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Shek
24 Mar 07,, 18:22
Here are some books that I have read or have on my wishlist. Any other recommendations? Thanks.

Comprehensive
Amazon.com: Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (Oxford History of the United States): Books: James M. McPherson (http://www.amazon.com/Battle-Cry-Freedom-Oxford-History/dp/019516895X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/102-0438121-3920159?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174755249&sr=1-2)
Amazon.com: The Civil War: A Narrative (3 Volume Set): Books: Shelby Foote (http://www.amazon.com/Civil-War-Narrative-Set/dp/0307290468/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-0438121-3920159?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174755073&sr=1-1)

Specific battles
Amazon.com: Landscape Turned Red: The Battle of Antietam: Books: Stephen W. Sears (http://astore.amazon.com/woraffboa-20/detail/0618344195/105-2293534-2113256)

Politics
Amazon.com: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln: Books: Doris Kearns Goodwin (http://astore.amazon.com/woraffboa-20/detail/0618344195/105-2293534-2113256)
Amazon.com: Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words that Remade America (Simon & Schuster Lincoln Library): Books: Garry Wills (http://astore.amazon.com/woraffboa-20/detail/0743299639/105-2293534-2113256)

Historical Fiction
Amazon.com: The Killer Angels: A Novel of the Civil War (Modern Library): Books: Michael Shaara (http://www.amazon.com/Killer-Angels-Novel-Modern-Library/dp/0679643249/ref=sr_1_4/102-0438121-3920159?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174756940&sr=1-4)
Amazon.com: Gettysburg: Books: Newt Gingrich,William R. Forstchen (http://www.amazon.com/Gettysburg-Newt-Gingrich/dp/0312987250/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3/102-0438121-3920159?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174756967&sr=1-3)
Amazon.com: Grant Comes East: Books: Newt Gingrich,William R. Forstchen (http://www.amazon.com/Grant-Comes-East-Newt-Gingrich/dp/0312987269/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-0438121-3920159?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174757074&sr=1-1)
Amazon.com: Never Call Retreat (Gingrich and Forstchen's Civil War Trilogy): Books: Newt Gingrich,William R. Forstchen,Albert S. Hanser (http://www.amazon.com/Never-Retreat-Gingrich-Forstchens-Trilogy/dp/0312949316/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-0438121-3920159?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174757019&sr=1-1)

EDIT: I bolded all the books that I have read.

Bluesman
24 Mar 07,, 18:48
Battle Cry of Freedom: I am fairly well-read on the ACW, but I learned LOTS from this one. My highest recommendation.

Shelby Foote's trilogy: I have NEVER been as engaged when reading history, and I read a LOT of history. My highest recommendation.

Landscape Turned Red: An outstanding account of the day's events, as well as terrific insights into the before and after of the battle. I used it as my guide book for my own personal 'staff ride' on Antitam National Battlefield. My highest recommendation.

Team of Rivals: Reading it now. The most important aspect of the ACW, the political angle in Washington. More than any other battlefiled, HERE is where the war was guided and decided. If you want to understand the War, don't read about the famous battles; read about the politics. My highest recommendation.

The Killer Angels: Right behind my Flashman, Hornblower and Aubrey series, there's THIS incredibly vivid and engaging account of the personalities and the realities of the Gettysburg Campaign. I never thought a work of fiction could teach me this much about my most beloved are of study, but Scharra is faithful to and is singulalry eqipped to tell the story. My highest recommendation.

Gingrich's Gettysburg: Worth reading for the alternate historical outcome. I enjoyed it, and it certainly is a tale that captures all the 'waht-ifs' that the battle has generated ever since Pickett marched into glorious destruction. Recommended.

If y'all think I was too free with the 'My highest recommendation', think again. shek has managed to list the absolute top-flight list of the books I have personal knowledge of, and it is no exageration to say that at the completion of each of the ones I've listed, you'll know what all Americans SHOULD know about the most crucial aspect of their history, and WHY it has made us into the country we are today.

Well, actually...you may want to read those first two through TWICE. I did, and came away with even more than the first time.:)

BudW
24 Mar 07,, 19:25
Look up Shelby Foote best Civil War author on the Civil War imho.

Shek
24 Mar 07,, 19:30
Blue,
Thanks for the response. I guess I should have indicated which ones I have already read, which I have now done. I concur with your thoughts on those that I have already read - I decided to move Words that Remade America to the politics section, as this book gets at how the Gettysburg Address reshaped our national self-image from "the United States" (think plural) to "The United States" (think singular). Some of the portions of the book are slow and cumbersome reading, especially if you are not well versed in the Greek classics (I am not, but have read some of the more pertinent texts such as Thucydides' "History of the Peloponnesian War" so I was able to muddle through it), but it is worth it to muddle through those portions for the insight gained from the other sections.

astralis
24 Mar 07,, 19:55
shek,

i thought gingrich's book was interesting...not least of which, the author's conclusion that a loss at gettysburg and the later destruction of the army of the potomac...would mean the civil war ends earlier, with union victory :eek:

Shek
25 Mar 07,, 19:58
shek,

i thought gingrich's book was interesting...not least of which, the author's conclusion that a loss at gettysburg and the later destruction of the army of the potomac...would mean the civil war ends earlier, with union victory :eek:

Astralis,

Although I am not a civil war buff, I believe their thoughts are that the Union had the logistical infrastructure, but lacked the generalship to take advantage of it. Combine that with the need for the South to obtain a decisive victory to prior to the 1864 elections and the sense for the kill of General Lee, I think that the scenario is plausible.

What I need to do at some point is to read all of Lincoln's correspondence with the Generals. The few that I have read are quite fascinating.

cape_royds
26 Mar 07,, 02:56
Students of the American Civil War are blessed with an abundance of extant firsthand accounts. Perhaps the best among them are the memoirs of Generals Grant and Sherman, which are very well-written and relatively free of apologetics.

They are both available on Project Gutenberg, so you're just a few clicks away from some very good reading:

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/4367

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/4361

Bluesman
26 Mar 07,, 03:05
Grant's memoirs are almost unique in that he has rendered one of the most honest accounts of his times - bad and good. THAT is fidelity to the truth, and whatever other faults the man had, self-agrandizement wasn't one of 'em.

He was a helluva man, and when he took the Army of the Potomac past the fork in the road and on along the road to more and even worse battles after the meat grinder of the Wilderness...it was a moment that had the absolute timestamp of history on it, and it literally saved the Union for the rest of us, and the entire world, too.

And the Army knew it, too: right then and on the spot, each regiment began a spontaneous cheer as the passed that fork, some marching to their deaths, but they knew their commander would FIGHT, and eventually, he would WIN.

And this backs up what I've always said: the one thing even the dimmest soldier understands is VICTORY. I've served under tough commanders, and I don't mind if they're hard as nails. But I want to WIN, and if he's a winner...I'll follow him.

Amled
26 Mar 07,, 16:43
Here’s a couple I found interesting.
Quantrill’s War by Duane Schultz
Soul Of The Lion by Willard M. Wallace a biography of Joshua L. Chamberlain
High Tide at Gettysburg by Glenn Tucker

S2
14 Apr 07,, 02:39
I'm sorta a Bruce Catton man. Loved his books. Can't think of one that was a poor read. A STILLNESS AT APPOMATTOX, GRANT TAKES COMMAND, AND MR. LINCOLN'S ARMY.

The Killer Angels remains a wonderful point of departure for Gettysburg.

Albany Rifles
27 Apr 07,, 19:49
A rambling, off the top of my head listing.

Western Theater

Peter Cozzens:

The Darkest Days of the War: The Battles of Iuka and Corinth

No Better Place To Die: The Battle of Stones River
This Terrible Sound: The Battle of Chickamauga
The Shipwreck of Their Hopes: The Battles for Chattanooga
Wiley Sword

Shiloh, Bloody April

The Confederacy's Last Hurrah: Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville

Glenn Tucker Chickamauga: Bloody Battle in The West

Eastern Theater

Steven Sears

Landscape Turned Red
Richmond Redeemed

Gordon Rhea
The Battle of the Wilderness, May 5-6, 1864
The Battles for Spotsylvania Court House and the Road to Yellow Tavern, May 7-12, 1864
To the North Anna River, May 13-26, 1864
Cold Harbor: Grant and Lee, May 26 - June 3, 1864
Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg! by George C. Rabble

A Wilson Greene
Breaking the Backbone of the Rebellion
Civil War Petersburg

GAU-8
28 Apr 07,, 20:40
Link: Last Chance For Victory (http://www.lastchanceforvictory.com/)

"Last Chance For Victory"

Believe it or not, but another book about Gettysburg. Excellent read.


That Devil Forrest. The Life of Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest.
J. A. Wyeth.
"First published in 1899, this book is based almost entirely on accounts of those who knew Forrest personally and on contemporary records. Grant called him "that devil Forrest." Sherman, it is reported, considered him "the most remarkable man our civil war produced on either side." Without military education or training, he became the scourge of Grant, Sherman, and almost every other Union general who fought in Tennessee, Alabama, or Kentucky. Paper. 614 pp."

S2
28 Apr 07,, 22:04
Just finished his bio, "James Longstreet- The Confederacy's Most Controversial Soldier".

A good read of a complex man unfairly derided by his peers. As much as anything, it illuminated for me the intense personal jealousies that plagued the command hierarchy of the south.

Albany Rifles
30 Apr 07,, 15:32
I went to a symposium a few years ago on the Corps Commanders of the Army of Northern Virginia. Jeff Wert was one of the speakers and of course he talked about Old Pete. He broke up the crowd when he remarked that Longstreet was the best of Lee's corps commanders....but he also was the only Confederate general to lose to Burnside!! (Knoxvill 63)

Jeff Wert made a great point when he pointed out that Longstreet led the 4 greatest infantry charges in the Civil War; 2nd Manassas, Gettysburg, Chickamauga & The Wilderness.

Always thought LOngstreet got short shrift by the Lost Cause folks.

Amled
30 Apr 07,, 19:45
Always thought LOngstreet got short shrift by the Lost Cause folks.
...and especially by Early!

Albany Rifles
01 May 07,, 14:07
Yes, Old Jubilee was a bit ahrd on the Old War Horse.

S2
08 Jan 08,, 01:09
Just got Jeffrey Wert's SWORD OF LINCOLN & Joshua Chamberlain's THE PASSING OF THE ARMIES.

BudW
21 Jan 08,, 00:38
Gettysburg-Sears great account of the battle.

Albany Rifles
22 Jan 08,, 17:04
Great writer...LOUSY speaker!

Johnny W
02 Aug 08,, 22:51
Yes, Old Jubilee was a bit ahrd on the Old War Horse.

Ironic since Lee fired Early late in the war, but never fired Longstreet.

CGXC runner
07 Sep 08,, 15:42
How the South Could Have Won the Civil War: The Fatal Errors That Led to Confederate Defeat by Bevin Alexander

RustyBattleship
02 Nov 08,, 02:30
Though I haven't read Stephen Crane's 1895 novel "Red Badge of Courage", it was made into a terrific movie starring Audie Murphy (highest decorated soldier of WW II) as a somewhat cowardly union soldier and the legendary "Willie and Joe" cartoonist Bill Maulden.

The scene where the Confederate flag bearer is shot down and still tries to hold the flag up was a tear jerker for my first wife (half was Southerner besides Hawaiin) as Audie grabs the flag and lets it float over the fallen Confederate. My wife was yelling, "Don't let it touch the ground."

Stephen Crane has been lauded for over a century now as having written one of the most realistic books of the Civil War, without ever having served in uniform himself. It was not intended to be a log book of battles and historical accuracy, but a story of what it was like to be a common soldier in that war.

Or for any war for that matter.

swornallegiance
03 Nov 08,, 17:27
A personal memior of Sam Watkins, an enlisted confederate soldier. No better description of the life of the common soldier. Watkins fought with his regiment from 1861-1865 in nearly every major battle fought in the west. Was one of only seven of the original 120 men still in the ranks at wars end. A great read from the little picture rather than the big picture most books cover.

Shek
24 Oct 09,, 04:39
Here's the book to read if you want a single one covering the Overland Campaign: Amazon.com: And Keep Moving On: The Virginia Campaign, May-June 1864 (Great Campaigns of the Civil War) (9780803271197): Mark Grimsley: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Keep-Moving-Virginia-Campaign-Campaigns/dp/0803271190/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1256355555&sr=8-2)

Any suggestions for the Petersburg Campaign?

Albany Rifles
26 Oct 09,, 14:20
Amazon.com: The Last Citadel: Petersburg, Virginia, June 1864-April 1865 (9780807118610): Noah Andre Trudeau: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Last-Citadel-Petersburg-Virginia-1864-April/dp/0807118613/ref=pd_sim_b_6)

In my opinion, Andy Trudeau's The Last Citadel is still the best single volume on the campaign.

However, look next year for a 2 volume campaign history done by Will Greene. Will wrote a masterful history of the breakthrough battles on 2 APR 65 called Breaking the Backbone of Rebellion

Amazon.com: The Final Battles of the Petersburg Campaign: Breaking the Backbone of the Rebellion (9781572336100): A. Wilson Greene: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Final-Battles-Petersburg-Campaign-Rebellion/dp/1572336102/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1256562896&sr=1-1)

I have only scanned Earl Hess' latest offering but if you want to get a little more into the specifis of the tactics with regard to use of fortifications this new volume comes highly recommended.

Amazon.com: In the Trenches at Petersburg: Field Fortifications and Confederate Defeat (Civil War America) (9780807832820): Earl J. Hess: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Trenches-Petersburg-Fortifications-Confederate-America/dp/0807832820/ref=cm_cr_pr_sims_t)

biteasaur
29 Oct 09,, 16:30
i like reading the shelby foote books.

gf0012-aust
21 Jan 10,, 20:33
Looking for an assist

This is hopelessly vague as it was first read by me about 30 years ago - and unfort I can't remember sufficient detail to try and track it down via my own resources

I've read a number of books on the technologies and logistics issues of the CW/WBS .

One of them was a dusk coloured book with an old photo of Union engineers at work. what was interesting about this book was that it timelined all the new technologies and logistics concepts developed or used during the war and the impact that these had on modern war in the 20th century.

unfort I cannot remember one iota of detail out side of this, but I am keen to try and track either it down, or something of similar quality.

eg it covered off all new weapons systems devs. the use of rail, the impact of the use of rail, some of the engineering feats which would prev have been regarded as unworkable etc...

any help appreciated.

gf

Bigfella
21 Jan 10,, 21:05
Looking for an assist

This is hopelessly vague as it was first read by me about 30 years ago - and unfort I can't remember sufficient detail to try and track it down via my own resources

I've read a number of books on the technologies and logistics issues of the CW/WBS .

One of them was a dusk coloured book with an old photo of Union engineers at work. what was interesting about this book was that it timelined all the new technologies and logistics concepts developed or used during the war and the impact that these had on modern war in the 20th century.

unfort I cannot remember one iota of detail out side of this, but I am keen to try and track either it down, or something of similar quality.

eg it covered off all new weapons systems devs. the use of rail, the impact of the use of rail, some of the engineering feats which would prev have been regarded as unworkable etc...

any help appreciated.

gf

Might it be 'The American Civil War & the Origins of Modern Warfare' by Edward Hagerman (Indiana University Press 1988) ?

Good luck.

p.s. could you p.m. me the website where you are a moderator. Probably too milprofessional for me to post much, but I might learn something.

Ta.

gf0012-aust
22 Jan 10,, 02:22
Might it be 'The American Civil War & the Origins of Modern Warfare' by Edward Hagerman (Indiana University Press 1988) ?


Thanks BF. Not the one, but I have read it and its a very good read across broad issues.

gf

Triple C
19 Mar 10,, 09:57
Great thread. I am giving this a bump and I have a good pretext--I am reading McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom suggested by the first post of this thread and completely struck with awe. Contentious he may be, few historians today can match this man's depth and breadth of knowledge, prose and clarity. I am struck by the sheer physicality of foot-mobile warfare. I will read Fuller's Lee and Grant very soon...

Julie
14 Jun 10,, 04:26
Shelby Foote's trilogy: I have NEVER been as engaged when reading history, and I read a LOT of history. My highest recommendation.I have those, in hardback, copyright 1958.

Shek
19 Jun 10,, 12:29
Books battling for attention - Evening Sun (http://www.eveningsun.com/ci_15272534)


Books battling for attention

By MARC CHARISSSE
Posted: 06/13/2010 01:00:00 AM EDT

"Of making many books there is no end," Ecclesiastes tells us, "and much study is a weariness of the flesh."

Every year about this time, a whole new bevy of Gettysburg books appears on the shelves. And every year, I pack my worn artillery haversack full of weighty tomes to take out on the battlefield.

But the weariness comes mostly when I find that despite all those new titles, there is, to quote Ecclesiastes again, "nothing new under the sun."

Mostly, I find myself packing those tried and true titles that have gotten me through the vicissitudes of Little Round Top, the chaos of the Wheatfield and the perils of Pickett's Charge. But last November, I finally found the book that could safely guide me across Gettysburg all by itself.

So out of the dozens of Gettysburg books I've perused (or at least skimmed) here's my top-10 titles for understanding the battle, the ones that deserve a second, or even a third careful reading.

1. "The Gettysburg Campaign: A Study in Command (http://www.amazon.com/Gettysburg-Campaign-Study-Command/dp/0684845695)," by Edwin Coddington, was published more than 40 years ago, and still remains to most experts the best single-volume book on Lee's 1863 invasion. At 600 pages, plus 200 pages of notes, Coddington isn't light reading, but it's the beginning of any serious study of the Gettysburg campaign. The old Confederate controversies are all there, but a century after the battle, Coddington returns needed focus to the Union leadership that did, after all, win the battle.

2. "Gettysburg:The Second Day (http://www.amazon.com/Gettysburg-Second-Day-Harry-Pfanz/dp/0807847305/ref=pd_sim_b_3)," by former chief Park Service historian Harry Pfanz is easily the most beautifully written book I've read on Gettysburg. Pfanz weaves together the complex operations and the lives and experiences of the men who fought and died on this bloodiest day of the three-day battle. July 2 had the greatest number of opportunities and disasters on both sides, and Pfanz masterfully shows his reader exactly why it was the decisive day of the battle,

3. "Gettysburg Day Two: A Study in Maps (http://www.amazon.com/Gettysburg-Day-Two-Study-Maps/dp/0935523707/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276946670&sr=1-1)." I picked up my copy of John Imhof's 1999 collection of tactical maps in a remainder pile in downtown Gettysburg a few years ago for a few dollars. Expect to pay hundreds if you can find one for sale now. No source beats the detailed tactical evolutions depicted on Imhof's regimental-level maps. And with some showing movements as little as 20 minutes apart, you can finally visually grasp the unfolding of the second day. "Maps of Gettysburg" by Bradley Gottfried is an acceptable substitute, and it also covers the first and third days, though not in the same glorious tactical detail.

4. "Pickett's Charge (http://www.amazon.com/Picketts-Charge-George-Stewart/dp/0395597722/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276946695&sr=1-1)" by George Stewart is hard to follow in places if you aren't already well versed in July 3 troop movements. But as it shifts its focus back and forth between antagonists, it captures the confusion and emotional truth of war. In the end, it delivers a cohesive picture of the great charge and its heroic repulse, but the book's real power is in the haunting mental images it conjures of men in battle.

5. In "Gettysburg: A Journey in Time (http://www.amazon.com/Gettysburg-Journey-Time-William-Frassanito/dp/0939631970/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276946735&sr=1-1)," William Frassanito changed the way we look at the battlefield. His research into early battlefield photography, and discovery of many new images, tell a timeless story in words and pictures. Besides, the many then-and-now pairings are eerily fun to recreate. Frassanito's two then-and-now collections, and even his massive "Early Photography at Gettysburg" usually manage to get squeezed into my haversack as well.

6. Pfanz's "Gettysburg: Culp's Hill & Cemetery Hill (http://www.amazon.com/Gettysburg-Culps-Hill-Cemetery-Harry-Pfanz/dp/0807849960/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276946758&sr=1-3)" isn't quite as wonderful as his "Second Day." But it's a solid, highly readable study of this neglected, yet unique and fascinating part of the battle.

7. "Plenty of Blame to Go Around (http://www.amazon.com/Plenty-Blame-Around-Controversial-Gettysburg/dp/1932714200/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276946780&sr=1-1)," by Eric J. Wittenberg and J. David Petruzzi is the best study of J.E.B. Stuart's famous ride around the Union army. It includes detailed descriptions of the battles of Hanover and Hunterstown, as well as an excellent driving tour. A great book.

8. "Regimental Strengths and Losses at Gettysburg (http://www.amazon.com/Regimental-Strengths-Losses-at-Gettysburg/dp/0944413676/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276946807&sr=1-1)" by John Busey and David Martin is a compendium of the losses at Gettysburg, killed, wounded and captured, regiment by regiment, followed by charts and tables of comparative losses. But in its stark, typewritten pages are ultimately poignant records of the human cost of war.

9. "The Gettysburg Gospel (http://www.amazon.com/Gettysburg-Gospel-Lincoln-Schuster-Library/dp/0743288211/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276946851&sr=1-1)" by Gabor Boritt. For many years, Gary Wills' "Lincoln at Gettysburg" has been my favorite book on the November address that redefined the battle and the nation. But Boritt's work is as thoughtful and a better read. A little less erudite, perhaps, but ultimately a richer retelling of the story.

10. "The Complete Gettysburg Guide (http://www.amazon.com/COMPLETE-GETTYSBURG-GUIDE-Battlefield-Cemeteries/dp/1932714634/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276946897&sr=8-1)." At last, the one book I'd take to Gettysburg if I could only take one book. It's got everything - walking tours, driving tours, battle maps, monuments and battlefield lore. In a way, Petruzzi's new book is too good, pointing out all those cool rock carvings, dinosaur fossils and other hidden battlefield stuff some of us had to spend years to find.

If you see me on the battlefield, I'll let you take a look at my copy. I'll be easy to spot - the guy dragging that old leather bag stuffed with books up the side of Little Round Top.

Marc Charisse is editor of The Evening Sun. E-mail: mcharisse@eveningsun.com

Shek
19 Jun 10,, 12:36
Gordon Rhea
The Battle of the Wilderness, May 5-6, 1864
The Battles for Spotsylvania Court House and the Road to Yellow Tavern, May 7-12, 1864
To the North Anna River, May 13-26, 1864
Cold Harbor: Grant and Lee, May 26 - June 3, 1864

I'm almost halfway through Gordon Rhea's 5 volume set (only 4 published to date, though) on the battle for the I-95 corridor (Overland Campaign).

A superb series thus far that recounts details down to the brigade and regimental level during actions, woven together with vivid personal recollections of both staff officers and individual soldiers to color the action, and provides some strong analysis of the generalship of both sides. To date, I've found his analysis to be very even keeled and frank.

I'd highly recommend this to anyone who's going to be visiting any of these battlefields, and one of these weeks this summer, once I finish up the master bath, I'll drive the hour south from occupied Virginia and check out the battlefields in depth :redface:

Albany Rifles
13 Mar 12,, 16:06
Vicksburg: The Campaign That Opened the Mississippi (Civil War America) by Michael B. Ballard

EXCELLENT work on a key campaign. I really am enjoying his analysis of Pemberton and Johnston, their comamnd problems and how their indecision and inactions allowed Grant a great deal of freedom to be succesful. I am also gaining a better appreciation for McClernand as a battlefield commander. I also am enjoying that a couple of my favorite "unknowns" get their due, Peter Osterhaus as well as a Confederate John S. Bowen.

Grab this book!!!

Minskaya
20 Sep 12,, 07:42
Grant's memoirs are almost unique in that he has rendered one of the most honest accounts of his times - bad and good.
I heartily agree. Probably due to the uncounted cigars sent to him by admirers, Grant succumbed to throat cancer in 1885. He finished his autobiography bedridden, unable to communicate except by note. Although occasionally self-serving, this is a military and literary masterpiece. This contemporary edition should be available at most public library systems:

Personal Memoirs - Ulysses S. Grant / Penguin / 1991 (one volume reissue)