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troung
20 Jan 07,, 01:53
Royal Marines launch dramatic rescue bid to save fallen soldier

Media: The Associated Press
Byline: By DANICA KIRKA
Date: 17 January 2007


LONDON_British Marines strapped themselves to helicopters in a daring dash
into hostile territory to rescue a fallen comrade in Afghanistan, but it was
too late to save his life, defense officials said Wednesday.

The effort to save Lance Cpl. Mathew Ford, 30, followed an attack Monday on
a fort being used as an insurgent base in Afghanistan's southern Helmand
province. After falling back to regroup, the forces realized Ford had been
left behind, according to an account by the Ministry of Defense.

The forces quickly drafted a plan to rescue Ford using Apaches, an attack
helicopter which is so crammed with equipment that only two people can be
seated. Two Marines were strapped on the side wings of each of two Apache
helicopters. A third Apache provided cover.

"It was a leap into the unknown," said Lt. Col. Rory Bruce, the spokesman of
the U.K. task force, which is the British force operating under NATO
command. "This is believed to be the first time U.K. forces have ever tried
this type of rescue mission."

While other units provided cover fire, one Apache landed inside the wall of
the fort, and one outside. The four Marines got off the wings, together with
some of the army air corps air crew, to provide cover. Ford's body was
strapped on an Apache and taken away.

"With great sadness, they later found that their brother-in-arms had been
killed in action," Bruce said.

British troops have faced fierce action since moving into southern
Afghanistan last year for a mission some have charged was a disaster in the
making. Critics of Prime Minister Tony Blair have accused politicians of
failing to anticipate the strength of resurgent Taliban forces and of
sending forces ill-equipped to do a job involving far more combat than
anticipated.

Casualty figures have climbed: 46 military personnel have died in
Afghanistan, though not all have been killed in combat.

News of the rescue mission dominated British television newscasts Wednesday,
leading to speculation that the forces who undertook the rescue mission
should be awarded military honors. The Marines who undertook the mission
have not been named.

"Clearly the prime minister would want to pay tribute to the bravery
displayed, but it is too early to speculate about awarding of honors," said
Blair's official spokesman, who speaks on condition of anonymity in line
with government rules. "Everyone recognizes the bravery involved."

Tronic
20 Jan 07,, 02:49
Hats off to those boys... puts the good guys in a league of their own...

MarquezRazor
20 Jan 07,, 07:02
Good God!Thats incredible bravery indeed!Wish they could have saved the soldier.





the strength of resurgent Taliban forces and of
sending forces ill-equipped to do a job involving far more combat than
anticipated.



that we all know whats it about!:rolleyes:

glyn
20 Jan 07,, 12:35
Good God!Thats incredible bravery indeed!Wish they could have saved the soldier.




that we all know whats it about!:rolleyes:

It was mentioned on British TV but the Jade Goody story received far more (and still continuing) coverage.

tankie
20 Jan 07,, 15:31
[QUOTE=troung;331802]Royal Marines launch dramatic rescue bid to save fallen soldier

Media: The Associated Press
Byline: By DANICA KIRKA
Date: 17 January 2007



"It was a leap into the unknown," said Lt. Col. Rory Bruce, the spokesman of
the U.K. task force, which is the British force operating under NATO
command. "This is believed to be the first time U.K. forces have ever tried
this type of rescue mission."

QUOTE]

Very commendable to say the least .

MarquezRazor
20 Jan 07,, 16:29
It was mentioned on British TV but the Jade Goody story received far more (and still continuing) coverage.

Sign of the times!:frown:

Shipwreck
20 Jan 07,, 21:24
USMC reportedly training to do the same from a Hog :biggrin:

Shipwreck
20 Jan 07,, 21:29
Kudos to the Royal Marines :)

Ray
21 Jan 07,, 19:46
It was on Indian TV too!

Excellent work that!

Really worth the kudos.

Well done!

Hope medals come their way!

A great morale booster the world over!

Shipwreck
21 Jan 07,, 20:32
Footage of Rescue on BBC News :

BBC NEWS | UK | Film of marines' daring mission (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6285091.stm)

(click on *Watch the Rescue Attempt*, top of page, for the footage)

Stan187
21 Jan 07,, 21:47
Now that's committment to your buddies. I'm surprised though that the got the go ahead to land a chopper inside this compound, let alone agreement from the army aviation pilots!:eek:

pdf27
21 Jan 07,, 23:39
Now that's committment to your buddies. I'm surprised though that the got the go ahead to land a chopper inside this compound, let alone agreement from the army aviation pilots!:eek:
They seem to have been fairly keen. Some of the Apache aircrew even got out to try and find the guy!

Stan187
22 Jan 07,, 20:39
While its good that it worked out without any casualties on the part of the rescuers, I'm just saying that this time luck was on their side. Executing an op like that is just asking for it, in my opinion. The line between daring and disasterous is drawn by the outcome.

Ray
23 Jan 07,, 08:33
Shipwreck,

Thanks for the link.

Just saw the rescue operations on the video.

Marvellous work by the soldiers and the helicopter pilots.

Very daring and great!

Ray
23 Jan 07,, 08:43
While its good that it worked out without any casualties on the part of the rescuers, I'm just saying that this time luck was on their side. Executing an op like that is just asking for it, in my opinion. The line between daring and disasterous is drawn by the outcome.

It is true it is a thin line between daring and disaster. But then, there are people in uniform who take such gambles even at the risk of their own careers!

We had a Colonel (Aviation) who flew into the night in his helicopter in the Siachen where there is a raging battle daily and rescued a trooper who was surely going to die otherwise.

It was, and still is, against the rules to fly at night since there are no night navigational instruments on board. He did it. He got sacked. But he is a legend today.

His name is Tom Dulat.

I sure would love to have him around when I am under fire or ill where there is no medical aid.

Such people make the Armed Forces what it is all about and not the penpushers, who only understand how to chalk a successful career!

The Apache pilots and the Marines and this Indian Aviation Colonel are the ones that allow the citizens their peaceful night's sleep while they slog it out braving the dangers and the risks.

God Bless their types!

T_igger_cs_30
23 Jan 07,, 09:10
While its good that it worked out without any casualties on the part of the rescuers, I'm just saying that this time luck was on their side. Executing an op like that is just asking for it, in my opinion. The line between daring and disasterous is drawn by the outcome.

I disagree, you make your own luck(FEAR NAUGHT)

Given what the boys are facing,non stop fire fights/contacts, lack of equipment, broken promises by politicians this incredible act of bravery by this group will have done more for morale than anyone can imagine.

Also can you imagine what it means to the Marines parents....who will be able to achieve closure, there son will be home. ....RIP L/Bdr James Dwyer.......

gunnut
23 Jan 07,, 09:39
Video for those of you who haven't seen it.

LiveLeak.com - Royal Marines daring rescue attempt in Afghanistan - Strapped to an Apache (http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=d03858b562)

pdf27
23 Jan 07,, 09:44
Also can you imagine what it means to the Marines parents....who will be able to achieve closure, there son will be home. ....RIP L/Bdr James Dwyer.......[/B]
It also means a hell of a lot to any of the guys out there who might be cut off. They're going to know that someone is coming to get them, rather than them being left to (in the words of Kipling talking about another Afghan war):
"When you're wounded and left on Afghanistan's plains,
And the women come out to cut up what remains,
Jest roll to your rifle and blow out your brains
An' go to your Gawd like a soldier.."

kams
23 Jan 07,, 16:07
Wow, We salute you.



We had a Colonel (Aviation) who flew into the night in his helicopter in the Siachen where there is a raging battle daily and rescued a trooper who was surely going to die otherwise.

It was, and still is, against the rules to fly at night since there are no night navigational instruments on board. He did it. He got sacked. But he is a legend today.

His name is Tom Dulat.

I am surprised that he was sacked. What he did was beyond the call of duty, putting his life in danger, to save a fellow stricken brother. He took initiative, improvised in adverse conditions. That is what we look for in a leader. Am I wrong?

MarquezRazor
23 Jan 07,, 16:15
I am surprised that he was sacked. What he did was beyond the call of duty, putting his life in danger, to save a fellow stricken brother. He took initiative, improvised in adverse conditions. That is what we look for in a leader. Am I wrong?

I think the bravery is beyond reproach but discipline needs to be maintained..you dont want to set precedents ..which in other cases may go horribly wrong and jeopardise many lives.

Anyway thats what I think of it.

Stan187
23 Jan 07,, 17:33
All I'm saying is, while it was a remarkable rescue and boost for morale and such, as their CO, I would not have authorized that. Not the whole thing mind you, but just the part where the Apache sets down inside the enemy compound. The other parts I have no problem with.

HistoricalDavid
23 Jan 07,, 18:43
Until I saw it, I certainly would have laughed at anyone who said you could strap people to an Apache's wings.

pdf27
23 Jan 07,, 18:56
All I'm saying is, while it was a remarkable rescue and boost for morale and such, as their CO, I would not have authorized that. Not the whole thing mind you, but just the part where the Apache sets down inside the enemy compound. The other parts I have no problem with.
So as a CO, you'd happily abandon your men to the barbarians if there is a risk of losing expensive equipment? Nice to know the loyalty thing would go both ways!

Stan187
23 Jan 07,, 19:30
So as a CO, you'd happily abandon your men to the barbarians if there is a risk of losing expensive equipment? Nice to know the loyalty thing would go both ways!

You're not reading what I'm writing. I said I didn't have a problem with the other parts of the mission, but I wouldn't set down the Apache inside the fort itself, but instead outside of it, like the other one did.

I don't think that was a smart move. I never said I'd abandon anyone in such a situation. I'm just saying I wouldn't land a chopper inside an enemy fort, but outside of it. Really, read what I write before you respond.

Ray
24 Jan 07,, 17:16
Stan,

You may have a point and I can see what you are getting at, but then I am sure the pilots of both the helicopters would have sized up the situation, made a quick plan and decided to take the calculated gamble.

This is what combat leadership, camaraderie and daring is all about!

If they had failed hopelessly and if they had done without the OK, then it could have been a different matter, especially if the citizens, the media and the politicians made a huge hue and cry about taking unnecessary risks and getting people killed and such stuff.

Now, that is another professional hazard. Some take it and some don't.

Stan187
25 Jan 07,, 01:56
Occupational hazard indeed Brigadier, all I'm saying is that as long as its within reason, we should try to reduce those occupational hazards as much as possible.