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Shek
01 Nov 09,, 01:32
Which American Civil War general had the highest casualty rate in his army?

Tarek Morgen
01 Nov 09,, 01:06
Lee?

edit:

ah and how is "highest rate" defined? Highest number of total casulties or in percantage of men under his command?

ace16807
01 Nov 09,, 01:17
Lee?

edit:

ah and how is "highest rate" defined? Highest number of total casulties or in percantage of men under his command?

I think it's percentage under his command. I'm pretty sure it's Lee as well.

Shek
01 Nov 09,, 01:21
Lee?

edit:

ah and how is "highest rate" defined? Highest number of total casulties or in percantage of men under his command?

Rate is percentage, and Lee was the general (at the army level or higher) in the Civil War with the highest casualty rate. Your turn.

Tarek Morgen
01 Nov 09,, 01:31
What was the (unused) plan suggested to the Confederate authorities to get rid of the Unionist in St. Louis?

Albany Rifles
03 Nov 09,, 21:01
What was the (unused) plan suggested to the Confederate authorities to get rid of the Unionist in St. Louis?

The request by Governor Jackson of Jefferson Davis for siege guns to destroy the ST Louis Arsenal?

Tarek Morgen
03 Nov 09,, 22:31
The request by Governor Jackson of Jefferson Davis for siege guns to destroy the ST Louis Arsenal?

um not the one I had in mind but I guess it still counts.

What I though of was:


A Missouri man had once written the Confederate authorities that all they had to do to get rid of the Saint Louis Unionists was destroy the local breweries and seize all the beer: "... By this means the Germans will all die in a week and the Yankees will then run from this State.


Brigadier General M. Jeff Thompson

Shek
03 Nov 09,, 22:35
um not the one I had in mind but I guess it still counts.

What I though of was:


Brigadier General M. Jeff Thompson

Destroy Anheuser Busch? Heretics all!

Tarek Morgen
03 Nov 09,, 22:37
Well back then they still made at least actual beer.

Albany Rifles has the next question.

Albany Rifles
03 Nov 09,, 23:54
um not the one I had in mind but I guess it still counts.

What I though of was:


Brigadier General M. Jeff Thompson

That would have made what happened in the borderland of Kansas and Missouri seem like a tiff. :eek:

Bleeding Kansas? Hell, how about Burning Missouri!:tongue:

Should have known a German would have beer in the equation!!!

Albany Rifles
03 Nov 09,, 23:56
What ACW battle had the participants mostly composed of Native Americans, Affricans and only a few white units involved?

Tech
03 Dec 09,, 03:26
Only one I could think of was Honey Springs in Oklahoma, July of 1863. Close?



And hopefully this isn't considered necro-posting.

Albany Rifles
03 Dec 09,, 19:42
Tech,

You got it...and no, you are within the statute of limitation to keep the zombies at bay!

Your question!

Tech
04 Dec 09,, 02:55
Dang it! I even had my shotgun ready for the zombies this time.

Sorry, too much Left 4 Dead of late.

What Confederate blockade runner never entered a Southern port?

TopHatter
04 Dec 09,, 04:50
What Confederate blockade runner never entered a Southern port?

I would say CSS Alabama, except she wasn't a blockade runner (nor a privateer, for that matter).

Stitch
04 Dec 09,, 05:27
I would say CSS Alabama, except she wasn't a blockade runner (nor a privateer, for that matter).

Is that the same ironclad known as the Merrimack north of the border?

Tech
04 Dec 09,, 06:35
Really? The C.S.S. Alabama was the one I meant. I can't remember the title of the trivia book I used to have (it walked when I loaned it to a fellow student) but I remember reading about the Alabama being a blockade runner. And I found this online,


In July 1861, a contract was signed with shipbuilders Laird Brothers, for vessel number 290, known as Enrica. On 29 July 1862 Enrica went to sea supposedly for trials with various dignitaries on board. After putting them off by a tug she quietly sailed off for the Azores to take on armaments and ammunition and begin life as the blockade-runner CSS Alabama.

from the Merseyside Maritime Museum's website: Liverpool museums - The history of CSS Alabama (http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/archive/displays/alabama/history.aspx)

zraver
04 Dec 09,, 07:48
Really? The C.S.S. Alabama was the one I meant. I can't remember the title of the trivia book I used to have (it walked when I loaned it to a fellow student) but I remember reading about the Alabama being a blockade runner. And I found this online,



from the Merseyside Maritime Museum's website: Liverpool museums - The history of CSS Alabama (http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/maritime/archive/displays/alabama/history.aspx)

Blockade runners try to get cargo in or out, the Alabama was a commerce raider. She didn't take many prizes she sank shipping for the most part.

Upon the completion of her seven expeditionary raids, Alabama had been at sea for 534 days out of 657, never visiting a single Confederate port. She boarded nearly 450 vessels, captured or burned 65 Union merchant ships, and took more than 2,000 prisoners without a single loss of life from either prisoners or her own crew.

Tech
04 Dec 09,, 08:03
Well, suck. I'm sorry. Guess I'll have to fire some of my online resources that I have saved and try to regain some of my dignity. :redface:

Albany Rifles
04 Dec 09,, 14:02
Tech,

And to rub salt in the wounds, here is another Confederate ship which never entered a Confederate port, the CSS Shenandoah

CSS Shenandoah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CSS_Shenandoah)

As for blockade runners, they were merchant ships, and almost all were manned by British crews with RN officers.

TopHatter
04 Dec 09,, 17:52
Is that the same ironclad known as the Merrimack north of the border?

No, you're thinking of CSS Virginia


Really? The C.S.S. Alabama was the one I meant. I can't remember the title of the trivia book I used to have (it walked when I loaned it to a fellow student) but I remember reading about the Alabama being a blockade runner. And I found this online,

Even scholarly sources get their nomenclature screwed up, which is depressing.

This has already been gone into, but I'm in mood to quote some Wiki :redface:

Blockade Runner - A blockade runner is a term applied to ships used to evade a naval blockade of a harbor or strait, as opposed to confronting the blockaders to break the blockade. Very often blockade running is done in order to transport cargo, for example to bring food or arms to a blockaded city. In other cases the blockade running is an attempt to communicate with the outside world.

Privateer - A private vessel authorized by a country's government by letters of marque to attack foreign shipping in exchange for prize money.

Merchant Raider - A commissioned naval vessel that seeks out and captures or destroys enemy commerce.

CSS Alabama was not a privateer, though she's often described as such. She was a commissioned vessel of the Confederate States Navy, hence the "CSS" prefix.

Interestingly, she was crewed almost solely by Britons, as well as a couple of her officers. The captain and other officers were the only Confederate naval officers aboard.

TopHatter
07 Dec 09,, 02:02
Here's a really easy one :)

Name the small arm:

This unusual Civil War-era pistol was also known as the "Grape Shot Revolver"

Bluesman
07 Dec 09,, 04:01
The LeMat.

TopHatter
07 Dec 09,, 17:53
The LeMat.

Yep, an especially easy one for the likes of you! :rolleyes: :))

And it's your question, fire away!

Bluesman
08 Dec 09,, 00:43
"Poinsett's Tactics" was the cavalry drill manual at the start of the war. A prominent US Cavalry officer wrote a manual to supercede that one, but it was not adopted.

However, that officer was noted for two other points. Who was he, what was he known as, and who was his famous family member?

ghost88
08 Dec 09,, 02:23
"Poinsett's Tactics" was the cavalry drill manual at the start of the war. A prominent US Cavalry officer wrote a manual to supercede that one, but it was not adopted.

However, that officer was noted for two other points. Who was he, what was he known as, and who was his famous family member?

Phillip StGeorge Cooke the "Father of the US Cavalry",who's daughter Flora was married to James Ewell Brown Stuart.

Bluesman
08 Dec 09,, 03:28
Nailed it.

ghost88
08 Dec 09,, 20:37
Nailed it.

This widow of a ACW general was headmistress of a Ladies preparatory school.
This school had among its students the Woman who founded the US's most popular organization for girls.
This school also had as a student one of the most famous of the writers during the "Golden Age of Sci FI"

Name the School,the Headmistress, the organization, and the writer.

Albany Rifles
08 Dec 09,, 21:16
This widow of a ACW general was headmistress of a Ladies preparatory school.
This school had among its students the Woman who founded the US's most popular organization for girls.
This school also had as a student one of the most famous of the writers during the "Golden Age of Sci FI"

Name the School,the Headmistress, the organization, and the writer.

Virginia Female Institute (now the Stuart Hall School) is the school
Flora Cooke Stuart, JEB Stuart's widow is the Headmistress
Girl Scouts of America founder Julliette Gordon Low
Anne McCaffrey is the writer


(Geeez....I know too much useless crap! Sign of a misspent youth!)

ghost88
08 Dec 09,, 21:21
Virginia Female Institute (now the Stuart Hall School) is the school
Flora Cooke Stuart, JEB Stuart's widow is the Headmistress
Girl Scouts of America founder Julliette Gordon Low
Anne McCaffrey is the writer


(Geeez....I know too much useless crap! Sign of a misspent youth!)

Okay smarty what was the.....

u-turn

Albany Rifles
09 Dec 09,, 14:17
What is the oldest monument erected on a Civil War battlefield?

Bluesman
09 Dec 09,, 19:54
Hadda Goog that one, so I'm DQ'ing myself.

Great story, though, of the action, the unit, and the actual monument.

Albany Rifles
09 Dec 09,, 20:05
Hadda Goog that one, so I'm DQ'ing myself.

Great story, though, of the action, the unit, and the actual monument.


Those men were tougher than woodpecker lips. I am always stunned whenever I visit there.

dave lukins
09 Dec 09,, 22:40
The Hazen Monument

Albany Rifles
10 Dec 09,, 13:47
The Hazen Monument

National Park Service (http://www.nps.gov/archive/stri/cultural_his_hazenbrigade.htm)

Hazen's Brigade occupied a vital piece of ground astride the Murfreesboro Post Road durign the opening of the Battle of Stone's River, 31 DEC 62 - 2 JAN 63. Their stand formed a salient which broke up succesive attacks and allowed Rosecrans to reorganize his Army of the Cumberland. The men of the brigade erected the monument in summer 1863.

It is really impressive.

All your's Dave

dave lukins
11 Dec 09,, 13:22
In what Campaign did Ulysses S Grant cross the Mississippi to force Lt Gen Pemberton into defensive lines?

Albany Rifles
11 Dec 09,, 15:47
Vicksburg

dave lukins
11 Dec 09,, 16:09
Vicksburg

Stop on Sir..Your question

Albany Rifles
11 Dec 09,, 18:19
What was Sickles' Hole?

Bluesman
11 Dec 09,, 20:19
The 'low ground' he THOUGHT his III Corps was in at the center of the Federalline at Gettysburg.

So, seeing some marginally higher ground to his front...he marched an entire army corps out in front of his supports on the left and right...and Hood promptly saw it, came on, and smashed him to bits.

Almost lost the battle single-handedly.

dave lukins
11 Dec 09,, 22:14
Dan Sickles and his controversial move forward from his assigned position on Cemetery Ridge on July 2.



Major-General Daniel Sickles (1819-1914) was born in New York, New York. He became a lawyer and a force in the Democratic Party. He became a state senator, and a United States Congressman. He murdered his wife’s lover, Philip Barton Key, the son of “Star Spangled Banner” author Francis Scott Key, across the street from the White House in 1859, but was acquitted. His influence with Northern Democrats helped his advancement in the United States Army, and by November 19, 1862 he was promoted to Major-General. He commanded the Third Corps at the Battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863.

Shek
12 Dec 09,, 03:41
The 'low ground' he THOUGHT his III Corps was in at the center of the Federalline at Gettysburg.

So, seeing some marginally higher ground to his front...he marched an entire army corps out in front of his supports on the left and right...and Hood promptly saw it, came on, and smashed him to bits.

Almost lost the battle single-handedly.

I didn't get a chance to walk the ground completely, so I'd have to do this same thought experiment, but it is an interesting anecdote in support of Sickles:

Civil Warriors Letting the Ground Argue - Pt 2 (http://civilwarriors.net/wordpress/?p=1212)

Bluesman
12 Dec 09,, 08:22
I didn't get a chance to walk the ground completely, so I'd have to do this same thought experiment, but it is an interesting anecdote in support of Sickles:

Civil Warriors Letting the Ground Argue - Pt 2 (http://civilwarriors.net/wordpress/?p=1212)

I don't think that terrain is 'dominating' to anything like being worth the risk that Sickles took to take an entire corps out of a perfectly fine battle line and bring it into an exposed position. Furthermore, I'd have to say that the question was definitively settled by historical result. Hood demonstrated as decisively as could be possibly be that Sickles made a mistake by being blasted off that supposedly better position by an attacker that only brought equal numerical strength, and STILL ripped the entire Corps up.

The 'hole' isn't really a hole, and the 'ridge' isn't really a ridge. One is certainly higher, but this isn't so important as Sickles seemed to think, and in that rolling terrain, the REAL dominating points DO matter. And Sickles came dam' close to letting a hole get blown out of the center that could've (and SHOULD'VE) cut off Culp's / Cemetary / the Round Tops from each other.

He screwed up.

Albany Rifles
12 Dec 09,, 20:45
All good points. And I have always been in the camp of calling Sickles and idiot....which he was.

That said, remember what happened at Chancellorsville when he gave up the high ground at Hazel Grove....he got the snot pounded out of his corps.

I can give him a little more slack having stood both pieces of ground and trying to think what an amateur would think.

Keith, your question.

Bluesman
12 Dec 09,, 21:10
What Confederate officer lost a son, killed by the forces he commanded?

Albany Rifles
14 Dec 09,, 13:48
I have the name rattling around in what I call a brain but I can't recall it. Tried looking it up this weekend but couldn't find it.

I'd say you have stumped us pretty well!

Shek
14 Dec 09,, 21:40
What Confederate officer lost a son, killed by the forces he commanded?

Hardee?

Bluesman
15 Dec 09,, 05:06
Hardee?

Not to my knowledge, but if you can give us the details, I'll take it in lieu of the man I have in mind.

Bluesman
15 Dec 09,, 05:08
I'll give you a hint, but it may not be all that helpful:

It wasn't friendly fire; the son was on the other side. And he wasn't a Union soldier.

Bluesman
15 Dec 09,, 05:36
Dammit; I was going from memory, and I got one little detail wrong: the Confederate officer wasn't COMMANDING the forces that killed his son; he was a staff officer in the action, and was present when his son received his mortal wounds.

The action also had a great many other odd facts.

Albany Rifles
15 Dec 09,, 13:26
Shek,

I know Willie Hardee was killed at Bentonville but I believe it was Union rifle fire which killed him.

Albany Rifles
15 Dec 09,, 13:28
Blue's

Was the son a member of the US Sanitary Commission?

Shek
15 Dec 09,, 17:00
Shek,

I know Willie Hardee was killed at Bentonville but I believe it was Union rifle fire which killed him.

That's what I thought, but I wasn't sure and so I'd figure that I'd hazard it as a guess.

Bluesman
15 Dec 09,, 20:04
This is a WAY obscure incident, but one of the most poignant moments in a Civil War which saw such enormous tragedy.

The battle that saw this human disaster also was noteworthy for several OTHER notable facts:
The officer in the question was a general in a pre-war state militia, but only a major in the battle in which his son was killed, because that state was not in the Confederacy.
The son was second-in-command of one of the units enagaged, and his commanding officer was also killed.
That battle was fought on New Year's Day.
It saw what was very probably the youngest AND oldest (in uniform, anyway; hat-tip to John Burns) combatants.
A United States military unit was named in the son's honor.
A NORTHERN city was named for the father (a Confederate).
Both father and son graduated from different national military academies.

Some other noteworthy facts, but I'm late for lunch. :(

Bluesman
15 Dec 09,, 20:04
Blue's

Was the son a member of the US Sanitary Commission?

No.

Bluesman
16 Dec 09,, 00:31
Okay, any other tries before I give the answer?

Bluesman
16 Dec 09,, 05:50
Major Albert Lea (West Point, 1831) was adjutant to Major General 'Prince John' Magruder (West Point, 1830) at the Battle of Galveston, 1 January, 1863.

His son, Edward (US Naval Academy, 1855), was executive officer on the USS Harriet Lane, commanded by Commander Jonathon Mayhew Wainwright. Both men were mortally wounded in the battle.

'My father is here.' (http://camplea-suv.org/leabio.htm)

Bluesman
16 Dec 09,, 06:11
Albert Lea, Minnesota is named after the father; USS Lea (DD-118), a Wickes-class destroyer built in 1918 and served in both World Wars, was named after the son.

The father was a general in the Iowa state militia before the Civil war.

The oldest (69)and youngest(10) uniformed combatants in the Civil War likely served in the Battle of Galveston.

Albany Rifles
16 Dec 09,, 14:19
Excellent question!

Bluesman
16 Dec 09,, 14:36
Thanks, Buck.

dave lukins
16 Dec 09,, 15:25
Excellent question!

And an excellent answer. How many fought 'blood' against 'blood' and went through similar situations? Sad, but that's war I suppose.

Bluesman
16 Dec 09,, 22:36
Okay, still my question.

And here it is:
THREE TIMES, this commander's men threatened mutiny and disobedience, unless HE obeyed THEM. Each time, he obeyed, and none of the soldiers were ever punished, but instead were lauded by their commander and the entire country as heroes.

Name the commander and what did his men order him to do?

Bluesman
16 Dec 09,, 22:38
And an excellent answer. How many fought 'blood' against 'blood' and went through similar situations? Sad, but that's war I suppose.

Imagine, if you can, the searing pain of a father writing home to his wife, his son's mother, with the news of what had just happened.

I think about that sometimes, and I almost break down.

Shek
16 Dec 09,, 23:40
Okay, still my question.

And here it is:
THREE TIMES, this commander's men threatened mutiny and disobedience, unless HE obeyed THEM. Each time, he obeyed, and none of the soldiers were ever punished, but instead were lauded by their commander and the entire country as heroes.

Name the commander and what did his men order him to do?

"Lee to the rear!"

Bluesman
16 Dec 09,, 23:41
"Lee to the rear!"

Too easy? :redface:

Good shot, and fire away.

Shek
16 Dec 09,, 23:46
Too easy? :redface:

Good shot, and fire away.

Having just finished Shelby Foote's third volume, it wasn't too difficult.

This commander was relieved of command for insanity early in the war. He was later restored to command and promoted both in rank and in position.

Bluesman
17 Dec 09,, 02:02
Having just finished Shelby Foote's third volume, it wasn't too difficult.

This commander was relieved of command for insanity early in the war. He was later restored to command and promoted both in rank and in position.

Uncle Billy.

Shek
17 Dec 09,, 02:42
Uncle Billy.

Your question - it was Sherman for those who aren't familiar with his nickname.

Bluesman
17 Dec 09,, 04:38
Okay, trivia warriors...NO GOOGLING/BINGING or searching of any kind! (I want to see who knows THIS factoid.)

Who organized the first battery of Confederate horse artillery?

Albany Rifles
17 Dec 09,, 16:09
Okay, trivia warriors...NO GOOGLING/BINGING or searching of any kind! (I want to see who knows THIS factoid.)

Who organized the first battery of Confederate horse artillery?

MAJ James Breathed and the 1st Stuart Horse Artillery Battery

Bluesman
17 Dec 09,, 18:30
No, but what a helluva man. Every bit as renowned as Pelham.

Anybody else?

Bluesman
18 Dec 09,, 21:40
Okay, time's up.


Roger Preston Chew was only 19 years old, Milton Rouse 17 years old, and James Thomson 18 years old the day the three appeared before their former VMI artillery instructor, Col. Thomas J. Jackson, to offer their services as volunteers in the new army of the Confederate States of America. At the suggestion of Turner Ashby, flamboyant commander of Jackson's cavalry in the Shenandoah Valley, the three were commissioned, respectively, Captain, First Lieutenant, and Second Lieutenant of an artillery battery that would revolutionize the tactics of the American Civil War.

Chew's Battery, armed with an imported British Blakely rifled cannon, a 12-pounder smoothbore and a 3-inch iron rifle, became the first of several horse artillery batteries organized and employed by Confederate cavalry commanders.

Lemme think of another good'un...

Bluesman
18 Dec 09,, 23:31
Only counting the war years, from the ranks of this volunteer regiment came four brigadier generals (three confirmed, one acting), the most of any non-Regular regiment. It was the only unit granted permission to designate itself as the senior regiment from its state.

Bluesman
20 Dec 09,, 01:39
Anybody?

Albany Rifles
22 Dec 09,, 01:27
Well, the 69th New York and the 45th Illinois each produced 4 generals so I am not sure which regiment you are the referring to.

Bluesman
22 Dec 09,, 01:42
Well, the 69th New York and the 45th Illinois each produced 4 generals so I am not sure which regiment you are the referring to.

REALLY? I didn't know that. During the war years?

Because the regiment I'm thinking of was the 154th Tennesssee (Senior) Regiment. It was also known as the 1st Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers...but not to this who served in it.

Okay, gotta think of another toughie...

Albany Rifles
22 Dec 09,, 16:22
69th NY

Michael Corchoran BG
Thomas Meagher BG
Robert Nugent BG
Patrick Kelly BG (KIA at Petersburg, never received his promotion...died after confirmed as BG USV)


45th ILL

John Eugene Smith BG
Jasper A. Maltby BG
John Rawlins BG

Okay, a technicality

Ely Parker's BG was backdated to 9 APR 65...originally it was dated June 65.

Bluesman
12 Mar 10,, 01:44
Sorry; I think I dropped the ball on this, but it's time to revive it.

Okay...

Here we go again...

Two famous Confederate FEMALE spies had a common tie: blockade runners.

One died when the one she sailed aboard failed to complete its trip. The other married one of her captors when the ship she was aboard also failed.

Name the women and the ships they made famous.

Bluesman
16 Mar 10,, 21:25
Bumpity-boo.

Anybody?