PDA

View Full Version : A good book



mike nickeas
22 Sep 07,, 13:01
I read on average a book a week, mainly military history or something similar, however, I think that it may be time to expand my horizons. What book(s) would you recomend I read?

Here are two of my favourites
Most secret was R. V. Jones
Chickenhawk R. Mason

Thanks
Mike :))

Tarek Morgen
22 Sep 07,, 16:28
Well I guess the typical suggestions would be stuff like the "art of war", "about war" or "the new wars" but i guess you already know these.

Other stuff in that direction would be "Achtung Panzer" by Guderian or "Infantry Attacks" by Rommel (if you not already have those), if it should be something not about military I would suggest the roundworld books by Terry Pratchett.

sappersgt
22 Sep 07,, 17:14
This week I'm reading "Deep Survival" by Laurence Gonzales and "Wars of Blood and Faith" by Ralph Peters.

entropy
22 Sep 07,, 17:32
Viktor Suvorov - The Aquarium.

A true story (some things have been changed for safety of writer) of a defected GRU spy. Great language (at least in Russian it was so) and good descriptions of both the GRU Spetznaz and the realm of the spy.

glyn
22 Sep 07,, 19:33
Anything by Hans Helmut Kirst.
The funniest book I ever read was Three Cheers for Me, by Donald Jack.

Kansas Bear
22 Sep 07,, 19:44
I found "Paper Money" by Adam Smith quite intriguing.

"Wealth and Poverty of Nations" was an excellent read.

BD1
22 Sep 07,, 19:47
Pratchett´s ´Discworld´ -series are always entertaining for me too .

mike nickeas
22 Sep 07,, 20:11
I have read an abridged version of art of war, and Guderian's achtung panzer.
:biggrin:

entropy
22 Sep 07,, 20:22
Is "Achtung, Panzer!" still actual?

mike nickeas
22 Sep 07,, 21:30
Actual as in print yes, doctrine and militarily up to date I am unsure as I was a Gunner not a tankie, bloody good read though, maybe Tankie knows. :)

mike nickeas
22 Sep 07,, 21:32
By the way Entropy I like the posters you used in your halls.

indus creed
22 Sep 07,, 21:50
'Cryptonomicon' by Neil Stephenson

'Faranheit 451 ' by Ray Bradbury

'Neuromancer' by William Gibson

'Foucault's Pendulum' by Umberto Eco

entropy
23 Sep 07,, 01:30
Oh yes and the Strugatski brothers are horribly underestimated. Perhaps someone of more respectable age will remember them, but I doubt it.
They are Russian science fiction writers, but not science fiction as you know it. They give you a very different perception of philosophy, time, reality and mathematics in general, asking the question of how men would behave in certain situations and what is possible and not possible in the universe. The Noon Universe is a good world created by them, but also their side-works such as the Picknick on the Roadside. If you are interested, ask me for recommendations. Their books can be found online for free.

Tarek Morgen
23 Sep 07,, 07:53
When reading russian science fiction books I get always the feeling it was not written by a proffessional Author, but by a mathecian who decided to write a novel (uhm that is not meant as a bad thing).

entropy
23 Sep 07,, 09:19
When reading russian science fiction books I get always the feeling it was not written by a proffessional Author, but by a mathecian who decided to write a novel (uhm that is not meant as a bad thing).

Which one?