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ChrisF202
04 Oct 04,, 22:13
Does anybody know what the longest siege in history was? I was thinking either Leningrad in WW2 or Khartoum in the 1880's.

Amled
04 Oct 04,, 23:39
The jury is still out regarding the historical authenticity of the Siege of Troy.
That is reported to have lasted well over a decade.

ChrisF202
05 Oct 04,, 01:12
The jury is still out regarding the historical authenticity of the Siege of Troy.
That is reported to have lasted well over a decade.
Thanks for the info, found that as well while doing a search. Found some more:

- Leningrad in WW2 was over 900 days (talk about amazing).
- The 1884/1885 seige of Khartoum lasted 416 days and the city fell two days before rescue column arrived.

Stalingrad and Dien Bien Phu were also pretty long sieges, I belive they both lasted over a year.

ZFBoxcar
05 Oct 04,, 01:40
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sieges

This may be of some help.

Confed999
05 Oct 04,, 01:49
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sieges

This may be of some help.
Neat, thanks...

philipjd
05 Oct 04,, 23:16
I believe that the Ottoman siege of Malta lasted quite long time - whether it measured longer than the Leningrad seige, not sure.

Just a thought

cheers

2DREZQ
16 Oct 04,, 16:32
The siege of Constantinople in 1453 lasted 53 days, but it was, perhaps, the most important of the Millenium.

Donnie
16 Oct 04,, 20:44
the siege of Sarajevo March 2, 1992 – March 19, 1996. 1477 days

edit--- there are differing accounts of dates, but it is the longest in history.

smilingassassin
17 Oct 04,, 07:59
Too bad we don't have a difinitive number of days for the seige of Troy, thats the first seige I thought of.

ChrisF202
17 Oct 04,, 14:29
the siege of Sarajevo March 2, 1992 – March 19, 1996. 1477 days

edit--- there are differing accounts of dates, but it is the longest in history.
How could anyone survive in a city under seige for that long? I mean how did they keep from going insane with all the explosions and killing?

As for Troy, I dont think its possible for one to mentally and physically survive a decade long siege, its just not possible in my opinion.

Officer of Engineers
17 Oct 04,, 20:08
How could anyone survive in a city under seige for that long? I mean how did they keep from going insane with all the explosions and killing?

Most of the action were small arms in the peripherals. UNPROFOR kept the airport openned and when we got too pissed off at the fire that was keeping the planes away, we send an armoured column through which the Serbs allowed through and let the planes land for "humanitarian reasons." In other words, they were scared ****less of us coming in with guns blazing.

The fact was that it was only a seige in name. Leakage happenned all over the place and UNPROFOR was way too tough for any of them to handle. When we finally got pissed off at the UN *****footing around and chucked our blue berets for our regt berets, the French Battalion (FREBAT) destroyed the beseiging forces from within Sarajevo.

smilingassassin
18 Oct 04,, 00:59
How could anyone survive in a city under seige for that long? I mean how did they keep from going insane with all the explosions and killing?

As for Troy, I dont think its possible for one to mentally and physically survive a decade long siege, its just not possible in my opinion.

I think thats why they recieved the "god" status that they did.

Achillies was a one man wrecking crew, and slew the best the trojans had to offer in Hector.

ASG
26 Jun 06,, 18:18
The jury is still out regarding the historical authenticity of the Siege of Troy.
That is reported to have lasted well over a decade.

There were no seige weapons back in the days of Troy. You cannot beseige a walled city without seige weaponary.

Bluecoat
27 Jun 06,, 15:54
American War of Independence

Siege of Gibraltar - 1316 days.

In it's way a more important engagement than Yorktown (the British could always land fresh troops if they had wanted to on another peninsular if they had politically wanted to) was the failure for 40,000 spanish troops to defeat the 5,000 gibraltar garrision for nearly four years.

Canmoore
27 Jun 06,, 16:25
How could anyone survive in a city under seige for that long? I mean how did they keep from going insane with all the explosions and killing?

As for Troy, I dont think its possible for one to mentally and physically survive a decade long siege, its just not possible in my opinion.

I was watching a program on the Vietnamese people during the Vietnam war, wich lasted 15 years (21 if you include the french).

And what happens is that the people culture adapts to the war, it becomes apart of there daily lives. Everything they did was for the war. Woman would Farm the rice fields and carry rifles while they worked, and whenever a helicoptor or plane flew over they would take a few shots at it. then bring home the rice that would be for the soldiers.
Children either worked in shops that converted looted american ammunition into into deadly IED's or landmines, or they dug in the tunnels.

Humans are the apex creature of this planet because we can adapt to our surroundings so fast and so well....its no different than in constant war.

mattswm
28 Feb 08,, 11:59
I believe that one of, if not the longest siege in history was the siege of the venetian city of Candia (modern Heraklion, Crete) by the Ottoman Empire during the Cretan War. It lasted from 1648 to 1670 (22 years). The Ottomans were ultimately victorious.

glyn
28 Feb 08,, 12:40
I believe that one of, if not the longest siege in history was the siege of the venetian city of Candia (modern Heraklion, Crete) by the Ottoman Empire during the Cretan War. It lasted from 1648 to 1670 (22 years). The Ottomans were ultimately victorious.

What patience!

dave lukins
28 Feb 08,, 12:42
Too bad we don't have a difinitive number of days for the seige of Troy, thats the first seige I thought of.


Troy, siege of (mythical?). According to legend, Paris, prince of Troy—or Ilium (Ilion) as it was also called—carried off Helen, wife of Menelaus of Sparta, whereupon a confederation led by Menelaus' brother, Agamemnon, king of Mycenae, was formed to recover her, and over a thousand ships assembled to carry the heroes to Troy. But the siege dragged on for nine years,

now that's what you call a seige

Albany Rifles
28 Feb 08,, 20:25
While called a siege, it never really was.

It is more rightfully called a campaign. The campaign started 15 June 64 and Petersburg was never cut off until 2 April 1865 when Union forces took the last rail line into the city. Technically it still wasn't a siege because the Confederate forces were able to withdraw into the open countryside NW of Petersburg before being run to ground a week later.

Petersburg National Battlefield (U.S. National Park Service) (http://www.nps.gov/pete/)

ghost88
28 Feb 08,, 20:39
While called a siege, it never really was.

It is more rightfully called a campaign. The campaign started 15 June 64 and Petersburg was never cut off until 2 April 1865 when Union forces took the last rail line into the city. Technically it still wasn't a siege because the Confederate forces were able to withdraw into the open countryside NW of Petersburg before being run to ground a week later.

Petersburg National Battlefield (U.S. National Park Service) (http://www.nps.gov/pete/)
Then you could say the same for Lenningrad as it was never totally cut off.

Albany Rifles
28 Feb 08,, 20:45
I think the difference would be, I believe, that the Red Army around Leningrad had lost its ability to maneuver while Lee stayed inthe trenches to protect his Amry, Petersburg and the supply lines to Richmond. Lee could have pulled out at most anytime...in fact, Grant hoped he would do just that. If Lee had, then Richmond would have fallen, which in itself would not have meant defeat but it would have cost them Tredegar Iron Works, the last real foundary in the Confederacy. And Lee would also have to deal with Grant's larger force in more open country than central Virginia

If I am wrong about Leningrad, please correct me.

neyzen
28 Feb 08,, 21:19
Siege of Bursa 1314-1326

Foremost
03 Mar 08,, 23:27
The siege of Carthage by the Romans started in 149 BC & ended in 146 BC, now that's what I call a mutha of a siege, jeez! http://smilies.sofrayt.com/%5E/_950/fencing.gif

Blackleaf
06 Mar 08,, 18:16
I'm not sure what the longest siege in history is but the Siege of Plymouth, during the English Civil War, was the longest siege in history at that time, and also the fiercest.

For 4 years, from 1642 to 1646, the Devon town was held by Parliamentarian forces against the onslaught of the Royalist forces.

The Parliamentarians eventually won the Civil War, Charles I was beheaded and England became a Republic from 1649-1660. Though in 1660, the Monarchy was restored.

The Siege of Plymouth

http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/i/siege_200.jpg
CIVIL WAR | A twist in the tale of the siege


Plymouth is a town built on the scene of bloodbaths and killing fields, yet few know the true extent of Plymouth’s loss during the Civil War over 350 years ago.

The English Civil War immersed the South West, and nowhere was the loss of life as great as in Plymouth. To mark the anniversary of the end of the Civil War, Inside Out reveals a new twist in the tale of the siege.

When war swept through the South West, Plymouth came under attack because it sided with parliament against King Charles I.

John Syms was a puritan minister who sought sanctuary in Plymouth. His diary sheds new light on the town’s steadfast resolve in their fight against the Royalists.

The people of Plymouth were faced with a stark choice of seeing their town burn to ashes or surrendering to the enemy. They chose to fight.

Solemn oath

http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/i/siege_skull_150.jpg
The death toll in Plymouth was the highest in the South West

The people of Plymouth signed a solemn covenant to fight to the last man and indeed facing the Royalist army may have proven the lesser of two evils.

John Syms’ diary reveals that failure to keep the oath lead to punishment and even death.

Extracts from Syms’ diary state, "George Henwood of Plymouth and one of the captain’s troop were executed on the Hoe for deserting the Parliament’s army after their covenant… The renegade committed a barbarous cruelty on two of our soldiers going out to the country enforcing one to hang the other."

More revelations

http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/i/siege_burial_150.jpg
Deserters of the army were punishable by death

Syms’ revelations do not end there however. His diary tells of a betrayal which could have been the end of Plymouth.

Commander Alexander Carew plotted to give up Drake’s Island to the enemy camped over at Mount Edgecumbe. Thankfully Carew was caught before the plot was carried out. He protested his innocence all the way to the gallows.

King Charles took up headquarters at Widey House believing Plymouth ready to surrender. With their refusal, the King dared not risk his 15,000 strong army against Plymouth and the task fell to others.

Bravery

http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/i/siege_01_150.jpg
John Syms' diary reveals new details of Plymouth's role in the Civil War



Sir Richard Grenville amassed a formidable force in the last major attempt to break the resistance. Thousands of soldiers surged towards Plymouth and its badly armed defenders.

The Plymothians displayed astonishing bravery and by the end of the fighting it was the blood of Grenville’s men that was shed.

Plymouth stood firm for nearly four years and with the King finally defeated, they found themselves on the winning side.

Their triumph however was short lived. The monarchy was restored and the new King, Charles II exacted revenge for Plymouth’s resistance. Many of its heroes were imprisoned on Drake’s Island, some until their deaths’.

BBC Inside Out - The seige of Plymouth (http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/siege_civil_war_plymouth.shtml)

Foremost
06 Mar 08,, 18:48
I'm not sure what the longest siege in history is but the Siege of Plymouth, during the English Civil War, was the longest siege in history at that time, and also the fiercest.

For 4 years, from 1642 to 1646, the Devon town was held by Parliamentarian forces against the onslaught of the Royalist forces.

The Parliamentarians eventually won the Civil War, Charles I was beheaded and England became a Republic from 1649-1660. Though in 1660, the Monarchy was restored.

The Siege of Plymouth

http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/i/siege_200.jpg
CIVIL WAR | A twist in the tale of the siege


Plymouth is a town built on the scene of bloodbaths and killing fields, yet few know the true extent of Plymouth’s loss during the Civil War over 350 years ago.

The English Civil War immersed the South West, and nowhere was the loss of life as great as in Plymouth. To mark the anniversary of the end of the Civil War, Inside Out reveals a new twist in the tale of the siege.

When war swept through the South West, Plymouth came under attack because it sided with parliament against King Charles I.

John Syms was a puritan minister who sought sanctuary in Plymouth. His diary sheds new light on the town’s steadfast resolve in their fight against the Royalists.

The people of Plymouth were faced with a stark choice of seeing their town burn to ashes or surrendering to the enemy. They chose to fight.

Solemn oath

http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/i/siege_skull_150.jpg
The death toll in Plymouth was the highest in the South West

The people of Plymouth signed a solemn covenant to fight to the last man and indeed facing the Royalist army may have proven the lesser of two evils.

John Syms’ diary reveals that failure to keep the oath lead to punishment and even death.

Extracts from Syms’ diary state, "George Henwood of Plymouth and one of the captain’s troop were executed on the Hoe for deserting the Parliament’s army after their covenant… The renegade committed a barbarous cruelty on two of our soldiers going out to the country enforcing one to hang the other."

More revelations

http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/i/siege_burial_150.jpg
Deserters of the army were punishable by death

Syms’ revelations do not end there however. His diary tells of a betrayal which could have been the end of Plymouth.

Commander Alexander Carew plotted to give up Drake’s Island to the enemy camped over at Mount Edgecumbe. Thankfully Carew was caught before the plot was carried out. He protested his innocence all the way to the gallows.

King Charles took up headquarters at Widey House believing Plymouth ready to surrender. With their refusal, the King dared not risk his 15,000 strong army against Plymouth and the task fell to others.

Bravery

http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/i/siege_01_150.jpg
John Syms' diary reveals new details of Plymouth's role in the Civil War



Sir Richard Grenville amassed a formidable force in the last major attempt to break the resistance. Thousands of soldiers surged towards Plymouth and its badly armed defenders.

The Plymothians displayed astonishing bravery and by the end of the fighting it was the blood of Grenville’s men that was shed.

Plymouth stood firm for nearly four years and with the King finally defeated, they found themselves on the winning side.

Their triumph however was short lived. The monarchy was restored and the new King, Charles II exacted revenge for Plymouth’s resistance. Many of its heroes were imprisoned on Drake’s Island, some until their deaths’.

BBC Inside Out - The seige of Plymouth (http://www.bbc.co.uk/insideout/southwest/series2/siege_civil_war_plymouth.shtml)
Have look here too; www.plymouthdata.info/%20Plymouth.htm I only live 100 miles from Plymouth.

DC Katoch
12 Apr 08,, 09:51
In the 16th century, the Mughal siege of the Rajput fort of Chittor (http://airavat.googlepages.com/chittor) lasted 122 days.

Ray
12 Apr 08,, 13:06
DC,

Are you the same person who is the brother of Col Rasam Chand Katoch?

LetsTalk
15 Apr 08,, 04:53
So far the answer sounds like it is Troy, if it lasted 10 years. Man I got lots of reading to do, great question CrisF202!

DC Katoch
16 Apr 08,, 01:25
DC,

Are you the same person who is the brother of Col Rasam Chand Katoch?

No sir I'm not.

In fact I've never served and don't have any near relations in the army.....I'm an "internet warrior" :biggrin:

LetsTalk
16 Apr 08,, 05:32
YouTube - Trojan War - ancient weapons technology (documentary clip) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aznz9mj5grA&eurl=http://www.network54.com/Forum/248068/thread/1200258060/last-1200388261/astonish+reserch+about+ancient+greek+weapone)

According to this History Chanel documentary, the Trojan war lasted 10 years.

Kansas Bear
16 Apr 08,, 06:21
YouTube - Trojan War - ancient weapons technology (documentary clip) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aznz9mj5grA&eurl=http://www.network54.com/Forum/248068/thread/1200258060/last-1200388261/astonish+reserch+about+ancient+greek+weapone)

According to this History Chanel documentary, the Trojan war lasted 10 years.


You've never read the Iliad??? :eek:

LetsTalk
16 Apr 08,, 06:27
Actually I did(about 20 years ago), the question has always been, how much of it is really real.

Kansas Bear
16 Apr 08,, 06:36
Actually I did(about 20 years ago), the question has always been, how much of it is really real.


I read it 30+ yrs ago, and apparently it wasn't too far off the mark.

morphium
14 Aug 08,, 22:58
Sarajevo, I'm from Bosnia and if you ask how people did not went crazy, they did ;)

April 5, 1992 to February 29, 1996.

hagakuré
29 Aug 08,, 21:47
Sarajevo, I'm from Bosnia and if you ask how people did not went crazy, they did ;)

April 5, 1992 to February 29, 1996.


Sarajevo was hell, it was the longest siege in modern warfare.

"Sniper Alley" should be well known to all who fought in Sarajevo, including the peacekeepers and civilians whose life was waged in the line of fire, day after day after day....

IFOR veteran