees around 3 PM; violent thunderstorms would lash the field starting in early evening and last for over a day.

Albany Rifles
04 Jul 13,, 14:44
1863. Under the cover of rain Lee begins moving his army through the hills southwest of Gettysburg heading towards the Potomac at Westport.

After a 45 day siege John Pemberton surrenders Vicksburg and the Army of Mississippi to US Grant and the Army of the Tennessee. Recognizing that moving 29000 prisoners north by ship would tie up too much shipping he paroles the AoM. When they are exchanged a month later 40% of the Confederates had deserted.

Albany Rifles
05 Jul 13,, 14:53
1863 Gettysburg Campaign. Union and Confederate cavalry spar in the hills to the Southwest of Gettysburg in the battles of Monterey Pass and Smithsburg. Keystone civilians attack Imboden's supply wagons with axes to destroy the wheels and slow the retreat. Sedgwick's VI Corps begins tom attack the rear guard of the ANV.

Vicksburg Campaign. Sherman begins heading east with 2 corps to run down Johnston's forces in the Jackson Expedition. Skirmish at Birdsong Ferry, MS.

Albany Rifles
06 Jul 13,, 14:30
1863 Skirmishing near Willaimsport and Hagerstown, MD.

Albany Rifles
07 Jul 13,, 17:36
1862 Battle of Hill's Plantation, Arkansas

1863 Federal troops sack Brierfield, the plantation home of Jefferson Davis

Braxton Bragg completes his withdrawal from Tullahoma to Chattanooga

1864 Congress appropriates $2 million for restoration of Ford's Theater

1865 Secretary of War Edwin Stanton orders Union troops to stand guard at Ford's Theater to prevent it from reopening following the assasination of President Lincoln

Conspirators Lewis Payne, George A. Atzerodt, David Herold and Mary Surratt are hung in Washington, D. C. for the assassination of President Lincoln

Doktor
07 Jul 13,, 17:53
1864 Congress appropriates $2 million for restoration of Ford's Theater

1865 Secretary of War Edwin Stanton orders Union troops to stand guard at Ford's Theater to prevent it from reopening following the assasination of President Lincoln

Why 3 months later? Why Union troops were needed to prevent it from opening?
On a side note, I assume $2mn were a hell lot of money back then.

JAD_333
08 Jul 13,, 05:23
Why 3 months later? Why Union troops were needed to prevent it from opening?
On a side note, I assume $2mn were a hell lot of money back then.

Secretary of War Stanton didn't want the theater to reopen. I guess the symbolism disturbed him. The government ended up buying Ford's about a year later and converted it to offices.

I think Albany got the year of the $2 million appropriation from a timeline that is in error. The appropriation was made in 1964 not 1864.

Albany Rifles
08 Jul 13,, 16:36
I think Albany got the year of the $2 million appropriation from a timeline that is in error. The appropriation was made in 1964 not 1864.

That would be correct.

Damn....something on the internet was wrong!

Who would believe it!

Albany Rifles
08 Jul 13,, 16:47
1862 Abraham Lincoln visits with George McClellan at Harrison's Landing

1863 After hearing about the fall of Vicksburg, Confederate forces begin to negotiate for the surrender of Port Hudson. The surrender occurs the next day, giving the Union control of the Mississippi.

1864 Army of the Ohio under General John Schofield [US] crosses the Chattahoochee River at Sope (Soap) Creek

1865 John T. Ford agrees to lease Ford's Theater to the War Department

Doktor
08 Jul 13,, 17:10
That would be correct.

Damn....something on the internet was wrong!

Who would believe it!

Lincoln would! I believe it was your sig :)

Albany Rifles
10 Jul 13,, 17:36
1863 Action at Falling Waters, Maryland
Siege of Fort Wagner, Charleston Harbor, South Carolina begins

Albany Rifles
11 Jul 13,, 20:26
1861 Engagement at Rich Mountain, Virginia (now West Virginia)
1862 Henry Halleck named General-In-Chief. Lincoln finds his paperpusher.
1863 First assault on Fort Wagner, South Carolina
1864 Jubal Early's Raid and the Battle of Fort Stevens Note: The 43rd NYVI would lose their regimental commander and XO and 3 company commanders KIA that day. Every field grade officer in 3rd Brigade, 2d Division, VIth Corps AOP would become a casualty that day. They fought under the eyes Lincoln on that day.
Battle of Fort Stevens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Stevens)

Albany Rifles
12 Jul 13,, 13:05
1862: Morgan's Confederate raiders capture Lebanon, KY on their first raid
1864: Early's raid of Fort Stevens, DC continues. Early would withdraw early in the AM of 13 July.

Triple C
12 Jul 13,, 18:53
Belated question about McClernand, hope it doesn't count as derailing your thread.

Grant really despised him. According to Grant McClernand couldn't do anything right. Grant put the blame for tactical setbacks in Ft. Donelson and Champion Hill on him. Was that justified or Grant playing the military politician?

Albany Rifles
15 Jul 13,, 02:50
1862 Secession of the western counties of Virginia recognized by senate as state of WV
1863 The last of the ANV crosses the Potomac marking the end of the Gettysburg Campaign.
1864 Battle of Tupelo (Harrisburg), Mississippi

Albany Rifles
15 Jul 13,, 03:07
Belated question about McClernand, hope it doesn't count as derailing your thread.

Grant really despised him. According to Grant McClernand couldn't do anything right. Grant put the blame for tactical setbacks in Ft. Donelson and Champion Hill on him. Was that justified or Grant playing the military politician?

Grant was hardly a perfect man. He did despise McClernand...but McClernand gave him plenty of reason. If you see the line up of forces and the execution of the Vicksburg Campaign you begin to realize that McClernand was the first to believe in Grant's scheme and the most vigorous in prosecuting it. He was baulky at Champions Hill...but I have stood on the ground and I am not surprised. While not brilliant McClernand did win at Grand Gulf,

What upset Grant was McClernand went behind Grant's back, something he specifically forbade. So like so many others Grant put up with McClernand as long as he served Grant's purposes. Once he became too much of a burden, he was jetisoned. He would do the same to Butler a year later.

As most of the professionals felt (and there is no doubt Grant was a professional) Grant shared his peers belief that the political generals were next to useless tactically but useful in raising troop....that was the name of the game. In fact the only political general he ever gave much credence to was Black Jack Logan...but Logan had been proving it on the battlefield since Shiloh.

And don't worry about thread jacking...I am trying to encourage discussion by informing.

Albany Rifles
15 Jul 13,, 18:49
1862: CSS Arkansas sorties from Yazoo River and passes the combined Union fleets

Albany Rifles
16 Jul 13,, 18:11
1862 Confederate representative meets with Napoleon III of France to discuss foreign aid.

1864 General Jubal Early leaves Leesburg and heads west to the Shenandoah Valley.

Albany Rifles
18 Jul 13,, 16:45
1863. The 2d Battle of Fort Wagner, SC.

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1864. The Battle of Cool Springs, VA.

dave lukins
18 Jul 13,, 16:52
Stunning! Great workmanship

Albany Rifles
18 Jul 13,, 18:46
Stunning! Great workmanship

Dave,

Here is the story.

story - (http://www.nps.gov/resources/story.htm?id=202)

I remember my Dad showing it to me as a child....and revisit whenever I can.

Albany Rifles
19 Jul 13,, 15:08
1863 The Battle of Buffington Island, Ohio Morgan is badly hammered trying to cross the Ohio River. He would lose almost 70% of his command.

Battle of Buffington Island - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Buffington_Island)

dave lukins
19 Jul 13,, 15:50
Dave,

Here is the story.

story - (http://www.nps.gov/resources/story.htm?id=202)

I remember my Dad showing it to me as a child....and revisit whenever I can.

Thanks for that AR. ''The Robert Gould Shaw Memorial remains one of sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens' most stirring and celebrated masterpieces and is considered by some to be America's greatest public monument.'' ... Of that there can be little doubt.

astralis
20 Jul 13,, 02:37
that's one of my favorite memorials, and absolutely touching. i'm not ashamed to admit that Glory brought a tear to the eye!

for me, this represented a signal moment in history, where the best aspects and impulses of the Enlightenment tradition overwhelmed the autocratic, malign influence of the mid-Atlantic slave trade tradition.

Albany Rifles
21 Jul 13,, 16:12
And it begins....


1861: War's first major battle erupts at Manassas (Bull Run), VA

The Battle of Bull Run Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/bullrun.html)

1863: Cavalry clash along many gaps in the Manassas?Bull Run ountains as Lee hurries to interpose the ANV between the AOP & Richmond.

1864: Union forces under Frank Blair seize Bald Hill and Federal forces observe Atlanta proper for the first time since the war began.

Albany Rifles
22 Jul 13,, 17:47
1861 George B. McClellan ordered to Washington to take command of the Army of the Potomac following the defeat at Bull Run.
In a proclamation, Jefferson Davis accepts Tennessee as a member of the Confederacy

1862 President Lincoln presents his Emancipation Proclamation to his Cabinet. William Seward recommends waiting until a victory to present it to the public.

1864 Battle of Atlanta Hood's Second Sortie Major General William Hardee hits James McPherson's line from the south while Major General B. F. Cheatham attacks his corps along its wide front. In spite of McPherson's death the Union wins the battle.

Albany Rifles
24 Jul 13,, 16:52
I was too ill yesterday to post but I need to add for 23 July

1885 Sam Grant passes away from throat cancer in Wilton, NY


1864 Second Battle of Kernstown, Virginia

Albany Rifles
06 Aug 13,, 17:12
Between leave, furlough and Lyme Disease I've been remiss.

Today.

1861 Second Session of the Second Wheeling Convention is called to order.

1862 CSS Arkansas scuttled near Baton Rouge, Louisiana

1864 CSS Tallahassee departs Wilmington, North Carolina on a 3-week cruise

Albany Rifles
07 Aug 13,, 18:44
1864 Cavalry Engagement at Moorefield, West Virginia. Averell's Union cavalry smashed a Confederate force twice his size. This was the last action of Early's Raid Campaign. Early lost most of his cavalry in this battle which was to greatly hamper Confederate efforts in the coming Valley Campaign.

Doktor
07 Aug 13,, 21:13
Not one fight for over two weeks?

I am teasing, just glad you are better.

M551
08 Aug 13,, 03:36
Isn't today the day Mobile Bay fell?

Albany Rifles
09 Aug 13,, 03:14
1863. After the debacle at Gettysburg Lee offers to resign as a commander ANV

Albany Rifles
09 Aug 13,, 14:37
1862 The Battle of Cedar Mountain. The Northern Virginia Campaign opens The Battle of Cedar Mountain Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/cedar-mountain.html)

A photo of my battlefield touring buddy and yours truly at Cedar Mountain Battlefield last May

33564



1864 An explosion at City Point, Virginia is caused by a Confederate time bomb placed aboard a Union ammunition ship. 43 killed 126 wounded and an unknown number of freed blacks and other workers are vaporized. Through it all Grant maintained his composure. Within a week the Union has rebuilt all facilities and operations are back to normal. Military History Online (http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/civilwar/articles/citypoint.aspx)

Albany Rifles
10 Aug 13,, 13:59
1861 Battle of Wilson's Creek/Oak Hill, MO. Based on the number of combatants it would be a bloodier fight compared to the fight at First Manassas/Bull Run fought 3 weeks earlier.

The Battle of Wilson's Creek Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/wilson-s-creek.html)

Albany Rifles
11 Aug 13,, 16:46
1862 The First Battle of Independence, MO

First Battle of Independence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Battle_of_Independence)

Albany Rifles
13 Aug 13,, 19:32
1862 Battle of Little Creek, MO. Battle of Yellow Creek (1862) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Yellow_Creek_(1862))

Albany Rifles
17 Aug 13,, 20:29
1861. George Thomas is appointed to BG of Volunteers. (Well look at that reward for loyalty!)

1862. JEB Stuart is appointed commander of cavalry for the ANV.

1863. A 200 pound Parrot rifle dubbed The Swamp Angel opens fire on FT Sumter and reduced it to rubble within days.

Albany Rifles
18 Aug 13,, 18:43
1863 The Great Sioux Uprising begins in Minnesota

1864 The Battle of Weldon Railroad/Globe Tavern begins as part of the Petersburg Campaign

Albany Rifles
21 Aug 13,, 21:27
August 21, 1862 Braxton Bragg crosses the Tennessee River at Chattanooga to start his Invasion of Kentucky

August 21, 1863 The Confederate Navy attempts to attack the USS New Ironsides with a torpedo from the four-man vessel the CSS David. The attack is ineffective

August 21, 1863 Quantrill's Raiders, now numbering more 400, attack Lawrence, Kansas, killing every male they could find who was old enough to carry a gun (a total of 183 men). One they missed was U. S. Senator James H. Lane, who hid in a cornfield in his nightshirt. Quantrill's men burned the town following the raid

August 21, 1864 Forrest liberates Memphis Almost 2,000 Confederates occupied Memphis for a few hours during the day, nearly capturing Major Generals Stephen Hurlbut and C. C. Washburn. The raid forced troops operating in the area to withdraw to Memphis, giving Forrest free reign to raid William Tecumseh Sherman's supply lines

JAD_333
22 Aug 13,, 00:18
View from the bureaucrat:



A Rebel War Clerk’s Diary, August 1863

August 21, 2013

A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital, By John Beauchamp Jones

by John Beauchamp Jones

AUGUST 21ST, FRIDAY.—This is a day appointed by the President for humiliation, fasting, and prayer. Yet the Marylanders in possession of the passport office report the following in the Dispatch of this date:

“Passports.—The passport office was besieged yesterday and last night by large crowds of persons soliciting permission to leave the city, in order that some relaxation might be had from its busy scenes. Among those who obtained them were His Excellency Jefferson Davis and his Honor Joseph Mayo, both designing to pay a short visit to the neighboring County of Chesterfield.”

We fast, certainly—and feel greatly humiliated at the loss of New Orleans and Vicksburg—and we pray, daily.

Yesterday Fort Sumter suffered much from the enemy’s batteries, and much apprehension is felt for its fate.

Gen. Lee, it is said, is not permitted to follow Meade, who is retrograding, being weakened by detachments. A few weeks hence the fall campaign will open in Virginia, when the very earth may tremble again with the thunders of war, and the rivulets may again spout human blood.

There were no letters to-day, for the reason that last night the clerks in the post-office resigned, their salaries not being sufficient to support them. I hope a force will be detailed, to-morrow, to distribute the letters.

I met Prof. A. T. Bledsoe to-day as he was ambling toward the passport office. He said he was just about to start for London, where he intended publishing his book—on slavery, I believe. He has a free passage on one of the government steamers, to sail from Wilmington. He asked me if I fasted to-day; I answered yes, as usual! He then bid me good-by, and at parting I told him I hoped he would not find us all hanged when he returned. I think it probable he has a mission from the President, as well as his book to publish. Daily Observations from The Civil War (http://dotcw.com/)

I didn't know people needed passports to move around in the CSA.

To think that this picture of disintegration was recorded almost 2 years before Lee's surrender...

Albany Rifles
22 Aug 13,, 02:31
JAD,

AWESOME contribution to this thread!!!

And yes civil liberties were not greatly enjoyed in the Confederacy. It was intended to prevent intelligence gathering and also to restrict movements of free blacks.

Albany Rifles
22 Aug 13,, 21:28
1831 21 & 22 AUG Nat Turner's Rebellion

1862 Cavalry Skirmish at Catlett's Station, later site of the Battle of Auburn during Gettysburg Campaign.

Albany Rifles
23 Aug 13,, 18:52
1864 After 18 days Mobile Bay,AL falls to Union forces with the fall of Fort Morgan The Battle of Mobile Bay Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/mobile-bay.html)

Albany Rifles
24 Aug 13,, 15:52
1861 James Mason and John Slidell are appointed commissioners to GB & FR by the CSA.

Albany Rifles
26 Aug 13,, 03:55
1864. The Second Battle of Reams Station

Doktor
26 Aug 13,, 04:31
1831 21 & 22 AUG Nat Turner's Rebellion

Is this considered part of ACW?

Triple C
26 Aug 13,, 12:19
No, but it is often thought of as a catalyst of the ACW. Turner's Rebellion showed the fragility of the system of slavery and caused it to harden. For example,Manumission (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manumission) was virtually eliminated, and if memory serves, there was an increasing trend to portray slavery as a positive good in Southern discourse.

Albany Rifles
26 Aug 13,, 17:27
1861 General Benjamin Butler leads a successful amphibious landing on Cape Hatteras

1862 Fitzhugh Lee captures the rail depot at Manassas Junction setting in motion a chain of events that culminate in Second Manassas

Albany Rifles
26 Aug 13,, 17:27
Is this considered part of ACW?

Threw that up as a result of my George Thomas discussion.

Albany Rifles
28 Aug 13,, 16:32
1861: Capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark, North Carolina
Ulysses S. Grant is given command of federal forces in Southern Illinois and Southeastern Missouri

1862: Battle of Brawner's Farm (Groveton), Virginia

Brawner's Farm - August 28, 1862 (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/secondmanassas/maps/brawners-farm-map.html)

Braxton Bragg leaves from north of Chattanooga, heading to join Kirby Smith in Kentucky as part of his Kentucky Campaign. It would culminate at Perryville.

1864: 60,000 Union troops are moving south, west of Atlanta to Jonesboro, Georgia, trying to outflank John Bell Hood and cut the Macon and Western Railroad.

Albany Rifles
29 Aug 13,, 14:33
1862 The Battle of Second Manassas/Bull Run begins The Battle of Second Manassas Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/second-manassas.html)

NOTE: National Guard units which have lineage and honors tied to units which COnfederate heritage fly this streamer on their unit colors:

33707

There is no 2nd Bull Run Union streamer. Units with that lineage are credited with either a Valley 1862 or Antietam 1862 streamer and the blue band is over the gray band.

Albany Rifles
30 Aug 13,, 17:50
1861 John Fremont seizes Comfederate slaves in Missouri in violation of Federal law.

1862 Culminating battle of Second Manassas. FitzJohn Porter's corps is shattered by Longstreet's flank attack. Longstreet 28000 men is the largest assault in the history of the Western Hemisphere.

Kirby Smith defeats Bull Nelson at Richmond, KY as the Confderates head northward in the Kentucky Campaign.

1864. Sherman's shift of troops towards the Macon RR causes Hood to shift Cleburne's corps to the SE to cover the line.

dave lukins
30 Aug 13,, 22:11
1861 John Fremont seizes Comfederate slaves in Missouri in violation of Federal law.

1862 Culminating battle of Second Manassas. FitzJohn Porter's corps is shattered by Longstreet's flank attack. Longstreet 28000 men is the largest assault in the history of the Western Hemisphere.

Kirby Smith defeats Bull Nelson at Richmond, KY as the Confderates head northward in the Kentucky Campaign.

1864. Sherman's shift of troops towards the Macon RR causes Hood to shift Cleburne's corps to the SE to cover the line.

I like reading between the lines and finding classic snippets such as this : Confiscation Act ''This Act has been widely criticized due to the contradiction it creates. By defining slaves as contraband property that has been confiscated by the United States government, the US government then is considered to be retaining slaves. However, slavery being illegal in the North, the government cannot own slaves, and therefore they can no longer be considered contraband.''

JAD_333
30 Aug 13,, 23:25
I like reading between the lines and finding classic snippets such as this : Confiscation Act ''This Act has been widely criticized due to the contradiction it creates. By defining slaves as contraband property that has been confiscated by the United States government, the US government then is considered to be retaining slaves. However, slavery being illegal in the North, the government cannot own slaves, and therefore they can no longer be considered contraband.''

Dave: Most Northern states banned slavery in their respective states. There was no national ban at the time, nor could there be as the Federal government had no power under the Constitution to ban slavery anywhere. However, slaves encountered by the Union forces in rebellious states could be classified as contraband because they were still legal property, albeit of the enemy. Keep in mind that states on the Union side like Maryland and Delaware where slavery was legal never had their slaves confiscated, and those were only freed when the 13th Amendment was passed.

Albany Rifles
31 Aug 13,, 13:32
1861 Samuel Cooper, Robert E. Lee, Albert Sidney Johnston, Joseph E. Johnston and P. G. T. Beauregard are promoted to full general.

1864 Battle of Jonesboro (Jonesborough), Georgia In the final battle of the Atlanta Campaign, General William Hardee [CS] attacks O. O. Howard's [US] Army of the Tennessee west of the city of Jonesboro. North of the battle John Schofield cut the Macon and Western at Rough and Ready and Hood's Army was in jeopardy. The battle was joined the second day by large numbers of Union troops. Hardee withdraws at nightfall to join Hood at Lovejoy Station

The Battle of Jonesborough Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/jonesborough.html)

George McClellan nominated for President at the Democratic Party Convention in Chicago

dave lukins
31 Aug 13,, 19:35
Dave: Most Northern states banned slavery in their respective states. There was no national ban at the time, nor could there be as the Federal government had no power under the Constitution to ban slavery anywhere. However, slaves encountered by the Union forces in rebellious states could be classified as contraband because they were still legal property, albeit of the enemy. Keep in mind that states on the Union side like Maryland and Delaware where slavery was legal never had their slaves confiscated, and those were only freed when the 13th Amendment was passed.

Thanks for that Jad. It's the thought that anyone can be classed as 'contraband' ... smuggled goods illegal goods yes, but human beings? It's quite shocking to class people as goods and chattels.

JAD_333
31 Aug 13,, 20:58
Thanks for that Jad. It's the thought that anyone can be classed as 'contraband' ... smuggled goods illegal goods yes, but human beings? It's quite shocking to class people as goods and chattels.

Dave, I completely agree with you. Sometimes injustices arise out of scrupulous adherence to the law. In this case it was the social contract, the Constitution, which Lincoln had sworn to uphold (no matter how fishy part of it stunk). Anyway he got it changed in proper form.

Albany Rifles
01 Sep 13,, 20:03
1862: Battle of Chantilly (Ox Hill), Virginia

The Battle of Chantilly Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/chantilly.html)

1863: Battle of Devil's Backbone (Backbone Mountain)

Battle of Devil's Backbone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Devil's_Backbone)

1864: Confederates evacuate Atlanta, Georgia

Albany Rifles
01 Sep 13,, 20:06
Dave, also recall that accoding to the Constitution each slave counted as 3/5ths of a human being for population purposes to determine Congressional districts.

It was not rescinded until the 13th & 14th Amendment after the ACW.

dave lukins
01 Sep 13,, 23:38
It's just astonishing in the cold light of day how one set of human beings classed another set of human beings even down to not classing one set as a whole being.

JAD_333
02 Sep 13,, 05:45
It's just astonishing in the cold light of day how one set of human beings classed another set of human beings even down to not classing one set as a whole being.

Oddly enough it was the non-slave states that struck that compromise. They wanted to limit the slave states population count, which, as Albany pointed out, was the basis of determining the number of representatives states could have in the House of Representatives. If every slave counted as one person in the census, the slave states would have more representatives.

It wasn't, so far as I understand, a matter of evaluating the black race compared to the white race.

When it came to the intrinsic value of coloreds, southerners and to a lesser extent northerners, considered them totally inferior to whites.

Albany Rifles
03 Sep 13,, 16:06
To add a bit more to the discussion, the word slave is not mentioned in the Constitution until the 13th Amendment.

Under the Articles of Confederation each state had a vote. At the Constitutional Convention Edmund Randolph of Virginia laid out the Virginia Plan which proposed voting density based on population. This made sense to Virginia as it was the most populous states. However if only whites were counted Pennsylvania was almost as populous as Virginia. To move the plan forward a delegation proposed the slave population would count as 3/5s of a person when determining population. While it seemed as a way ahead Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts sneeringly replied

"Blacks are property, and are used to the southward as horses and cattle to the northward; and why should their representation be increased to the southward on account of the number of slaves, than horses or oxen to the north?"

Eventually compromise was reached....but that is what our Constitution is, one Grand Compromise.

For more on this topic;

Garrison's Constitution (http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2000/winter/garrisons-constitution-1.html)

Albany Rifles
03 Sep 13,, 16:58
1861: Confederate troops enter Kentucky, ending the state's neutral status

1862: Confederate forces under Braxton Bragg capture Frankfurt, the capital of Kentucky

1863: Lord Russell orders two ironclad Laird Rams bound for the Confederacy to be detained

Albany Rifles
04 Sep 13,, 14:49
1864: John Hunt Morgan is shot dead by Federal troops fleeing the home of a woman who had betrayed him

Albany Rifles
05 Sep 13,, 15:42
1862: Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia enters Maryland

Ton's of info on South Mountain & the Antietam Campaign to be found here

Battle Search Results (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/battle-search-results.html?state=MD)

And here

Antietam National Battlefield - Antietam National Battlefield (http://www.nps.gov/ancm/index.htm)

JAD_333
05 Sep 13,, 17:09
1862: Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia enters Maryland

I thought they started yesterday. They'd still be crossing over today, so I guess you're right. :)

JAD_333
05 Sep 13,, 17:20
The Battle of Antietam begins in 2 weeks. I've been passing the battlefield every week for the last 6 months while traveling back and forth between Winchester and Chambersburg. I took a detour off 81 through Williamsport the other day. Not much to see there on a drive thru. I think I'll stop at the battlefield on my next trip.

Albany Rifles
05 Sep 13,, 19:10
The Battle of Antietam begins in 2 weeks. I've been passing the battlefield every week for the last 6 months while traveling back and forth between Winchester and Chambersburg. I took a detour off 81 through Williamsport the other day. Not much to see there on a drive thru. I think I'll stop at the battlefield on my next trip.

JAD, if you get a chance head east on Old US 40...you come out on the South Mountain battlefield. Nice interpretation doen their as well.

Antietam is one of my favorite eastern battlefields of the ACW. You can stand behind the visitors center and see almost all of the relevant parts of the battlefield less Burnside Bridge.

JAD_333
05 Sep 13,, 19:46
JAD, if you get a chance head east on Old US 40...you come out on the South Mountain battlefield. Nice interpretation doen their as well.

Antietam is one of my favorite eastern battlefields of the ACW. You can stand behind the visitors center and see almost all of the relevant parts of the battlefield less Burnside Bridge.


I might just do that. Thanks.

JAD_333
05 Sep 13,, 20:24
Diehards.

Ku Klux Klan Plans Rally At Antietam National Battlefield CBS Baltimore (http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2013/09/03/klan-plans-rally-at-antietam-national-battlefield/)

Albany Rifles
05 Sep 13,, 21:57
Diehards.

I would say douchebags.

They do not represent the bravery of the soldiers of the ANV.

JAD_333
06 Sep 13,, 03:38
I would say douchebags.

They do not represent the bravery of the soldiers of the ANV.

No, they don't.

They already did their part in scuttling reconstruction. BTW, I'm reading a new book called Ecstatic Nation by Brenda Wineapple, which covers the period 1848-1877. Book review: ‘Ecstatic Nation: Confidence, Crisis, and Compromise, 1848-1877’ by Brenda Wineapple - Books - The Boston Globe (http://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/books/2013/08/17/book-review-ecstatic-nation-confidence-crisis-and-compromise-brenda-wineapple/rPEd40dBkX3NVpko4kPwQO/story.html)

I can't stack it up against other books on the post-war period, but it's an interesting read. What books on the period would you recommend?

Albany Rifles
07 Sep 13,, 15:55
1864: Sherman orders the evacuation of Atlanta

USS Wachusett captures CSS Florida at Bahia, Brazil

Albany Rifles
09 Sep 13,, 16:07
Busy day

1862 Skirmish at Barnesville, Maryland

General Robert E. Lee issues Special Order No. 191

1863 The Federal Army of the Cumberland enters Chattanooga, Tennessee

Brigadier General John W. Frazier surrenders his men guarding the Cumberland Gap to Union forces

Longstreet's Corps leaves Virginia to reinforce Braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee in NW Georgia

Albany Rifles
10 Sep 13,, 13:54
1861 George Thomas ordered to relieve Bull Nelson at Camp Dick Robinson. General Nelson is ordered to Eastern Kentucky.

Battle of Carnifax Ferry General William Rosecrans defeats General John Floyd

Jefferson Davis places Albert Sidney Johnston in command of the Confederate West ("Department Number Two").

1863 Battle of Davis Crossroads

Battle of Bayou Forche, Arkansas

1864 Joe Wheeler returns to Confederate lines following a raid into North Georgia


And with that I will be off posting until 19 SEP (Chickamauga battle start anniversary).

I am heading to upstate New York and Ontario to do a War of 1812 Tour.

Anyone else feel free to post away in my absence...or even when I am here!

Albany Rifles
18 Sep 13,, 21:25
And we are back...

So what are some key events wich occurred in my absence?

Well there was the Antietam Campaiogn of 1862...Antietam: A Savage Day In American History : NPR (http://www.npr.org/2012/09/17/161248814/antietam-a-savage-day-in-american-history) and The Battle of Antietam Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/antietam.html?tab=facts)

In 1864 as part of the Petersburg Campaign there was the Beefsteak Raid...14-17 SEP Beefsteak Raid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beefsteak_Raid)

My son went to elementary school about a 1/4 mile from the fields where the herds were...I live about 2 miles from there.

And today?

1863 The Fight at Reed's Bridge...opening bell of the Battle of Chickamauga The Fight at Reed's Bridge (http://www.civilwar.org/hallowed-ground-magazine/fall-2010/fight-at-reeds-bridge.html)

Doktor
19 Sep 13,, 05:50
Good to see you back.

Albany Rifles
19 Sep 13,, 13:50
Good to see you back.

Thanks...almost done in by a few regiments of fencibles but managed to wiggle out of it!

What struck me the most on all of the sites I visited was 2 things...how short the campaiogn season was because of the northern climes and wilderness areas and how small most of the battles were, even when compared to the Rev War battles.

I will do a a write up soon.

Albany Rifles
19 Sep 13,, 14:04
1861: Crossing into Kentucky through the Cumberland Pass, Brigadier General Felix Zollicoffer disperses a small federal garrison at Barboursville

1862: Battle of Shepherdstown, WV The Battle of Shepherdstown Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/shepherdstown.html)

1862: Battle of Iuka, Mississippi The Battle of Iuka Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/iuka.html)

1863: Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia The Battle of Chickamauga Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/chickamauga.html)

1864: Battle of Third Winchester (Opequon), Virginia The Battle of Third Winchester Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/third-winchester.html)


I will have much more to write about Chickamauga tomorrow...that day has significant meaning to me in my professional life.

Albany Rifles
20 Sep 13,, 14:24
1861: Battle of Lexington. Sterling Price, with 18,000 men, lays siege to Lexington, Missouri, with a federal force of 3.600 under Colonel James Mulligan. After fighting intensified on September 19, Mulligan surrendered on the 20th.

1862: The culmination of the Battle of Shepardstown. The Battle of Shepherdstown Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/shepherdstown.html)

1863: The culmination of the Battle of Chickamauga

I already posted a link yesterday giving an excellent overview of the Battle of Chickamauga. But this battle and this date has a very special place for me. As a captain, I was S-3 Air, S4 and A Company commander in 3rd Battalion, 19th Infantry. Through Army reorganization we were lineal descendants of the 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry which fought at Chickamauga in King’s regular Brigade (3rd Brigade, 1st Division, XIVth Corps, Army of the Cumberland). On 20 SEP 63 King’s Brigade formed the anchor of the small line which stood with Thomas on Snodgrass Hill. Their stand on that day would earn Thomas the nickname The Rock of Chickamauga and the same name was applied to the 19th Infantry as its motto. As a regular battalion, the 19th did not have colonel or lieutenant colonel in command but a major. The 19th US entered the battle with a major in command and 237 soldiers. When the regiment marched off Snodgrass Hill and headed for Chattanooga it was commanded by a second lieutenant and had 51 men present for duty.

To commemorate that the unit coat of arms bears a rock with the shoulder strap of an Infantry Second Lieutenant.

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We did several things in my battalion to keep the history alive. First of all, we had a 19 pound rock from the battle field itself. It was kept in the care of the junior lieutenant in the battalion. It was polished and had its own health and personnel records. That lieutenant took that rock with him EVERYwhere…to the field, formal functions, battalions runs, etc.

Every 20 September was Chickamauga day and we held our organization day. We started out with a 5 mile run and a breakfast where the officers served the men. After everyone got cleaned up we had a formal parade…where a change of command ceremony took place and that same junior lieutenant was placed in command of the battalion for the day…and the lieutenant colonel humped The Rock.

In exchanging salutes enlisted men & NCOs would say “Top Of The Rock, Sir!” and the officer would respond with “CHICKAMAUGA!”

Prior to serving in that battalion I was all about 20th Century military history, primarily World War 2 (After all I had served previously in the 16th & 26th Infantry in the 1st Infantry Division…the Big Red One.) I very quickly grew to appreciate Civil War history. And what really got me started was when my Battalion XO asked (I should say ordered) me to plan, organize and lead the battalion officers on a Staff Ride to Chickamauga National Military Park. In those pre-internet days it was a little hard gathering resources but a couple of weekend trips (we were at FT Stewart in Savannah, GA), a very helpful Park Ranger / historian and post librarian I got the trip organized. I actually received a medal for that deal.

And that XO created a monster!

Albany Rifles
21 Sep 13,, 18:34
1863. Thomas pulls back from Rossville Defense Line to Chattanooga with the rest of his corps.

BG Richard Hardin Helm of the Orphan Brigade dies from wounds. He was Lincoln's brother-in-law and was shot by a sergeant from the 15th Kentucky (US) Infantry.

Triple C
22 Sep 13,, 17:42
A very vague and amateurish question.

It seems to me that most flank attacks launched during the ACW were not what we would understand as flanking maneuvers. Rather than forming a line perpendicular to the enemy, a flank attack, for the most part, seem to be a frontal assault driven at the extreme left or right "front" of the enemy. It seems that trying to execute the former would actually put the attackers at risk of lateral fires from enemy rifles.

Is that a correct observation?

JAD_333
22 Sep 13,, 20:16
Triple:

I am not an expert on Napoleonic tactics but have read a good deal about different CW battles. So this is just an amateur's two cents. Albany will be along to correct me.

If by a flank attack you mean an attack directed at the right or left of center of the enemy force, the risk of lateral fire all depends on whether you also engage the enemy's center and opposite flank to some extent. Often the tactic was used to draw enemy forces toward their flank to reinforce it. If successful, you would then increase pressure in the center with forces held in reserve and hope for a break through. Flank attacks were also done in anticipation that the enemy's center was too strong.

A successful flank attack could also lead to outflanking the enemy and thus being a position to roll up his line. Any enemy fire in the direction of a roll up could do more damage to one's own retreating troops than to you. At battles such as Cedar Creek the Confederates initial attack was aimed directly at and parallel to the Union's flank and a roll up ensued with panicked Union troops running for dear life. Lee, in his tactical retreat away Grant's forces after the 2nd Battle of the Wilderness continually extended his line to match Grant's persistent effort to out flank him or thin out his lines to effect a breakthrough. Albany can shed more light on the subject and cite battles where frontal flank attacks were used successfully or failed.

Shek
23 Sep 13,, 00:02
A very vague and amateurish question.

It seems to me that most flank attacks launched during the ACW were not what we would understand as flanking maneuvers. Rather than forming a line perpendicular to the enemy, a flank attack, for the most part, seem to be a frontal assault driven at the extreme left or right "front" of the enemy. It seems that trying to execute the former would actually put the attackers at risk of lateral fires from enemy rifles.

Is that a correct observation?

You're correct. You tried to find the extreme flank and then overlap it. Once you overlapped it, you could then enfilade the line, and with fire coming from two different directions, the psychological moment would be reached and the line would crumble. The issue was having enough force to continue to push down the line with your flank attack (think short hook vs. Longstreet's long hook at the Wilderness or Jackson's long hook at Chancelorsville) - typically, you ran out of force or you became too disorganized to exploit the initial success.

Albany Rifles
23 Sep 13,, 02:07
I can add nothing!!! JAD and Shek nailed it.

Albany Rifles
23 Sep 13,, 02:11
1862. Lincoln's seminal statement of the war...the Emancipation Proclamation is issued. The face and reason of the war changes.

1864. Battle of Fishers Hill. The 8th Corps comes of age and The Burning of the Valley begins.

Albany Rifles
23 Sep 13,, 19:47
1863 In the wake of Chickamauga President Lincoln orders the 11th and 12th Corps to Stevenson, Alabama to relieve the Army of the Cumberland surrounded in Chattanooga. Joe Hooker finds redemption.

Albany Rifles
24 Sep 13,, 20:04
1862 While blocking the Texas coast, the U. S. Navy encounters a Rebel regiment at Sabine Pass. After a Union shelling Rebels withdraw.
14 governors declare their support for the President and emancipation from a conference in Altoona, Pennsylvania

1863 President Lincoln wires Gen. Rosecrans [US} in Chattanooga, telling him 40,000 to 60,000 troops are on their way. Within a week a corps arrives at Stevenson, Alabama

1864 The Battle of Pilot Knob (Fort Davidson) MO, the start of Price's disasterous Missouri Raid. Battle of Fort Davidson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Davidson)

Albany Rifles
25 Sep 13,, 16:41
1862 The Army of the Cumberland reaches Louisville, KY, ahead of the Army of Tennessee stopping the threat to Ohio.

1864 Jeff Davis visits John B Hoos in Palmetto.

JAD_333
26 Sep 13,, 04:31
1864 Jeff Davis visits John B Hoos in Palmetto.

AR, what's the significance of this? Who's Hoos.:)

Albany Rifles
26 Sep 13,, 14:59
AR, what's the significance of this? Who's Hoos.:)

#%$###%^#^%#^%# spelling.

HOOD!!!

John B. Hoos joined with Samuel Ters to form the restaurant chain Hooters after the war. I believe Jeff Davis was discussing franchise opportunities in the Hampton Roads area for the circa 1865-1868 timeframe.

Albany Rifles
26 Sep 13,, 15:14
1863 If you think OPSEC issues are a new problem: President Lincoln and members of his Administration are distressed that troop movements aiding General Rosecrans in Chattanooga are published in the New York Post.

dave lukins
27 Sep 13,, 00:06
1863 If you think OPSEC issues are a new problem: President Lincoln and members of his Administration are distressed that troop movements aiding General Rosecrans in Chattanooga are published in the New York Post.

Did heads roll after that publication? 'Distressed' would not be the adjective used today.

Albany Rifles
27 Sep 13,, 00:26
David,

No....freedom of the press.

There were no D Notice options to Abe. And this was a common occurrence.

JAD_333
27 Sep 13,, 02:42
#%$###%^#^%#^%# spelling.

HOOD!!!

John B. Hoos joined with Samuel Ters to form the restaurant chain Hooters after the war. I believe Jeff Davis was discussing franchise opportunities in the Hampton Roads area for the circa 1865-1868 timeframe.

Little did they realize where it would lead. Hooter girls in Corpus Christi, TX. Hoos was a Texas man wasn't he?
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Albany Rifles
01 Oct 13,, 19:18
1862 Flag Officer David Dixon Porter is given command of the Mississippi Squadron

Major General John Pemberton replaces Earl van Dorn at the head of the reorganized Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana

Abraham Lincoln visits Harper's Ferry on his way to Antietam

Albany Rifles
03 Oct 13,, 18:21
1862 The start of the Battle of Corinth The Battle of Corinth Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/corinth.html)

1863 Lincoln calls for a national day of thinksgiving to be celebrated in late November.

(BTW I had the best fried green tomato ever in Corinth, MS a couple of years ago. And a nice town, even if its dry!)

Albany Rifles
04 Oct 13,, 14:56
1859 The Wyandotte Constitution is ratified by the state of Kansas. It abolishes slavery.

1861 President Lincoln views a tethered hot-air balloon ascent outside Washington D. C. The balloon was considered a top secret observation instrument to be used for observation during battles

Confederate government signs treaties with the Shawnee and Seneca Indians

1862 Richard Hawes is inaugurated as Confederate governor of Kentucky. Braxton Bragg attends.

Final day of the Battle of Corinth, Ms. Union forces hold on to the town and the Confederate forces are badly mauled.

1864 Moving north along the Western and Atlantic Railroad in an attempt to sever Sherman's supply line, John Bell Hood attacks blockhouses and encampments at Acworth and Moon's Station.

astralis
04 Oct 13,, 18:19
i'm really surprised use of observation balloons never really took off. the french used it all the way back in their revolutionary wars.

Albany Rifles
04 Oct 13,, 21:40
i'm really surprised use of observation balloons never really took off. the french used it all the way back in their revolutionary wars.

2 reasons.

1. They were a target for 10 pound Parrots and 3 inch rifles. They were accurate enough to force the balloons far enough back from the front to keep them effective.

2. At the risk of incurring the Wrath of Gunny, the logistics supporting them were horrible. Too much infrastructure for too little return.

Albany Rifles
08 Oct 13,, 16:38
1861 General William Tecumseh Sherman replaces General Robert Anderson as commander of the Department of the Cumberland. Anderson had suffered a severe mental breakdown.

1862 The Battle of Perryville. Another fine day by George Thomas

The Battle of Perryville Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/perryville.html)

A little more on this whole campaign later.

Albany Rifles
09 Oct 13,, 16:58
So, to my tease of yesterday...

What is often overlooked by some folks is that the operations of the fall of 1862 represent the only real strategic level operation carried out by the Confederacy during the Civil War. That autumn the Confederacy organized 3 coordinated assaults against strategic and operational targets within Union territory. In the East Lee's Northern Virginia and Maryland Campaigns were not done in isolation. Yes they had the goal of getting the AOP away from Richmond and an attempt to get a Confederate Saratoga. But they were part of a coordinated effort to apply pressure against the Union. In the West, Bragg's Kentucky Campaign was aimed at the Ohio River Valley and was hoped as a spring board to "return" Kentucky to the Confederacy. This invasion resulted in the Battle of Perryville in early October. Coinciding with that was an attack by Stirling Price out of the Trans-Mississippi aimed at the critical northern Mississippi rail junction town of Corinth. This action resulted in the twin fights of Iuka & Corinth.

In all instances, and in varying degrees, each was to be for naught. By early November all 3 Confederate thrusts had been repulsed and the status quo returned.

And this leads to a little more on Bragg's campaign.

Several years ago I attended a seminar whcih discussed teh ACW in the borderland. Various speakers talkled about actions and activities in Missouri, Kentucky, West Virginia & Maryland. Ken Noe spoke on the Battle of Perryville...this was not long after his masterful book on the that battle was published Perryville: This Grand Havoc of Battle: Kenneth W. Noe: 9780813122090: Amazon.com: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Perryville-This-Grand-Havoc-Battle/dp/0813122090/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1381331125&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=perryville+ken+noe).

Ken stated that while researching the book he noted a very peculiar trace for the Army of Tennessee for its route northward. The path the Confederates took looked like a tour of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail! Sure enough the line of advance fairly closely matched the trail. He had a cool map with overlay to illustrate the point.

So were the Confederates a bunch of drunks?

The answer actually had a very practical reason. The fall of 1862 was a very dry one in the South. It was really a major drought situation. So logically the armies moved along routes where they could get water. And distilleries are set up on reliable sources of water....natural springs! So that is why they were on that route. In fact the 2 armies clashing at Perryville started as a fight by picket lines along Doctor's Creek over pools of water in the drying stream.

Albany Rifles
09 Oct 13,, 20:17
1861 Engagement on Santa Rosa Island, Florida

Battle of Santa Rosa Island - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Santa_Rosa_Island)

1863 Bristoe Station Campaign begins in Virginia

The Battle of Bristoe Station Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/bristoe-station.html)

1864 Engagement at Tom's Brook, Virginia

The Battle of Tom's Brook Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/toms-brook.html)

Albany Rifles
10 Oct 13,, 15:38
1862 Fighting at Harrodsburg and Danville Cross Roads, Kentucky as Bragg retreats from Perryville.

1862 Jeff Davis asked the Commonwealth of Virginia to draft 4,500 blacks to complete fortifications at Richmond.

Albany Rifles
16 Oct 13,, 13:33
Sorry about the lack of dilligence...with over half my staff furloughed its been a rough couple of weeks!

1859 John Brown raids Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia). (NOTE: I wrote a paper about this in grad school. Brown, et al, were charged with and convicted of treason by the Commonwealth of Virginia. I remembered arguing at the time that this was a terrible interpretation of the law. Why? 1. The attack came on Federal property...the Federal courts had jurisdiction. 2. Brown was prosecuted by Virginia....which had no right to bring the charges because a) treason is a Federal crime and b) even if Virginia had standing Brown was not a citizen of Virginia...so how could he be charged by Virginia? I concluded it was all because the Buchanan Administration wanted nothing to do with this entire event. And it was that same head-in-the-sand mentality which lead to so many other problems in the coming months.

1862 MG Ulysses S. Grant is given command of the Department of Tennessee

6 members of the Great Train Chase raiding team escape from Fulton County Jail. They would later be rewarded with Medals of Honor.


1863 MG U.S. Grant named to command Union Military Division of the Mississippi

Doktor
16 Oct 13,, 13:38
Sorry about the lack of dilligence...with over half my staff furloughed its been a rough couple of weeks!

I am sorry to hear you are affected in that way. OTOH you still get paid, which is good. I guess.

Albany Rifles
16 Oct 13,, 14:03
I am sorry to hear you are affected in that way. OTOH you will eventually get paid, which is good. I guess.


Fixed it.

Doktor
16 Oct 13,, 14:23
Ouch!!!


Well at least there are some up there who are worth admiring.

Toyota latest to defer payments for furloughed workers - Oct. 15, 2013 (http://money.cnn.com/2013/10/15/autos/toyota-shutdown-payment-deferral/)

P.S. I know it's not for here, so I'll stop.

Albany Rifles
17 Oct 13,, 18:38
1863 Lincoln calls for 300,000 additional volunteers to join the army.

1864 General James Longstreet resumes command of his corps after suffering a serious wound at The Wilderness.

Albany Rifles
18 Oct 13,, 19:13
1859 U.S. Marines storm engine house at Harpers Ferry VA (now WV) and capture John Brown.

1862 Union Garrison captured at Lexington, Kentucky in Morgan's Raid.

1867 Russia cedes Alaska to the United States continuing the close relationship between the 2 countries which grew during the Civil War.

Albany Rifles
19 Oct 13,, 15:26
1863 Cavalry engagement known as the Buckland Races, Virginia

William Rosecrans is relieved of duty. General Grant replaces him as commander of the Army of the Cumberland with George Thomas.

1864 Raid on St. Albans, Vermont

1864 Battle of Cedar Creek (Belle Grove), Virginia

http://http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/cedar-creek.html

Cedar Creek is one of my favorite battles. It was the last battle where my namesake regiment fought with a regimental designation. After Cedar Creek, with enlistments expiring it was reorganized into 5 companies and designated the 43rd NYVI Battalion (Veteran). Additionally it was one of the great shining moments for my "favorite" Union corps, the VIth Corps. It was the finest moment of one of the best division commanders of either side, George Washington Getty. And it is the only battlefield of the war in which all of the units raised by the state of Vermont were present....Infantry, Artillery & Cavalry. While Jubal Early was not besmirched by the outcome, it effectively destroyed any Confederate control over the Shenendoah and removed the Army of the Valley from the order of battle...besides battle casualties massive desertions would follow in the months after the fight.

Albany Rifles
21 Oct 13,, 16:26
1861. The Battle of Balls Bluff, VA. http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/ballsbluff.html

Albany Rifles
22 Oct 13,, 14:48
1864 The Battle of Byram's Ford, the opening fight for the Battle of Westport (Kansas City), MO. Thos was to be the culminating battle of Price's Missouri Raid. Battle of Byram's Ford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Byram%27s_Ford)

Albany Rifles
23 Oct 13,, 15:10
1863 2 key events at Chattanooga, TN. Leonidas Polk is relieved by Bragg. Of more import, Grant arrives in Chattanooga to take personal command of the armies there.

1864 The Battle of Westport "The Gettysburg of the West" Battle of Westport - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Westport)

Albany Rifles
24 Oct 13,, 17:02
1861 Western Union completes the first trans-continental telegraph line

People of West Virginia vote overwhelmingly in favor of creating a new state as spelled out by the Wheeling Convention

1862 Union Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans replaces Maj. Gen. Buell as commander of Army of the Ohio. The XIV Corps, better known as the Army of the Cumberland, is created from the Army of the Ohio.

1863 General Grant, in Chattanooga, approves the plan of "Baldy" Smith to open a "Cracker Line" between Chattanooga and the railhead at Stevenson, Alabama

Albany Rifles
25 Oct 13,, 15:46
1861 The First Battle of Springfield, MO First Battle of Springfield - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Springfield_I)

1862 US Grant takes command, again, of the Army of the Tennessee.

1863 The Battle of Pine Bluff, AR

1864 The Battle of Mine Creek The Battle of Mine Creek Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/mine-creek.html) This put an end to Price's disasterous Missouri Raid.

Albany Rifles
28 Oct 13,, 01:30
1863 The second major bombardment of Fort Sumter. The three days of pounding artillery will be the heaviest in the siege of Charleston.

1864 Engagement at Fair Oaks and on Darbytown Road, Virginia
Battle of Boydton Plank Road (Burgess' Mill), Virginia
Union navy uses "torpedo" to sink Confederate ironclad Albemarle at Plymouth, NC

Albany Rifles
28 Oct 13,, 15:52
1863 General O. O. Howard reaches Brown's Ferry, Tennessee from Stevenson, AL, opening the famous Cracker Line. It is interesting to note that this battle in the West involved troops from both sides who had fought at Gettysburg. Both forces were in teh West as reinforcements. The Confederates would return East but the XI & XII Corps would be reorganizd into the XX Corps and be assigned to the Army of the Tennessee. Battle of Wauhatchie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Wauhatchie)

Triple C
29 Oct 13,, 11:38
What is the best concise account on Cedar Creek? I found the accounts of the battle confusing, no doubt a reflection of the chaotic fight.

Albany Rifles
29 Oct 13,, 16:17
C3,

The Go To book for me is From Winchester to Cedar Creek: The Shenandoah Campaign of 1864 by Jeff Wert. I believe that just reading about Cedar Creek loses the context needed of understanding how it played out based on the Shenendoah Campaign...all which happened prviously set the table.

The Civil War Trust's website (civilwar.org) has additional resources...its always a good starting point for battle resources.

Cedar Creek is marvelously well preserved except for the final line where the VIth Corps held. They also have a huge reenactment held annually on the anniversary.

Albany Rifles
29 Oct 13,, 18:31
1862 Skirmish at Island Mound, MO, the first engagement by African American troops in the ACW (1st Kansas Colored Volunteers) Skirmish at Island Mound - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skirmish_at_Island_Mound)

1863 Jefferson Davis grants Nathan Bedford Forrest's request for an independent command in north Mississippi and west Tennessee. This frees him from Braxton Bragg.

Albany Rifles
30 Oct 13,, 15:04
1862 MG Ormsby Mitchel dies of yellow fever in Beaufort SC

1864 Skirmish at Muscle Shoals, Alabama

Albany Rifles
31 Oct 13,, 02:57
A little dig at a HUGE blowhard....


http://youtu.be/pQTD_D1dZFI

Albany Rifles
31 Oct 13,, 16:23
1861 Winfield Scott relieved from duty as Supreme Comander of the United States

1864 Nevada becomes 36th state

Albany Rifles
01 Nov 13,, 14:24
1861 George McClellan promoted to General-in-Chief. (Great administrator....lousy battlefield commander)

Triple C
05 Nov 13,, 16:54
I have the feeling that the reason Cedar Creek was considered a decisive battle had operational and psychological dimensions in addition to raw battlefield losses. The Confederates were heavily reinforced by ANV troops, who could not be counted upon to remain in theater and the defeat of Jubal Early suggests the best shot the CSA could take wasn't good enough. Early also lost what precious cannons and provisions he took to the fight, and his army was badly disorganized... am I on mark here?

JAD_333
05 Nov 13,, 19:01
I have the feeling that the reason Cedar Creek was considered a decisive battle had operational and psychological dimensions in addition to raw battlefield losses. The Confederates were heavily reinforced by ANV troops, who could not be counted upon to remain in theater and the defeat of Jubal Early suggests the best shot the CSA could take wasn't good enough. Early also lost what precious cannons and provisions he took to the fight, and his army was badly disorganized... am I on mark here?

You're half on the mark. The battle itself was herky jerky. Early achieved complete surprise and his troops rolled up the Union lines, captured many Yankees and a boat load of equipment, wagons and such. All pointed to a CSA victory, but little things happened that may have cost the CSA the momentum. For example, CSA troops stopped to eat cooking food left behind by retreating Yankees. Later Early seemed unsure how to proceed. His senior commanders wanted to press the attack, but he dallied. The Union commander, Sheridan, arrived late on the battlefield, but even before he got there his second in command, Gen Wright, had managed to form new lines. The CSA finally moved to break up the reformed Union lines but could not. That and the boisterous energy of Sheridan turned the tide of battle. Union forces counterattacked forcing Early to retreat leaving behind all the booty he had captured, a good bit of his artillery and many irreplaceable CSA dead. All in all the CSA attack was well planned and well executed up to a point. The little things I mentioned may or may not been responsible for his defeat, but they certainly contributed to it.

BTW I live a couple of miles from the battlefield and have traced Early's footsteps.

JAD_333
05 Nov 13,, 19:22
1861 George McClellan promoted to General-in-Chief. (Great administrator....lousy battlefield commander)

Albany:

Based on his record I agree he did not shine as a battlefield commander, but in my reading over the years I've formed the impression that he had the tactical sense to be a good commander. He did well enough at Antietam. He could have done better at Seven Pines and the Seven Days--he was great in retreat:)--had he not misjudged the forces arrayed against him. IMO, he suffered from 3 major drawbacks: 1) he consistently overestimated the enemy's strength, 2) he hesitated to commit his beloved troops to pitched battle for fear of unnecessary bloodshed; and 3) he was too preoccupied with his larger-than-life in the North to risk losing.

Albany Rifles
05 Nov 13,, 20:30
1862 Lincoln replaces McClellan with Burnside as commander of the Army of the Potomac

Albany Rifles
05 Nov 13,, 20:31
Albany:

Based on his record I agree he did not shine as a battlefield commander, but in my reading over the years I've formed the impression that he had the tactical sense to be a good commander. He did well enough at Antietam. He could have done better at Seven Pines and the Seven Days--he was great in retreat:)--had he not misjudged the forces arrayed against him. IMO, he suffered from 3 major drawbacks: 1) he consistently overestimated the enemy's strength, 2) he hesitated to commit his beloved troops to pitched battle for fear of unnecessary bloodshed; and 3) he was too preoccupied with his larger-than-life in the North to risk losing.

Hence my assessment.

Those 3 major drawbacks made him a lousy commander.

JAD_333
05 Nov 13,, 20:34
Hence my assessment.

Those 3 major drawbacks made him a lousy commander.

Yes, yes, of course. But he did show promise at least once, didn't he?

Albany Rifles
05 Nov 13,, 20:41
Yes, yes, of course. But he did show promise at least once, didn't he?

So did Burnside & JEB Magruder!

JAD_333
05 Nov 13,, 21:00
So did Burnside & JEB Magruder!

I can't figure Burnside. Even he didn't want full command. I don't think the little Napoleon would have thrown wave after wave of troops across the river at Fredricksburg...even you wouldn't have. :) Magruder, I don't know, but he never rose to the level of the other two.

Albany Rifles
05 Nov 13,, 21:27
Burnside did beat Longstreet though!

And his plan was actually pretty good, and he did fool Lee...but someone forgot to bring the bridges. And for some reason they decided to move them to F'burg overland rather than by river. Took them 15 days. In that amount of time Lee flexed and dug in on the Heights.

Magruder's best work was as an actor (see Yorktown). At all others he as inept to inadequate....but he did have Galveston!

JAD_333
05 Nov 13,, 21:44
Burnside did beat Longstreet though!

And his plan was actually pretty good, and he did fool Lee...but someone forgot to bring the bridges. And for some reason they decided to move them to F'burg overland rather than by river. Took them 15 days. In that amount of time Lee flexed and dug in on the Heights.

You're quite right. I had forgotten about that. Perhaps the distinction between planning and executing should come into play in your assessment. BTW, I thought the bridges finally arrived and were being laid south of the city under steady rebel sniper fire. I agree the delay was critical.


Magruder's best work was as an actor (see Yorktown). At all others he as inept to inadequate....but he did have Galveston!

lol...a sop to a washed up general.

Albany Rifles
06 Nov 13,, 14:51
1860 Abraham Lincoln elected 16th President of the United States with 39.7% of the vote or 180 electoral votes. His opponents combined garnered only 123 electoral votes.

1862 Jefferson Davis is elected President and Alexander Stephens is elected Vice President of the Confederate States of America.

Thomas Jackson is promoted to lieutenant general, CSA.

1863 The Battle of Droop Mountain, West (BY GOD!!!!) Virginia The Union victory detroyed Confederate resistance in the state for the remainder of the war.

Albany Rifles
07 Nov 13,, 15:04
1861 Engagement at Belmont, Missouri; Sam Grant learns the other guy can be just as scared as you are.

Battle of Port Royal, SC Battle of Port Royal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Port_Royal)

1863 Battle of Rappahannock Station, Virginia The VI Corps AOP succesfully assaults and takes a Confederate position with disasterous results for the ANV. It effectively closed the Bristoe Campaign and launched the Mine Run Campaign. Oh what Meade could have done with better corps commanders! Second Battle of Rappahannock Station - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Rappahannock_Station)

Albany Rifles
08 Nov 13,, 14:52
1861 Confederate emissary to England removed from British vessel by the commander of the USS San Jacinto, initiating Trent Affair. Lincoln later releases James Mason & John Slidell to silence war drums from England. He would say to his cabinet for his reason; "One war at a time."

The Battle of Ivy Mountain Big Sandy Expedition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Sandy_Expedition)


1864 Abraham Lincoln is re-elected President of the United States, defeating the Democratic Party candidate George McClellan. Lincoln would win by 400,000 votes, largely bouyed by the soldier vote....the men who had fought and bled wanted to finish the job.

Albany Rifles
09 Nov 13,, 17:31
1860. South Carolina lawmakers call for Secession Convention in the wake of Lincoln's election.

1861. Henry Halleck is placed in command of all states between the Appalachians and the Mississippi.

1865. North Carolina nullifies it Ordinance of Secession.

Albany Rifles
11 Nov 13,, 15:47
1831 Nat Turner is hung for leading a slave revolt.

1863 Benjamin Butler is returned to active service and placed in command of Department of Virginia and North Carolina.

1864 The Battle of Bulls Gap, TN Battle of Bull's Gap - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bull's_Gap)

Albany Rifles
12 Nov 13,, 15:44
1860 In Preston County, Western Virginia holds its first organizational meeting, expressing a desire to "adhere to the Union".

1861 Blockade Runner Fingal, bought by Confederates in England, arrives in Savannah.

1864 General Sherman in Cartersville sends his last message to General Thomas in Nashville, Tennessee. He will be out of communication with the North until December 13.

Albany Rifles
14 Nov 13,, 14:45
A lot of major reorganization going on this date


1862 Ambrose Burnside reorganises the Army of the Potomac command structure into three Grand Divisions with the Right Grand Division under Major Edwin Vose Sumner, Central Grand Division under Joe Hooker and the Left Grand Division under William B. Franklin.

1864 Sherman enters Atlanta and divides his 60,000 men into a Left Wing and Right Wing. In doing so he creates a rarity....a Union Army not named for a body of water. The Union Army of Georgia is formed by combining the XXth Corps (there are those Germans!) with the remaining the XIVth Corps, Army of the Cumberland. Henry Slocum (he of the XIIth Corps at Gettysburg) is appointed its commander.

Albany Rifles
15 Nov 13,, 15:19
A busy date for old Cump!

1861 William Tecumseh Sherman is replaced by Don Carlos Buell at the head of the reorganized Department of Ohio. Sherman had assumed command as senior officer when Anderson was relieved of duty.

Second pro-Union rebellion in East Tennessee, centered in the Chattanooga area.

1862 Confederate Secretary of War George Randolph resigns over President Jefferson Davis's control of the War Department.

1863 Moving east from the Mississippi, General William Tecumseh Sherman arrives in Stevenson, Alabama with four divisions. Sherman then confers with Grant in Chattanooga.

1864 William T. Sherman departs Atlanta on the March to the Sea, leaving Atlanta in ruins.

astralis
15 Nov 13,, 19:14
AR,

that date in 1863 is particularly interesting to me. amazing how much the confederacy collapsed within a period of six months. i think the confederacy had a shot, albeit a poor shot, at turning things around in may 1863; by november 1863 the writing was on the wall.

Albany Rifles
15 Nov 13,, 20:21
AR,

that date in 1863 is particularly interesting to me. amazing how much the confederacy collapsed within a period of six months. i think the confederacy had a shot, albeit a poor shot, at turning things around in may 1863; by november 1863 the writing was on the wall.

Absolutely.

Bloodlettings in the East coupled with victorious turns in the West and Trans-Mississippi ensured the war could not be won by the Confederacy on the battlefield by November of 1863. The seemingly high points for the Confederates at Chickamauga were dashed within weeks. And Lee continued to underestimate Meade an would suffer for it with reverses at Bristoe & Rappahannock Stations. Even Mine Run was not a great outcome for the Confederacy.

Albany Rifles
16 Nov 13,, 13:52
1861 Skidell & Mason are delivered to Federal authorities in Boston from the USS San Jacinto.

1863 The Battle of Campbell's Station Battle of Campbell's Station - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Campbell's_Station) 1863 was such a strange year for the Lee's Old Warhorse. Near great success at Gettysburg and a glorious success at Chickamauga are bookended by the ignominious defeats at Suffolk and Knoxville.

1864 Sherman's March consumes much of Marietta, Rome & Cartersville, GA.

Albany Rifles
17 Nov 13,, 18:00
1862. The Right Grand Division under Bull Sumner closes on the Rappahanock River.

Albany Rifles
19 Nov 13,, 03:15
1863 Longstreet begins the Siege of Knoxville.

In Washington, a special 4 car train is boarded by President Lincoln and several members and his cabinet and travels to the crossroads town of Gettysburg, PA to take part in a dedication ceremony the next day.

JAD_333
19 Nov 13,, 04:00
1863 Longstreet begins the Siege of Knoxville.

A rather tepid effort, wouldn't you say? As I recall Union forces rushed to Knoxville to relieve their 'besieged' forces there only to find the commanding general (forgot his name?) fat, cheery and having a nice feast of a dinner.

Albany Rifles
19 Nov 13,, 04:20
A rather tepid effort, wouldn't you say? As I recall Union forces rushed to Knoxville to relieve their 'besieged' forces there only to find the commanding general (forgot his name?) fat, cheery and having a nice feast of a dinner.


Hence my comments of 2 days ago.

And that Union general was Burnside!

Albany Rifles
19 Nov 13,, 12:25
1863 Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives, that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate – we can not hallow – this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.

It is for us, the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here, have, thus far, so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain – that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom – and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

The President had not been the keynote speaker. In fact he was an afterthought. The date of 19 NOV was selected due to the calendar on the keynote speaker, Edward Everett of Massachusetts. Everett was the foremost speaker of his day and was considered a real catch by the burghers of the town.

After Lincoln gave the short speech above the next day everett penned a note to him: "I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes."

I fully consider this one of the 3 best speeches in the English language (Churchill's We Will Never Give In & Kennedy's Innaugural are the other 2...in no particular order).

Lincoln's speech is panned across the Union and barely acknowledged in the Confederacy.

Elsewhere...

1861 Henry Halleck is appointed commander fo Union forces in Missouri.

JAD_333
19 Nov 13,, 20:50
1863

Lincoln's speech is panned across the Union and barely acknowledged in the Confederacy.



Finally, a retraction, after 150 years.

Living on the wrong side of history? The Harrisburg Patriot & Union's notorious 'review' of the Gettysburg Address | PennLive.com (http://blog.pennlive.com/gettysburg-150/2013/11/lincoln_gettysburg_address_har.html)


"We pass over the silly remarks of the President. For the credit of the nation we are willing that the veil of oblivion shall be dropped over them and that they shall be no more repeated or thought of."

With those few belittling and dismissive words, Harrisburg's Patriot & Union newspaper - the Patriot-News's Civil War ancestor - earned itself an enduring place in history for having got Lincoln's Gettysburg Address utterly, jaw-droppingly wrong.

(2013) A Patriot-News editorial retraction: The Gettysburg Address
Full text of the Gettysburg Address
Nationwide reaction to the retraction

Just as the Gettysburg Address has become one of the most-read and most-quoted American political documents, the Patriot & Union "review" of it has become one of the most-quoted commentaries.

The quote lives on - as counterpoint to Lincoln's masterful rhetoric - not only in scholarly literature, but in popular histories, Internet discussions and even the resource materials for school teachers distributed by the Gettysburg National Military Park.

It also has lived on, of course, as fodder for generations of readers who disagree with Patriot-News editorials, who opine that the mental capacity and judgement of the newspaper's aspiring opinion makers has not improved considerably since the early days.

This infamous "review," which seems to imply the newspaper ignored the Gettysburg Address altogether, is also trotted out on occasion as evidence of how newspaper people sometimes miss history being made right in front of their notebooks.

But like Lincoln's speech itself, the Patriot & Union "review" has acquired accretions of myth and misunderstanding that obscure actual history.

The words about Lincoln's "silly remarks" have been divorced from their context and given more weight than they arguably deserve.

A thorough review of the Patriot & Union coverage of the Gettysburg ceremonies 150 years ago paints a different picture.

First, the famous quote is taken from an editorial that did not appear in the newspaper until Nov. 24, five days after the event. Prior to that, there was considerable news coverage of Lincoln's visit and speech in Gettysburg - and that news coverage would surprise many who have judged the newspaper solely on the editorial quote.

Albany Rifles
20 Nov 13,, 23:46
1862 The Army of Mississippi is renamed The Army of Tennessee (Confederate).

1863 Federals began heavy bombardment of Fort Sumter. It will continue, off and on, through December 4.

Albany Rifles
21 Nov 13,, 15:34
1861 Judah P. Benjamin named Confederate Secretary of War

1862 James A. Seddon replaces George W. Randolph as Confederate Secretary of War

Albany Rifles
23 Nov 13,, 16:25
1863. Battle of Orchard Knob. The redemption of the XIth Corps and the Army of the Cumberland begins.

The Battle of Chattanooga Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/chattanooga.html)

Albany Rifles
24 Nov 13,, 18:41
1862. Joseph Johnston takes command of a reorganized Department of the West. Under his command would be the Armies of Tennessee (Bragg) and Mississippi (Pemberton).


1863 The Battle of Lookout Mountain....Joe Hooker's finest moment.

Battle of Lookout Mountain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Lookout_Mountain)

Albany Rifles
25 Nov 13,, 21:08
1863 The Battle of Missionary Ridge. Chickamauga is avenged. Battle of Missionary Ridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Missionary_Ridge)

1864 Confederates fail at attempt to set fire to New York City hotels and Barnum's Museum

Albany Rifles
26 Nov 13,, 18:31
1861 West Virginia Constitutional Convention convenes in Wheeling

1863 Battle of Ringgold Gap Patrick Cleburne's [CS] rear guard action against Joseph Hooker [US] following the defeat at Missionary Ridge gives Braxton Bragg time to establish a line in Dalton, GA.

George Meade crosses the Rapidan River attempting to turn Lee's right flank, starting the Mine Run Campaign.

Albany Rifles
27 Nov 13,, 16:52
1861 Passengers from the SS Trent arrive in London and report the ship had been boarded by the US Navy and the Confederate’s Sliddell and Mason forcibly removed.

1863 Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan escapes from the Ohio State Penitentiary

General William French’s 5th Corps is attacked by Edward Johnson and his Confederate division near Payne Farm in the first battle of the Mine Run Campaign.
The Battle of Mine Run Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/mine-run.html)

Albany Rifles
28 Nov 13,, 19:22
1861 Though never leaving the Union a Confederate government of Missouri is recognized and admitted to the Confederacy.

1862. The Battle of Cane Hill, AR. Opening round of the Battle of the Boston Mountains which will culminate at the Battle of Prairie Grove.

1863 Grant orders Sherman to Knoxville with a relief column. Bragg offers his resignation.

1864 Rosser's Raid on Union forces at Keyser, WV.

Albany Rifles
29 Nov 13,, 14:31
1862 "Prince " John Magruder assumes command of Confederate forces in Texas. With no apologies to Lebron James, he brought his talents to the Southwest.

1863 Assault on Fort Sanders, Tennessee Battle of Fort Sanders - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Sanders) Burnside has his signature victory of the war.

1864 Battle of Spring Hill, Tennessee The Battle of Spring Hill Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/spring-hill.html) Hood decides to teach his army a lesson.

Col. J.M. Chivington leads Sand Creek Massacre in the Colorado Territory. Even with the American Civil War going on westerners still take time to to try to exterminate Native Americans and added a dark stain to the record of the US Army.

Albany Rifles
30 Nov 13,, 17:09
1863 GK Warren declines to assault at Mind Run, refuses to support Vermont Brigade in its breakthrough of Lee's line.

Davis accepts Bragg's resignation and places William Hardee in temporary command.

1864 The Battle of Franklin, TN. Hood's attempt to teach a lesson to the AOT results in a bloodletting.

Battle of Honey Hill, SC.

Albany Rifles
04 Dec 13,, 15:39
1864 Battle of Waynesboro, GA Battle of Waynesboro, Georgia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Waynesboro,_Georgia)

Albany Rifles
05 Dec 13,, 19:00
1862 Battle of Coffeeville, MS

Albany Rifles
06 Dec 13,, 14:55
1863 Sherman enters Knoxville marking the official end to the siege.

1864 The Stoney Creek Raid opens...also known as the Applejack Raid. Stony Creek Depot (http://www.craterroad.com/stonycreek.html)

Salmon P. Chase named the Chief Justice of SCOTUS.

Albany Rifles
07 Dec 13,, 23:53
1862 The Battle of Prairie Grove, AR. The Battle of Prairie Grove Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org (http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/prairie-grove.html). Arkansas is secured.

Albany Rifles
08 Dec 13,, 18:06
1860 Governor Isham Harris calls for a special session of the Tennessee Legislature to discuss secession.

1863 Lincoln issues his Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction.

Albany Rifles
09 Dec 13,, 16:46
1861 Battle at Chusto-Talasah (Bird Creek), Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) Battle of Chusto-Talasah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Chusto-Talasah) This and other successes would drive the pro-Union Native Americans into Kansas for sanctuary.

Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War established by the U.S. Senate


1863 Ambrose Burnside is relieved of command (Department of the Ohio).

Albany Rifles
10 Dec 13,, 15:09
1862 U. S. House passes a bill allowing the creation of the state of West Virginia

1864 Sherman's armies arrive on the western and southern approaches to Savannah.

Albany Rifles
11 Dec 13,, 16:11
1862 The Goldsboro Expedition begins as the Union Army in North Carolina under John G. Foster pushes into the state in an attempt to sever railroad supply lines to Virginia.

The AOP occupies the city of Fredericksburg, VA.

Albany Rifles
12 Dec 13,, 19:08
1860 Lewis Cass tenders his resignation as Secretary of State over President Buchanan's refusal to reinforce federal troops in Charleston.

1862 The USS Cairo is sunk on the Yazoo River near Vicksburg, MS.

1864 The Stoney Creek Raid ends. 16 miles of railroad line are destroyed.