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ChrisF202
13 Dec 04,, 00:27
Whats a good, easy to use bolt action rifle that can be adopted for hunting with the addition of scope.

If it matters (such as for caliber), the most common form of game around here is deer, we do have bears upstate as well.

highsea
13 Dec 04,, 18:56
Pretty hard to beat the classic .30-06 for one rifle that does just about everything. Ammunition is available for just about any game in North America, from .22 sabot rounds for prairie dogs to heavy 220 gr.+ round nose slugs suitable for bear.

Every major gun manufacturer has a bolt action rifle chambered for the 06. The classic is the pre-64 Winchester model 70, but Winchester, Remingtom, Kimber, Savage, Ruger, Browning, etc. all make bolt action 06's. Just look for someting in your price range.

Bill
13 Dec 04,, 22:10
I'm more partial to .25-06, but beyond that highsea gave good advice.

Officer of Engineers
13 Dec 04,, 22:28
I'm more partial to .25-06, but beyond that highsea gave good advice.
I have to say now I'm intrigue. Any recommendation as to brand and model in both rifle and ammo for my next year hunt?

ChrisF202
13 Dec 04,, 22:40
I was looking into the Ruger M77. Is the M1903 Springfield still in production, I heard it makes a great hunting rifle? Hunting is very popular in my town, a couple of my friends go upstate every other weekend or so and go hunting.

highsea
13 Dec 04,, 22:41
M21, I like the .25-06 and also the .270. Great rounds. I just consider them a little light for larger bears. Even the .30-06 is light for Brown bears. But for Blacks and Grizzlies, it's okay.

The problem with the .30-06 is that once you own one, it's hard to find an excuse to buy another rifle!

OofE, where is your hunt, and what are you going after?

Bill
13 Dec 04,, 22:45
Some of the heavier bullets in .25-06 are fine for bear, but shot placement becomes more crucial.

I don't hunt anything that big though, so it's not a consideration for me.

I like the high velocity and flat trajectory of the .25-06. It's a hell of a cartridge.

highsea
13 Dec 04,, 22:48
I was looking into the Ruger M77. Is the M1903 Springfield still in production, I heard it makes a great hunting rifle? Hunting is very popular in my town, a couple of my friends go upstate every other weekend or so and go hunting.
Sporterized 03's make good hunting rifles, there are lots of them around. They are a little bit clumsier wrt the safety and magazine cut-off, and you would want to have a gunsmith check it out before you buy, as many have been modified from their original .30-06 chambering, and not properly marked. Also, some of them have a LOT of rounds through them. The 1903 is not in production today.

The Ruger is a very good choice. Also the Remington Model 700, and my personal favorite, the pre-64 Winchester Model 70. The new Kimbers are a copy of the pre-64 Win, beautiful rifles, but pricey.

Be sure to sight it in with the rounds you will hunt with, and get some practice with it before your hunt. Take a hunting safety course if you haven't already.

Good luck and have fun!

Officer of Engineers
13 Dec 04,, 22:53
Eastern Ontario, Canada. My two weeks (if my wife will allow me) is divided into one for moose and one for white tail. I have a .30-06 which I probably would keep for moose but I like something a little more smaller game oriented for deer. I've made a decision to buy a .270 next year but would like to check out the .25-06 1st.

highsea
13 Dec 04,, 23:09
OofE,
If I already owned a .30-06, I would probably pick the .25-06 over the .270, just to give me more flexibility if my main goal was smaller game.

I wouldn't go after a bull moose with anything under the .30-06, and would prefer a belted magnum like a .300 or .338 Win Mag. or a 7MM Rem Mag. They will carry their punch downrange better than the .30-06 on big game. But the .30-06 will definitely work, as M21 mentioned wrt bear and the .25-06, shot placement becomes a little more crucial.

If it was me, and I was planning to hunt mostly deer and moose, instead of buying a smaller rifle, I would get a bigger gun for moose and use the -06 for deer. Also, if you happen to stumble into a Griz, the Magnum gives you a little extra security.

See what I mean about the .30-06? It just does everything so well, it's hard to decide what else you need. My ideal combo would be the .270 and the .338. The .270 for deer and elk, and the .338 for moose and bear. They are far enough apart that I could feel like I needed them both. :tongue:

Officer of Engineers
14 Dec 04,, 04:34
Mags hurt.

Damn it! Now, you've got me thinking about 2 guns! Need to convince the wife somehow. Think the family van could last another 3 years ...

Bill
14 Dec 04,, 06:11
When we get into Magnums i am inclined toward the Weatherbys.

I love Weatherby rifles, just beautiful weapons.

highsea
14 Dec 04,, 06:41
M21, Weatherby's are pretty, but I don't know, I just never really got into them. A friend had a .300, and it was very nice. But the ammo is so damn expensive if you don't reload...

I guess I'm just more of a meat and potatoes guy, born and raised in Alaska, I've owned lots of Remingtons and Winchesters over the years. Right now I have a pre-64 M70 in .30-06 and a Rem 700 in 7mm Mag. I can't think of a reason to switch either one for something else. ;)

Bill
14 Dec 04,, 06:50
Fair point, but ammo cost isn't really much of an issue for me. My brother works in a gunstore. :)

highsea
14 Dec 04,, 06:59
That does make things easier! Both my rifles have a lot of sentimental value to me, so I could never part with either one, but I still would like to get a .338...Something a litle more modern, with a composite stock that I don't mind beating around in the woods with.

I never shoot my -06, because it is a 1955 that was bought new by an ex-landlord of mine. When he passed away his wife gave it to me. It has only had the sight-in rounds from 1955 fired through it. It's never been fired since.

My 7mm was my dad's gun, that's the one I hunt with, but it's a wood stock, and I worry about banging it up.

Hey! I just came up with a reason to get that .338. Thanks guys!

Bill
14 Dec 04,, 07:02
7mm is a hell of a rifle. That'd be a good choice too. :)

I see no reason to have a 'need' for a new firearm other than having an itch i can't scratch...lol.

Fury
14 Dec 04,, 13:54
The .338 caliber can get quite expensive over long time but to someone with lots of extra cash its a secondary concern.
Speaking of extra cash if you like .30-06 caliber and you got money why not try Remington model 700 titanium, I dunno exactly how much its in U.S but here the price range is about 3000 euros but Im sure you get quality for your money :)

2DREZQ
14 Dec 04,, 15:32
If OofE is thinking about a smaller caliber, take a look at the .243 Win. It's flat shooting, mild recoil, commonly available ammo, and great for prarie dogs up through deer. You can get the Browning lever-action in it, and they tend to be quite accurate (even by sniper's standards.

Bill
20 Dec 04,, 09:49
Lever actions(if tube magazine fed) are only safe for use with round nose bullets, not spitzers.

Just figured i'd point that out. ;)

highsea
20 Dec 04,, 12:36
Lever actions(if tube magazine fed) are only safe for use with round nose bullets, not spitzers.

Just figured i'd point that out. ;)That's true, tube mags are no good for pointy bullets. The BLR has a detachable box mag for that very reason. So it's safe for .243, .308, etc. They even chambered it for 7mm. Rem and .300 Win Mag!

2DREZQ
20 Dec 04,, 17:19
That's true, tube mags are no good for pointy bullets. The BLR has a detachable box mag for that very reason. So it's safe for .243, .308, etc. They even chambered it for 7mm. Rem and .300 Win Mag!


Yup, Look for a pre-81 BLR. They were made in Belgium for a few years (70?-something?) before mfg. switched to Japan. Good-looking weapon.