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rickusn
17 Apr 05,, 13:03
China's sub plan menace
By James T. Hackett

Much has been written about China's arms buildup. Perhaps most ominous is the major ugrading of Beijing's submarine fleet. The world's third-largest submarine force is training to blockade Taiwan and attack U.S. aircraft carriers.
China has long had a fleet of 70 or more submarines, but most were Chinese-built versions of Russian Romeo-class diesel vessels. Eighty-four Chinese Romeos were produced and about 35 are still operable. Those still in service have been equipped with French sonar and, while considered obsolete, could be effective against commercial vessels and for laying mines. China has replaced 20 Romeos with more modern Chinese-built Ming-class submarines.

A newer domestic-built submarine is the Song. The first prototype failed and had to be redesigned, but the bugs seem to have been worked out. Song-class submarines reportedly are equipped with Air Independent Propulsion, enabling them to be very quiet and remain underwater for weeks. And they carry modern anti-ship cruise missiles. Song-class submarines are in production, with seven currently in service.
Last year, The Washington Times reported the appearance of yet another new non-nuclear Chinese submarine, the Yuan-class, which appears to be a completely new design combining elements of China's Song and Russia's Kilo submarines. Two Yuan-class boats have been launched to date. Over the last three years, China has launched 13 new submarines from three different shipyards.
But most notable was Beijing's purchase from Russia of four Kilo-class diesel-electric submarines, two of which are Project 636 type. These are excellent submarines, quieter than most, and have modern sensors and torpedoes. China has ordered eight more advanced Kilos, described by the Russians as "state-of-the-art Russian submarines." They will carry modern long-range anti-ship missiles, and are to be delivered by 2007.
Beijing also is improving its nuclear-powered submarines. For years China had six nuclear-powered subs, five Han-class attack submarines and one Xia-class ballistic missile submarine, which were very noisy and leaked radiation, among other problems. But the nuclear reactors have been rebuilt and French electronics and sonar equipment added. They now carry submarine-launched cruise missiles.
The first of China's newest nuclear attack submarine, Type 093, is nearing completion and the second is under construction, with two more planned. Built with Russian help, Type 093 is a major technological advance over the Han-class and will carry China's new HN-3 land-attack cruise missile.
Based largely on Russian technology, China last year launched a new Type 094 nuclear-powered missile submarine that will carry 16 JL-2 underwater-launched missiles, versions of China's DF-31 intercontinental ballistic missile. China plans to extend the JL-2's range beyond 8,000 miles and is expected to equip it with multiple warheads and penetration aids. This missile will be able to reach the U.S. mainland from China's coastal waters.
But the main goal of China's naval buildup is the ability to blockade or invade Taiwan, and prevent the U.S. Pacific Fleet from intervening. The Chinese describe that goal in detail in reports and publications. Their armed forces conduct annual exercises to invade across the Taiwan Strait and fight an aircraft carrier task force.
The United States is alert to the danger and has joined with allies such as Japan, Australia and Singapore to confront Beijing's aggressive posture. Pacific Fleet commander Adm. Walter Doran said diesel submarines carry very good weapons and provide "the capability for access denial." To combat that threat, the Navy has increased its presence in the Pacific, based attack submarines at Guam, and established an anti-submarine warfare command in San Diego.
The recent incursion of a Chinese Kilo submarine into Japanese waters energized Tokyo to improve its anti-submarine operations in cooperation with the U.S., and to say it will not be neutral if China attacks Taiwan. The Taiwan government also is strengthening its defenses, announcing on April 11 plans to mass-produce a new supersonic anti-ship cruise missile.
But Taiwan must do more. The government is trying, twice proposing an appropriation to buy from the U.S. six Patriot PAC-3 missile defense batteries, 12 anti-submarine patrol planes, and eight diesel submarines, but the opposition alliance that has a narrow majority in the legislature has twice said no.
A submarine is perhaps the best anti-submarine weapon, but Taiwan has only four obsolete submarines to face the mainland's modern vessels. Submarines also could deter China by threatening to interfere with its shipping, especially oil imports through the Strait of Malacca, crucial to sustained economic development.
Opposition parties of Taiwan, a genuine democracy, can disagree with the government. But it is ironic the Kuomintang, which Chiang Kai-shek led against the communists, has joined those who seem eager to appease a mainland regime that last month passed a law authorizing use of force against Taiwan.
Taiwan's opposition politicians should stop opposing an arms purchase needed to defend their country against the growing threat of blockade or invasion.

James T. Hackett is a contributing writer to The Washington Times based in San Diego.

Bill
17 Apr 05,, 19:38
Alarmist articles like this are a sure sign it's budgetary request season in Washington... ;)

rickusn
17 Apr 05,, 20:38
Dunno about that analysis but heres a related article out Taiwan:


Tensions mount in East China Sea


2005/4/17




Sino-Japanese tensions are mounting to a dangerous point when Tokyo is pushing ahead with a controversial plan to allow Japanese companies the right to drill for gas in disputed waters in the East China Sea.
Tokyo took the action this week in defiance of the large-scale anti-Japanese demonstrations sweeping mainland China last week. The turbulent diplomatic relations between the two Asian giants went from bad to worse when mainland Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao hinted for the first time this week at Beijing's non-support for Japan's bid for permanent membership on the U.N. Security Council. Beijing was quick to strike back at Tokyo's latest "provocation" and threatened to take further action.

The new development, reflecting Tokyo's hard-line response to the massive and sometimes violent anti-Japanese protests, is throwing Sino-Japanese ties into uncertainty, on the eve of a crucial visit to Beijing Sunday by Japanese Foreign Minister Nobutaka Machimura.

Although Tokyo denied any linkage between the drilling-rights allocation and the demonstrations in Beijing and elsewhere in China, the dispute over gas exploration is a sensitive, nationalistic issue. The disputed natural gas fields are in an area of 350 kilometers southeast of Ningpo, Zhejiang province, and only five kilometers from waters claimed by Japan. The so-called Exclusive Economic Zones claimed by Beijing and Tokyo overlap in some areas.

For decades, the Japanese government has barred its companies from drilling on disputed gas fields for fear of antagonizing Beijing. Tokyo's new "provocation" may signal Japan's new assertiveness in its China policy, and more trouble between the two countries.

Clearly, Tokyo's latest action is adding fuel to the fire. Already, thousands of angry Chinese protesters have jammed the Internet to demand the government dispatch warships to protect territorial integrity. This does not bode well for a peaceful settlement of the dispute.

The explosive potential of the territorial dispute was vividly illustrated last November when a Chinese nuclear submarine was spotted in Japanese waters. Japan reacted with an unusually strong military response. For three days, it chased the Chinese sub with two destroyers and several sub-hunting aircraft. It was the most serious military confrontation between the two countries since World War II.

The drilling-rights dispute is the beginning of a storm in the East China Sea. The two countries have conflicting interests regionally and internationally. China views Japan with suspicion and distrust, if not hostility. The two countries have fought two wars in recent history. Today, they are competing for dominance in Asia. The rivalry may lead to war if the leaders of both sides fail to see the danger looming large and allow the situation to get out of control.

To cool off the situation, Beijing should rein in the anti-Japanese protests, even if they were "spontaneous." The regime has the responsibility to protect innocent Japanese nationals. On the other hand, Tokyo should be sensitive to the feelings of those victimized by imperialistic Japan and stop doing things that will rub salt into the wounds, such as Japanese Prime Minister Koizumi Junichiro's controversial visit to the Yasukuni Shrine, or the distortion of history to whitewash its war-time atrocities. Both sides should start building mutual trust, however difficult it may be.

Press freedom, or the freedom of expression, is often said to be at the core of democracy. The degree of press freedom enjoyed by the news media naturally reflects the level of maturity of democracy in a given country.

Today, the press of the world is often classified into three categories: free, partly free, and not free. Taiwan has experienced all such grades in the past half century, thanks to the courageous struggle of numerous journalists. Today, our press is "free," compared the "not free" press in mainland China.

But the aura of a free and unfettered press in Taiwan has lost some brilliance due to the government's recent suspension of permission for two leading mainland Chinese news organizations-Xinhua and People's Daily -- to station their journalists in Taiwan. They were unwelcome here and were sent packing.

The irony is that Taiwan journalists are still allowed to cover news in the "not free" mainland China. Beijing seems unfazed by Taiwan's aggressive, hard-hitting reporters of paparazzi fame.

Why the suspension? According to a high-ranking official of the cabinet's Mainland Affairs Council, it was because of the mainland journalists' incorrect and misleading reports.

It is clear to everybody that the real target of the action was neither Xinhua nor People's Daily. The Chen Shui-bian administration wanted to show its resentment over Beijing's enactment of the anti-secession law and the ice-breaking visit to the mainland by P. K. Chiang, vice chairman of the opposition Kuomintang,

There should have been better ways to express the resentment than making Xinhua and People's Daily reporters scapegoats at the expense of Taiwan's hard-earned press freedom. Booting mainland journalists out of "democratic Taiwan" for inaccurate coverage makes a mockery of Taiwan's democracy. Taiwan's image as a free and democratic country has been tarnished.

rickusn
17 Apr 05,, 21:30
Here Sniper is an article that would be worthy of your analysis. LOL But of course the USAF is above criticism. LOL:

"Alarmist articles like this are a sure sign it's budgetary request season in Washington...."



Facing $3 Billion Budget Shortfall, Air Force Trims Costs
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
European Stars and Stripes
April 13, 2005

Facing $3 Billion Budget Shortfall, Air Force Trims Entertainment, Other Costs

By Ron Jensen and Scott Schonauer, Stars and Stripes

The people fighting the war on terrorism are being asked to tighten their belts to help pay for it.

Air Force bases are cutting back on utility bills. Commands are canceling travel or training that doesn’t somehow support the war. And at some fitness centers, people will have to bring their own towel to save on laundry costs.

Budget cuts are even hitting small, local businesses that rely on U.S. air bases.

Tony Molloy, who owns a news agency in Beck Row near RAF Mildenhall, England, said the base canceled its contract for 316 magazines with weekly TV listings because it has pulled the plug on cable television in billeting.

“They rang up from the contracting office and said they were cutting the cable, so they wouldn’t need the magazines,” said Molloy, who has provided the magazines for several years. Col. Richard Devereaux, RAF Mildenhall’s base commander, confirmed the loss of cable TV in billeting.

The global war on terror and the ongoing battle with insurgents in Iraq are eating up dollars, forcing all services to rein in spending on anything else. The Air Force is facing a $3 billion shortfall for the year, and Gen. John P. Jumper, Air Force chief of staff, ordered cutbacks to avoid a “budget crisis.”

Air Force bases in Europe are scrutinizing the money handed to them by the region’s headquarters to determine how to make it last through the fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30.

“The budget is tight every year,” said Maj. Norm Dozier, commander of the 48th Comptroller Squadron at RAF Lakenheath. “This one is turning out to be extremely tight.”

Maj. Chris Crane, commander of the 100th Comptroller Squadron, said, “This year will be a challenging year. We knew it would be a challenging year.”

Mildenhall and Lakenheath, each of which is home to about 5,000 active-duty servicemembers and a couple of thousand civilian workers, have not been given a budget target, officials said. Instead, they’ve simply been told there will be no other money floating down from U.S. Air Forces in Europe headquarters in Germany during the year.

“This year, we’re told not to expect any supplemental funding,” Devereaux said. “This will have some impact on base services and quality-of-life programs.”

Which specific programs will get hit the hardest is difficult to tell. The Air Force has released few specifics or details on which services might get the ax.

Capt. Chris Watt, a spokesman for U.S. Air Forces in Europe, said he could not release how much of a shortfall air bases in Europe are facing because it would only be speculation.

However, wing commanders have been ordered to look at cutting travel to such things as conferences and extending the shelf life of office computers to save cash.

At Spangdahlem Air Base in Germany, commands are tracking spending closely, said Col. David Goldfein, commander of the 52nd Fighter Wing, the base’s host unit. He is taking the budget cuts in stride and said looking for ways to save money is a necessary part of doing business in today’s military.

“What you have is that each year, we’re constantly looking at where things can be more efficient,” Goldfein said.

Civilian hiring will be examined closely. Devereaux said a “rule of thumb” is that one job of every two that opens will be filled.

“Everything is on the table to be looked at,” Dozier said.

Small things would have a large impact, Devereaux added. For example, the chapel’s weekly bulletins will be in black and white instead of color, and cell phones will be shelved if they are not used enough to support the contract. The 435th Air Base Wing, the host unit at Ramstein Air Base in Germany, is reducing supplies and equipment purchases and limiting video teleconferencing use, according to Lt. Col. John Long, commander of the 435th Comptroller Squadron. Bases also are asking people to turn down the heat in the winter to save on utility bills.

“Small things add up,” Devereaux said. “Sometimes small savings send a signal that we really need to tighten our belt.”

Of course, officials said, war- fighting capabilities and readiness are untouchable. Other than that, they said, everything is fair game.

“It will be painful,” Devereaux said, “but we can get there."

Enzo Ferrari
18 Apr 05,, 13:54
Dunno about that analysis but heres a related article out Taiwan:


Tensions mount in East China Sea


2005/4/17




Sino-Japanese tensions are mounting to a dangerous point when Tokyo is pushing ahead with a controversial plan to allow Japanese companies the right to drill for gas in disputed waters in the East China Sea.
Tokyo took the action this week in defiance of the large-scale anti-Japanese demonstrations sweeping mainland China last week. The turbulent diplomatic relations between the two Asian giants went from bad to worse when mainland Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao hinted for the first time this week at Beijing's non-support for Japan's bid for permanent membership on the U.N. Security Council. Beijing was quick to strike back at Tokyo's latest "provocation" and threatened to take further action.

The new development, reflecting Tokyo's hard-line response to the massive and sometimes violent anti-Japanese protests, is throwing Sino-Japanese ties into uncertainty, on the eve of a crucial visit to Beijing Sunday by Japanese Foreign Minister Nobutaka Machimura.

Although Tokyo denied any linkage between the drilling-rights allocation and the demonstrations in Beijing and elsewhere in China, the dispute over gas exploration is a sensitive, nationalistic issue. The disputed natural gas fields are in an area of 350 kilometers southeast of Ningpo, Zhejiang province, and only five kilometers from waters claimed by Japan. The so-called Exclusive Economic Zones claimed by Beijing and Tokyo overlap in some areas.

For decades, the Japanese government has barred its companies from drilling on disputed gas fields for fear of antagonizing Beijing. Tokyo's new "provocation" may signal Japan's new assertiveness in its China policy, and more trouble between the two countries.

Clearly, Tokyo's latest action is adding fuel to the fire. Already, thousands of angry Chinese protesters have jammed the Internet to demand the government dispatch warships to protect territorial integrity. This does not bode well for a peaceful settlement of the dispute.

The explosive potential of the territorial dispute was vividly illustrated last November when a Chinese nuclear submarine was spotted in Japanese waters. Japan reacted with an unusually strong military response. For three days, it chased the Chinese sub with two destroyers and several sub-hunting aircraft. It was the most serious military confrontation between the two countries since World War II.

The drilling-rights dispute is the beginning of a storm in the East China Sea. The two countries have conflicting interests regionally and internationally. China views Japan with suspicion and distrust, if not hostility. The two countries have fought two wars in recent history. Today, they are competing for dominance in Asia. The rivalry may lead to war if the leaders of both sides fail to see the danger looming large and allow the situation to get out of control.

To cool off the situation, Beijing should rein in the anti-Japanese protests, even if they were "spontaneous." The regime has the responsibility to protect innocent Japanese nationals. On the other hand, Tokyo should be sensitive to the feelings of those victimized by imperialistic Japan and stop doing things that will rub salt into the wounds, such as Japanese Prime Minister Koizumi Junichiro's controversial visit to the Yasukuni Shrine, or the distortion of history to whitewash its war-time atrocities. Both sides should start building mutual trust, however difficult it may be.

Press freedom, or the freedom of expression, is often said to be at the core of democracy. The degree of press freedom enjoyed by the news media naturally reflects the level of maturity of democracy in a given country.

Today, the press of the world is often classified into three categories: free, partly free, and not free. Taiwan has experienced all such grades in the past half century, thanks to the courageous struggle of numerous journalists. Today, our press is "free," compared the "not free" press in mainland China.

But the aura of a free and unfettered press in Taiwan has lost some brilliance due to the government's recent suspension of permission for two leading mainland Chinese news organizations-Xinhua and People's Daily -- to station their journalists in Taiwan. They were unwelcome here and were sent packing.

The irony is that Taiwan journalists are still allowed to cover news in the "not free" mainland China. Beijing seems unfazed by Taiwan's aggressive, hard-hitting reporters of paparazzi fame.

Why the suspension? According to a high-ranking official of the cabinet's Mainland Affairs Council, it was because of the mainland journalists' incorrect and misleading reports.

It is clear to everybody that the real target of the action was neither Xinhua nor People's Daily. The Chen Shui-bian administration wanted to show its resentment over Beijing's enactment of the anti-secession law and the ice-breaking visit to the mainland by P. K. Chiang, vice chairman of the opposition Kuomintang,

There should have been better ways to express the resentment than making Xinhua and People's Daily reporters scapegoats at the expense of Taiwan's hard-earned press freedom. Booting mainland journalists out of "democratic Taiwan" for inaccurate coverage makes a mockery of Taiwan's democracy. Taiwan's image as a free and democratic country has been tarnished.

Second Pacific War?

Chinese Navy bought Russian Klio Sub. and Destoryer can launched "Sunburn" supersonic anti-ship missile in order to "destroy" US carriers...

What do you think, expert?

Bill
18 Apr 05,, 21:39
"Second Pacific War?

Chinese Navy bought Russian Klio Sub. and Destoryer can launched "Sunburn" supersonic anti-ship missile in order to "destroy" US carriers...

What do you think, expert?"

I think you know a lot more about cars than naval power.

Bill
18 Apr 05,, 21:45
"Of course, officials said, war- fighting capabilities and readiness are untouchable. Other than that, they said, everything is fair game"

That's as it should be.

What exactly is it i should be criticizing Rick?

FlyingCaddy
19 Apr 05,, 06:59
If anyone believes in repetitive history, this is quite similar to the Byzantines under Alx Comenius in the late 11th cent, he was so busy fighting the normans the Seljuks came and took the rump of turkey. From there the crusades occured and it all went to hell. In similarity, the US gov't is chasing the jihadist around the world, as if they were Guiscard's Normans and the Chinese, like the Seljuks, are poised to hit our rump.

Bill
20 Apr 05,, 09:41
Except that the USN would kick the living shiit out of the Chinese...

WeeGiZ
28 May 05,, 12:30
Except that the USN would kick the living shiit out of the Chinese...
I believe not only Chinese.. :rolleyes:
OT: here's advantage for russians (sorry, maybe old school training NATO vs WP :biggrin: ). it's no problem for them to wash their loundry and do similar daily routine works :biggrin: :biggrin: