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View Full Version : Fly Fishing anyone?



bonehead
07 Apr 12,, 15:28
After fishing most any other way I decided to get my feet wet with a fly rod in hand. After buying the basics, well... better quality basics, I am sure hoping that fly fishing will be cheaper in the long haul as there is less nickel and diming as there is with bait casting/spinning reels. The new rod/reel is a Sage "the one" 9' 5 wt and a Sage 4200 reel.
Going to the lake today to flail a bit until I get the hang of it until I can find someone who can show me the light. A class might be in order as well. Waders,vest, and all the other goodies will slowly trickle in so If anyone has any insight I would vastly appreciate it. My usual quarry will be the trout that hang in streams/rivers and mountain lakes. Once I get the hang of it I might add steelhead to the mix.

USSWisconsin
07 Apr 12,, 15:56
I have several friends who do this. One of their favorite parts is tying flies. It looks pretty calming, with a lttle vice and a cigar box of assorted hooks, thread and feathers. The flies are proudly displayed in a flip open metal cigarette box or on a hat. I didn't get the impression it was cheaper than bait fishing without a boat though. ;) Henry Blake in the TV series M*A*S*H spent some time doing this. :)

Doktor
07 Apr 12,, 19:26
Bonehead,

All I know is that we have invented it:cool:






















































... and S2 mastered it.

bonehead
08 Apr 12,, 03:05
I have several friends who do this. One of their favorite parts is tying flies. It looks pretty calming, with a lttle vice and a cigar box of assorted hooks, thread and feathers. The flies are proudly displayed in a flip open metal cigarette box or on a hat. I didn't get the impression it was cheaper than bait fishing without a boat though. ;) Henry Blake in the TV series M*A*S*H spent some time doing this. :)

Calming? I remember a few winters ago when I watched a couple in the water,sleet swirling around and they were attempting to tie on on the line. Took nearly 15 minutes in the numbing cold and one guy was anything but calm.

I already know several who do their own flys and they are relatively cheap so availability is not a problem. That would drive me nuts as I would remember every imperfection when ever I used a fly I made. Yeah, Want to piss of Colonel Blake? salute him.

Day one was not so great. The weather was superb but my technique was ......lacking. I realized out there that I spent 40+ years casting with my wrist and now that is a no no. Its like learning a whole new language. Pity the fool that says, "bobber" to a fly man. Oh well, Now I have a new challenge to master.

bonehead
08 Apr 12,, 03:09
Bonehead,

All I know is that we have invented it:cool:






















































... and S2 mastered it.

There was a time today I really wished that you guys ........kept it to yourselves. :bang:

Going to have to get some pointers from the fly fishing zen master.:fish:

S2
08 Apr 12,, 03:17
Live in the neighborhood and have been flyfishing for 24 years. You've done the manly thing. Casting is easy. Strip line off the reel as you backcast. The rod will load that line if you're sufficiently patient to allow it. Step toward your target and cast. 9 o' clock and 1 o' clock are your rod positions.

Practice casting in a park. Embarassing yourself in front of five year olds beats looking like a doofus on the Deschutes.

I transitioned from gear for one reason. I fish trout in the high desert and you'll catch more and bigger fish on average when flyfishing, especially if you learn to nymph fish and swing streamers. Lot of guys, though, are DEVOTED to flyfishing for salmon and steelies.

Drop me a P.M. I'll share some private info with you that you might wish to know.

USSWisconsin
08 Apr 12,, 04:18
Calming? I remember a few winters ago when I watched a couple in the water,sleet swirling around and they were attempting to tie on on the line. Took nearly 15 minutes in the numbing cold and one guy was anything but calm.

I already know several who do their own flys and they are relatively cheap so availability is not a problem. That would drive me nuts as I would remember every imperfection when ever I used a fly I made. Yeah, Want to piss of Colonel Blake? salute him.

Day one was not so great. The weather was superb but my technique was ......lacking. I realized out there that I spent 40+ years casting with my wrist and now that is a no no. Its like learning a whole new language. Pity the fool that says, "bobber" to a fly man. Oh well, Now I have a new challenge to master.

I was thinking of the associated hobby of tying flies. Fly fishing in winter? Didn't know about that. Best of luck with your new hobby, I hope it brings you pleasure.

bonehead
08 Apr 12,, 06:08
I was thinking of the associated hobby of tying flies. Fly fishing in winter? Didn't know about that. Best of luck with your new hobby, I hope it brings you pleasure.

Winter steelhead run the rivers in the worst of winter and there are those who stand in the water and fish them....a fly rod in one hand and a steaming hot latte in the other. Not my cup of tea. The closest I would come to that is plunking... Throw a large weight on and have the lure just above the stream bed. Run back to the car and watch the pole while you turn up the heater.

I have too much on my plate and not the patience required for fly tying. Its going to take quite a bit for me to study entomology as bugs were never my thing in my biology classes. I swatted them, never studied them. Now the biting bastards are important. Go figure.

bonehead
08 Apr 12,, 06:13
Live in the neighborhood and have been flyfishing for 24 years. You've done the manly thing. Casting is easy. Strip line off the reel as you backcast. The rod will load that line if you're sufficiently patient to allow it. Step toward your target and cast. 9 o' clock and 1 o' clock are your rod positions.

Practice casting in a park. Embarassing yourself in front of five year olds beats looking like a doofus on the Deschutes.

I transitioned from gear for one reason. I fish trout in the high desert and you'll catch more and bigger fish on average when flyfishing, especially if you learn to nymph fish and swing streamers. Lot of guys, though, are DEVOTED to flyfishing for salmon and steelies.

Drop me a P.M. I'll share some private info with you that you might wish to know.

I was already ushered out of one city park. Who knew you couldn't target squirrels, not that I have a prayer of hitting any of them. Went to Detroit today. Lots of room,no wind and I had only the elk and geese to laugh at me. I will send you the P.M. later. Just keep in mind. Bonehead=noob in the fly fishing department.

S2
08 Apr 12,, 06:18
"...Now the biting bastards are important..."

Not really. Just the usual recreational hazard. Trout don't really focus on mosquitoes much. You will if trying to tie on a fly and they're about. Not bad over in the desert. Worse up around Crane Prarie.

Now...their close cousin, the midge? Yup. Trout make them a staple. Stoneflies, mayflies, caddis, crustaceans, terrestials, minnows and worms will be the brunt of your focus. Blue-Winged Olives, tricos, pale morning duns, salmonflies, orange caddis, march browns, mahogany duns, sulphers, grasshoppers, beetles, ants.

Parihaka
08 Apr 12,, 08:28
From a personal perspective with nothing like Steve's experience, may I say that you should treat it like a zen moment. Be in the now and take satisfaction simply from the environment and the slow perfection of your cast, because you sure as hell aren't going to catch any actual fish until you give up trying.

Parihaka
08 Apr 12,, 08:29
Oh, and don't forget to have a piss before you put your waders on.

Doktor
08 Apr 12,, 08:53
From a personal perspective with nothing like Steve's experience, may I say that you should treat it like a zen moment. Be in the now and take satisfaction simply from the environment and the slow perfection of your cast, because you sure as hell aren't going to catch any actual fish until you give up trying.

+1.

I always wondered how fishing is relaxing?

Never really connected all the curses how the fish wasn't hungry that day with the profound way of explaining how relaxing the whole process is.

It is something like golf I guess :Dancing-Banana:

S2
08 Apr 12,, 10:07
"I always wondered how fishing is relaxing?"

Who said it was? I saw Tiger Woods beat his driver today. I've done the same or worse fishing.

However it can, at its best, be a pleasant distraction. Often very pleasant. Addictively so.

tankie
08 Apr 12,, 14:57
Best sport in the world , 1st off ,fish wet flies , they are the ones that sink , then progress to dry fly (floating )wet is the easier of the 2 , practice on land casting so you master the art , the line should be rolled out over the water making as little sound/splash as possible , most of all study the water , see whats hatching , nymphs/buzzers/redworm/ etc etc then match what you see to imitate as near as possible ,remember never whip the line out , let the rod do the work , match the rod to the line vica versa , there are loads on the market ,and you get what you pay for , buy the best you can and it eases frustration and keeps you by the water ,tight lines m8y and dont forget , its a lifetimes dedication and you learn everyday .I prefer a tip action rod against an all through action which i find sloppy with crap control ;)

:fish::fish::fish:

S2
08 Apr 12,, 17:06
"I prefer a tip action rod against an all through action which i find sloppy with crap control"

I prefer a progressive action with a moderate tip. I don't typically need to cast beyond 45 ft. After that, mending becomes a chore plus when throwing a dry/nymph combo I'd rather have a more open loop.

I work for Gary Loomis. Not his former company, G. Loomis (owned by Shimano) but the man himself. His office is ten feet from my desk. He long ago left G. Loomis and has formed two new companies, North Fork Composites LLC (a blank company) and EDGE Rods.

We just started building rods last December although we've been building blanks for the custom rod market now for about four years. This will be Gary's fifth rod company and I've met nobody with such a grasp on the three key components of rod-building- material, design and production.

So far our focus has been on steelhead and salmon rods because of the winter steelhead and spring chinook runs. Lightest, most sensitive rods on the market. We use an amazing high modulus graphite, refuse to coat our blanks and employ minimal guides. All designed to reduce weight that otherwise unnecessarily impedes performance. We've just completed a blank production run for 9' four-piece 5wt fast-action flyrods. Action is progressive through the blank but speeds in the tip section. We'll be building those out as our first flyrod offerings.

I own two Sage VPS series rods from the early 2000s and a few others (including a bamboo from 1947). The Sage rods are nice enough but gather dust now. Don't load the way I prefer. Something I didn't realize until casting some of our prototypes. It proved to me that you've really got to cast a number of rods to properly feel each action and understand it. Without doing so, you don't know what you might be missing.

Officer of Engineers
08 Apr 12,, 17:09
I always wondered how fishing is relaxing?Well, I always find dealing with sticks of dynamite very relaxing since I forced myself to pay attention and forget all my other worries.

tankie
08 Apr 12,, 17:18
Well, I always find dealing with sticks of dynamite very relaxing since I forced myself to pay attention and forget all my other worries.

Philistine

bonehead
08 Apr 12,, 18:05
Well, I always find dealing with sticks of dynamite very relaxing since I forced myself to pay attention and forget all my other worries.

Well...That explains the scotch.

Doktor
08 Apr 12,, 18:23
Well, I always find dealing with sticks of dynamite very relaxing since I forced myself to pay attention and forget all my other worries.

Makes sense. You make fish fly plus you are relaxed.

bonehead
08 Apr 12,, 18:31
"I prefer a tip action rod against an all through action which i find sloppy with crap control"

I prefer a progressive action with a moderate tip. I don't typically need to cast beyond 45 ft. After that, mending becomes a chore plus when throwing a dry/nymph combo I'd rather have a more open loop.

I work for Gary Loomis. Not his former company, G. Loomis (owned by Shimano) but the man himself. His office is ten feet from my desk. He long ago left G. Loomis and has formed two new companies, North Fork Composites LLC (a blank company) and EDGE Rods.

We just started building rods last December although we've been building blanks for the custom rod market now for about four years. This will be Gary's fifth rod company and I've met nobody with such a grasp on the three key components of rod-building- material, design and production.

So far our focus has been on steelhead and salmon rods because of the winter steelhead and spring chinook runs. Lightest, most sensitive rods on the market. We use an amazing high modulus graphite, refuse to coat our blanks and employ minimal guides. All designed to reduce weight that otherwise unnecessarily impedes performance. We've just completed a blank production run for 9' four-piece 5wt fast-action flyrods. Action is progressive through the blank but speeds in the tip section. We'll be building those out as our first flyrod offerings.

I own two Sage VPS series rods from the early 2000s and a few others (including a bamboo from 1947). The Sage rods are nice enough but gather dust now. Don't load the way I prefer. Something I didn't realize until casting some of our prototypes. It proved to me that you've really got to cast a number of rods to properly feel each action and understand it. Without doing so, you don't know what you might be missing.

Ok, my purchase was a shot in the dark. I kind of narrowed it down between that and the ZXL. Lots of talk about medium action/classic action and fast action. Nothing of progressive action and tip action. I didn't have the opportunity to experiment with a lot of rods beforehand so I am really hoping this rod is something I can get a competence of in the near future.
So far I do Ok with the direction but the casts are still short and with a lot of "WTH? dribbles" so I am thinking my timing needs improving in addition to just getting a feel of the rod. I would rather not pick up any bad habits along the way that I would have to break later if I could help it.

You plan on using the 5wt for Salmon and steelhead? interesting.

bonehead
08 Apr 12,, 18:33
"...Now the biting bastards are important..."

Not really. Just the usual recreational hazard. Trout don't really focus on mosquitoes much. You will if trying to tie on a fly and they're about. Not bad over in the desert. Worse up around Crane Prarie.

Now...their close cousin, the midge? Yup. Trout make them a staple. Stoneflies, mayflies, caddis, crustaceans, terrestials, minnows and worms will be the brunt of your focus. Blue-Winged Olives, tricos, pale morning duns, salmonflies, orange caddis, march browns, mahogany duns, sulphers, grasshoppers, beetles, ants.

Minnows,worms and grasshoppers. Everything else I get to learn.

tankie
08 Apr 12,, 18:54
Not forgetting the best ever trout killer ,,the greenwell glory , dry fly :wors:

S2
08 Apr 12,, 19:12
"So far I do Ok with the direction but the casts are still short and with a lot of "WTH? dribbles" so I am thinking my timing needs improving in addition to just getting a feel of the rod..."

That's common. No worries there. Becoming comfortable with how the rod loads on the backcast will help build the patience and muscle memory.

"...You plan on using the 5wt for Salmon and steelhead? interesting..."

I wasn't clear. That'll be a trout flyrod for anybody but the most daring.:eek:

Since EDGE started building rods in December those have been side-drifting, salmon mooching and steelhead plug rods for gear fishing. While North Fork Composites have offered trout, steelhead and salmon fly blanks for four years, these five wts we'll be manufacturing will be the first fly rods made by EDGE, our rod company. North Fork Composites offer trout fly blanks in the 3wt-6wt class and steelhead-salmon fly blanks in the 7-8wt class.

I'd be willing to use our 6 wt for summer-run steelies over on the Deschutes though.:)

bonehead
11 Apr 12,, 06:21
Toured some Portland fly shops today. Orvis in Bridgeport village and the Fly shop on Halsey. Any other places I should check out.

S2
11 Apr 12,, 06:26
Might stop here (http://www.thecaddisfly.com/) when next in Eugene.

bonehead
12 Apr 12,, 03:43
If that is the place a couple of blocks west from the 5th street market its already on my "to visit" places. If not I will add it to the other place I had in mind. Been meaning to get down there soon anyway to visit an old professor or two.

Going to look for a place or two on the west side (Portland) as it looks like I will be working in Hillsboro for awhile. Have to know where all these places are so I can drop in on the way to whatever to pick up odds and ends.

bonehead
14 Apr 12,, 04:14
Ya know I have been pondering the dynamite a bit. I imagine a couple of sticks would be way cheaper accumulating all the fishing gear. None of that fancy knot tying and casting either. Just light and throw, collect whatever surfaces and retire to a comfortable place to throw back a few shots.