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-{SpoonmaN}-
10 Dec 06,, 05:00
OK as I said in the last thread I started on this forum I've got 3 months to get ready for my selection board, so you can all look forward to me asking lots of questions. Today its for some advice on getting fit in the manner the Military would like, since I cant get anything particularly useful out of my recruiters, I think they're worried about scaring people off.
Anyway I was wondering if anyone had some advice on a good training program I could follow, since my fitness, while improving, is nothing spectacular.
Currently I can manage a max set of 45 push-ups or so, and in those weird sit-ups we do in the ADF I can score about 80, which apparently puts me over the top for the BFA (I do the Sit-ups without my feet being held or anything, chin to the chest, palms flat on the thighs). Pull-ups destory me, I don't have anywhere I can do them unobstructed (sometimes being 6'2" is a curse), very annoying. At recruit training they test you on a 2.4km run, this is the thing I have the most problem with, especially since I cant get an accurate time requirement out of anyone. right now I can manage it in about 9:45, obviously I need some improvement in this field, I just havent got used to running fast over that distance yet, since I've mostly been training on 12km, which I can do in a bit under an hour. Basically I need to improve on all counts, and every gym I go to seems to be unable to grasp the concept that I'm not doing this **** for looks.

Shek
10 Dec 06,, 15:55
OK as I said in the last thread I started on this forum I've got 3 months to get ready for my selection board, so you can all look forward to me asking lots of questions. Today its for some advice on getting fit in the manner the Military would like, since I cant get anything particularly useful out of my recruiters, I think they're worried about scaring people off.
Anyway I was wondering if anyone had some advice on a good training program I could follow, since my fitness, while improving, is nothing spectacular.
Currently I can manage a max set of 45 push-ups or so, and in those weird sit-ups we do in the ADF I can score about 80, which apparently puts me over the top for the BFA (I do the Sit-ups without my feet being held or anything, chin to the chest, palms flat on the thighs). Pull-ups destory me, I don't have anywhere I can do them unobstructed (sometimes being 6'2" is a curse), very annoying. At recruit training they test you on a 2.4km run, this is the thing I have the most problem with, especially since I cant get an accurate time requirement out of anyone. right now I can manage it in about 9:45, obviously I need some improvement in this field, I just havent got used to running fast over that distance yet, since I've mostly been training on 12km, which I can do in a bit under an hour. Basically I need to improve on all counts, and every gym I go to seems to be unable to grasp the concept that I'm not doing this **** for looks.

Spoon,

The first principle is to avoid overtraining. You'll get injured, and so it will be counterproductive.

The second principle is to recognize what exercises you are doing specifically for the test, and to recognize that most military tests don't necessarily equate to testing combat fitness.

Those two principles behind us, here's my recommendations.

To improve pushups, if you aren't lifting and want to, bench press, just doing a vanilla workout of 3 sets of 10 will improve pushups. I've done 100 pushups in two minutes by just doing this. If you don't have the time or resources to hit the gym, doing 3 sets of 30 seconds max pushups with a regular grip will improve your pushups. Once this doesn't take you to muscle fatigue (after a couple of weeks), add in 3 sets of wide grip pushups and 3 sets of narrow grip (diamond) pushups. I've done 100 pushups in two minutes doing this as well.

For running, it sounds like you have a good base of running under your belt. If this is so, then doing intervals once a week will boost your time. If you can, find a 400m track and then do about 6-12 sets of two laps, with one lap being at or just below the pace of what you want to run the 2.4km in, with a slow jogging lap in between. Once again, start off on the shorter distance end and increase as your body is ready for it. This workout does two things for you - it gets your legs used to dealing with lactic acid so they can process it better to keep you going faster for longer. It also will give you a great feel for whether you are at pace or not during the actual test.

For pullups, just doing them is going to be your best bet - get someone to spot you so they can push you beyond your muscle failure.

Finally, for situps, I don't know what your test is, but if the test involves your feet being held, then do that. Similar to the pushup improvement workout, do 3 sets of 30 seconds max. Also, after this, do some cruches so that you work different parts of your abs.

About two weeks prior to the test, do a full scale rehearsal. This will help you get used to the what it's like to string back to back efforts together, gauge where you are at, and then set new goals for the actual test date.

Good luck!

bonehead
11 Dec 06,, 04:08
Spoonman. Keep your eye out for cross training exercises as well. Get on a bike and find some moderate hills to climb. biking puts far less strain on your knees and ankles, yet will tone the stomach muscles, build leg muscles and biking can be a killer arobic workout. Best of all, by doing something different every now and then you give the body a change of pace, keep the workouts interesting, and lessen the risk for repetitive injuries. A modified pull-up can be done on a weight machine. It is not the same but it will help. if possible, find a 2.4k run that is mostly uphill. When you get used to the hill, you will fly on level ground. As Shek said, an injury would be counter productive so key on building gradually and pay attention to the minor aches and pains so they won't turn into major issues.

-{SpoonmaN}-
11 Dec 06,, 08:08
Out of curiosity whats a good amount of weight to be benchpressing a lad such as myself, sitting on around 22 BMI? We have 15kg weights lying around the house but nothing heavier than that without me having to pay for a gym membership, which I may well decide to do but if I can save money then thats what I'll try to do. Generally I understand the concept that doing fewer reps with huge weights is for body building, in which I have no interest since I'm only doing this for conditioning, not looks, and more reps with less weight is good for endurance which I figure is what I want, correct?
As for the running I've found a nice 9km track that includes a 2km uphill and a grassed surface running the entire length, so I figure I can start running that and get pretty much everything I need out of it. The reason I'm not too bad with the running is that I've put much more work into it to get over the hump, which in my case was something of a mountain because I had very little experience of distance running. As for the sit-ups, I'm not sure if they hold your feet at recruit training, passing the pre-enlistment test is pretty much a joke, so it wouldn't surprise me if they dont, and besides I find I improve more without it, when something's holding my feet I find I can pull with my thighs and do a lot more than I should be able to, and I don't feeling like cheating on stuff that could save some poor sap's life one day.
And thanks for the advice guys it helps a lot to get it from people who've been there.

lemontree
11 Dec 06,, 13:32
At recruit training they test you on a 2.4km run, this is the thing I have the most problem with, especially since I cant get an accurate time requirement out of anyone. right now I can manage it in about 9:45,...
In our army the for 2.4 km timing is as under:-
Excellent - 9 min
Good - 9:30 min
Satisfactory - 10 min.

I think this timing will hold good for most armies.

cato
11 Dec 06,, 18:37
Spoonman,
I'm not a military guy, but I have experience in the ring, and the physical requirements are quite similar. As a trainup for the one Thai rules boxing match I've fought, I used the U.S. Navy SEAL BUDS (http://www.navysealteams.com/warning.htm) warning order workout. It took me darn near six months to complete, but it is, without a doubt the most effective calisthenic military-type workout you'll find. It is also free, provided you can find a place to do pull-ups and dips. It is designed to take a man off the street, and turn him into a machine. It is most certainly a gut-check, as the Cat II workouts will take you almost two hours to complete (not including the running and swimming). However, the results are undeniable. You WILL look like you just got out of prison. If you take this route, finding a good, motivated workout partner was of great benifit to me, and probably would be for you. If sport is more your thing, rather than simply pushing for the sake of pushing, finding a good traditional boxing, or even better Muay Thai gym (any program that works on a three minute boxing clock). It will harden you up quite nicely. I'd advocate doing both. From what I hear the Army can be a hard knocks type of environment. Knowing how to get hit and still keep moving may be of benifit. Appologies for the verbosity, hope it helps!
Thanks,
Cato

MarquezRazor
11 Dec 06,, 20:10
You WILL look like you just got out of prison

:eek: do they have any particular type of looks?;)

cato
11 Dec 06,, 23:45
:eek: do they have any particular type of looks?;)
Too little p@#$y, too many push ups. Jacked and CRANKY!
Cato