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gunnut
19 Dec 09,, 10:51
This is the most visually stunning movie up until now. James Cameron definitely knows how to make a movie. It is long (almost 3 hours). That can be good and bad. Did I mention it is the most visually stunning movie yet?

Now to my rant...

I hate god-damn hippies.

I like nature as much as the next guy, but I ain't gonna sacrifice development over some plants.

This movie has a completely biased view of humans. All we hear are the buzz words: corporation, profits, and mining. Maybe we need this mineral to sustain our world. There isn't another place to get it. So we had to spend all this time and effort to come to this planet/moon to mine it.

Nature can be beautiful. Nature can also be ugly. Nature is uncaring. Nature is cruel. Nature is ruthless. Nature is unpredictable. Let's not get all choked up about saving something that can destroy us without a blink of an eye.

I much prefer machines. They are entirely predictable. This alone makes them more friendly.

axeman
19 Dec 09,, 14:07
I much prefer machines. They are entirely predictable. This alone makes them more friendly.

http://scrapetv.com/News/News%20Pages/Technology/images/skynet-terminator.jpg

:eek:

on topic:

The movie really bored me. I've seen too many with a similar theme before (alien sex aside).

bolo121
19 Dec 09,, 15:31
This is the most visually stunning movie up until now. James Cameron definitely knows how to make a movie. It is long (almost 3 hours). That can be good and bad. Did I mention it is the most visually stunning movie yet?

Now to my rant...

I hate god-damn hippies.

I like nature as much as the next guy, but I ain't gonna sacrifice development over some plants.

This movie has a completely biased view of humans. All we hear are the buzz words: corporation, profits, and mining. Maybe we need this mineral to sustain our world. There isn't another place to get it. So we had to spend all this time and effort to come to this planet/moon to mine it.

Nature can be beautiful. Nature can also be ugly. Nature is uncaring. Nature is cruel. Nature is ruthless. Nature is unpredictable. Let's not get all choked up about saving something that can destroy us without a blink of an eye.

I much prefer machines. They are entirely predictable. This alone makes them more friendly.

Right on! The whole time i was thinking i dont give a flying f*** about the effing blue idiots. Crush them! Humans first always.
Also a teeny weeny nit pick, the corporations supposedly need the minerals below the surface and the atmosphere is toxic anyway. Why bother sending all those troops and avatars? Fractional orbital bombardment baby! Frag that rock and then extract what we need at leisure.

sappersgt
20 Dec 09,, 06:47
Now I want a tail (and a neural interface)!:biggrin:

Officer of Engineers
20 Dec 09,, 06:54
Battle of Endor, Star Wars III or VI, anyone? Three words - air burst nuke.

andrew
21 Dec 09,, 00:43
What is the meaning of age restriction upon this movie?
Here in Russia restrictions formally exist, but it seems that they are never respected.
I saw Avatar together with my 6,5 year old nephew yesterday and more than half of the audience were children under 10. And they were deriving the most pleasure of all.

Gun Grape
21 Dec 09,, 01:23
I'm still mad that Cameron didn't let M. Night Shyamalan use the name Avatar for his movie.

Now called The Last Airbender based on the Nick cartoon "Avatar"

Panther
21 Dec 09,, 02:20
We seem to be on the same page?




I hate god-damn hippies.


Help protect the environment, punch a hippy. :biggrin:



This movie has a completely biased view of humans. All we hear are the buzz words: corporation, profits, and mining. Maybe we need this mineral to sustain our world. There isn't another place to get it. So we had to spend all this time and effort to come to this planet/moon to mine it.


The movie plot does not sound unusual, but normal compared to Hollywood standards. I admit i haven't seen it but reading all of the reviews, i do not ever plan too, even when it comes out on dvd. I just am not interested in being indoctrinated!



Nature can be beautiful. Nature can also be ugly. Nature is uncaring. Nature is cruel. Nature is ruthless. Nature is unpredictable. Let's not get all choked up about saving something that can destroy us without a blink of an eye.


Indeed, nature can never be controlled. Humans on the other hand, seem to think they can control the other with the proper conditioning/indoctrination if the process is started when they are young. At least there is no lack of trying on our part. :mad:

crooks
21 Dec 09,, 17:40
I really enjoyed it - was it strongly cliched?

Yeah, but at least it's a cliche with truth, that humans are greedy, spoilt and consumeristic by nature, than a false one.

I say that as a human, btw:)).

Dante
23 Dec 09,, 12:24
Great movie,saw it last night:D
The visuals efects where like..WOW:)

Didn't like the way humans where portrayed(event though there's some truth in it)

Ps:"Fractional orbital bombardment baby! Frag that rock and then extract what we need at leisure."this made me laugh:)) not nice,imagine the other way around:P

gunnut
23 Dec 09,, 18:52
Ever noticed that District 9 and Avatar have a similar plot?

sappersgt
23 Dec 09,, 19:40
Ever noticed that District 9 and Avatar have a similar plot?

I did notice right off that the "bad" guys once again are military contractors and the "good" guys are humanoid and or have human like behavior. I did like the palletised "bomb" load shoved off the ramp. But nice improvisation for someone limited resources. No nukes, CS and improvised demolition, you use what you got!:cool::biggrin:

Chogy
24 Dec 09,, 15:17
Ever noticed that District 9 and Avatar have a similar plot?

That the military is composed of morons that have no conscience; that military contractors are greedy war-mongers, and together will rape/kill everything and anything that stands in the path of power and/or profit? Yes.

gunnut
24 Dec 09,, 18:43
That the military is composed of morons that have no conscience; that military contractors are greedy war-mongers, and together will rape/kill everything and anything that stands in the path of power and/or profit? Yes.

Actually I was thinking "human turned alien" part of the plot. :tongue:

TopHatter
28 Dec 09,, 05:53
This is the most visually stunning movie up until now. James Cameron definitely knows how to make a movie. It is long (almost 3 hours). That can be good and bad. Did I mention it is the most visually stunning movie yet?He does indeed. I am not an especially theater-going person, but I will always watch a James Cameron movie in the theater.


This movie has a completely biased view of humans. All we hear are the buzz words: corporation, profits, and mining.

As at least one review pointed out, that's a classic Cameron cliche


[IMG]
The movie really bored me. I've seen too many with a similar theme before (alien sex aside).
Oh how true. I guess I've watched too many movies because it was fairly predictable. Who lives, who dies, the wildlife rising up against the company mercenaries, but especially the very end of the movie, Jake fusing with his Avatar...I think I predicted that a few minutes after he met his blue girlfriend.



Also a teeny weeny nit pick, the corporations supposedly need the minerals below the surface and the atmosphere is toxic anyway. Why bother sending all those troops and avatars? Fractional orbital bombardment baby! Frag that rock and then extract what we need at leisure.

Not teeny at all. A HUGE gaping plot hole: What happens when the company people get back to Earth? They're just going to write off that much potential wealth?

Well, maybe. Remember, this is a "company", (the old Cameron standby) with more or less humane stockholders. In addition, that's not the regular army we saw. They're also employing mercenaries, extremely well-armed former-military mercs to be sure, but mercs nonetheless. So that kind of planet-busting weaponry may be somewhat out of the company's reach.

Having said all that, Cameron has stated he wants to make 2 sequals if Avatar is successful. And I'm pretty that's gonna happen, judging by this weekend's box office. So maybe the regular army will get called in or the company will get their dirty hands on a FOBS.


Battle of Endor, Star Wars III or VI, anyone? Three words - air burst nuke.
Oh my god, I know right? :rolleyes:

Return of the Jedi
Dances With Wolves
Dune

Just to name a few. Which Cameron more or less freely admits to.


That the military is composed of morons that have no conscience; that military contractors are greedy war-mongers, and together will rape/kill everything and anything that stands in the path of power and/or profit? Yes.

That disgusted me to no end at first and still does to a large extent.

Unfortunately companies like Blackwater and KBR aren't exactly the most sterling examples of professionalism at it's best. But hey, their motivation, their very raison d'Ítre is profit.

So, not too much of a stretch for me once I reminded myself that these were not professional soldiers serving their country, but mercenaries motivated by bigtime money (why else would they be on such a so-called shithole deathtrap of a planet) and probably heavily indoctrinated to boot.

xinhui
28 Dec 09,, 07:25
watched the movie last night and it is clear that Cameron incorporated some of the military elements from the Aliens into the current flick, the rifle, the walkers, etc, even the female chopper pilot.

Chogy
28 Dec 09,, 15:36
watched the movie last night and it is clear that Cameron incorporated some of the military elements from the Aliens into the current flick, the rifle, the walkers, etc, even the female chopper pilot.

Even Sigourney Weaver, the ultimate Alien slayer... reprised in a role as a peace-maker. :biggrin:

I wonder if most of those outside the U.S. picked up on the Native-American themes. The tribal conditions, the societies, the ceremonies, war-whoops, even the languages sounded right from the plains of 1800's America. Except this time the Indians won.

gunnut
28 Dec 09,, 19:04
Avatar only experienced a 3% drop in sales in its 2nd weekend vs. opening weekend, which is remarkable for a blockbuster opening. Normally a blockbuster opening will experience a 30% to 50% drop in sales in the weekend following the opening weekend.

Avatar has made $212 million in 1 week and 2 weekends in the US market.

:eek:

xinhui
28 Dec 09,, 19:07
Except this time the Indians won.

it is a syfy movie after all.

tim52
29 Dec 09,, 15:19
Saw the movie over the weekend and I just want to say from my perspective I think that too much is made of the evil corporation verses the natives plot line.

Fact is there are ample examples throughout history of what happens when a technologically superior culture interacts with the low tech indigenous population and in almost every case it’s not a happy outcome for the locals. If anything, you could say this was a remake of Dances with Wolves or even Little Big Man; only in space with blue indians.

Other than that it was a visual treat with plenty of eye candy. So I say set aside any bias you may have toward tree hugging Hollywood liberals and go see the movie and enjoy it for what it is; an epic cowboy and indian movie, set on another planet. :)

Officer of Engineers
29 Dec 09,, 15:52
Well, maybe. Remember, this is a "company", (the old Cameron standby) with more or less humane stockholders. In addition, that's not the regular army we saw. They're also employing mercenaries, extremely well-armed former-military mercs to be sure, but mercs nonetheless. So that kind of planet-busting weaponry may be somewhat out of the company's reach.They can move a 10 story skyrise 6 light years but can't move a rock to hit a planet?

Shamus
29 Dec 09,, 16:04
They can move a 10 story skyrise 6 light years but can't move a rock to hit a planet?Sounds suspiciously like AT&T;):biggrin:.

YellowFever
29 Dec 09,, 17:41
Even though the "corporate greed" theme was expected in this Cameron movie, I was still seething at the individual (for a lack of a better term) meaness of the "soldiers".

I'm still trying to figure out one aspect of the film that wasn't predictable. Overall, an enjoyable film but it's definitely not worth the hype it's generated.

TopHatter
29 Dec 09,, 18:00
They can move a 10 story skyrise 6 light years but can't move a rock to hit a planet?

Just because they "can" doesn't mean they "will".

This is of course a corporation and the reason they didn't simply exterminate the Blue Man Group decades earlier was that wouldn't sit very well with their stockholders.

(Even near the end when the corporation's mercenaries toppled the Mother Tree, it was mainly to get the natives to move the hell out of the way. Because it was clear -finally- that there would be no bargains or negotiations, but the point was to forcibly relocate them, not exterminate them. Ditto the "shock and awe" daisy cutter.)

So, in order to move that rock to hit the planet, first you have to get the project approved, because that will most defintely cost money.

Suppose that system is free of large enough asteroids? You'll have to bring one in from elsewhere, which will cost even more money. That kind of capital expediture has to be explained.

And finally, even if through subterfuge you are able to bombard the planet and kill the natives, word of it will get out. It always does.

That's assuming of course that you're able to rig that asteroid to airburst, lest it destroy or otherwise ruin the very minerals you're trying to extract (assuming they're fairly close to the surface, which it looks like they possibly are, judging by the strip-mining seen at other sites), assuming of course the corporation and it's stockholdres have decided that genocide is the only way to go.
Even though the "corporate greed" theme was expected in this Cameron movie, I was still seething at the individual (for a lack of a better term) meaness of the "soldiers".
I agree. ONE chopper pilot has a conscience. The rest of them, including plenty of women, are up for wholesale slaughter. Not ONE of them is willing to even passively resist.

Whatever Mr. Cameron. Whatever. :rolleyes:


I'm still trying to figure out one aspect of the film that wasn't predictable. Overall, an enjoyable film but it's definitely not worth the hype it's generated.Ditto on the predictability, but the visual effects are literally unprecedented and worth the price of admission.

The story/script portion....no, not worth the hype. But then, that's not what the hype's been about.

gunnut
29 Dec 09,, 20:03
You know, if the "corporation" is as evil as the movie depicts and humans are as greedy as the movie depicts, the sequel can't end well for the natives. I would use orbital bombardment to clear the mining site of all life to make my operation safer and cheaper. But that's just me...

<== my AVATAR

:))

TopHatter
29 Dec 09,, 20:38
You know, if the "corporation" is as evil as the movie depicts and humans are as greedy as the movie depicts, the sequel can't end well for the natives. I would use orbital bombardment to clear the mining site of all life to make my operation safer and cheaper. But that's just me...

<== my AVATAR

:))

Interesting phrase in your avatar:


"I have an absolute reverence for men who have a sense of duty, courage, but Iím also a child of the í60s. Thereís a part of me who wants to put a daisy in the end of the gun barrel.

I believe in peace through superior firepower, but on the other hand I abhor the abuse of power and creeping imperialism disguised as patriotism.

Some of these things you canít raise without being called unpatriotic, but I think itís very patriotic to question a system that needs to be corralled, or it becomes Rome."
óJames Cameron on theme of Avatar

gunnut
29 Dec 09,, 21:18
I believe in peace through superior firepower, but on the other hand I abhor the abuse of power and creeping imperialism disguised as patriotism.

Some of these things you canít raise without being called unpatriotic, but I think itís very patriotic to question a system that needs to be corralled, or it becomes Rome."

óJames Cameron on theme of Avatar


At the risk of de-railing this thread into a political food fight, I hope he sees the irony of his views now that a true imperial president is sitting in the White House.

zraver
02 Jan 10,, 04:37
I agree. ONE chopper pilot has a conscience. The rest of them, including plenty of women, are up for wholesale slaughter. Not ONE of them is willing to even passively resist.


I am going to take an opposite tac here. In the two big battle seen the first was fairly non-leathal. While a lot more missiles were fired, the body count was fairly low and achieved the objective. The one pilot to object, was the one we knew was interacting with the xeno scientists. The Corporation also had morality- offering science, schools, medicine etc. The problems didn't really start until the company manager ran up against the will of the colonel and the dead line to show a profit.

Even in the final battle scene the objective was to kill the spirit tree to disperse the tribes. The Colonel who wanted war still had to frame his objectives defensively. Those mercs thought/knew they faced a horse bent on their destruction and moved out to deal with a clear threat. The only really evil human is the colonel.

On to the plot, the history of imperialism isn't a pretty one. Humanity is not kind to nature or his fellow man. That part of the plot is totally believable. Also believable is the fact that the company focused on unobtainium is missing the forest for the trees. Imagine the implications of a biologically aware ecosystem and the possibility to mind meld with other living beings. of figuring out how to float mountains. If you could move a million tons or more of bulk material imagine what you could do.

Chogy
02 Jan 10,, 15:24
They never did explain the floating mountains, other than that it was a "magnetically disturbed region..." Yeah, which results in billions upon billions of tons of rock to float about magically. I could suspend belief for the Gaia theme. After all, the possibilities of a gigantic network of neurons is something that may well exist, somewhere. But violating the basic laws of physics (like gravity) bothers me.

What keeps anything with mass in the area from shooting upwards? I would think the company would be more interested in the floating mountain phenomenon (possible anti-grav drive?) than a mineral.

TopHatter
02 Jan 10,, 15:46
I am going to take an opposite tac here. In the two big battle seen the first was fairly non-leathal. While a lot more missiles were fired, the body count was fairly low and achieved the objective. The one pilot to object, was the one we knew was interacting with the xeno scientists.

Even in the final battle scene the objective was to kill the spirit tree to disperse the tribes. The Colonel who wanted war still had to frame his objectives defensively. Those mercs thought/knew they faced a horse bent on their destruction and moved out to deal with a clear threat.
Yeah, the more that I think about it, after it was clear that the tribes were gathering and uniting, the mercs were suddenly and painfully aware that the natives were now out for blood, they had a former Marine leading them and now "it's them or us".


The only really evil human is the colonel.

Oddly enough and I don't entirely agree with him, but the actor who protrayed Colonel , Stephen Lang (Yep, George Pickett and then Stonewall Jackson in Gettysburg and God's and Generals) doesn't see his character as being "evil (http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/herocomplex/2009/12/dont-tell-stephen-lang-hes-the-bad-guy-in-avatar-i-dont-play-a-villain-i-play-a-man-doing-his-job.html)"


The Corporation also had morality- offering science, schools, medicine etc. The problems didn't really start until the company manager ran up against the will of the colonel and the dead line to show a profit.
I see that as a morality born, first of convenience and then of necessity, but always with profit in mind. Which is of course, as stated earlier, the raison d'Ítre of a corporation.

They initially offered those things so the natives would behave, and also probably as a sort of condescending "white man's burden". They bring in a bunch of xeno-scientists to make it look good and produce some results and everybody's happy.

Later, they knew they couldn't roll in there with gunships blazing because of their stockholder's morality, even after the natives proved hostile to the mining efforts.


They never did explain the floating mountains

Well, obviously Roger Dean is a native of that planet. ;)

Prof
02 Jan 10,, 18:16
Well, I went to see the thing.

I never go to movies in the theatre (A chronic Mary grump) because a) I can't smoke or head for the head without missing something & b) A large, seat-overlapping heroically obese person always sits next to me. This time I figured that it might be worth it, & we went during the middle of a work day. Sparsely inhabited theater, so I was spared the globular lipid incursion.

It was OK. The special effects were nice; good eye-candy. I finally got to see what all the 3-D hooraw was about. It was OK, too, although the colors were far brighter when you removed the glasses, something I did from time to time. I actually involuntarily dodged a rock or something hurtling in my direction at one point, which was kinda nifty.

The politics? Yeah. Dances With Wolves goo. Ah, well. Don't forget that the Hero/Messiah was also a Marine. But against that, I like reasonably nekkid ladies, even when they're 9ft tall & blue. & I want a big animal to flap around on, zoomie-style.

Now, come, come. This hippy stuff. My wife considered herself a hippy. In the 60s, when that stuff was "real", not some goofy-ass retro shit incorporated into the Entitlement Movement. She's an IT exec at the Gas Company now. Like, & liked, her fine in either incarnation. Even before we got together, hippies marvelously improved my sex life. Sorta went with the territory. Sometimes conformity can be good. Even excellent. 'Course, they hadn't invented AIDS yet back then. Maybe you meant guy hippies, Mssr. L'Bartender? If not, meet me tomorrow on the sandbar with your second & a physician of your choice, sir.

I don't know if any of you folks ever watch the TV series Bones. I do. A subplot in one of the recent installments was an homage to the movie. A regular in the series, the guy who plays an Eeyoreish intern at "The Jeffersonian Institution" & who was also our turncoat's intended Mentor in the movie, was featured prominently. Very funny, especially now that I've seen the film.

My review: On balance, I expect that it'll be another couple of years before my lady gets me into one of those places again.

Cheers,

Prof

Prof
02 Jan 10,, 18:24
Jeepers! It was GunNut I just challenged to a duel. Ah, weel. Guess I'm dead.

Prof

Prof
03 Jan 10,, 02:02
Death by Webley. Could be worse. No! Wait! It's January 2! I get choice of weapons! I forgot about the new winter rules. Cheese slices @ 20 paces.

Prof

superstring01
03 Jan 10,, 03:05
Loved the movie. I want my own avatar.

~String

gunnut
04 Jan 10,, 00:21
Obamas take in 'Avatar' on New Year's Eve

Dec. 31, 2009, 2:47 PM EST

KANEOHE, Hawaii (AP) -- President Barack Obama's family have spent New Year's Eve with the Na'vi.

The Obamas visited a movie theater to see "Avatar" near their rented vacation home in Hawaii on Thursday morning. Officials say the first family had the theater to themselves to watch director James Cameron's tech-heavy film.

The Obamas, including first daughters Sasha and Malia, left their compound before noon on New Year's Eve. Before the screening, Obama, a self-described movie buff, worked out at the Marine Corps base nearby.

The Obamas are set to return to Washington in the new year.


Obamas take in 'Avatar' on New Year's Eve - MSN Movies News (http://entertainment.msn.com/news/article.aspx?news=449592)

zraver
09 Jan 10,, 08:06
They never did explain the floating mountains, other than that it was a "magnetically disturbed region..." Yeah, which results in billions upon billions of tons of rock to float about magically. I could suspend belief for the Gaia theme. After all, the possibilities of a gigantic network of neurons is something that may well exist, somewhere. But violating the basic laws of physics (like gravity) bothers me.

What keeps anything with mass in the area from shooting upwards? I would think the company would be more interested in the floating mountain phenomenon (possible anti-grav drive?) than a mineral.

The unobtainium the company was after might be capable of creating a singularity if properly stimulated thus allowing worm holes and thus FTL travel. if stimulated in another way it may have a reverse effect and repel say ferros metals which the mountaisn could be loaded with. The mountaisn are in the flux after all.

just my .02

Big K
09 Jan 10,, 09:05
i watched it twice. once 2d once 3d.

2d was far better.

i guess it is not a "3-d movie" but more likely a "movie that can be seen in 3-d"

Doomarias
09 Jan 10,, 09:15
Obamas take in 'Avatar' on New Year's Eve - MSN Movies News (http://entertainment.msn.com/news/article.aspx?news=449592)

Dam, I thought I read Obama's take on Avatar. I was all ready to read a gushing review of the morals of the new classic:tongue:.

400posts...

Big K
09 Jan 10,, 10:01
Did I mention it is the most visually stunning movie yet?

one of best i think


Ever noticed that District 9 and Avatar have a similar plot?

agreed.

Avatar describes&open in question the greedy human nature who can destroy many other valuable things when screamig "development".

the movie underlines that despite all that "civilised" & "developed" nature of humans they dont have any "world" left to live in.

their greedy nature destroyed their world & culture by destroying other cultures & mother nature

all that "advance" technological mambo jambos could not save their own planet.

nothing can prevent humans greedy nature, only the human it self can control it.

but for this one must be "awaken"

on the other hand despite all the magical & supernatural life that Na'Vi's live they could not defend theirselves.

so back to the Na'vi's philosphy.

balance once again balance must be kept by all and in all aspects...

i think the movie is all about this.

Mihais
09 Jan 10,, 15:08
Watched the movie.Can't say I was thrilled for a second.Characters are some of the most boring in years.The natives are dumb.I mean after they're supposed to be in contact with humans for years they still shoot arrows at those armed Osprey's.And those bad white colonialists...
I want a remake on Zulu.I want Mel Gibson leading bayonet charges.

gunnut
12 Jan 10,, 20:47
Audiences experience 'Avatar' blues

By Jo Piazza, Special to CNN
January 11, 2010 8:06 a.m. EST

(CNN) -- James Cameron's completely immersive spectacle "Avatar" may have been a little too real for some fans who say they have experienced depression and suicidal thoughts after seeing the film because they long to enjoy the beauty of the alien world Pandora.

On the fan forum site "Avatar Forums," a topic thread entitled "Ways to cope with the depression of the dream of Pandora being intangible," has received more than 1,000 posts from people experiencing depression and fans trying to help them cope. The topic became so popular last month that forum administrator Philippe Baghdassarian had to create a second thread so people could continue to post their confused feelings about the movie.

"I wasn't depressed myself. In fact the movie made me happy ," Baghdassarian said. "But I can understand why it made people depressed. The movie was so beautiful and it showed something we don't have here on Earth. I think people saw we could be living in a completely different world and that caused them to be depressed."

A post by a user called Elequin expresses an almost obsessive relationship with the film.

"That's all I have been doing as of late, searching the Internet for more info about 'Avatar.' I guess that helps. It's so hard I can't force myself to think that it's just a movie, and to get over it, that living like the Na'vi will never happen. I think I need a rebound movie," Elequin posted.

A user named Mike wrote on the fan Web site "Naviblue" that he contemplated suicide after seeing the movie.

"Ever since I went to see 'Avatar' I have been depressed. Watching the wonderful world of Pandora and all the Na'vi made me want to be one of them. I can't stop thinking about all the things that happened in the film and all of the tears and shivers I got from it," Mike posted. "I even contemplate suicide thinking that if I do it I will be rebirthed in a world similar to Pandora and the everything is the same as in 'Avatar.' "

Other fans have expressed feelings of disgust with the human race and disengagement with reality.

Cameron's movie, which has pulled in more than $1.4 billion in worldwide box office sales and could be on track to be the highest grossing film of all time, is set in the future when the Earth's resources have been pillaged by the human race. A greedy corporation is trying to mine the rare mineral unobtainium from the planet Pandora, which is inhabited by a peace-loving race of 7-foot tall, blue-skinned natives called the Na'vi.

In their race to mine for Pandora's resources, the humans clash with the Na'vi, leading to casualties on both sides. The world of Pandora is reminiscent of a prehistoric fantasyland, filled with dinosaur-like creatures mixed with the kinds of fauna you may find in the deep reaches of the ocean. Compared with life on Earth, Pandora is a beautiful, glowing utopia.

Ivar Hill posts to the "Avatar" forum page under the name Eltu. He wrote about his post-"Avatar" depression after he first saw the film earlier this month.

"When I woke up this morning after watching Avatar for the first time yesterday, the world seemed ... gray. It was like my whole life, everything I've done and worked for, lost its meaning," Hill wrote on the forum. "It just seems so ... meaningless. I still don't really see any reason to keep ... doing things at all. I live in a dying world."

Reached via e-mail in Sweden where he is studying game design, Hill, 17, explained that his feelings of despair made him desperately want to escape reality.

"One can say my depression was twofold: I was depressed because I really wanted to live in Pandora, which seemed like such a perfect place, but I was also depressed and disgusted with the sight of our world, what we have done to Earth. I so much wanted to escape reality," Hill said.

Cameron's special effects masterpiece is very lifelike, and the 3-D performance capture and CGI effects essentially allow the viewer to enter the alien world of Pandora for the movie's 2Ĺ-hour running time, which only lends to the separation anxiety some individuals experience when they depart the movie theater.

"Virtual life is not real life and it never will be, but this is the pinnacle of what we can build in a virtual presentation so far," said Dr. Stephan Quentzel, psychiatrist and Medical Director for the Louis Armstrong Center for Music and Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. "It has taken the best of our technology to create this virtual world and real life will never be as utopian as it seems onscreen. It makes real life seem more imperfect."

Fans of the movie may find actor Stephen Lang, who plays the villainous Col. Miles Quaritch in the film, an enemy of the Na'vi people and their sacred ground, an unlikely sympathizer. But Lang says he can understand the connection people are feeling with the movie.

"Pandora is a pristine world and there is the synergy between all of the creatures of the planet and I think that strikes a deep chord within people that has a wishfulness and a wistfulness to it," Lang said. "James Cameron had the technical resources to go along with this incredibly fertile imagination of his and his dream is built out of the same things that other peoples' dreams are made of."

The bright side is that for Hill and others like him -- who became dissatisfied with their own lives and with our imperfect world after enjoying the fictional creation of James Cameron -- becoming a part of a community of like-minded people on an online forum has helped them emerge from the darkness.

"After discussing on the forums for a while now, my depression is beginning to fade away. Having taken a part in many discussions concerning all this has really, really helped me," Hill said. "Before, I had lost the reason to keep on living -- but now it feels like these feelings are gradually being replaced with others."

Quentzel said creating relationships with others is one of the keys to human happiness, and that even if those connections are occurring online they are better than nothing.

"Obviously there is community building in these forums," Quentzel said. "It may be technologically different from other community building, but it serves the same purpose."

Within the fan community, suggestions for battling feelings of depression after seeing the movie include things like playing "Avatar" video games or downloading the movie soundtrack, in addition to encouraging members to relate to other people outside the virtual realm and to seek out positive and constructive activities.


Audiences experience 'Avatar' blues - CNN.com (http://www.cnn.com/2010/SHOWBIZ/Movies/01/11/avatar.movie.blues/index.html)

Wow, and I thought I needed psychological help...

Good to know there are people in this world way more F'ed up than me.:biggrin:

gunnut
13 Jan 10,, 01:04
Neo has some of the smartest commenters in the zone. Case in point: commenter Jim Sullivan at neo-neocon's Avatar: the war against humans brings us the very best round-up of the educational aspects of Avatar. Heed him and LEARN heedless humans!

* It's OK to kill things as long as you use a bow and arrow and not a gun or missile.

* Teh Interwebz au Naturale of the Allmother (or whatever the f*** the Giganto-smurfs called her) beats the technology of a species that has harvested the power of the atom, is capable of celestial travel, and has armored the unholy f*** out of everything. Also:

* It's a much better way to call up your bizarro world rhino and pterodactyl allies (the ones that previously wanted to eat you) than a Tarzan call or a Conch shell. But, you still have to send the Dire-pony express to the Four Corners of the world to rally the tribes.

* Soldiers are bad unless they are A) not Caucasian or B) handi-capped. All other soldiers are A) psychopaths B) mindless myrmidons or C) nameless cannon fodder (or in this case arrow fodder)

* Even shallow, selfish, homicidal savages are good because they're savages and therefore inherently and unquestionably noble.

* The best way for primitive screw-heads to fight off a technologically superior, militarily sophisticated force is to fight the superior force on their terms. Asymmetric strategy, insurgent tactics and guerrilla warfare couldn't possibly even the odds. Not in a million years.

* All scientists are compassionate and resent the very soldiers prepared to die to protect them. This is completely reasonable and in no way intellectually dishonest. Hollywood decrees it!

* Subjugating other species is wrong -- unless you are able to have mind-blowing ponytail intercourse and biologically hack into their brain. Then it's OK.

* When you encounter a new mineral that floats and causes whole mountain ranges to float, the coolest, catchiest, most marketable name for it is Unobtainium. After you succeed in mining it, it semantically transforms,a la magma/lava, into HaHaHa!I'sAllMine-ite.

* When the nobly savage Giganto-smurfs, the Emo-scientists and their Land-networked planetary defense menagerie evict the eeevil military-capitalist Gestapo from their idyllic floating mountain paradise back to their ecologically dead world, the nature frolickers all live happily ever after. There's no chance in hell that those same military-capitalists will return with a full blown invasion fleet. Never happen. Hollywood decrees it!


"Things I learned while watching Avatar" @ AMERICAN DIGEST (http://americandigest.org/mt-archives/art_within_america/things_i_learned_while_wa.php)

Glad I'm not the only one. :biggrin:

furkensturker
06 Feb 10,, 06:10
Keeping in mind that Avatar was just a movie, I would like to make a couple of observations.

There was no mention of a treaty or even permission for the humans to mine "unobtainian" on Pandora, being an alien world. So one must assume that the Humans have decided to plunder the wealth of another world for the betterment of Earth. Seems to have parallels to some cultures here on earth.

I don't think mention was made as to the need for Unobtanian, as in is it something the the Earth needed to keep life going as we/they knew it? Please correct me if I'm wrong

Why do the Humans believe they are the higher beings in this situation? While they have better technological equipment and kick arse hardware, the gentle people of Pandora lived a subsistence lifestyle where food and other necessities were managed. Not like here on Earth where man has raped the seas and the forests for money, leaving an ecological wasteland that threatens the whole human race. What gives Humans the right to decimate Pandora? How many Earthlings can plug into the brain of animals and be as one? Compare that to technologically advanced helicopters and walking machines controlled by a computer system, that I hope was not Windows based.

If the Earthlings were as advanced as they would have you believe, they would have worked out the floating mountains, and not just accept it as an anomaly that interrupted navigation systems.

The movie also focuses on the Americans version of peace, that being as long as everything goes the way of the American military, there will be peace, if not, they'll throw more hardware and man power at them until peace is sustained. The loss of life as now seems to be something that is to be expected, and get over it. The Marine Colonel was the wrong person to have as CO. He was more Gung Ho that the Co of the chopper regt in Apocalypse now. On a side point, can someone tell me why the Marines say WHEERRP and OOORAH a lot? I'm Australian and don't understand.

The movie was set 150 years in the future; one would like to think that in 150 years from now, we would have a few more clues as to global warming, sustainable farming and forestry and minerals, world peace (but then again, man has fought wars since recorded time), living with their fellow man.

Mention was made of a battle in Venezuela, this begs the question; why was the US fighting in Venezuela? Maybe that was the last known deposit of unodtanian, who knows?

Again, please keep in mind that this was just a movie, not foreign pollicy.

Freddie

paintgun
06 Feb 10,, 12:04
Prof, Mihais

Avatar is a breakthrough in artistic technical point of view
It is also a breakthrough in 3D cinematic production which could and have started a new hype and interest in 3D movies (3D televisions, 3D porn, more 3D movies)
It set itself as a new benchmark for the next upcoming 3D movies,
previously 3D movies are seen as gimmicks to rob people a few more dollars than the movie's worth, throwing stuffs, speeding cars, buzzing planes
but Avatar shows of how 3D filming techniques can be brought to a new level, scene dramatization and focus in real life scenes, and heavy 3D contents through out the length movie

If someone tries to make a robot movie, he will find himself competing with the impressions of the Transformers movies
If someone tries to make a sci-fi action flick, they will find themselves versus the cheesiness but compelling actions from the Matrix series
If someone tries to make a space saga adventure movie, they will first duel with Luke Skywalker before attempting

If someone tries to make 3D sci-fi real life emulating flick, they will be compared with Avatar
a 3D trailer of Battle for Terra is shown before Avatar is played, and one can see it is pale in comparison with Avatar. Not good for an upcoming movie

Avatar has set a high new bar of how animated movies are made and produced in many aspect. 2 billion dollars in revenue of worldwide screening. hmm... I want to be James Cameron

paintgun
06 Feb 10,, 12:21
Sir Freddie

James Cameron himself stated that Avatar is a pro-enviroment and anti-war movie, and everyone can see Avatar carries that heavy nuance in the movie

Replying to your post :

Unobtainium is a term usually used widely in storytelling and movies, referring to rare, expensive, highly desirable mineral/material which is very hard to extract. People usually invent names for the mineral/material but in Avatar they simply go for unobtainium


Why do the Humans believe they are the higher beings in this situation?
It is human nature to behave so when encountering less sophisticated civilization


Not like here on Earth where man has raped the seas and the forests for money, leaving an ecological wasteland that threatens the whole human race.
Human were once as nature-friendly creature as the depicted Nav'is in Avatar


If the Earthlings were as advanced as they would have you believe, they would have worked out the floating mountains, and not just accept it as an anomaly that interrupted navigation systems.
As in real-life mining operations, people will only go for the most feasible and profitable locations.


The movie also focuses on the Americans version of peace, that being as long as everything goes the way of the American military, there will be peace, if not, they'll throw more hardware and man power at them until peace is sustained. The loss of life as now seems to be something that is to be expected, and get over it. The Marine Colonel was the wrong person to have as CO. He was more Gung Ho that the Co of the chopper regt in Apocalypse now. On a side point, can someone tell me why the Marines say WHEERRP and OOORAH a lot? I'm Australian and don't understand.
The movie tries to be artistically accurate, and provokes interest with such accurate depiction, making relations with real life situations. It's one of some story telling technique to get the audience involved with the story, even after they leave the screening room.

Chogy
06 Feb 10,, 15:01
Human were once as nature-friendly creature as the depicted Nav'is in Avatar

I disagree 1,000% Humans were "nature friendly" insofar as their technology was too limited to do too much damage. Primitive humans would and did do anything to their environment if it gave them and their progeny the slimmest additional chance for survival.

Hunt animals to extinction? No problem, do so, then move on. Slash and burn agriculture? Go for it. Run 1,000 Bison off a cliff and eat only 20 of them? Yup.

The romanticization of primitive peoples and their relationship with a "Gaia" figure has been badly overblown in our modern culture. American Natives were in fact extremely savage, practiced both cannibalism and (to the South) human sacrifice, were continually at war with their neighbors, and generally were not what we would consider nice people. Until the Spanish brought the horse, their only non-human creature that lived in "peace" with them was the dog. Everything else was either food, or danger.

paintgun
06 Feb 10,, 15:44
I disagree 1,000% Humans were "nature friendly" insofar as their technology was too limited to do too much damage. Primitive humans would and did do anything to their environment if it gave them and their progeny the slimmest additional chance for survival.

Yes that was my context of nature-friendly, seems i still use the wrong word, i avoided nature-loving, but nature-friendly still don't cut it :tongue: