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bigross86
25 Aug 12,, 23:02
Neil Armstrong, 1st man on the moon, dies at 82 (http://news.yahoo.com/neil-armstrong-1st-man-moon-dies-82-200215442--finance.html)


Neil Armstrong, 1st man on the moon, dies at 82
By LISA CORNWELL and SETH BORENSTEIN | Associated Press 15 mins ago

CINCINNATI (AP) Neil Armstrong was a soft-spoken engineer who became a global hero when as a steely-nerved pilot he made "one giant leap for mankind" with a small step onto the moon. The modest man, who had people on Earth entranced and awed from almost a quarter-million miles away, but credited others for the feat, died Saturday. He was 82.

Armstrong died following complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures, his family said in a statement. Armstrong had had a bypass operation this month, according to NASA. His family didn't say where he died; he had lived in suburban Cincinnati.

Armstrong commanded the Apollo 11 spacecraft that landed on the moon July 20, 1969, capping the most daring of the 20th century's scientific expeditions. His first words after becoming the first person to set foot on the surface are etched in history books and the memories of those who heard them in a live broadcast.

"That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind," Armstrong said.

(Armstrong insisted later that he had said "a'' before man, but said he too couldn't hear it in the version that went to the world.)

In those first few moments on the moon, during the climax of a heated space race with the then-Soviet Union, Armstrong stopped in what he called "a tender moment" and left a patch to commemorate NASA astronauts and Soviet cosmonauts who had died in action.

"It was special and memorable but it was only instantaneous because there was work to do," Armstrong told an Australian television interviewer this year.

Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin spent nearly three hours walking on the lunar surface, collecting samples, conducting experiments and taking photographs.

"The sights were simply magnificent, beyond any visual experience that I had ever been exposed to," Armstrong once said.

The moonwalk marked America's victory in the Cold War space race that began Oct. 4, 1957, with the launch of the Soviet Union's Sputnik 1, a 184-pound satellite that sent shock waves around the world.

Although he had been a Navy fighter pilot, a test pilot for NASA's forerunner and an astronaut, Armstrong never allowed himself to be caught up in the celebrity and glamour of the space program.

"I am, and ever will be, a white socks, pocket protector, nerdy engineer," he said in February 2000 in one of his rare public appearances. "And I take a substantial amount of pride in the accomplishments of my profession."

A man who kept away from cameras, Armstrong went public in 2010 with his concerns about President Barack Obama's space policy that shifted attention away from a return to the moon and emphasized private companies developing spaceships. He testified before Congress and in an email to The Associated Press, Armstrong said he had "substantial reservations," and along with more than two dozen Apollo-era veterans, he signed a letter calling the plan a "misguided proposal that forces NASA out of human space operations for the foreseeable future."

Armstrong was among the greatest of American heroes, Obama said in a statement.

"When he and his fellow crew members lifted off aboard Apollo 11 in 1969, they carried with them the aspirations of an entire nation. They set out to show the world that the American spirit can see beyond what seems unimaginable that with enough drive and ingenuity, anything is possible," Obama said.

Obama's Republican opponent Mitt Romney echoed those sentiments, calling Armstrong an American hero whose passion for space, science and discovery will inspire him for the rest of his life.

"The moon will miss its first son of earth," Romney said.

NASA chief Charles Bolden recalled Armstrong's grace and humility.

"As long as there are history books, Neil Armstrong will be included in them, remembered for taking humankind's first small step on a world beyond our own," Bolden said in a statement.

Armstrong's modesty and self-effacing manner never faded.

When he appeared in Dayton in 2003 to help celebrate the 100th anniversary of powered flight, he bounded onto a stage before 10,000 people packed into a baseball stadium. But he spoke for only a few seconds, did not mention the moon, and quickly ducked out of the spotlight.

He later joined former astronaut and Sen. John Glenn to lay wreaths on the graves of Wilbur and Orville Wright. Glenn introduced Armstrong and noted it was 34 years to the day that Armstrong had walked on the moon.

"Thank you, John. Thirty-four years?" Armstrong quipped, as if he hadn't given it a thought.

At another joint appearance, the two embraced and Glenn commented: "To this day, he's the one person on Earth, I'm truly, truly envious of."

Glenn echoed those thoughts Saturday in a phone interview from Columbus, Ohio.

"When I think of Neil, I think of someone who for our country was dedicated enough to dare greatly," Glenn said.

Armstrong's moonwalk capped a series of accomplishments that included piloting the X-15 rocket plane and making the first space docking during the Gemini 8 mission, which included a successful emergency splashdown.

In the years afterward, Armstrong retreated to the quiet of the classroom and his southwest Ohio farm. Aldrin said in his book "Men from Earth" that Armstrong was one of the quietest, most private men he had ever met.

In the Australian interview, Armstrong acknowledged that "now and then I miss the excitement about being in the cockpit of an airplane and doing new things."

At the time of the flight's 40th anniversary, Armstrong again was low-key, telling a gathering that the space race was "the ultimate peaceful competition: USA versus U.S.S.R. It did allow both sides to take the high road with the objectives of science and learning and exploration."

Glenn, who went through jungle training in Panama with Armstrong as part of the astronaut program, described him as "exceptionally brilliant" with technical matters but "rather retiring, doesn't like to be thrust into the limelight much."

Derek Elliott, curator of the Smithsonian Institution's U.S. Air and Space Museum from 1982 to 1992, said the moonwalk probably marked the high point of space exploration.

The manned lunar landing was a boon to the prestige of the United States, which had been locked in a space race with the former Soviet Union, and re-established U.S. pre-eminence in science and technology, Elliott said.

"The fact that we were able to see it and be a part of it means that we are in our own way witnesses to history," he said.

The 1969 landing met an audacious deadline that President Kennedy had set in May 1961, shortly after Alan Shepard became the first American in space with a 15-minute suborbital flight. (Soviet cosmonaut Yuri A. Gagarin had orbited the Earth and beaten the U.S. into space the previous month.)

"I believe this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before the decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to Earth," Kennedy had said. "No single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind, or more important to the long-range exploration of space; and none will be so difficult or expensive to accomplish."

The end-of-decade goal was met with more than five months to spare. "Houston: Tranquility Base here," Armstrong radioed after the spacecraft settled onto the moon. "The Eagle has landed."

"Roger, Tranquility," Apollo astronaut Charles Duke radioed back from Mission Control. "We copy you on the ground. You've got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We're breathing again. Thanks a lot."

The third astronaut on the mission, Michael Collins, circled the moon in the mother ship Columbia 60 miles overhead while Armstrong and Aldrin went to the moon's surface.

Collins told NASA on Saturday that he will miss Armstrong terribly, spokesman Bob Jacobs tweeted.

In all, 12 American astronauts walked on the moon between 1969 and the last moon mission in 1972.

For Americans, reaching the moon provided uplift and respite from the Vietnam War, from strife in the Middle East, from the startling news just a few days earlier that a young woman had drowned in a car driven off a wooden bridge on Chappaquiddick Island by Sen. Edward Kennedy. The landing occurred as organizers were gearing up for Woodstock, the legendary three-day rock festival on a farm in the Catskills of New York.

Armstrong was born Aug. 5, 1930, on a farm near Wapakoneta in western Ohio. He took his first airplane ride at age 6 and developed a fascination with aviation that prompted him to build model airplanes and conduct experiments in a homemade wind tunnel.

As a boy, he worked at a pharmacy and took flying lessons. He was licensed to fly at 16, before he got his driver's license.

Armstrong enrolled in Purdue University to study aeronautical engineering but was called to duty with the U.S. Navy in 1949 and flew 78 combat missions in Korea.

After the war, Armstrong finished his degree from Purdue and later earned a master's degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Southern California. He became a test pilot with what evolved into the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, flying more than 200 kinds of aircraft from gliders to jets.

Armstrong was accepted into NASA's second astronaut class in 1962 the first, including Glenn, was chosen in 1959 and commanded the Gemini 8 mission in 1966. After the first space docking, he brought the capsule back in an emergency landing in the Pacific Ocean when a wildly firing thruster kicked it out of orbit.

Armstrong was backup commander for the historic Apollo 8 mission at Christmastime in 1968. In that flight, Commander Frank Borman, and Jim Lovell and Bill Anders circled the moon 10 times, and paving the way for the lunar landing seven months later.

Aldrin said he and Armstrong were not prone to free exchanges of sentiment.

"But there was that moment on the moon, a brief moment, in which we sort of looked at each other and slapped each other on the shoulder ... and said, 'We made it. Good show,' or something like that," Aldrin said.

An estimated 600 million people a fifth of the world's population watched and listened to the landing, the largest audience for any single event in history.

Parents huddled with their children in front of the family television, mesmerized by what they were witnessing. Farmers abandoned their nightly milking duties, and motorists pulled off the highway and checked into motels just to see the moonwalk.

Television-less campers in California ran to their cars to catch the word on the radio. Boy Scouts at a camp in Michigan watched on a generator-powered television supplied by a parent.

Afterward, people walked out of their homes and gazed at the moon, in awe of what they had just seen. Others peeked through telescopes in hopes of spotting the astronauts.

In Wapakoneta, media and souvenir frenzy was swirling around the home of Armstrong's parents.

"You couldn't see the house for the news media," recalled John Zwez, former manager of the Neil Armstrong Air and Space Museum. "People were pulling grass out of their front yard."

Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins were given ticker tape parades in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles and later made a 22-nation world tour. A homecoming in Wapakoneta drew 50,000 people to the city of 9,000.

In 1970, Armstrong was appointed deputy associate administrator for aeronautics at NASA but left the following year to teach aerospace engineering at the University of Cincinnati.

He remained there until 1979 and during that time bought a 310-acre farm near Lebanon, where he raised cattle and corn. He stayed out of public view, accepting few requests for interviews or speeches.

"He didn't give interviews, but he wasn't a strange person or hard to talk to," said Ron Huston, a colleague at the University of Cincinnati. "He just didn't like being a novelty."

Those who knew him said he enjoyed golfing with friends, was active in the local YMCA and frequently ate lunch at the same restaurant in Lebanon.

In 2000, when he agreed to announce the top 20 engineering achievements of the 20th century as voted by the National Academy of Engineering, Armstrong said there was one disappointment relating to his moonwalk.

"I can honestly say and it's a big surprise to me that I have never had a dream about being on the moon," he said.

From 1982 to 1992, Armstrong was chairman of Charlottesville, Va.-based Computing Technologies for Aviation Inc., a company that supplies computer information management systems for business aircraft.

He then became chairman of AIL Systems Inc., an electronic systems company in Deer Park, N.Y.

Armstrong married Carol Knight in 1999, and the couple lived in Indian Hill, a Cincinnati suburb. He had two adult sons from a previous marriage.

It's the second death in a month of one of NASA's most visible, history-making astronauts. Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, died of pancreatic cancer on July 23 at age 61.

One of NASA's closest astronaut friends was fellow Ohioan, Mercury astronaut John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth.

Just prior to the 50th anniversary of Glenn's orbital flight this past February, Armstrong offered high praise to the elder astronaut and said that Glenn had told him many times how he wished he, too, had flown to the moon on Apollo 11. Glenn said it was his only regret.

Noted Armstrong in an email: "I am hoping I will be 'in his shoes' and have as much success in longevity as he has demonstrated." Glenn is 91.

At the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles on Saturday, visitors held a minute of silence for Armstrong. His family's statement made a simple request for anyone else who wanted to remember him:

"Honor his example of service, accomplishment and modesty, and the next time you walk outside on a clear night and see the moon smiling down at you, think of Neil Armstrong and give him a wink."
___
Borenstein reported from Washington. Associated Press writer Steve Peoples in New Hampshire and AP Science Writers Alicia Chang in Los Angeles and Marcia Dunn in Cape Canaveral, Fla., contributed to this report.

Doktor
25 Aug 12,, 23:06
God bless.

Chogy
25 Aug 12,, 23:17
<salute>

A modest, genuine hero.

Parihaka
25 Aug 12,, 23:17
29893

Full resolution here (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e2/Armstrong_and_Scott_with_Hatches_Open_-_GPN-2000-001413.jpg)

mako88sb
25 Aug 12,, 23:34
Very sad to hear about this. Loved the great interview he did in Australia a few months ago. He seemed in pretty good health for his age. That's a super photo there Parihaka. Never seen that one before.


http://www.heraldsun.com.au/technology/sci-tech/cpa-australias-giant-leap-neil-armstrong-agrees-to-interview-with-accountant/story-fn5iztw3-1226343845785

Officer of Engineers
25 Aug 12,, 23:43
Present Arms.

God speed, Sir, thank you for putting dreams into a boy's head.

tankie
25 Aug 12,, 23:50
Sorry mods i posted just after Ben in the science thread , please merge

RIP.

Bigfella
26 Aug 12,, 02:07
An iconic figure in the history of the C20th & someone whose name will live thtough the ages. I can recall the excietment I felt as a 10 year old boy when I set foot inside the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum & saw some of the re-entry capsules from lunar missions. When I went back last year I felt that same excitement. There is someting about lunar exploration that has that effect on people of all ages. Armstrong will forever be a part of that excitement.

Parihaka
26 Aug 12,, 02:35
That's a super photo there Parihaka. Never seen that one before.

It's Gemini 8. They had a malfunction on one of their thrusters while docked with an Agena. Armstrong undocked, stabilised the Agena and passed control of it to Huston, pulled the Gemini out of a 60prm roll and brought it in for a textbook landing.

Doktor
26 Aug 12,, 02:45
Super cool photo. Where are the rods?

Parihaka
26 Aug 12,, 03:09
Rods?

S2
26 Aug 12,, 04:14
"Present Arms.

God speed, Sir, thank you for putting dreams into a boy's head."

Indeed, Colonel. I easily recall this 13 year old boy sitting in our livingroom watching with the rest of my family. Not a car stirred in the street. It seemed as though the whole nation, at that moment, stepped off the lunar landing module with Armstrong. Actually, the whole world.

You know this already, Colonel but yesterday I met Maj. General Chuck Yeager. Although aware of his test pilot work at Edwards AFB following W.W.II and periodically throughout his career, I had no idea that he was the first commandant of the U.S.A.F. Aerospace Research Pilot School. The coincidence with Armstrong's death is sadly ironic. Evidently they only flew together once to evaluate a dry lake as an alternative landing site for the X-15. In the course of doing so, they became stuck on the lake bed. I can't help but wonder how General Yeager is taking this news today. I know he went fishing again with our general manager and Gary Loomis.

God bless Neil Armstrong. He was a remarkable man and an icon for an entire generation.

mako88sb
26 Aug 12,, 05:12
It's Gemini 8. They had a malfunction on one of their thrusters while docked with an Agena. Armstrong undocked, stabilised the Agena and passed control of it to Huston, pulled the Gemini out of a 60prm roll and brought it in for a textbook landing.

I didn't know much about that incident until I seen "From the Earth To the Moon" when it originally aired. Pretty hairy situation and such a close call. Looks like Armstrong and Scott recovered well from their sea sickness.

Parihaka
26 Aug 12,, 06:13
I didn't know much about that incident until I seen "From the Earth To the Moon" when it originally aired. Pretty hairy situation and such a close call. Looks like Armstrong and Scott recovered well from their sea sickness.

Don't they look cool? :cool:

Minskaya
26 Aug 12,, 06:18
A true hero and icon. Not only to America, but to all people everywhere.

May he Rest in Blessed Peace.

Deltacamelately
26 Aug 12,, 13:07
Rest in Peace.

Entire humankind owes something special to Neil Armstrong.
I indeed named my only son Neil.

tankie
26 Aug 12,, 14:00
Rods?

I think he meant this :fish: whilst waiting for recovery .;)

mako88sb
26 Aug 12,, 15:53
Last week, I was looking for some information about the lunar modules when I found this great site of somebody who built a very detailed 1/24 scale Eagle. Lots of photos and drawings in case anybody may be inspired to tackle a similar project. The guy sure went all out even making sure he got the landing probes after touchdown exactly right.


LM-5 (http://spacemodels.nuxit.net/LEM-24/index.htm)

Chogy
26 Aug 12,, 15:55
I noticed that right away in the Gemini capsule picture... the utter "coolness" of those guys. "OK buddy, the cameras are about to roll here. Got your Ray Bans? And be sure your arm rests on the rail like it's a fighter jet or a sports car."

Anyone who has read "The Right Stuff" may ponder the fact that when the manned space program started, astronauts were NOT cool. Only those with a stick in their hands and 100% control of their craft, the test pilots, were cool. The first astronauts for Mercury and Gemini were considered biological payloads by their cooler bretheren.

Only after the first few U.S. astronauts flew did that attitude (apparently) change, due to the rock star reception they got. "Ticker tape parades? I'll be damned... maybe I need to sign up for the astronaut program."

Chogy
26 Aug 12,, 16:00
Last week, I was looking for some information about the lunar modules when I found this great site of somebody who built a very detailed 1/24 scale Eagle. Lots of photos and drawings in case anybody may be inspired to tackle a similar project. The guy sure went all out even making sure he got the landing probes after touchdown exactly right.


LM-5 (http://spacemodels.nuxit.net/LEM-24/index.htm)

I don't know why exactly, but I love the Lunar Modules for their clunkiness. They are pure function over form. An obvious exoatmospheric vehicle that looks nothing like what you'd expect for a lunar lander.

I'm still amazed that the tiny upper stage of the LM can reach lunar escape velocity. I know the gravity is much lighter, but intellectually, you'd expect it'd require more fuel.

mako88sb
26 Aug 12,, 16:56
I don't know why exactly, but I love the Lunar Modules for their clunkiness. They are pure function over form. An obvious exoatmospheric vehicle that looks nothing like what you'd expect for a lunar lander.

I'm still amazed that the tiny upper stage of the LM can reach lunar escape velocity. I know the gravity is much lighter, but intellectually, you'd expect it'd require more fuel.

Probably my favorite episode of "From the Earth to the Moon" is the "Spider" episode. Fascinating to see the evolution of design process with the elimination of the seats and huge reduction in weight by being able to go with much smaller windows. Any idea how much those seats would of weighed? I'm thinking those along with the reduced glass area might of cut the weight by about 800-1000lbs. Pretty significant as Kelly's book mentions that every lb of weight reduction meant 3 less lbs of combined ascent/descent rocket fuel required.

If you haven't read Tom Kelly's book, I highly recommend it. The chapter titled "Problems, Problems" is just a great read. The ascent engine instability issues where especially worrisome. Here's a quote from the book: "Frequently the LM ascent engine made the notorious "show stoppers" list as a problem that could stop the enormous nationwide Apollo program dead in it's tracks." They did tests to make sure any oscillations caused by combustion instability would eventually dampen out. That test involves detonating a bomb(more like a blasting cap) inside the nozzle during a test firing to make sure spontaneous instability wouldn't lead to an engine explosion. The troublesome ascent stage only received approval after passing 53 consecutive bomb tests. Btw, this bomb testing method , was developed after 3 of the expensive F-1 engines for the Saturn S-1C where destroyed during testing.

Chogy
26 Aug 12,, 19:25
Neil Armstrong on the cancellation of the Shuttle and the Ares launch system, leaving the USA without the capability to send a man into orbit:


In 2010, he made a rare public criticism of the decision to cancel the Ares 1 launch vehicle and the Constellation moon landing program.[143] In an open public letter also signed by Apollo veterans Jim Lovell and Gene Cernan, he noted, "For The United States, the leading space faring nation for nearly half a century, to be without carriage to low Earth orbit and with no human exploration capability to go beyond Earth orbit for an indeterminate time into the future, destines our nation to become one of second or even third rate stature".

Normally a very retiring man, the fact that he spoke out on this says a lot. I happen to agree with him. Probes are very cool, but it's just not the same.

Parihaka
26 Aug 12,, 21:21
I think he meant this :fish: whilst waiting for recovery .;)
Ahhh. :redface:

Parihaka
26 Aug 12,, 21:29
Probably my favorite episode of "From the Earth to the Moon" is the "Spider" episode. Fascinating to see the evolution of design process with the elimination of the seats and huge reduction in weight by being able to go with much smaller windows. Any idea how much those seats would of weighed? I'm thinking those along with the reduced glass area might of cut the weight by about 800-1000lbs. Pretty significant as Kelly's book mentions that every lb of weight reduction meant 3 less lbs of combined ascent/descent rocket fuel required.

If you haven't read Tom Kelly's book, I highly recommend it. The chapter titled "Problems, Problems" is just a great read. The ascent engine instability issues where especially worrisome. Here's a quote from the book: "Frequently the LM ascent engine made the notorious "show stoppers" list as a problem that could stop the enormous nationwide Apollo program dead in it's tracks." They did tests to make sure any oscillations caused by combustion instability would eventually dampen out. That test involves detonating a bomb(more like a blasting cap) inside the nozzle during a test firing to make sure spontaneous instability wouldn't lead to an engine explosion. The troublesome ascent stage only received approval after passing 53 consecutive bomb tests. Btw, this bomb testing method , was developed after 3 of the expensive F-1 engines for the Saturn S-1C where destroyed during testing.

I haven't read it but I can see I'm going to have to. BTW, have you read Andrew Chaikin's book From the Earth to the Moon? The basis for the HBO series? Well worth it.

Parihaka
26 Aug 12,, 21:34
Neil Armstrong on the cancellation of the Shuttle and the Ares launch system, leaving the USA without the capability to send a man into orbit:



Normally a very retiring man, the fact that he spoke out on this says a lot. I happen to agree with him. Probes are very cool, but it's just not the same.

I agree. We're big on offering assistance to our less fortunate, but seldom offer the same assistance to our brightest and best.
They need a true purpose though, not grandstanding like a Mars mission. permanent HEO station, permanent Moon orbit station, Earth/Moon orbiter, permanent moon base with prospecting and mining (especially volatiles) as platform for launches of all varieties into the solar system. In a hundred years all we should be lifting off Earth is the people.

mako88sb
26 Aug 12,, 22:49
I haven't read it but I can see I'm going to have to. BTW, have you read Andrew Chaikin's book From the Earth to the Moon? The basis for the HBO series? Well worth it.

I got it not long after finding out the series was based on it. Must admit I didn't know a whole lot about Apollo aside from AP-11 & AP-13 and practically nothing about Gemini so the series and the book where quite the eye openers.

Parihaka
26 Aug 12,, 23:28
I got it not long after finding out the series was based on it. Must admit I didn't know a whole lot about Apollo aside from AP-11 & AP-13 and practically nothing about Gemini so the series and the book where quite the eye openers.

Weren't they just. I'd followed it all as a kid, including the chance to eyeball one of the Mercury capsules up close but the detail Chaikin was able to add to the story was enlightening to say the least.

Dreadnought
26 Aug 12,, 23:39
An American hero...RIP,:frown:

USSWisconsin
27 Aug 12,, 01:48
He was a fine man. RIP. It means a lot to me that he cared so much about our future in space.

S2
27 Aug 12,, 04:01
All those guys embodied the meaning of "professional". Courage, commitment, candor, competence and confidence oozed from them all. A remarkable group of men and Armstrong may have stood right at the fore.

lemontree
27 Aug 12,, 06:11
RIP Neil....A whole generation of boys were named after you.

You left your mark on earth and it's moon....wow!

Tronic
27 Aug 12,, 06:55
Rest in Peace Neil. You're a hero who inspired the entire human race.

Chogy
27 Aug 12,, 14:19
I hope he's not resting in peace.




I hope he is visiting his old landing site in the Sea of Tranquility.... checking out Mars... nearby stars.... Saying hello to Gagarin, Grissom, White, Chaffee...

S2
27 Aug 12,, 15:01
Sorta the Universal Studios tour for the afterlife, eh?

Chogy
27 Aug 12,, 16:13
Sorta the Universal Studios tour for the afterlife, eh?

We tap dance around the Spiritual here on WAB, but I've always thought the ideal afterlife would involve a lot of cool exploration, transcendence of time, and maybe some fine booze and BBQ, and for BigRoss, beach volleyball, vs. an eternity of chanting, harp playing, or poltergeist activities. ;)

mako88sb
27 Aug 12,, 16:18
I finished Jim Hansen's "First Man" a few weeks ago and one comment by Harrison Schmitt was particularly insightful of Neil's capabilities. Schmitt was instrumental in preparing Neil and Buzz for the geological sampling they would perform on the moon. This was pretty rudimentary compared to later missions but according to Schmitt, "Neil's collection of rocks was the best that anybody did on the moon."(Not sure if Harrison was including his samples with that remark). He chalked this up to Neil's engineering interest that closely jived with the logic involved with a certain geology theory when it came to determining the appropriate samples to collect. I thought that was pretty amazing considering how much better prepared the follow on missions where and how little time AP-11 was on the moon compared to them.

Albany Rifles
27 Aug 12,, 20:20
When I heard of his passing the other day I immediately flashed back to my childhood. In the mid-60s to the early-70s we were ALL space nerds. And I mean everyone my age, not just my friends. We hung on every launch and landing. Teachers would stop class and roll in black and white TV sets so we could watch the events live (we really LOVED NASA for that!) I can remember Jules Bergman, Walter Cronkite, John Chancellor, and a host of others explain what events were happening with the same Revell models I had hanging in my room.

I recall the day they landed….we had the TV on with the feed while having dinner….and when Walter Cronkite announced 1 Minute To Landing we all dashed for the living room. I can still remember clearly when Armstrong made his epic announcement announcing Tranquility Base. A huge white banner flashed on and of that said MAN IS ON THE MOON!!! Not an American is on the Moon but Man. We cheered our heads off!

After dinner I had to go and collect for my paper route and everyone told me to hurry home so I wouldn’t miss the live pictures when they emerged. I stayed up to 3 the next day watching all of the footage.

Thanks Neil, Buzz & Mike.

tbm3fan
28 Aug 12,, 07:21
All those guys embodied the meaning of "professional". Courage, commitment, candor, competence and confidence oozed from them all. A remarkable group of men and Armstrong may have stood right at the fore.


Yes, and gave everyone else the credit for enabling him to get to the moon. In short he was just a pilot sort of guy so there is also self-effacing.

I'm lucky in that I get to see some of that history every week. Being a volunteer, on the Hornet, we have one of the quarantine facilities, the picture of the three at the window they looked out as Nixon greeted them and a replica of #66 where it was parked in 1969 not to mention an Apollo room.

tankie
01 Sep 12,, 13:40
There Are Places to Go Beyond Belief” – Neil Armstrong

By Diane Tessman - 3 days 23 hours ago

The Eagle has taken off – Neil Armstrong has died.
On July 20, 1994, Neil Armstrong, the first human to walk on the Moon, said, ”To you we say we have only completed a beginning. We leave you much that is undone. There are great ideas undiscovered, breakthroughs available to those who can remove one of truth’s protective layers. There are places to go beyond belief.”
Neil Armstrong tried to explain himself: “I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer, born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow. . . . [Arthur C. Clarke’s] third law seems particularly apt today: Any sufficiently developed technology is indistinguishable from magic. Truly, it has been a magical century.”
Armstrong and science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke were good friends. Make no mistake: Neil Armstrong was also a dreamer and visionary.
Armstrong himself was a key figure in engineering that magic. Along with John Glenn, he showed the world a new style of American hero, combining the grace under pressure of test pilots with the bravery of explorers in the new, final frontier.


If NASA wanted a Charles Lindbergh in the role, however, they may have gotten too much of one; for after his legendary achievement, Armstrong seemed to vanish from the world, struggling with the question: What do you do after you’ve been to the Moon? What do you do after The Eagle has landed?
Apollo 13’s Jim Lovell: “Sometimes I chastise Neil for being too Lindbergh-like. … And Neil’s answer to that is, ‘I’d be harassed all the time if I weren’t reclusive.’ And he’s probably right.” Others, however, have a different opinion; astronaut Gene Cernan: “I’d just like to say, it could have been anyone who walked [first] on the Moon: it could have been Neil, it could have been Buzz, it could have been Wally [Schirra], it could have been any one of our colleagues. But I don’t think any one of us—any one of us—who would have had that opportunity, could have handled it with as great and as honorable dignity as Neil Armstrong has handled the responsibility of being the first human being to step foot on the surface of the Moon.”
Grace. Bravery. Honor. Dignity. All in a man who took a slide rule with him when he went to the Moon. Could there be a better hero for our time?
Yes, yes, maybe we didn’t go to the Moon; it’s invigorating to be an armchair skeptic. History is a funny thing; doggedly skeptical conspiracy theories sometimes ultimately hurt the perceiver more than they hurt the focus of the investigation and/or rumors.
I know, however, that truth is truth regarding our trip (or lack of trip), to the moon. In time, we will all be sure if we did go to the Moon in 1969 or not. We do know that the NASA astronauts were incredibly brave and maybe just plain crazy to climb into those tiny tin boxes with a horrific bunch of rocket fuel at their behinds, and try to go into space!


Neil Armstrong bore the curse and the blessing of the entire human race: He wanted to go to the stars. He wanted to know. He wanted this gnosis to unfold with intelligence, peace, and logic.
Neil Armstrong was a class act and so shiningly smart! I am sure he knew fear all too well but he handled it by using his logic and intelligence, something we must all do as we encounter the Unknown. Let’s stop allowing fear to lead us before it is too late.
Does Neil Armstrong’s quote, “There are places to go beyond belief,” indicate that he also saw UFOs during his time in space and/or on the Moon? Some people think so. Neil did not talk about what he saw (or didn’t see), as some of the astronauts have bravely done. But then Neil didn’t talk much about anything, he lived in his head and spirit.
In his famous “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind…” proclamation, Neil Armstrong was trying to tell us: The stars, space, time, the unknown, aliens, it is all somehow about the evolution of humankind!
Good-bye, Neil Armstrong, it is launch-time for The Eagle!