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THL
17 Oct 08,, 20:47
linked here (http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-cps-checks-17oct17,0,1119922.story)


When this weekend's homecoming dance rolls around, freshman Khadijah Alfred will be decked out in a new outfit thanks to the $125 check she earned Thursday for getting straight A's the last five weeks.

The 14-year-old at Manley Career Academy High School is one of more than 1,650 Chicago Public Schools students cashing in on a new district program offering money to freshmen at 20 schools for getting top—and even average—grades in five core subjects including math, English and science. District officials said students earned $265,986 this time, with the money coming from a Harvard University education research laboratory and private donations.

Every five weeks, students receive $50 for A's, $35 for B's and $20 for C's. Students get half the money now and collect the rest only if they graduate. For Alfred, who wants to go to law school, that's money in the bank for college.

"It's awesome. I'm going shopping," she said. "It made me work a little bit harder but I'm already a highly motivated person."

Schools chief Arne Duncan said 86 percent of Manley freshmen earned money for grades—the highest percentage in the district. At a news conference, he told Manley freshmen they will serve as role models to younger students if they keep their grades up.

"This is about success now, but success now is not enough. . . . There are no good jobs out there without a high school diploma," he said.

Roland Fryer, the Harvard economics professor heading the program, told students he dropped out of school and began selling drugs until family members and others "invested" in him. "This is investing in you. This is what it's all about," Fryer said.

Sarah Shields, a freshman history teacher who is coordinating the project at Manley, said she has begun seeing students working harder to get better grades, even forming study groups.

"Getting a check is a really personal motivation. Students know if they work harder their personal checks will be bigger," Shields said.

New York City has a similar program that rewards students for grades. Since 2005, Bronzeville High School, formerly the Bronzeville Academic Center in Chicago, has paid out more than $45,000 to 41 students who have maintained a 2.5 grade-point average, have an 85 percent attendance record and show leadership qualities, officials said.

really?

Parihaka
17 Oct 08,, 21:02
Makes a nice change from rewarding mediocrity

THL
17 Oct 08,, 21:14
In my day we went to school, learned and went home. If we did not do this well, THEN our parents had something waiting for us in their hands when we got home, and it was NOT a $50 bill.

astralis
17 Oct 08,, 21:28
THL,


If we did not do this well, THEN our parents had something waiting for us in their hands when we got home, and it was NOT a $50 bill.

be thankful you didn't grow up in an asian country- if one did not do well, the teacher would have something waiting...and then he'd tell the parents, whom would dispense, ah, still more "hugs". :))

HistoricalDavid
17 Oct 08,, 21:40
In my day we went to school, learned and went home. If we did not do this well, THEN our parents had something waiting for us in their hands when we got home, and it was NOT a $50 bill.

Everything was better in your day. I apologise on behalf of my generation for being such all-round sh-ts.

EDIT: Sh-t it didn't censor 'sh-ts'!

Southie
17 Oct 08,, 21:48
I don't know, maybe I don't think like most other parents, but the way I look at it, is if my daughter earns good grades in school, she should be rewarded. After all, if I do a good job, and get an excellent rating for an inspection, I'm rewarded, either with a promotion or a bonus!

antimony
17 Oct 08,, 21:55
One thing that bothers me is that all this particular student can think of is shopping


"It's awesome. I'm going shopping," she said. "It made me work a little bit harder but I'm already a highly motivated person."


In my view a better use of the money would be to deposit it in some 529 plan for the student, eligible for withdrawal for College expenses

Southie
17 Oct 08,, 22:00
One thing that bothers me is that all this particular student can think of is shopping



In my view a better use of the money would be to deposit it in some 529 plan for the student, eligible for withdrawal for College expenses

From what the article says, it sounds like she is putting it away for college. She plans on going to law school. She might have been excited about going shopping because of homecoming!


Every five weeks, students receive $50 for A's, $35 for B's and $20 for C's. Students get half the money now and collect the rest only if they graduate. For Alfred, who wants to go to law school, that's money in the bank for college.

"It's awesome. I'm going shopping," she said. "It made me work a little bit harder but I'm already a highly motivated person."

gunnut
17 Oct 08,, 22:05
Do they have to report this as income to the IRS?

Skull6
18 Oct 08,, 01:09
"...but I'm already a highly motivated person."

& therein lies the rub, imo. This only will "entice" those kids who can achieve higher, but to this point have chosen not to (for whatever reason). Those that actually struggle & still only achieve the C's are in effect being penalized under this protocol.

There's a reason why the median is the median of a curve...

jame$thegreat
20 Oct 08,, 03:34
As my parents always tell me: you don't get rewarded for what you are supposed to do. Apparently now you do...

LongshotSNN
20 Oct 08,, 04:16
THL,
be thankful you didn't grow up in an asian country- if one did not do well, the teacher would have something waiting...and then he'd tell the parents, whom would dispense, ah, still more "hugs". :))

:biggrin:I sometimes wonder how I made it through the single-digit years with the crap marks for tests I got in my school. It didn't help that I was half-a-banana and put in a Mandarin vernacular school. I dreaded having my monthly Mandarin test papers signed by the parents.....:redface:

Desdemona
22 Oct 08,, 03:03
What do you expect from the same college that produced liberal, socialist Obama?

Take the wealth and spread it around--bet the alumni are happy to hear all about it.

Ray
22 Oct 08,, 08:20
Spread happiness all around.

That is the maxim that leads to good mental and physical health! ;)

In the Asian culture, you are blessed if you spread the wealth around through giving alms to the poor and those not fortunate as you.

In the materialistic world, it does appear odd, but then it gives great mental peace to the one giving!

Not a bad philosophy really.

Makes one less selfish and mean.

dave lukins
22 Oct 08,, 23:26
The Aussies have a different view on bad behaviour:))

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/7681876.stm

ace16807
22 Oct 08,, 23:33
Ehhhh. I can't say I agree with this. I had always believed that your own education is more or less an investment. If you take the time and effort to enrich yourself, several years in the future, your work will be paid off. However, in this case, students begin to see money as their incentive to work hard, not their future. Along side that, what prevents me from taking the easiest classes I can to rake up some easy money? A student taking 5 basic classes and gets all A's would trump a student taking 5 AP classes with one or two B's. Really now?

gunnut
23 Oct 08,, 00:05
Maybe the all-knowing government can come up with a pricing schedule for different courses and different age groups. This will be posted in classrooms and mailed to homes like a menu for a take out restaurant.