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View Full Version : Who will win 2009 elections in Iran?



Ironduke
15 Nov 08,, 21:00
Will Ahmadinejad and his allies prevail, or will the pragmatists or reformers such as Khatami or Rafsanjani (or their allies) capture the presidency? Do you think the Guardian Council will ease the restrictions on reformists running for the parliament?

ozjohn39
15 Nov 08,, 22:02
The ones counting the votes!


John.

1980s
16 Nov 08,, 21:26
Its too early to ask this question. We dont even know who will be standing for election yet and on what platform they will be campaigning on.

Pedicabby
17 Nov 08,, 13:04
Does it really matter? I thought some whacko mullah throws the thunder bolts in that part of the world.

TTL
17 Nov 08,, 13:58
Yes it matters because despite the real control is in mullahs hands world will know what the average Iranian thinks.

Dreadnought
17 Nov 08,, 17:31
Barrak Obamas accendance to the US Presidency might just fuel the reformers and their supporters. "Change" has come lets see if the follow suite.
IMO Akmadiajad wont be missed by anyone outside of Iran oh except the Russians.:))

Mobbme
17 Nov 08,, 20:23
A-Jad.

citanon
17 Nov 08,, 22:48
A-jad will lose because of falling oil prices. That doesn't mean the guy elected will be a true reformer.

Why is Rafsanjani considered a reformer?

Traxus
17 Nov 08,, 22:56
Ahmadinejad hasn't done much to alleviate Iran's economic situation. Its quite possible he will lose because of this, although I don't have any idea on who may end up replacing him. A reformer would be nice.

Mercenary
10 Feb 09,, 03:57
Doesn't the Khomenei decide who should be the next..? ... I thought the elections there was just a smoke-curtain

Ironduke
10 Feb 09,, 08:51
Doesn't the Khomenei decide who should be the next..? ... I thought the elections there was just a smoke-curtain
If I recall correctly, Rafsanjani was clearly favored by Supreme Leader in 2005. Amahdijihad won.

Traxus
10 Feb 09,, 16:43
Doesn't the Khomenei decide who should be the next..? ... I thought the elections there was just a smoke-curtain

The Supreme Leader has his favorites, and in this case will clearly be back Ahmadinejad. Iranian elections however are fair-ish, so its certainly possible for someone else to win.

Aryajet
10 Feb 09,, 16:53
Khatami just announced his candidacy for next presidential election. With President Obama in the White House Khatami will be hard to beat.

Freeloader
25 Feb 09,, 07:05
Shit I hope Khatami wins. If nothing else, some sense of "stability" and chance with Iran may occur in our favor if he takes office and Ahmadinejad goes back to his job of taking the change out of vending machines and filling em with water

Traxus
27 Feb 09,, 02:45
Shit I hope Khatami wins. If nothing else, some sense of "stability" and chance with Iran may occur in our favor if he takes office and Ahmadinejad goes back to his job of taking the change out of vending machines and filling em with water

I don't think stability is insured if Khatami wins. The next Iranian president is going to have some major problems to tackle, namely the economy. The price of oil has fallen by two thirds, and a huge decrease in trade is going to hit Iran hard. The average Iranian as well as the government are going to be hit hard, especially since their economy wasn't exactly in tip top shape before the current crisis.

Whoever becomes the next president is probably going to have to deal with growing instability, at home, regionally and throughout the world. Not easy for anyone.

Freeloader
02 Mar 09,, 04:38
I didn't word that perfectly, but I was implying stability with relations with the United States and adjacent countries. I believe it would benefit the United
States to see Khatami in office as opposed to the openly anti American, Ahmadienjad. I believe a regime or social change is due in Iran, especially of we leave Iraq and the people of Iran see Iraqis with all the "personal freedom" they will likely (hopefully) have. Iranians will be shouting "Hey, we want to live like that!" and stir the pot in Tehran.

Dreadnought
05 Mar 09,, 16:42
Imagine a holy man calling for destruction of other countries and trying to put all other nations that dont see his way down and threatens with the most pathetic rhetoric that a five year old could come up with. I think Pope Benedict should for one time renounce peace and kick the living shit out of this person the Ayatollah for impersonating a "religious" leader. The only religion about this guy is the appointed title he has. Nothing more nothing less then a terrorist who hides behind a holy title.

A true religious leader would do nothing but call for peace and tolerance. When was the last time you ever heard that out of this guys mouth?:rolleyes:

Traxus
10 Mar 09,, 02:22
Imagine a holy man calling for destruction of other countries and trying to put all other nations that dont see his way down and threatens with the most pathetic rhetoric that a five year old could come up with. I think Pope Benedict should for one time renounce peace and kick the living shit out of this person the Ayatollah for impersonating a "religious" leader. The only religion about this guy is the appointed title he has. Nothing more nothing less then a terrorist who hides behind a holy title.

A true religious leader would do nothing but call for peace and tolerance. When was the last time you ever heard that out of this guys mouth?:rolleyes:

lol, he's a terrorist? There's a good joke; how many civilians has he personally killed?

Religion is not about peace. The past 2000 years of history contain countless religious wars. Remember a little thing called the crusades?

Western christianity has been heavily neutered since the Enlightenment. Calling for the death of infidels simply isn't something the Pope is allowed to say anymore, its not politically acceptable. The Islamic world however has no analog; with no separation of church and state it is inevitable that you get some religious guy spouting inflammatory rhetoric. Thats what they do.

A religious leader promoting violence isn't the exception, its the rule. And someone promoting violence isn't a terrorist, unless you want the majority of leaders in history to be considered terrorists as well.

Traxus
16 Mar 09,, 17:36
Well, looks like Khatami is out


Iran's former president Mohammad Khatami is to withdraw his candidacy from the country's June presidential election, the BBC understands.

Mr Khatami was president of Iran from 1997-2005 and was succeeded by Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, a conservative.

Mr Ahmadinejad is expected to stand for re-election.

Mr Khatami's apparent decision to withdraw leaves Mr Ahmadinejad in a stronger position, says the BBC's Jon Leyne in Tehran.

Despite heavy criticism of his management of the economy, among other things, Mr Ahmadinejad could well win another four years in power, our correspondent says.

Mr Khatami was the most liberal president since the revolution.

But he entered this campaign reluctantly and unenthusiastically, adds our correspondent, and it soon became clear that many of those in power in Iran did not want him to return as president. One city prevented Mr Khatami from campaigning with the excuse that it would cause traffic jams.

His withdrawal therefore comes as no surprise, says our correspondent, and Mr Khatami is now expected to endorse former Prime Minister Mir Hossein Mousavi.

Mr Mousavi held office between 1980 and 1988. He is also a member of Iran's Expediency Council which is the country's top political arbitration body.

The candidacy of more than one reformist may split voters opposed to Mr Ahmadinejad.

In this 30th anniversary year of the revolution, June's election will give Iranians a stark choice over the future of the Islamic Republic.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7945822.stm

Dreadnought
16 Mar 09,, 18:19
lol, he's a terrorist? There's a good joke; how many civilians has he personally killed?

Religion is not about peace. The past 2000 years of history contain countless religious wars. Remember a little thing called the crusades?

Western christianity has been heavily neutered since the Enlightenment. Calling for the death of infidels simply isn't something the Pope is allowed to say anymore, its not politically acceptable. The Islamic world however has no analog; with no separation of church and state it is inevitable that you get some religious guy spouting inflammatory rhetoric. Thats what they do.

A religious leader promoting violence isn't the exception, its the rule. And someone promoting violence isn't a terrorist, unless you want the majority of leaders in history to be considered terrorists as well.

*A good joke? How many has he killed personally? Hows about how many has his own mouth threated to "wipe from the planet? Seems to be an entire population called Israel.

"The Islamic world however has no analog; with no separation of church and state it is inevitable that you get some religious guy spouting inflammatory rhetoric. Thats what they do."

Thats the reason they are called terrorists. Religion has zero to do with killing anyone in the modern age. It is their perverted version of it that they instill in a younger generation. They want the 13th imam to come. I say we give it to them and speed the process along so they can see for themselves exactly what their religious pervsions mean in real life. Who do you think will want this supposed 13th to come then? I doubt you will have many takers and this is why the two cultures will never meet eye to eye. I say we tell them to go back to the trees for walking on the ground is for the civilized populations of the earth.:P

Dreadnought
16 Mar 09,, 20:36
BAGHDAD, Iraq (CNN) -- U.S. fighter jets in Iraq have shot down an unmanned Iranian spy drone aircraft, the U.S. military said Monday.

The Iranian aircraft had been flying in Iraqi airspace for 70 minutes before being shot down 60 miles northeast of Baghdad last month, the military said.

"This was not an accident on the part of the Iranians," the U.S. military said in a statement. "The [drone] was in Iraqi airspace for nearly one hour and 10 minutes and well inside Iraqi territory before it was engaged."

Two F-16 fighter jets followed the drone for about an hour before shooting it down, a Pentagon official said.

The drone had no weapons and was strictly a spy aircraft, the official told CNN.

The U.S. military has taken ownership of the drone, which the Pentagon official said is in "pretty good shape."

Iraq's national security adviser, Mowaffak al-Rubaie, declined to comment on the allegation and most major state-run media outlets in Iran did not carry news of any incident involving an Iranian drone.
The Bush administration regularly accused Iran of meddling in Iraq and arming fighters, and in 2002 President George W. Bush put Iran in his "axis of evil."

Since President Barack Obama took office he has appeared more conciliatory towards Iran although the country continues to cause U.S. concern over its nuclear ambitions and its role in Iraq.


*Ofcoarse we wont show it. Why would we want the people to know that what the international community states is correct and no wonder the US and Iran are odds.:rolleyes:;)

Obvioulsy their RRCS does not work as well as they believe.

Psst, thanks for the free drone.;):P

Dreadnought
16 Mar 09,, 20:57
BAGHDAD (AP) - U.S. jets shot down an Iranian unmanned surveillance aircraft last month over Iraqi territory about 60 miles northeast of Baghdad, the U.S. military said Monday.

A U.S. statement said the Ababil 3 was tracked for about 70 minutes before U.S. jets shot it down "well-inside Iraqi airspace" and that the aircraft's presence over Iraq "was not an accident."

An Iraqi official said the Iranian aircraft went down near the Iraqi border town of Mandali. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the media.

The Ababil is believed to have a maximum range of about 90 miles and can fly up to 14,000 feet. It is primarily designed for surveillance and intelligence-gathering.


U.S. officials have frequently accused the Iranians of supplying weapons, training and money to Shiite extremist groups opposed to the U.S. military presence and to the U.S.-backed Iraqi government.

Iran has denied links to militant groups inside Iraq and says the instability in this country is a result of the U.S. "occupation." The Iranians consider the presence of about 140,000 U.S. troops in a neighboring country as a threat to their national security.

Dreadnought
17 Mar 09,, 21:39
So far according to reports the Iranians have confirmed they lost a drone. But they wont confirm who recovered it.;)

zara
15 Oct 09,, 14:18
Iranians have unmanned drones?

I thought only the Americans had those things.

Didn't associate Iran with that level of technology.

omon
15 Oct 09,, 16:18
Iranians have unmanned drones?

I thought only the Americans had those things.

Didn't associate Iran with that level of technology.

lol, imagine that.

something is fishy, drone was shot down, yet it is still in good shape????

i,ve build rc planes since i was 12, i smell b.s.

Dreadnought
15 Oct 09,, 17:36
Iranians have unmanned drones?

I thought only the Americans had those things.

Didn't associate Iran with that level of technology.

*Iran has them, this is well known, they were purchased not built by Iran. US fighters followed it to see where it was going and what it was looking at before they decided to down it.

*You dont really need to shoot anything down. Fly past it fast enough and spin it or "tip" one of its wings and it will crash soon enough.

Dreadnought
21 Dec 09,, 17:35
A former member of the Iranian security militia discloses he was ordered to tamper with the 2009 elections among other actions.

Slowly but surely its coming out.;)

Video - Breaking News Videos from CNN.com (http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2009/12/20/hilsum.iran.basij.speaks.itn)

Dreadnought
21 Dec 09,, 18:18
Funnier still not long after that Iran ownes up to killing prisoners from the pretests. Amazing!:rolleyes:

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - After months of denials, Iran acknowledged Saturday that at least three people detained in the country's postelection turmoil were beaten to death by their jailers.

The surprise announcement by the hard-line judiciary confirmed one of the opposition's most devastating and embarrassing claims against authorities and the elite Revolutionary Guard forces that led the crackdown after June's disputed presidential vote.

There was no immediate public reaction from the opposition, but some activists asserted that authorities under pressure over abuse claims were merely seeking to punish low ranking staff while shielding senior level officials who the opposition says are most to blame.

Still, the statement offered some rare vindication for the government's critics, who had rejected earlier explanations from the police and the judiciary that the detainees' deaths were caused by illnesses like meningitis, not physical mistreatment.


"The coroner's office has rejected that meningitis was the cause of the deaths and has confirmed the existence of signs of repeated beatings on the bodies and has declared that the wounds inflicted were the cause of the deaths," the judiciary statement said, according to the Web site of Iran's state TV.

The judiciary also said it has charged 12 officials at Kahrizak prison - three of them with murder, but it did not identify them. The prison, on the southern outskirts of the capital, Tehran, was at the center of the opposition's claims that prisoners were tortured and raped in custody.

Anger over the abuse claims, which emerged in August, extended far beyond the reformist camp, with influential conservative figures in the clerical hierarchy condemning the mistreatment of detainees.

The outrage forced Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to order the immediate closure of the Kahrizak facility.

The opposition says at least 72 protesters were killed in the postelection crackdown, but the government puts the number of confirmed dead at 30.

Authorities initially tried to repel the abuse claims by accusing the opposition of running a campaign of lies against the ruling system. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad had even accused Iran's enemies of being involved in the crimes, a claim the opposition rejected as ridiculous.

Iran's police chief, Gen. Ismail Ahmadi Moghaddam, said in August that protesters were beaten by their jailers at Kahrizak, but he maintained at the time that the deaths were not caused by the abuse.

The opposition's criticism was implicitly aimed at the country's most powerful military force, the Revolutionary Guard, which operates with some autonomy from the ruling clerics and led the harsh crackdown and detention of protesters in the tense weeks after the election.

The unrest broke out after pro-reform candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi claimed he was robbed of the presidency through massive fraud in the vote.

Pressure around the abuse claims accelerated in early August.

One of the other pro-reform candidates defeated in the election, Mahdi Karroubi, said then that he had received reports from former military commanders and other senior officials that some detainees, male and female, were raped in custody to the point of physical and mental injury.

It also emerged that one of the detainees who had died in custody was the son of Abdolhossein Rouhalamini, a top aide to conservative presidential candidate Mohsen Rezaei. That was a central factor in raising anger among government supporters.

His son, Mohsen Rouhalamini, was arrested during a July 9 protest and taken two weeks later to a hospital where he died within hours.

Saturday's judiciary announcement named him as one of the three people it had found to be victims of abuse. The other two were identified as Amir Javadi and Mohammad Kamrani.

Further adding to the outcry, prosecutors said this month that a doctor who exposed the torture of jailed protesters died of poisoning from a delivery salad laced with an overdose of blood pressure medication.

Their findings fueled opposition suspicions that he was killed because of what he knew.

The 26-year-old doctor, Ramin Pourandarjani, had testified to a parliamentary committee, reportedly telling them that one of the protesters he treated was the younger Rouhalamini and that he died from severe torture. He said he was also forced by security officials to list the cause of death as meningitis, according to opposition Web sites.

Pourandarjani died on Nov. 10 in mysterious circumstances, and authorities initially gave conflicting explanations, saying he was in a car accident, had a heart attack or committed suicide. Forensic tests later showed that the doctor died of "poisoning by drugs" that matched doses of propranolol found in a salad that was delivered to him, Tehran prosecutor Abbas Jafari Dolatabadi said early this month.

The government's rivals did not immediately respond directly to the judiciary's statement Saturday.

One prominent reformist voice, former President Mohammad Khatami, told an audience of academics in western Iran on Saturday that the use of force against protesters demonstrates the government has little regard for human rights.

"A majority of the people are dissatisfied with the way the country is being administered," his Web site quoted him as saying.

He added that "a considerable portion of society" has objections over the official election results.

"These must be heard. They (people) must be convinced that the elections were really fair. Such convincing can't be achieved through jail, crackdowns and restrictions," Khatami said.

Iran's judiciary has also had a central role in authorities' efforts to silence the opposition. Since August, it has brought to trial more than 100 protesters, activists and pro-reform opposition leaders, accusing them of fueling the protests and being part of a plot to overthrow the government.

Triple C
23 Dec 09,, 08:43
Dreadnought,

That reminded me of the youtube Der Untergang parody when Hitler said: "The fall guys stay--everyone else get out of my face!" Looks like some of the henchmen are getting chop for causing the regime public embrassment? Or the Iranian judiciary had recovered their ballz? Last time I checked there was a power struggle between the clerics and the jurists and the clerics won. Anyone else think the jurists are making a come back?