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View Full Version : Anyone use Kindle (or another e-reader)?



gunnut
07 Dec 10,, 18:59
I know all y'all are a bunch of book worms, reading when you should be outdoors or watching TV and drinking beer indoors. Or even play games on your consoles or computers. How many of you read books on these fancy schmancy electronic book gizmos? I'm a techie, but I'm also old school. I still have a newspaper subscription, and it's not the online version. I'd rather read a book on paper (if I read) rather than these Star Trek readers.

Tarek Morgen
07 Dec 10,, 19:17
While I don't have a kindle or any similar E-Reader yet (so far I have seen none that offers all the features I would like to have), I do often read books on my computer. While I do of course prefer real books, I also did spend (and still do) quite a lot of time in hospitals. Since I do finish 2 or 3 books each day while there, I need lots of space to store all those books while I am there. After a while I started to use my notebook for reading while in the hospital. Instead of dozens of book I only need my computer. The option to go online from my room instead of the terminal in the lobby is of course another bonus.

I detest reading newspapers though..not because of the content but because the format of the papers is just the most impractical I can think of. Completly unhandy and required way too much space to even turn a page.

gunnut
07 Dec 10,, 19:23
I don't read books as in novels or something that's long and continuous. I read newspapers and magazines and books with short articles in them. I guess I just couldn't hold my attention on something for too long.

ShawnG
07 Dec 10,, 19:34
I am interested in a Kindle, but still don't have one. I suppose having a library at your fingertips is nice, but I have no need for more than 1 (maybe 2) books when I go on a trip. Otherwise, how else will I build a nice collection for the shelves?!

bolo121
07 Dec 10,, 19:41
I use my ipod touch for reading. Not good for extended reading but convenient for when bored.

gunnut
07 Dec 10,, 19:51
I am interested in a Kindle, but still don't have one. I suppose having a library at your fingertips is nice, but I have no need for more than 1 (maybe 2) books when I go on a trip. Otherwise, how else will I build a nice collection for the shelves?!

Well, if Kindle is anything like Apple product, you can still build up a nice collection on the shelves as new models come out every year, which feature only incremental upgrades.:biggrin:

crooks
07 Dec 10,, 20:15
I can't turn anywhere without seeing ads for it, but no, ain't got one. Don't think I will either tbh - It's 120 euro off the bat, and my absolute favourite time of the day is in the evening, curling up on the sofa with wifey in one arm and a decent (and usually battered) paperback in the other. Can't envision it being the same with a kindle.

I adore books and have huge nostalgia on account of the family I grew up in - We had very little disposable income but what we did have usually went in to the arts, literature especially. Dad used to spend hours at the weekend catogorising them into some semblance of order: sport, Gaeilge, crime, real life, bio, it was mindboggling. My own place is littered with them wherever you can look. I like the way the cover of a book can pique your interest as well, the mystery of what it's about. I like that, and I think technology can wreck the feeling of a good book.

So I'll stick with the battered paperback, I think :).

sappersgt
08 Dec 10,, 00:13
I'm old school, read two newspapers every day, at least two books a week. When I replaced my laptop, I'm thinking maybe I should have got a desktop AND a notebook for the slight increase in cost. I didn't initially care for the screen size of any of the readers. Have a friend who just got a Kindle, he reads as much as I do. I'm watching closely to see how it works out for him.:hmmm:

koshi
08 Dec 10,, 01:44
I have the Kindle app on my iphone and some other reader apps. It is nice to be able to carry 20 books in your pocket, but real books are nicer to read.

ArmchairGeneral
08 Dec 10,, 02:29
I occasionally read novels online- Gutenberg's good for classics I don't have when I don't have time to go to a library, and Baen Books has a wide selection of SF novels available on their website. I'm thinking about getting my sister a Kindle for Christmas, she's been pining for one for a while.

USSWisconsin
08 Dec 10,, 04:07
I didn't find a happy choice, while I love real books, some are hard to find and an electronic copy is a good substitue. Free google books are great too, so I do both, read on screens and pages. I'm waiting to see how kindle pans out, not enough titles in areas I'm interested in yet. I seems like a nice idea, but a tablet pc may be a better way (might be widely available in a few years), not requiring a bunch of dedicated devices. I wouldn't want to read on a phone, too tiny.

ZekeJones
08 Dec 10,, 05:16
I use a Fuji Stylistic 3500 tablet running win2000 with a 60gb hd for a reader. I got it off ebay for around $100 a couple years ago. The only thing I don't like about it is you have to use a stylus, but that is minor. I also use it as a GPS device with a receiver.

sumob
08 Dec 10,, 12:39
I have a Kindle and currently have around 185 titles loaded on it. Had to switch to the Kindle when my wife threatened me to stop buying books as we had run out of space to store them. So the next best thing was to go in for a Kindle.

For the newspaper I prefer the reading the real thing, the e- version does not work for me. Need to read 2-3 newspapers to get the real gist of the story.

devgupt
25 Dec 10,, 00:26
I have a Nook(Barnes and Noble e reader) and I am loving it.
Because of e-ink , It's not much different from normal book .The best thing is obviously that I dont have to carry books when I am shifting.

Cowman88
30 Dec 10,, 13:35
I also have a Nook and love it but I still buy read and enjoy paper books. I have about 365 books on my Nook and I've had it sense last February.

ArmchairGeneral
30 Dec 10,, 19:44
Got my sister the Kindle she wanted. I'm rather in love. The screen is amazing, it really is like paper, but much higher resolution than I expected. Extremely thin and lightweight- easier to hold than a book, and you can read one handed easily. A lot of public domain books are free, and books in general are much cheaper than new paper books.

Will it replace paper books entirely? No, but it's great for heavy readers and heavy travelers. Also good if you don't have much space in your home, and/or don't have a very good public library. I'll never give up physical books entirely- I like to make notes in the margin, and I just like real books in general, but there are enough positives to the Kindle that I may get one in the next year or two.

T_igger_cs_30
02 Jan 11,, 17:40
Yep, bought me a KOBO reader last Septmeber, holds upto 1000 books, is slim easy to carry and use. Great for travelling, when in waiting rooms and reading the books you would never buy to add to your collection, saves a walk to the library, at home never use it, always the book in hand, with a single malt (alas no cigar now, as I have quit smoking) or newspaper.......... but when on the road excellent .

Rastagir
03 Feb 11,, 13:03
I am a bit of a bookworm, I read about 2-3 books per week.And, although I love the very feel and smell and sight of books in my library (which takes up one room of my house) I know that sooner or later I must somewhat tone the "book-buying habit" down.

The purchase of an e-book reader has been one great solution for me. I can find a great deal of books online and I can read books that I am interested in but have no intention of buying (or reading books that I have no intention of reading again)


But, truth be told, I don't think an ebook reader, no matter how good it is, will take the place of a regular book in my heart for quite some time....

andrew
03 Feb 11,, 19:09
I think Kindle is a doomed niche product. Because of its rather boring design and the b/w display which can't show pictures, it doesn't suit the biggest market - books for children and teenagers.

Damac
03 Feb 11,, 19:29
I have an old piece of outdated crud called the EbookWise. Love it. Gots me some freebee classics on it from gutenberg project. Got lots of Bean stuff. And, there's no chance the "... then she lowered her lips to his throbbing..." type literature will get discovered while my carry on is going through security.

An advantage of ebook gizmos over computers, for reading... the screen doesn't flicker on ebook gizmos. Eye fatigue isn't a prob. Also, if you have an ebook gizmo that's back lit, like my cruddy old fashioned one, you can read while laying in bed with the lights off.

dave lukins
03 Feb 11,, 20:50
you can read while laying in bed with the lights off.

Obviously filling in the missing word

"... then she lowered her lips to his throbbing..." :biggrin:

sappersgt
03 Feb 11,, 23:41
Obviously filling in the missing word

"... then she lowered her lips to his throbbing..." :biggrin:

You going to list that book on the WAB book traders thread?:tongue:

Shek
24 Mar 11,, 13:03
I think Kindle is a doomed niche product. Because of its rather boring design and the b/w display which can't show pictures, it doesn't suit the biggest market - books for children and teenagers.

The data clearly speaks otherwise - e-book sales are more than hardcopy. Besides, how many teenagers really read picture books, and how many wouldn't want an e-book device to go with their iPod?

Zad Fnark
24 Mar 11,, 14:48
I'm seriously looking at one for the various paperbacks I read. My shelf space is seriously filling up, so this should alleviate the problem.

I like real books, but there's a place for a Kindle. (softcover paperbacks) It wouldn't replace a larger picture filled book.

ZF-

JAD_333
24 Mar 11,, 23:26
Wouldn't need this with a Kindle. I have nothing against the Kindle; actually makes good sense when you're out and about. But what happens to all those nice libraries and the shelf industry?
24749

andrew
25 Mar 11,, 00:26
The data clearly speaks otherwise - e-book sales are more than hardcopy. Besides, how many teenagers really read picture books, and how many wouldn't want an e-book device to go with their iPod?

Turn it the other side. How many of them would want to carry in their pockets multiple specialized devices when some smart corporation will offer a universal entertainment device with no strings attached?

Shek
25 Mar 11,, 01:29
Turn it the other side. How many of them would want to carry in their pockets multiple specialized devices when some smart corporation will offer a universal entertainment device with no strings attached?

The Kindle is the best e-reader product out there. E-ink is designed for long reading periods and has an associated superior battery life. There's a reason why they are the leader in the e-reader market. Besides, books don't fit in your pocket - they fit in your bag.

Albany Rifles
25 Mar 11,, 04:10
Wouldn't need this with a Kindle. I have nothing against the Kindle; actually makes good sense when you're out and about. But what happens to all those nice libraries and the shelf industry?
24749

You piker!!!

I have 4 like that.

I won't gop Kindle, etc., because I love the feel and smell of a book.

Sounds wierd I know but I enjoy the tactile sensation of reading.

Repatriated Canuck
08 Sep 11,, 23:15
I've really been thinking of getting one. I love my book collection and even after all these t\years of travel it grew a lot. More than half of all my possessions are books and they got expensive to move around!

I want an ereader for trash books. Stuff like historical fiction or other entertainment. I often don't buy them because if I am going to fork out $20+ I would rather get a history book. I know I like those even the boring heavy reading where I learn something. Sometimes I just want to be entertained hence why I bought the first two Harry Potter books today. Surely for other books of fiction I should start getting an ereader collection to save money and space.

How much money can I save per book do you think?

Genosaurer
08 Sep 11,, 23:32
I got a Kindle for my birthday this year. I find the prices for most books to be almost offensively high (often more than you would pay for the same title in paperback on Amazon) but have otherwise been happy with the service, and the Kindle reader itself is nice.

HKDan
09 Sep 11,, 02:11
I won't gop Kindle, etc., because I love the feel and smell of a book.

Sounds wierd I know but I enjoy the tactile sensation of reading.

I have a Kindle, and I love it. But you are dead on about the tactile sensation of a real book. I find I use my Kindle most when travelling, its really great for that. One weird little side note on the Kindle is that it has an experimental web browser on it and for some reason it isn't affected by the Great China Firewall. I found that to be a really neat little addition to it.

JAD_333
09 Sep 11,, 06:17
I'm edging toward a Kindle mainly because there are some 1.5 million books available free. Granted most of them were published before 1928 (copyrights have expired). In the history category there are many excellent titles available, particularly on US history. Anyone who devours books of that nature would easily justify the cost of the Kindle over time.

Repatriated Canuck
09 Sep 11,, 18:54
I got a Kindle for my birthday this year. I find the prices for most books to be almost offensively high (often more than you would pay for the same title in paperback on Amazon) but have otherwise been happy with the service, and the Kindle reader itself is nice.

Considering how many of these books are available on pirated websites they are not doing themselves any favours. I don't pirate due to my feelings on how it hurts the gaming industry but I can understand why some would feel justified ripping off a 30 second download to save 20 bucks per book.

There is no cost on printing them, make them cheap enough to be worth while. While that won't stop all the piracy it would help I think.

mako88sb
24 Jan 12,, 16:29
My daughter hinted the Kindle might be a good Christmas present for me. I informed her in the most polite way possible that I would never use it so don't bother. I suppose on the other hand, it would be a good gift for her next birthday.

bigross86
24 Jan 12,, 16:39
My dad bought a Kindle Fire so he gave me his Kindle 3. I've got over 100 titles on it and I love it. I've gotten almost as much reading done in the past 2 months as I have in the year before that. It's bloody brilliant!

dave lukins
24 Jan 12,, 17:22
My daughter hinted the Kindle might be a good Christmas present for me. I informed her in the most polite way possible that I would never use it so don't bother. I suppose on the other hand, it would be a good gift for her next birthday.

She used psychology and you are now destined to buy her what she wanted for herself in the first place. ;)

mako88sb
24 Jan 12,, 20:30
She used psychology and you are now destined to buy her what she wanted for herself in the first place. ;)

Nope. I'm way too clever to fall for that one....again!:whome:

ace16807
24 Jan 12,, 21:20
I use the Kindle Chrome app on my laptop. The nice thing is that a lot of classic books (and some newer books trying to get some publicity) are free (for the time being). Books are fairly cheap as well (not always as cheap as used paperbacks though).

bigross86
24 Jan 12,, 23:12
True, there is nothing like holding a book in your hands, and some of the books I've got on my bookcase back home show the love (abuse) I've shown them over multiple readings, but there is something to be said for the availability and variety you can carry on one Kindle

qnextt
07 Mar 12,, 23:52
There also seem to be more and more online sites offering free (or very low-cost) "e-books" for download. On some of these sites, you can even upload your own book (that you have written) and make it available to the community.

It seems to be a great way to promote your individual agenda, program, or manifesto . . . . if that is your thing.