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Tibbetts
04 Jan 05,, 21:36
Does anyone here have one? Or an actual working replica? I've been thinking about buying one and was wondering how folks liked them?


Tibbetts :biggrin:

ChrisF202
05 Jan 05,, 01:36
Does anyone here have one? Or an actual working replica? I've been thinking about buying one and was wondering how folks liked them?


Tibbetts :biggrin:
Ive been trying to get one for years, havent had any luck.

Bluesman
05 Jan 05,, 03:53
Does anyone here have one? Or an actual working replica? I've been thinking about buying one and was wondering how folks liked them?


Tibbetts :biggrin:

My son and I are ACW re-enactors. We're both buying one each sometime this year.

We've been using our pair of Zouave rifle-muskets. But they're two-band, and almost all 'line' units require three-band weapons. :frown:

Tibbetts
05 Jan 05,, 17:24
I've always wanted to own one and learn to shoot it. I'm a historian and from Maine, and I grew up hearing of the 20th Maine Volunteers at Little Round Top. So, I figure, if I own one, I'll be a lot closer to them. You know, to be a part of my past and all.

Not sure if that came out right, but, I tried.


Tibbetts

Bluesman
06 Jan 05,, 02:32
I've always wanted to own one and learn to shoot it. I'm a historian and from Maine, and I grew up hearing of the 20th Maine Volunteers at Little Round Top. So, I figure, if I own one, I'll be a lot closer to them. You know, to be a part of my past and all.

Not sure if that came out right, but, I tried.


Tibbetts

I completely followed that, man, and I agree that it's a worthy pursuit. It's why my son and I are re-enactors. (I had an ancestor in the 154th Tennessee at Shiloh.)

ChrisF202
06 Jan 05,, 11:09
20th Maine Volunteers at Little Round Top.
They were they stuff of a legend ... and deserving of a movie alone rather then a little part in one.

Amled
06 Jan 05,, 14:52
My son-in-law has one that he inherited from his grandfather, (I have no idea of how a Civil War rifle ended up in Denmark, might be fun looking into it,) but unfortunatly even though it's in perfect shape, the bayonet is missing. Have tried to look for one on my trips to the States, but so far no luck.
Any ideas???

Tibbetts
06 Jan 05,, 15:47
I completely followed that, man, and I agree that it's a worthy pursuit. It's why my son and I are re-enactors. (I had an ancestor in the 154th Tennessee at Shiloh.)

154th Tennessee: Were they at Gettysburg as well? Who's division were they with?


Tibbetts

Tibbetts
06 Jan 05,, 15:53
They were they stuff of a legend ... and deserving of a movie alone rather then a little part in one.

I agree. Wonder if they will ever do one. 'Cause i'd love to see it myself. The 20th Maine was in more than just the Gettysburg battle.

Or, maybe they should do a movie of Colonel Joshua Chamberlain's Civil War years. Because, after Gettysburg, he was given command of a Brigade. That would be interesting to see.


Tibbetts

griftadan
06 Jan 05,, 23:58
even if you could get one, where would you get a hold of thee percussion caps?

or are you just buying it to look at?

Amled
07 Jan 05,, 00:03
...maybe they should do a movie of Colonel Joshua Chamberlain's Civil War years. Because, after Gettysburg, he was given command of a Brigade. That would be interesting to see. - Tibbetts

Maybe base it upon Willard M. Wallace's book Soul of The Lion. A biography of Chamberlain. Damm good read!

Bluesman
07 Jan 05,, 09:33
154th Tennessee: Were they at Gettysburg as well? Who's division were they with?


Tibbetts

No, they were with the Army of Tennessee the whole time. At Shiloh, they were with Cheatham's Division, Johnson's Brigade. My ancestor (George Washington Verble, unknown rank) was listed as "Missing" a few days after the Battle of Shiloh. Nothing was ever heard about him after that, but his company commander (who had known him and his family all his life) wrote back to his people to tell them that he had gotten pneumonia sometime during the battle (probably the night between the first and second days during a torrential rain), and he was unable to keep the pace of the march back to Corinth. As Federal cavalry was thought to be pursuing, there was no chance to treat him, and he was left at a roadside hospital that was to be turned over to Federal surgeons when they came up - but they never did.

My uncle has that letter. Not-so-funny punchline: it is in a shoebox with some other family documents, completely unprotected from deterioration. I have tried to get my uncle to give it to the state archives (which it CERTAINLY qualifies for, due to its historical significance), but he won't consider it. I have no idea what condition it may be in now. :frown:

More than you wanted to know, I'm sure.

Bluesman
07 Jan 05,, 09:35
even if you could get one, where would you get a hold of thee percussion caps?

or are you just buying it to look at?

Percussion caps and ammo are no problem to get at all. I shoot my Zouave on occasion, and I intend to fire the Springfield when I get it, too. (Same caliber for both - .58.)

Bluesman
07 Jan 05,, 09:54
Maybe base it upon Willard M. Wallace's book Soul of The Lion. A biography of Chamberlain. Damm good read!

My favorite story from the life of this fascinating man was of him leading the detail at Appomatox that saw the Confederates formally surrender - stack arms and furl flags. When General Gordon's Confederates marched in, it was the hardest thing those proud men could be asked to do - but do it they must.

Chamberlain wrote:
"Instructions had been given, and when the head of each division column comes opposite our group, our bugle sounds the signal and instantly our whole line from right to left, regiment by regiment, in succession, gives the soldier's salutation, from the 'order arms' to the old 'carry'--the marching salute. Gordon at the head of the column, riding with heavy spirit and downcast face, catches the sound of shifting arms, looks up, and taking the meaning, wheels superbly, making with himself and his horse one uplifted figure, with profound salutation as he drops the point of his sword to the boot toe; then facing his own command, gives word for his successive brigades to pass us with the same position of the manual--honor answering honor".(30)

He was later criticized for this recognition of martial valor to former enemies that were once again countrymen, and his magnanimty endeared him to the South. And if ANYbody had the right to do it on his own authority, it was Major General Joshua Chamberlain, who had been severely wounded - almost killed - at the head of his troops a few months before...and then he went right back into the field as soon as he was able.

What a helluva man.

Tibbetts
07 Jan 05,, 19:20
even if you could get one, where would you get a hold of thee percussion caps?

or are you just buying it to look at?

I suppose i'd have to have them specially made. Cause I don't intend to just mount it on a wall and leave it. ;)


Tibbetts

Tibbetts
07 Jan 05,, 19:31
Maybe base it upon Willard M. Wallace's book Soul of The Lion. A biography of Chamberlain. Damm good read!

I've read a biography of Chamberlain but not that one. :biggrin: I'll see about buying it next month.


Tibbetts

Tibbetts
07 Jan 05,, 19:47
No, they were with the Army of Tennessee the whole time. At Shiloh, they were with Cheatham's Division, Johnson's Brigade. My ancestor (George Washington Verble, unknown rank) was listed as "Missing" a few days after the Battle of Shiloh. Nothing was ever heard about him after that, but his company commander (who had known him and his family all his life) wrote back to his people to tell them that he had gotten pneumonia sometime during the battle (probably the night between the first and second days during a torrential rain), and he was unable to keep the pace of the march back to Corinth. As Federal cavalry was thought to be pursuing, there was no chance to treat him, and he was left at a roadside hospital that was to be turned over to Federal surgeons when they came up - but they never did.

My uncle has that letter. Not-so-funny punchline: it is in a shoebox with some other family documents, completely unprotected from deterioration. I have tried to get my uncle to give it to the state archives (which it CERTAINLY qualifies for, due to its historical significance), but he won't consider it. I have no idea what condition it may be in now. :frown:

More than you wanted to know, I'm sure.


Wow. No, i'm interested in all such stories. But, maybe you can get your Uncle to get an airtight lock-box or something? See if he'll at least do that. That stuff is too important to let go to dust.


Tibbetts

Tibbetts
07 Jan 05,, 19:49
Percussion caps and ammo are no problem to get at all. I shoot my Zouave on occasion, and I intend to fire the Springfield when I get it, too. (Same caliber for both - .58.)

I've never shot a muzzle loader before. Is it true you should close your eyes just before you pull the trigger? You know, so the flash doesn't ruin the eye.


Tibbetts

Tibbetts
07 Jan 05,, 19:55
My favorite story from the life of this fascinating man was of him leading the detail at Appomatox that saw the Confederates formally surrender - stack arms and furl flags. When General Gordon's Confederates marched in, it was the hardest thing those proud men could be asked to do - but do it they must.

Chamberlain wrote:
"Instructions had been given, and when the head of each division column comes opposite our group, our bugle sounds the signal and instantly our whole line from right to left, regiment by regiment, in succession, gives the soldier's salutation, from the 'order arms' to the old 'carry'--the marching salute. Gordon at the head of the column, riding with heavy spirit and downcast face, catches the sound of shifting arms, looks up, and taking the meaning, wheels superbly, making with himself and his horse one uplifted figure, with profound salutation as he drops the point of his sword to the boot toe; then facing his own command, gives word for his successive brigades to pass us with the same position of the manual--honor answering honor".(30)

He was later criticized for this recognition of martial valor to former enemies that were once again countrymen, and his magnanimty endeared him to the South. And if ANYbody had the right to do it on his own authority, it was Major General Joshua Chamberlain, who had been severely wounded - almost killed - at the head of his troops a few months before...and then he went right back into the field as soon as he was able.

What a helluva man.


I still sit up straighter every time I read about Chamberlain and his heroics in battle and the honours he gave to the Confederate troops at Appomatix. It gives me a chill as well. To know that someone was willing to go straight back into hell for his Soldiers, his State, and his Country.

Damn. I'm sitting a bit straighter now just thinking and typing about it. I hope all that made some sorta sense. I was trying to put feeling to words and it may not have come out right.


Tibbetts

Bluesman
08 Jan 05,, 01:29
I've never shot a muzzle loader before. Is it true you should close your eyes just before you pull the trigger? You know, so the flash doesn't ruin the eye.


Tibbetts

I keep my eyes open to shoot, but when I'm not in a re-enactment, I use my shooting glasses. It IS a bit hazardous, and that's from personal experience.

Funny story:
A friend of mine is a Seven-Years' War re-enactor, and he carries a French Charleville .70 cal. musket. It is a flintlock, not a precussion, of course.

We were out behind his house shooting one day, and as I had never fired this gun before - or ANY flintlock - I asked if I could fire his, and he could fire mine.

No problem. Except that I'm a lefty. Without thinking about it, I thumbed the hammer back, aimed, and fired. What with an imperfectly-functioning lock and a bit more powder than is actually required...y'all see where this is going, right? :frown:

I came away with about fifty little black dots burned into my forehead, between hairline and eyebrows. My right eye had a white spot in the center of my field of vision for two days, fading completely after a week. No permanent damage, but a LOT of respect for the Manual of Arms, flintlock-style.

To my credit, I didn't drop my friend's weapon, and I'm proud of that, because it was VERY alarming. :eek: So we were still on speaking terms when I asked him what would they do with a French soldier Back Then that fired lefty. "No problem", he said. "They'd just beat him until he was a righty." :mad:

Bluesman
08 Jan 05,, 01:36
Wow. No, i'm interested in all such stories. But, maybe you can get your Uncle to get an airtight lock-box or something? See if he'll at least do that. That stuff is too important to let go to dust.


Tibbetts

I tried. I've talked to him about it three times, last time was over ten years ago. He refuses to let it leave family custody, or to laminate it, or do ANYthing to keep it from crumbling away.

I told my dad that I was going to sue my uncle -his brother - if he didn't do something to protect what is obviously an important historical document, and one that is especially significant to ME, personally. My dad talked me out of it, though, and when he passed away, I still had my promise to not cause family trouble over the letter 'on the books'.

So there ya go. :frown:

Amled
09 Jan 05,, 14:00
I've read a biography of Chamberlain but not that one. :biggrin: I'll see about buying it next month. Tibbetts
Here's the Publisher:
Stan Clark Military Books
915 Fairview Ave.,
Gettysburg Penn.,
717-337-1728

Tibbetts
10 Jan 05,, 23:30
I keep my eyes open to shoot, but when I'm not in a re-enactment, I use my shooting glasses. It IS a bit hazardous, and that's from personal experience.

Funny story:
A friend of mine is a Seven-Years' War re-enactor, and he carries a French Charleville .70 cal. musket. It is a flintlock, not a precussion, of course.

We were out behind his house shooting one day, and as I had never fired this gun before - or ANY flintlock - I asked if I could fire his, and he could fire mine.

No problem. Except that I'm a lefty. Without thinking about it, I thumbed the hammer back, aimed, and fired. What with an imperfectly-functioning lock and a bit more powder than is actually required...y'all see where this is going, right? :frown:

I came away with about fifty little black dots burned into my forehead, between hairline and eyebrows. My right eye had a white spot in the center of my field of vision for two days, fading completely after a week. No permanent damage, but a LOT of respect for the Manual of Arms, flintlock-style.

To my credit, I didn't drop my friend's weapon, and I'm proud of that, because it was VERY alarming. :eek: So we were still on speaking terms when I asked him what would they do with a French soldier Back Then that fired lefty. "No problem", he said. "They'd just beat him until he was a righty." :mad:


Wow dude. :eek: Glad you're okay. I've never fired one, but, if I ever do use a flintlock, i'll make sure i'm wearing protective glasses.


Tibbetts

Parihaka
11 Jan 05,, 00:08
I tried. I've talked to him about it three times, last time was over ten years ago. He refuses to let it leave family custody, or to laminate it, or do ANYthing to keep it from crumbling away.

I told my dad that I was going to sue my uncle -his brother - if he didn't do something to protect what is obviously an important historical document, and one that is especially significant to ME, personally. My dad talked me out of it, though, and when he passed away, I still had my promise to not cause family trouble over the letter 'on the books'.

So there ya go. :frown:
as a suggestion, give him some acid free paper and an opaque plastic folder and ask him as a favor to you to store it in them.
for gods sake though, DON'T laminate it.

lemontree
11 Jan 05,, 09:18
I suppose i'd have to have them specially made. Cause I don't intend to just mount it on a wall and leave it. ;)


Tibbetts
You can always have it imported from India. We still make it for the village folk, many still use the muzzel loaders for crop protection.

ChrisF202
11 Jan 05,, 11:05
You can always have it imported from India. We still make it for the village folk, many still use the muzzel loaders for crop protection.
1860's Springfields? Could you give me a source?

lemontree
11 Jan 05,, 12:29
1860's Springfields? Could you give me a source?
I was'nt talking about the rifles, but the percussion caps. Percussion caps would be standard for most muzzel loaders, I guess.

SGM
12 Jan 05,, 06:20
I have a "few" ACTUAL Civil War Muskets in .58.
They were the primary Arm of the North in the CW. I have been shooting the same Rifle since 1955 when I bought it from Bannermans in NYC.
Over the years I have had MANY of them.. and now.?? I think I have 5... One is a COLT Model 1861 - Special Model.
I do have one REPRODUCTION Springfield 1862. I love them .. They were part of my childhood and trained me to be safe and steady with a rifle. After 34 years in the Military - I can say that for sure...