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Bigfella
01 Jun 11,, 10:39
OK folks, time to pony up with your favourite protest/political songs. While I would argue that entertainers rarely have opinons worth having, let alone broadcasting, there are exceptions. Think lateral people, this isn't just a contest for the best folk song (though there are some fine examples in that genre) or the most obviuos antiwar anthem. There a a lot of songs & a lot of topics. I'll kick off with a few classics & a few notes on each.

Redemption Song has always been one of my favourite Bob Marley tracks. Simple, beautiful.

I've also thrown in a wonderful Joe Strummer version. Two greats. Gone but never forgotten.


Lifting material from a speech by pan-Africanist Marcus Garvey, calling for a second emanicipation from "mental slavery", "Redemption Song" is a simple call for awakening that is at once hopeful protest and heartbreaking resignation. The final line of the chorus, "All I ever had, redemption songs", reads like an epitaph for Marley's struggle.

While the anthem of that struggle was "No Woman, No Cry", "Redemption Song" is the antidote. The narrator is powerless: "Old pirates, yes, they rob I/Sold I to the merchant ships/Minutes after they took I/From the bottomless pit". At the same time, he is divinely empowered: "We forward in this generation triumphantly".

The idiomatic uses of "I" for "me" and "We forward" root the song in its Jamaican context, in the same way as the imperative "No Woman, No Cry". From this idiom, Marley had an ability to create honest protest songs such as "Get Up, Stand Up" that surpassed his own Rastafarian beliefs, and to reach beyond a strict identity:

"My father was a white and my mother was black. Them call me half-caste or whatever. Me don't dip on nobody's side. Me don't dip on the black man's side nor the white man's side. Me dip on God's side, the one who create me and cause me to come from black and white."

With two verses, a repeated chorus, and a simple chord progression, "Redemption Song" is a folk singalong from the reggae tradition. Written at the time of Marley's diagnosis with cancer, it evidences the increasingly religious nature of his songwriting on the 1980 album Uprising. The spiritual does not, however, overshadow the call to awaken against tyranny, and the message is the possibility of redemption, no matter how slim.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNkr86zZaP4&feature=related



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F10tP5HIpaA&feature=fvwrel

Bigfella
01 Jun 11,, 10:45
Always loved this song, especially the trumpet work by Chet Baker.. Had no idea what it was about. The power of subtlety.



"I wasn't being alarmist or trying to be morbid in any way," Elvis Costello would later say of his thought-provoking evocation of war and loss written during the Britain-Argentina Falklands conflict.

"Shipbuilding" examines how the conflict could potentially revive the traditional ship-building areas going into decline in the UK, only for the sons of those areas to potentially be lost in those same ships as the war progresses: initial euphoria at news that they'll be reopening the shipyards will become sadness as the letters notifying the next of kin arrive.

"Is it worth it?" the opening line asks, with workers anticipating the goods they will buy with new wages -- of course, the answer could not be clearer



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuPrrdRzlxc

Bigfella
01 Jun 11,, 10:55
OK, this is an antiwar folk song, but a goodie. Bogle was a scotsman transplanted to Australia, where he became a major figure in the folk scene. One of the reasons I love this song is how well it evokes Australia & the Australian experience of WW1. This song was written at a time when the celebration of our military past was well out of fashion. it is a fine reflection on the horrors of war. I've also thrown in the fione Pogues interpretation - Shane does such fine work.




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WG48Ftsr3OI



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZqN1glz4JY

Bigfella
01 Jun 11,, 11:09
This might seem an odd one to some English folk, as it is seen as simply a partiotic anthem to accompany the waving of union flags. It is much, much more. William Blake was a political radical in his day, and the reference to 'dark satanic mills' should give pause to the ruling classes who sing it with such gusto. It is an incredibly beautiful song with the most remarkable lyrics.

I've started off with a version by left wing performer Billy Bragg because you get the lyrics clearly. Th real way to hear this, however, is the second version. I get chills whenever I hear it.



Starting life as a poem by the English printmaker, painter and poet William Blake, "Jerusalem" would be transformed over a century later when it was published in a patriotic anthology during the middle of the First World War.

Amid flagging morale and mounting casualties, "Jerusalem" provided the affirmation that people badly needed of why the war was being fought. Such was its success that the poet laureate Robert Bridges asked Sir Hubert Parry to set it to music in 1916 and "Jerusalem" was reincarnated as the hymn known universally today.

The "Jerusalem" described here is new: Blake, inspired by the apocryphal story of Jesus's visit to England, linked it to the concept of the Second Coming and Jesus's establishment of another Jerusalem, by now a metaphor for a world of peace. For a wartime audience, that better, peaceful world was clearly England.

Another popular interpretation has focused on the industrial upheaval during the 19th century -- the nightmarish "dark Satanic mills" of Blake's imagination contrasting with the "pleasant pastures" where this new Jerusalem could be.

But if Blake's message was once given urgency by the change the Industrial Revolution brought to Britain, his words have nevertheless proved enduringly popular: as a suffragette song, as the anthem of the England cricket team, and now sung by the audience every year at the end of the Last Night of the Proms in the Royal Albert Hall.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_GteXsRfPc&playnext=1&list=PL791FAF6DF87813BE




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8VH0sbEU20&feature=related

bigross86
01 Jun 11,, 11:47
Barry McGuire - Eve of Destruction. Pretty self explanatory


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EyGcXj84mE

Bigfella
01 Jun 11,, 12:17
Absolute classic BR.

Wayfarer
01 Jun 11,, 12:24
Bigfella RE: The band played waltzing Matilda

I reckon Slim Dustys version is better


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MGlpxviu8PY

bigross86
01 Jun 11,, 13:53
One of my favorite bands, their album is coming out next month and is going to be one of the first albums I've bought in a very long time. I've been to 8 of their concerts in the past 5 months. They take Tracy Chapman's "Talkin' 'bout a Revolution" and interpret it based on the Arab Spring. Very enjoyable

Shmemel - Talking About an Arab Revolution.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qx7PR8sjRhs

crooks
01 Jun 11,, 18:45
Cool thread idea! Nice version of Tracy Chapman BR, the original is classic too.

There's been loads of Irish political songs I like, Paul McCartney's 'Give Ireland back to the Irish' was always a favourite (when I was a kid we used to chant it at British squaddies, they hated it:biggrin:):

C4OlM0lPqcE

U2 also did a great job with 'Sunday Bloody Sunday', powerful anti-war song:

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Wider afield, always find the Jefferson Airplane version of 'Wooden Ships' haunting, anti-nuke and anti-Vietnam:

hIccZsURyLc

Springsteen's 'Born in the USA' has similar themes, friggin love it:

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My favourite 'finger at the boss' song, so bloody catchy! Workers Unite:

WOrL1QaoBtE

The Dropkick Murphy's, emphasising everything that's awesome about Celtic rock:

We're the first ones to starve, we're the first ones to die
The first ones in line for that pie-in-the-sky
And we're always the last when the cream is shared out
For the worker is working when the fat cat's about :

aTafZRecy2k

Phil Ochs (RIP) was a powerful anti-war activist who wrote many spiffy songs, 'Love me I'm a liberal' is a rather witty critique of 'latte liberals', who were essentially pro-war and hypocritical. The second was banned from airwaves during the Vietnam war - which he took as a compliment:

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bigross86
01 Jun 11,, 19:01
Here's another Phil Ochs favorite of mine:

Phil Ochs - Draft Dodger Rag


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFFOUkipI4U

Doktor
01 Jun 11,, 23:51
STING - Russians

In Europe and America, there's a growing feeling of hysteria
Conditioned to respond to all the threats
In the rhetorical speeches of the Soviets
Mr. Krushchev said we will bury you
I don't subscribe to this point of view
It would be such an ignorant thing to do
If the Russians love their children too

How can I save my little boy from Oppenheimer's deadly toy
There is no monopoly in common sense
On either side of the political fence
We share the same biology
Regardless of ideology
Believe me when I say to you
I hope the Russians love their children too

There is no historical precedent
To put the words in the mouth of the President
There's no such thing as a winnable war
It's a lie that we don't believe anymore
Mr. Reagan says we will protect you
I don't subscribe to this point of view
Believe me when I say to you
I hope the Russians love their children too

We share the same biology
Regardless of ideology
What might save us, me, and you
Is that the Russians love their children too


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rk78eCIx4E

DOR
02 Jun 11,, 03:16
Somebody has to bring up Country Joe MacDonald's "Fixin' to Die Rag"

Yeah, come on all of you, big strong men,
Uncle Sam needs your help again.
He's got himself in a terrible jam
Way down yonder in Vietnam
So put down your books and pick up a gun,
We're gonna have a whole lotta fun.

And it's one, two, three,
What are we fighting for?
Don't ask me, I don't give a damn,
Next stop is Vietnam!

And it's five, six, seven,
Open up the pearly gates,
Well there ain't no time to wonder why,
Whoopee! we're all gonna die.

Well, come on generals, let's move fast;
Your big chance has come at last.
Gotta go out and get those reds 'cause
The only good commie is the one who's dead
And you know that peace can only be won
When we've blown 'em all to kingdom come.

And it's one, two, three,
What are we fighting for?
Don't ask me, I don't give a damn,
Next stop is Vietnam!

And it's five, six, seven,
Open up the pearly gates,
Well there ain't no time to wonder why
Whoopee! we're all gonna die.

Huh!
Well, come on Wall Street, don't move slow,
Why man, this is war's a-go-go-go.
There's plenty good money to be made
By supplying the Army with the tools of the trade,
Just hope and pray that if they drop the bomb,
They drop it on the Viet Cong.

And it's one, two, three,
What are we fighting for?
Don't ask me, I don't give a damn,
Next stop is Vietnam.
And it's five, six, seven,
Open up the pearly gates,
Well there ain't no time to wonder why
Whoopee! we're all gonna die.

Well, come on mothers throughout the land,
Pack your boys off to Vietnam.
Come on fathers, don't hesitate,
Send 'em off before it's too late.
Be the first one on your block
To have your boy come home in a box.

And it's one, two, three
What are we fighting for?
Don't ask me, I don't give a damn,
Next stop is Vietnam!

And it's five, six, seven,
Open up the pearly gates,
Well there ain't no time to wonder why,
Whoopee! we're all gonna die

Bigfella
02 Jun 11,, 10:39
Beat me to it DOR. Was thinking about this just yesterday. I would argue that in the context of the times the 'Fish Cheer' was almost as political.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4xD8j8ye9k

Bigfella
02 Jun 11,, 10:45
Some great selections here.

BR, loved that version of 'talkin' 'bout revolution'. Very cool.

Crooks, a nice mix of topics & artists. We could almost do a thread just based on political songs by Irishmen or about Ireland. Nice to see the Strawbs getting a run too. Very rousing.

Doc, I have to admit that I always thought Sting's sentiments were a wee bit silly, but it is a nice song, not least because it got a bit of Prokofiev intl the charts.

Inspired by BR, I think this counts as political (and it rocks):



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7DbFYsi9iSg

Bigfella
02 Jun 11,, 11:10
This is another Eric Bogle classic, this time about Ireland. The song doesn't take sides, but simply reflects on the grief of a parent who has lost a son. Even shorn of its political content this song is a stark evocation of grief.

I couldn't find a Bogle version, but Mary Black sounds better anyway. Apologies for the accompanying clip, it is Republican propaganda. Unfortunately it is the only clip with appropriate images for the song.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hcAT8I8ry0


I have posted this one before, but it is a truly stunning version of a much performed song about the 1916 uprising. Nice clip too.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlIot3gC43M


This one is proof that the Irish have long memories. A rollicking song about the hated Oliver Cromwell written & performed by perhaps the greates of modern Irish bands:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-LyUCV80d8&feature=related


And finally one about more recent injustices:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rdh08n279VI&feature=related

Double Edge
03 Jun 11,, 10:26
Gil Scott-Heron who recently (http://dyn.politico.com/printstory.cfm?uuid=96BDA75C-FB4B-45AB-A1B1-3C10F6C42AAC) died (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/gil-scottheron-musician-writer-and-political-activist-whose-years-lost-to-drug-addiction-could-not-erase-his-influence-2290724.html?service=Print) :frown: was a late discovery for me. Very much under the radar given his drug habit & associated legal problems but boy did he pack a punch when he was in his prime.

Political commentary by way of poetry & music about race relations, civil rights, repression like apartheid in S.Africa before it became mainstream with other artists, anti-nuclear stand to war.


In the dark, distrustful 1970s, Scott-Heron, with his musical partner Brian Jackson, battled to motivate the "Me Generation" with the altruism of someone raised during the "We Generation" of the civil rights 1960s. Although comparisons to both Stevie Wonder and Curtis Mayfield are not inaccurate, Gil's critiques on Watergate, drug addiction, race relations, Vietnam, nuclear power and apartheid, were far sharper, wittier and more explicit than the social appraisals by those two artists. Gil called his recordings "storm music". But the combativeness in certain tracks was often tinged with a sense of hope. Indeed, his apolitical songs, which received less attention, were shot through with sunshine.

H2Ogate blues - youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rh3bgPJ4dBs), lyrics (http://www.songmeanings.net/songs/view/3530822107858754026/)
Winter in America - youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGlRsjHTkbs), lyrics (http://www.lyricstime.com/gil-scott-heron-winter-in-america-lyrics.html)
B movie - youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56ipWM3DWe4), lyrics (http://www.lyricsreg.com/lyrics/gil+scott-heron/B+Movie/)
Work for peace - youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPqpV9olIlw), lyrics (http://frgdr.com/blog/2011/05/30/gil-scott-heron-work-for-peace/)

Bigfella
03 Jun 11,, 11:38
DE,

Crooks, S2 & I left some comments & music on the 'what are you listening to' thread. There is a GREAT clip for 'the revolution...'. Feel free to re-post here or add more. GSH has many admirers here.

*GSH trivia: his father was a talented jamaican footballer who was the first black man to play for the legendary Glasgow Celtic club. Can't imagine what Glasgow in the 50s might have been like for a black man. Curious indeed.

Bigfella
03 Jun 11,, 11:50
The Devil most assuredly has the bes tunes, and gnerally speaking the left has the best protest/political songs. There are some exceptions, however. In context these songs were very political.

Ironically. Merle DID smoke marijuana. Not a fan of hippes though.


Haggard told The Boot that he wrote the song in 1960 after being released from San Quentin Prison. He said that he became disheartened watching Vietnam War protests and incorporated that emotion and viewpoint into song. Haggard says, "When I was in prison, I knew what it was like to have freedom taken away. Freedom is everything. During Vietnam, there were all kinds of protests. Here were these [servicemen] going over there and dying for a cause -- we don't even know what it was really all about. And here are these young kids, that were free, bitching about it. There's something wrong with that and with [disparaging] those poor guys." He states that he wrote the song to support the troops.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iYY2FQHFwE


"The Ballad Of The Green Berets" is a patriotic song in the ballad style about the Green Berets, an elite special force in the U.S. Army. It is one of the very few songs of the 1960s to cast the military in a positive light, yet it became a major hit, reaching No. 1 on the Billboard charts for five weeks in 1966. It was also a crossover smash, reaching No. 1 on Billboard's Easy Listening chart and No. 2 on Billboard's Country survey.

The song was written by Robin Moore and Staff Sgt. Barry Sadler, while the latter was recuperating from a leg wound suffered as a medic in the Vietnam War. Moore also wrote a non-fiction book, The Green Berets, about the force. Lyrics include:

"Back at home a young wife waits/ Her Green Beret has met his fate/ He has died for those oppressed/ Leaving her this last request

Put silver wings on my son's chest/ Make him one of America's best/ He'll be a man they'll test one day/ Have him win the Green Beret"

The lyrics were written in honor of Green Beret James Gabriel, Jr., the first Native Hawaiian who died in Vietnam, who was executed by the Viet Cong while on a training mission on April 8, 1962.[1] One verse was written in honor of Gabriel, but it never made it into the final version.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LH4-tOqLH94

I'm a sucker for a good 'talkin' blues. Johnny explains this one pretty well.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxQS9ZOpB70

bigross86
03 Jun 11,, 12:14
Harvey Andrews - Soldier. An extremely powerful song, and I keep telling myself that I will translate it and cover it in Hebrew but never get around to it.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBosYG6p-sQ

John McDermott - Christmas in the Trenches. Gives me hope that eventually people will realize we're all human, but until then, we stand on the vigil


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gx2cAUo7i4&feature=watch_response

Bigfella
03 Jun 11,, 12:32
The dark years of the late 70s & the many & varied conflicts of the Thatcher years produced some fine political & protest songs.

The highlighted quote is a nice summation of this entire thread.


"Ghost Town captured the political mood," said Alexis Petridis, rock critic for The Guardian. "It's absolutely remarkable the amount of rioting that erupted just around the time it was number one."

Mr Petridis said the early Thatcher years had been a productive time for protest singers at least in part because of her strength of personality.

Lady Thatcher was 'easy to demonise', according to one critic "If you are going to make political music you need to have something to react against, and there was plenty to react against."

"Britain was turning from around in a really dramatic way from the liberal, post-war consensus. Thatcher was far right enough that the National Front vote collapsed. She was a very easy figure to demonise."

First up a song that saw the future:


"The Guns of Brixton" pre-dates the race riots that took place in the 1980s in Brixton but the lyrics depict the feelings of discontent that were building due to heavy-handedness of the police that led to the riots, the recession and other problems at that time.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hiQoq-wqZxg

...and a few about Maggie. First, one of my favourite bands of the 80s.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7e63qRuJ_w

and a couple by some of the great songwiters of the 80s.

Love the Booker T & the MGs sound here.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXTrCEXlLKY

Fair to say Elvis wasn't a fan


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-BZIWSI5UQ

Bigfella
03 Jun 11,, 13:08
Very moving BR.

crooks
03 Jun 11,, 13:42
Really loved that Sinéad O'Connor version of 'the Foggy Dew' BF, criminally I've never heard that, haunting. I like Morrisey's 'Irish blood, English heart', written to describe an oft-unheard part of the conflict, how England deals with it's post-colonial identity:

KKoS5X4SMrY

Similar (and epic) by the Pistols - the very definition of an anthem. Love the sarcasm, the sneering, the willingness to take a crack at British taboos:

2rm4dwuDkCI&feature=fvst

Loved this when it came out, the first truly catching anti-Iraq war song:

lBje9rsG9k8

Also if we're going off folk, 'Smalltown boy' is a beautiful 80s dance classic by Bronski Beat that is remixed to death these days - and is also about the torture of growing up gay in hostile territory. Mournful and moving:

HOTwr8-JlXE

'Another day in paradise' was a song I remember from my childhood, honest anti-poverty message:

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Also hip hop has often been a seriously strong popular medium for social change. Run DMC were at the forefront of this in the 80s and 90s (complete with hilarious breakdancing video - how did that seem cool lol?):

TLGWQfK-6DY

Bigfella
03 Jun 11,, 14:35
Crooks, nice selection, though I think 'its like that' is a bit of a stretch. I'll have to dig up some political hip hop shortly. Oh, that version of Foggy Dew is on a Chieftains album from a few years back - excellent album (including a jam with the Rolling Stones).

Still on the emerald isle, though a wee bit north of you, a group of young Belfast lads channeled their furstrations into the new punk format. The Stiff Little Fingers were one of the best punk groups of the first wave. Here's why:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTO7nXw4StY


As lead singer Jake Burns tells it, one night after a gig a young english man come up to him & they began to chat. He told Burns that he'd joined the British Army at age 17, been shipped off to Ulster & ended up shooting some kid. At 21 he was a psychological mess, still had time to serve before he could get cashiered & was considering going AWOL.

audio isn't the best. Sorry.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pl5V26oXHUI

This is one of the great covers of all time & one of my favourite songs. A Bob Marley song protesting the violence in Jamaica is transformed into a story about Belfast with unsettling ease. This is long, but it is worth it.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awT3gwmiLX8&feature=related

Blue
04 Jun 11,, 08:32
Barry McGuire - Eve of Destruction. Pretty self explanatory


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EyGcXj84mE

Without having to say.....yep it is one of my top faves!!!!

Blue
04 Jun 11,, 09:17
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LH4-tOqLH94



Well Pete, I am gonna have to say that I need some explanation as to why this song belongs here(as much as I do very truly love it). I do have a story that relates to this song and the "GBs".

At the opening of the movie "The Green Berets" they feature many actual GBs in training situations actually filmed at a location on Ft Bragg called "Gabriel Training Area", named for Sgt Gabriel. It was a training area for years for the USSF.

The 100 ft rappeling tower featured in the film was an actual tower that was still standing in 1987 and in honor and tradition and to our very own, some buddies and I one sunday afternoon entered the long abandoned, and declared off limits and unsafe, old gabriel TA, and with ropes, swiss seats, and beer in hand, scaled it and rappelled it. For everyones enjoyment, here is a pic of my ass while descending!:biggrin:

But anyhoo, while I appreciate that you appreciate the song (as I do) how was it political other than it pissed off many hippies at the time?

25339

S2
04 Jun 11,, 09:23
Blowin' In The Wind-


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zY_cM0_6vA

We Can Be Together-


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxA3Q96a8XE&feature=related

I Feel Like I'm Fixin' To Die Rag-


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zdH09mWVF8

Street Fightin' Man-


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qUO8ScYVeDo

Blue
04 Jun 11,, 09:31
My other pics off the top would be


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMUBWKJ5A_0&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_d8C4AIFgUg

Asim Aquil
04 Jun 11,, 09:54
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-b7qaSxuZUg

Imagine there's no countries
It isn't hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people
Living life in peace

You may say I'm a dreamer
But I'm not the only one

Bigfella
04 Jun 11,, 10:54
Well Pete, I am gonna have to say that I need some explanation as to why this song belongs here(as much as I do very truly love it). I do have a story that relates to this song and the "GBs".

At the opening of the movie "The Green Berets" they feature many actual GBs in training situations actually filmed at a location on Ft Bragg called "Gabriel Training Area", named for Sgt Gabriel. It was a training area for years for the USSF.

The 100 ft rappeling tower featured in the film was an actual tower that was still standing in 1987 and in honor and tradition and to our very own, some buddies and I one sunday afternoon entered the long abandoned, and declared off limits and unsafe, old gabriel TA, and with ropes, swiss seats, and beer in hand, scaled it and rappelled it. For everyones enjoyment, here is a pic of my ass while descending!:biggrin:

But anyhoo, while I appreciate that you appreciate the song (as I do) how was it political other than it pissed off many hippies at the time?



Eric,

Would I be correct in assuming that your arse was a wee bit smaller then?:biggrin:

As for the reason for the song being here, you were on the right track...sorta (there weren't many hippies or much of an antiwar movement in 1965-66). It was a very politcal song in the context of the times. Sadler wrote it while on active service in Vietnam. he also performed it for ABC cameras at the behest of Army Public Information while on active service - in 1965. When he got injured & returned to the US in late 1965 he was able to record the song & later promote it. The song itself was a tribute, but the Army's use of it to drum up support for the war was pure propaganda. I'm pretty sure the Army doesn't just let its elite soldiers perform on TV or release songs about the Army on a whim. This isn't criticism, simply commentary.

Double Edge
04 Jun 11,, 10:56
Now for something from BF's part of the world

ejorQVy3m8E

Bigfella
04 Jun 11,, 13:03
Beat me to it DE. You posted one of their best, but there are many more. The Oils were notable for writing very political songs despite having a hard core audience of young working class & lower middle class men with little interest in such issues (especially aboriginal rights). How did they do it? Damned fine rock & roll & incendiary live performances!

One from their first album, and my favourite oils track. 'There's a shit storm a comin" is one of the best opening lines of any song.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0owbx5mYd8M



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c3X0OlVjuE&feature=related

inspired by the bombing of the Rainbow Warrior by the French government.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BE9i-NxAmNE



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3ApXA1NsQM

...unfortunately this song remains as true as ever


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgukduYJZ44

and a wonderful evocation of the struggle of Australian Aboriginies.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16bFBzx7I_0

tankie
04 Jun 11,, 13:51
[QUOTE=crooks;810993]Cool thread idea! Nice version of Tracy Chapman BR, the original is classic too.

There's been loads of Irish political songs I like, Paul McCartney's 'Give Ireland back to the Irish' was always a favourite (when I was a kid we used to chant it at British squaddies, they hated it:biggrin:):[QUOTE]

Says a lot about your singin then dunnit :tongue:

ArtyEngineer
04 Jun 11,, 20:43
Surprised this hasnt been posted yet.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jcwsfns7KPQ&feature=fvwrel

Regards

Arty

S2
04 Jun 11,, 21:45
Ohio-


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SswXJX6X-ow&feature=related

"Tin soldiers and Nixon's coming. We're finally on our own..."

For What It's Worth-


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5M_Ttstbgs&feature=related

Four Days Gone-


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YA7HCHZIaBA

A story of a kid deserting the army during the war...

Double Edge
04 Jun 11,, 21:49
One (perhaps THE one) from Nigeria. The king of Afrobeat, the late, Fela Kuti


He had lampooned the army that threw him into jail, the army that burned down his house and killed his mother. He had championed Africa's powerless, knocking down the mighty, including President Olusegun Obasanjo, when he was the country's military ruler a generation ago. And Fela had transformed all of that into a magical fusion of music called Afrobeat and had become Africa's most famous musician.

He was known as Fela Ransome-Kuti until about 1978, when he renamed himself Fela Anikulapo Kuti, the middle name meaning 'he who carries death in his pouch'. He was a human rights revolutionary who started his own political party, Movement Of The People, to protest the kleptocracy in Nigeria.

His influence on funk and African music is unsurpassed and has put his name to many albums, the total number thought to be 77. It wasn’t just what Fela said about a country broken by corruption and oppression. It was how his music said it.

His son Seun in an interview (http://www.nytimes.com/2000/09/11/world/lagos-journal-nigeria-echoes-to-the-beat-that-defied-tyrants.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm) in 2000 said...

''We've not had democracy in a long time, Instead of legislators we have legislooters. Instead of legislating, they are legi-stealing.''

"Afrobeat is still the only music in Nigeria where you can say what you feel, tell the government what you think, Afrobeat is a weapon."

There's such a lot to choose from here and all of it very good if you like funked out jazz. A lot of his work extends into 20 minutes & over and is almost trance inducing, so here's a few excerpts, youtube duration limited, unfortunately...

Shuffering & Shmiling (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfDIakTWYeA)
After the 1977 police attack on Fela's Kalakuta Republic, where his mother and about 80 members of his entourage and band were injured and arrested, he set out to light a fire underneath the authority figures and his various other enemies that were causing him and, in his eyes, the people of Nigeria to suffer in the form of harassment, oppression, and economic devastation. Shuffering and Shmiling is one of those comments.

Fela had become increasingly concerned about the growing influence of non-traditional religions fracturing African countries. He believed that these divisions had created a population unable to unify and stand up for themselves and instead had them living in conditions that forced "them go pack themselves in like sardine (into a bus): Suffering and smiling," and without trying to change things he says they "Suffer suffer for world/Enjoy for heaven."

V.I.P. (Vagabonds in Power) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bpThXP9f8I)
Playing at the Berlin Jazz Festival in 1979 was the best thing that had happened to Fela Anikulapo Kuti and the Afrika 70 in some time. It was impossible for them to play in Nigeria due to a governmental ban, and it was increasingly difficult to play in other regions of Africa as those countries were not too hip to Fela's reputation of inspiring people to disdain their oppressive governments. To that end, the group was broke and without a live audience to convey their message. V.I.P. (Vagabonds in Power) is the result

Authority Stealing (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgqxFHMqlxs)
Authority Stealing garnered Fela Anikulapo Kuti one of his most severe beatings by the hands of the Nigerian government. Fela is blunt in his attack on the figures of government that were responsible for stealing large sums of money in the form of market control. Ironically, the government arrested him (and other outspoken citizens) for an armed robbery, meanwhile beating Fela close to death. All the while, Fela accuses the authority figures of being worse than armed robbers and deserving of hanging. Authority Stealing was originally distributed by Fela's own Kalakuta Records as no other company would touch it due to its inflammatory remarks. Authority Stealing is a critical record as historical and cultural comment but not for its musical innovation.

bigross86
04 Jun 11,, 22:22
Steve Biko, a noted black South African anti-apartheid activistת had been arrested by the South African police in late August 1977. After being held in custody for several days, he was interrogated in room 619 of the Walmer Street prison in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape.[1] Following the interrogation, during which he sustained serious head injuries, Biko was transferred to a prison in Pretoria, where he died shortly afterwards, on 12 September 1977.

Peter Gabriel - Biko


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rY_5e5ew12I

Simple Minds - Biko


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQ4XVsu3q5w

Bigfella
05 Jun 11,, 01:32
SOme more great stuff.

S2, always loved 'Ohio' & 'For What its Worth'.

DE, you made me feel stupid. I have something like 30 Fela CDs & didn't even think to post one song. Great lateral thinking. (do you realise that you can embed those clips so they show up in the post).

BR, alawyas liked that Peter Gabriel song.

Bigfella
05 Jun 11,, 02:06
Jazz was the first great Afro-American art form. While most jazz was not overtly political, it did sometimes express the anger & frustration of its performers. Louis Armstrong was the most popular jazz musician of all time. To some (including some blacks) he seemed to lean too much toward the 'shufflin' & jivin' cliches of minstrelcy. He did, however, feel racism deeply. His recording of Fats Waller's 'Black & Blue' was a powerful statement of feeling. He stripped down the original to its core and made it his own. To see footage of him playing it in Africa in the heady days of independence in the early 60s is to understand the power of music.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wO_rBCUEP4&feature=related

Ethel Waters was one of the first black female black singers to become a star. This is her 1930 version of 'black and blue', more faithful to the original and an interesting contrast to the Armstrong version.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6-XdQDPe1c



"Strange Fruit" was a poem written by Abel Meeropol, a Jewish high-school teacher from the Bronx, about the lynching of two black men. He published under the pen name Lewis Allan.

In the poem, Meeropol expressed his horror at lynchings, possibly after having seen Lawrence Beitler's photograph of the 1930 lynching of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith in Marion, Indiana. He published the poem in 1936 in The New York Teacher, a union magazine. Though Meeropol/Allan had often asked others (notably Earl Robinson) to set his poems to music, he set "Strange Fruit" to music himself.

Holiday first performed the song at Cafe Society in 1939. She said that singing it made her fearful of retaliation, but because its imagery reminded her of her father, she continued to sing it. She made the piece a regular part of her live performances. Because of the poignancy of the song, Josephson drew up some rules: Holiday would close with it; second, the waiters would stop all service in advance; the room would be in darkness except for a spotlight on Holiday's face; and there would be no encore.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4ZyuULy9zs


Coltrane wrote the song 'Alabama' in response to the bombing of the 16th St Baptist Church in Birmingham Alabama in 1963 that killed four young girls. He patterned his saxophone playing on Martin Luther King's funeral speech. Midway through the song, mirroring the point where King transforms his mourning into a statement of renewed determination for the struggle against racism, Elvin Jones's drumming rises from a whisper to a pounding rage. He wanted this crescendo to signify the rising of the civil rights movement.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOjxBuwBUEE

Bigfella
05 Jun 11,, 02:18
The 1950s & 60s were a tumultuous time for race relations in America & black music reflected the times. Some classics:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4j4nxy2-Gk&feature=fvst



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTL9myUqLMs



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xrJVCNHE10



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD78i6eoGkM

bigross86
05 Jun 11,, 18:48
Like those of many songs by the Clash, the lyrics of "Straight to Hell" decry injustice. The first verse refers to the shutting down of steel mills in Northern England and the alienation and racism suffered by immigrants despite their attempts to integrate into British society. The second verse concerns the abandonment of children in Vietnam who were fathered by American soldiers during the Vietnam War. The third verse contrasts the American Dream as seen through the eyes of an Amerasian child with a dystopian vision of American reality. The final verse considers the plight of immigrants throughout the world.

The Clash - Straight to Hell


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkyCrx4DyMk

Blue
06 Jun 11,, 05:22
Eric,

Would I be correct in assuming that your arse was a wee bit smaller then?:biggrin: A lot!! Thanks for pointing that out...

[QUOTE]As for the reason for the song being here, you were on the right track...sorta (there weren't many hippies or much of an antiwar movement in 1965-66). It was a very politcal song in the context of the times. Sadler wrote it while on active service in Vietnam. he also performed it for ABC cameras at the behest of Army Public Information while on active service - in 1965. When he got injured & returned to the US in late 1965 he was able to record the song & later promote it. The song itself was a tribute, but the Army's use of it to drum up support for the war was pure propaganda. I'm pretty sure the Army doesn't just let its elite soldiers perform on TV or release songs about the Army on a whim. This isn't criticism, simply commentary. I'll go with that,thanks Pete.

Bigfella
06 Jun 11,, 10:27
[QUOTE]Eric,

Would I be correct in assuming that your arse was a wee bit smaller then?:biggrin: A lot!! Thanks for pointing that out...

Just askin' ;)


I'll go with that,thanks Pete.

No worries mate. Just think, you too could have been a star!

Bigfella
14 Jun 11,, 15:20
Gone a bit quiet here, probably to do with mentioning Eric's arse.;) Time to liven things up again.

Rap music had its roots in the work of figures like the last poets & Gil Scott Heron, who took the spirit of Langston Hughes & others and set it to music. Rap music itself owed debts to funk & disco. Often emerging from inner urban communities, the music frequently protested the conditions in these ghettos.

'The message' was one of the first rap songs. If you doubt its 'protest' credentials, watch the setting for the clip.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4o8TeqKhgY


Flash forward a few years to the mean streets of Sth Central L.A. and you get the younger, angrier men of N.W.A. who have gone beyond shaking a fist - now they are shaking an mach 10.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMZi25Pq3T8&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1M8vei3L0L8

The Dispopsable Heroes of Hiphoprisy were a one album phenomenon, but on that on album they created some of the finest protest music in recent history.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgOWTM5R2DA



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBAkOifDeSw&feature=related

Bigfella
14 Jun 11,, 15:28
Public Enemy were part of that wave of angry young political rappers to emerge in the mid-1980s. They combined great music with provocative lyrics.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8PaoLy7PHwk


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJ-ldcnhsLY&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVMbnF9-l5w&feature=related

I always loved this one. Funky as all hell and a huge FU to a couple of states that resisted enacting MLK Day (I guess Arizona works better for the meter than New Hampshire).


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrFOb_f7ubw

bigross86
14 Jun 11,, 15:42
Antiflag - Die For Your Government


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WN4m6nWI5XI

Always good to let some angst out, though it does have some profanity, I dunno if the word "shit" makes something NSFW or not

Bigfella
15 Jun 11,, 15:16
Thanks for the shot of Punk BR. If rap expressed the feelings of inner urban blacks in the US and reggae covered afro-Carribeans, punk was the music of a certain segment of white youth. More of this to come over the next week.

I have always loved this song. oh the irony that Gerry Brown IS back.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIqESwzCGg4&feature=related


one of the great live performances


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eyROvw6zbY

A lyric change here made this into a song about the murder of gay San Francisco councilman Harvey Milk & Mayor George Moscone by felow councilman Dan White - White got off using the infamous 'twinkie defence' (probably helped that he killed a prominent gay politician). Jello Biafra once ran for Mayor of SFO. he lost.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbCqwl2geQg

Another cover...of sorts. Call it an updating of a classic.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wngUsiLnL7k&feature=related

Dreadnought
17 Jun 11,, 19:16
Land of confusion....Genesis
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zU9lv_WqK6k

Winds of Change... The Scorpions.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4RjJKxsamQ

Goodnight Saigon..Billy Joel
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qjzjhl-QztE

Bullet the Blue Sky......U2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3PaGQMGqXU

gunnut
17 Jun 11,, 19:36
How about Metallica's classics: One, Master Of Puppets, and For Whom The Bell Tolls.

WM8bTdBs-cw

6BBI33nSalg

ztk1V4utYdA

USSWisconsin
17 Jun 11,, 22:58
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBkhXtgqyps&feature=related


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-E9PKUESuxg


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_TuctvWUXk&feature=related

Samuels creek
08 Oct 14,, 05:14
Some of Australia's political songs rival anything anywhere with their brutal honesty and grasp of reality.

This is amongst the very best of that legacy.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3Ky8zTh6DY

Even though its 30 years old, this next one is very relevant in todays times.

Conquistador of Mexico
The Zulu and the Navaho
The Belgians in the Congo
Plantation in Virginia
The Raj in British India
The deadline in South Africa

The story of El Salvador
The silence of Hiroshima
Destruction of Cambodia

Short memory, must have a short memory

The sight of hotels by the Nile
The designated Hilton style
With running water specially bought

A smallish man Afghanistan
A watch dog in a nervous land
They're only there to lend a hand
The friendly five a dusty smile
Wake up in a sweat at dead of night
And in the tents new rifles, hey, short memory

Short memory, must have a short memory


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufqlbaurJPw

SW4U
10 May 16,, 18:26
Jimi Hendrix :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xpdw0ouogQo

Samuels creek
17 May 16,, 11:51
Jimi Hendrix :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xpdw0ouogQo


Alot of the heavier drugs used at that concert and by the musicians making a lot of the protest songs of that era, were smuggled into America by their own military, sometimes in body bags of fallen soldiers from that conflict in south east asia. Very ironic strange and surreal way of telling the world that drug use is wrong.

SW4U
18 May 16,, 01:03
Johnny Clegg :


https://youtu.be/BGS7SpI7obY

SW4U
18 May 16,, 01:07
https://youtu.be/tnY7or9ZLp8

SW4U
18 May 16,, 01:17
U2


https://youtu.be/EM4vblG6BVQ

SW4U
18 May 16,, 01:29
Pink Floyd :


https://youtu.be/YR5ApYxkU-U

SW4U
18 May 16,, 01:39
Gracias a la vida (by Mercedes Sosa) :


https://youtu.be/WyOJ-A5iv5I

SW4U
18 May 16,, 01:49
Christy Moore :


https://youtu.be/ZPJPbFm0RDs

SW4U
18 May 16,, 01:58
Eddy Grant :


https://youtu.be/oH2zXEu7nTc

SW4U
18 May 16,, 02:16
Billie Holiday -


https://youtu.be/Web007rzSOI

DOR
18 May 16,, 10:32
From Down Under, Khe Sanh by Cold Chisel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTjvG4WJD_A

anil
19 May 16,, 19:29
Why no BULLLS ON PARADDDEEEE!!!?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFmEK6RX-EA

RAAHHH

Not to forget...

Rages version of Bruce Springsteens Ghost of tom joad

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rz6GtLBR6sY

Double Edge
28 Aug 17,, 19:03
Here's one you can dance to


https://youtu.be/eo7iwlMFPrM

Albany Rifles
28 Aug 17,, 20:03
Silly Wizard - "Wha'll be King but Cherlie?"


https://youtu.be/VTPyvKrU1DM

John Prine - Paradise


https://youtu.be/DEy6EuZp9IY

Ohio Neil Young w CSN backup


https://youtu.be/hkg-bzTHeAk

Toby
28 Aug 17,, 23:19
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g527j5J0NiA


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jViTte8VAzU

Albany Rifles
29 Aug 17,, 14:39
Where the fuck is the like button!?!??!

Toby
29 Aug 17,, 22:59
Where the fuck is the like button!?!??!

God? we want a like button! ;-)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YRWRRBX3TB0

I seriously wonder how the hell Jeff gets a guitar to do that....

Some more Jeff, just coz..


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6dsffOrOoI

Double Edge
19 Nov 17,, 03:16
Thought this one goes here


https://youtu.be/nvlTJrNJ5lA