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THL
04 Mar 13,, 05:25
So I have my entry level Nikon, I have taken a class or two, I was doing good. Then I was convinced to take my camera off auto and shoot in manual and I am beyond frustrated. I know we have some good photographers on the board so which websites can you guys recommend for me to visit or books that I can read?

I know it's a lot about trial and error and it will take time and I have only been at this for a couple months, but I am so frustrated with my indoor lighting issues. I have a speedlight but don't always want to walk around with it on or have things to bounce light from. I also have some lights, but again, I'm not going to bring them with me everywhere I go.

Specifically today, I was at my parents and the pictures were too dark. I know what I could have done, I should have lowered my ISO so that tonight I could have lightened them in Photoshop without making them grainy, but I did not think of that today, so little good it does me now.

Also, I did just start capturing in RAW + JPEG Fine, so I do have the raw files, but they look worse than the JPEGs to me. Am I going crazy?

-Emily

Parihaka
04 Mar 13,, 06:59
Em, you shouldn't have to lighten them with photoshop unless your exposure was under. Unless you've gone to extremes with the ISO it shouldn't have any problems with grain. If the shots of your parents were indoors during the day and you had the ISO set to around 100 it's definitely an exposure problem. What's your exposure meter telling you when you're setting your aperture?

THL
04 Mar 13,, 07:08
Well, what happened is that they were in front of a window with a lot of light behind them, so I have a feeling it metered off the window. I should have double checked where it was metering, but again, one more thing to remember that I didn't.

I set the exposure to the middle once i focused, which I have been practicing and have had success with. Until today. Again I blame all the light coming from behind the people. So how do I tone down the bright behind the people without losing the people?

There is so much to remember to do at one time. Ugh. Auto was so much easier. lol

Doktor
04 Mar 13,, 07:10
Which Nikon do you have?

Nikon has some nice classes on their website.

Here is the article about ISO: Understanding ISO Sensitivity | When to Change ISO Settings from Nikon Photography Tips Techniques and Tutorials | Nikon Learn and Explore (http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Learn-And-Explore/Article/g9mqnyb1/understanding-iso-sensitivity.html)

Doktor
04 Mar 13,, 07:13
Well, what happened is that they were in front of a window with a lot of light behind them, so I have a feeling it metered off the window. I should have double checked where it was metering, but again, one more thing to remember that I didn't.

I set the exposure to the middle once i focused, which I have been practicing and have had success with. Until today. Again I blame all the light coming from behind the people. So how do I tone down the bright behind the people without losing the people?

There is so much to remember to do at one time. Ugh. Auto was so much easier. lol

You should leave the blend open longer. Only con is you should have a steady hand or a tripod.

I have two friends (girls) who are professional photo-reporters, so after a while the camera weight wont be an issue and people will hesitate to piss you after you develop those muscles :red:

chanjyj
04 Mar 13,, 13:43
Honestly? There is no need to shoot in Manual. I was never with the field that said manual would improve your skills. I personally shoot P, A, S with auto-ISO. The only time I shoot manual is when I know I need X shutter speed and Y aperture for a photo but I leave auto-ISO on. In essence I am adjusting my depth of field and rotational blur (or lack of it) and letting the camera compensate for my exposure with auto-ISO.

I own a photography company by the way, and was (is?) a professional photographer although I'm doing more of the management side than the shooting now.

THL
04 Mar 13,, 14:02
So with the sun, or bright lights, behind people inside a house, where it is then causing their faces to be dark, I guess I would have been better off using the flip up flash and shooting in P. It would have been better to have had them move to the other couch, but Dharma was being calm and cooperative so I did not want to make her move. lol. It's not like I lost some fantastic once-in-a-lifetime shot, but when I get these little ones wrong I like to fix them because one day there may be one I REALLY wanted to get.

THL
04 Mar 13,, 14:09
Which Nikon do you have?

Nikon has some nice classes on their website.

Here is the article about ISO: Understanding ISO Sensitivity | When to Change ISO Settings from Nikon Photography Tips Techniques and Tutorials | Nikon Learn and Explore (http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Learn-And-Explore/Article/g9mqnyb1/understanding-iso-sensitivity.html)

A D3100. Nothing too fancy, but enough that I can learn and if I like it upgrade later if I need to. I just want to be able to get better pictures of the kids and dogs, so it's not like I have high aspirations. lol.

I've looked around a little on their site, but not before I took an actual class where i could sit with someone and ask questions. Now that I have I should go back to Nikon and look around again. I am finding that the more different explanations I receive for the same thing, the more I understand it, but it was nice to be able to see someone show me answers than to just read them.

TopHatter
04 Mar 13,, 21:07
Dharma was being calm and cooperative so I did not want to make her move.

...the hell??

THL
05 Mar 13,, 00:39
...the hell??

I KNOW! She was being good and nice and even smiled. But then again that was right before that evil smile pic I posted on the Dharmaland FB wall. So she may have been bluffing. lol