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astralis
05 Jan 10,, 19:52
a question for formerly-serving/serving military personnel:

wars have been the catalyst of rapid changes in militaries, doctrinally, technologically, and organizationally. well, we have been in afghanistan for almost a decade and in iraq for somewhat less than that.

what significant changes/new capabilities have you personally noticed in the US military over the previous ten years? and do you believe that the difference to be as significant as say, earlier periods (1941-1951, or 1965-75)?

S2
05 Jan 10,, 20:06
"...what significant changes/new capabilities have you personally noticed in the US military over the previous ten years?"

I've been away awhile now but it seems our networking capabilities have accelerated the push of info through all layers. That has to have developed into an important capability enhancement.

Bluesman
05 Jan 10,, 23:17
"...what significant changes/new capabilities have you personally noticed in the US military over the previous ten years?"

I've been away awhile now but it seems our networking capabilities have accelerated the push of info through all layers. That has to have developed into an important capability enhancement.

You're very perceptive. Let me turn y'all onto a paper written by my commander (outgoing) and the New Guy (coming to us in July).

Bluesman
05 Jan 10,, 23:18
Operating the Distributed Common Ground System: A Look at the Human Factor in Net-Centric Operations (http://www.airpower.au.af.mil/airchronicles/apj/apj09/win09/brown.html)

Bluesman
05 Jan 10,, 23:21
Dammit; Lt Col Grunwald's paper is a .pdf. It's 31 pages long, so I can't put it in a post. Mod, help me get this thang in here.

Officer of Engineers
05 Jan 10,, 23:25
Where's the link?

Parihaka
05 Jan 10,, 23:45
Blues, if it's on your hard drive you can use "manage attachments" and upload it as an attachment

Bluesman
05 Jan 10,, 23:46
Oh, and this, too:

TopHatter
06 Jan 10,, 00:02
Here's Bluesman's link :)

Red Seven
06 Jan 10,, 16:50
what significant changes/new capabilities have you personally noticed in the US military over the previous ten years? and do you believe that the difference to be as significant as say, earlier periods (1941-1951, or 1965-75)?


Too many bullet-point presentations and video conferences.

Too many people with stars on their shoulders watching real-time UAV TV and chiming in with contradictory instructions.

Too many commanders not listening to or ignoring the advice of their guys on the ground.

Too many senior officers who think rank automatically gives them experience.

Aside from those petty complaints, I think some of the most significant changes of the last 10 years were levered in by Rumsfeld. He was initially on the right track by ramping up special ops, putting the emphasis on small, high-speed, low-drag units with terminal guidance capabilities. But, like a typical corporate exec, he streamlined from the bottom up, not the top down. When you do that, you end up top-heavy. Too many chiefs, not enough indians. It's a great thing having six guys on horse-back able to pull the chain and rain JDAMs down on hundreds of Taliban...but not so great when you have a 80 senior officers, politicians and their staffs telling the six guys on horseback what to do.

Are recent changes as significant as the earlier periods you mention? I don't think they can be compared to 1941-51, but I'd say they are more significant than the 65-75 decade.

Bluesman
06 Jan 10,, 17:43
Here is wisdom:

Too many commanders not listening to or ignoring the advice of their guys on the ground.
And this, too:


It's a great thing having six guys on horse-back able to pull the chain and rain JDAMs down on hundreds of Taliban...but not so great when you have a 80 senior officers, politicians and their staffs telling the six guys on horseback what to do.
It's like you read my mind.

We are embracing the concept of the 'mission-type order', and are revolutionizing Air Force ISR. Instead of a shopping list of MGRS coords and a 'fly the line' mentality, we are pressing the edge of the envelope on every mission, trying to maximize not only the tasked targets according to an intelligent, hard-eyed look at what's important and possible, but also on-the-fly, dynamically-tasked, end-user-requested targets that come up after the platform is already in the air and collecting. I do not exaggerate when I tell you that there are many Americans alive and many Taliban dead because we are letting captains and lieutenants listen to junior enlisted on when to turn the jet and go get a target that would never have been collected any other way.

And what you're saying is WHY this is just now happening. It should have been our paradigm all along, but the urge to control all aspects of every asset is a powerful drug, and its effect has been to make the most agile and flexible asset into a sluggish, unresponsive system. Well, we're making it into a WEAPON again, and I can see the future from where I stand.

GOD, I just LOVE this job.:cool:

astralis
06 Jan 10,, 18:10
keith,


We are embracing the concept of the 'mission-type order', and are revolutionizing Air Force ISR. Instead of a shopping list of MGRS coords and a 'fly the line' mentality, we are pressing the edge of the envelope on every mission, trying to maximize not only the tasked targets according to an intelligent, hard-eyed look at what's important and possible, but also on-the-fly, dynamically-tasked, end-user-requested targets that come up after the platform is already in the air and collecting. I do not exaggerate when I tell you that there are many Americans alive and many Taliban dead because we are letting captains and lieutenants listen to junior enlisted on when to turn the jet and go get a target that would never have been collected any other way.


correct me if i'm wrong, but this seems like a capability we only got in the last 3-4 years, as more ISR assets/target order software became available. i remember my first visit to a DCGS (DGS-1) a while back; way cool. it's good to get out of the staffing world and see what operational is like.

on another note, this capability, on such a scale, is also way ahead of what any of our allies (let alone enemies) have. yet i doubt anyone in the general public has much heard of this...

astralis
06 Jan 10,, 19:10
also, from the Army side, several big developments:

- development and field use of the Stryker, particularly the networking aspects and the day-night imaging; soon (if not already true) a commander will have better situational awareness buttoned up inside than with his head sticking out
- sped-up fielding of improved body armor; forces insurgents to move away from assault rifles towards heavier sniper rifles and the equivalent of a big muzzle-loading musket (the RPG).

of course, an increased appreciation for HUMINT, psychological warfare, and counterinsurgency.

Bluesman
06 Jan 10,, 19:22
keith,



correct me if i'm wrong, but this seems like a capability we only got in the last 3-4 years, as more ISR assets/target order software became available. i remember my first visit to a DCGS (DGS-1) a while back; way cool. it's good to get out of the staffing world and see what operational is like.

on another note, this capability, on such a scale, is also way ahead of what any of our allies (let alone enemies) have. yet i doubt anyone in the general public has much heard of this...

Forget the last 3-4 years; the biggest strides have come in the past 12 months. I have seen this place transformed, and I am as proud as Lucifer to have been a part of this - and I use this word with an appreciation of what it entails - REVOLUTION in ISR.

Go on back, because I can give you a tour guide that is as much a part of the hard turn as anybody. He runs the counterpart of my unit, here, the DART (DCGS Analysis and Reporting Team). You simply will not believe what's going on there, and here.

astralis
06 Jan 10,, 23:22
keith,


I use this word with an appreciation of what it entails - REVOLUTION in ISR.


oh, i believe it, buddy.

the next 10-15 years will be even crazier, too; if you read the stuff the thick-glasses boys at AFRL and AFOSR are putting out, they're hoping by 2030 to develop micro/nano-UAV swarms that can be controlled by a single user, with the ability to potentially implant themselves in terrorists.

ooo-rah.

Officer of Engineers
06 Jan 10,, 23:38
I believe that now, I am officially regulated to the era of the Triceratops Regiment.

TopHatter
07 Jan 10,, 00:23
I believe that now, I am officially regulated to the era of the Triceratops Regiment.
I'm sure they'll find work for you in the next Jurassic Park sequel.

So you've got that going for you. Which is nice.

Red Seven
07 Jan 10,, 00:25
keith,



oh, i believe it, buddy.

the next 10-15 years will be even crazier, too; if you read the stuff the thick-glasses boys at AFRL and AFOSR are putting out, they're hoping by 2030 to develop micro/nano-UAV swarms that can be controlled by a single user, with the ability to potentially implant themselves in terrorists.

ooo-rah.

Infinitely cool stuff, no doubt...along with robotic pack animals that can be programmed to hump gear, ammo & gauze to you, etc. :cool:

Parihaka
07 Jan 10,, 01:24
I believe that now, I am officially regulated to the era of the Triceratops Regiment.

Ive always picked you as belonging to the genus Doyathinkeysaurus.


Doyathinkeysaurus (http://www.worldaffairsboard.com/staff-college/54199-afghanistan-iraq-evolution-us-military-2.html#post707505)
[do-yah-think-ee-sore-us] Noun

A heavily armoured dinosaur renowned for staking out a territory with pre-prepared traps then burying itself in a hole of it's own making.
When an unsuspecting animal blunders into the territory it's disabled by the traps and the Doyathinkeysaurus can venture forth and eat the victim at leasure.
The only known defence is to approach it's territory in numbers, create several diversions simultaneously, then run like hell.

ShawnG
10 Mar 10,, 21:21
The involvement of and role played by the reserve components is a dramatic change from times past.

The development of BCTs (Brigade Combat Teams), using the aforementioned smaller and faster mentality...

And last and certainly least: the wear-out-fast, my-zipper-broke, I-ripped-the-crotch-out-of-a-dozen, "hook-and-pile (velcro)" laden, ACU Uniform.