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Ironduke
27 Apr 04,, 05:43
Cyprus 'spurns historic chance'

Map of Cyprus, The Vote on Reunification, Turkish Cypriots waving EU flag
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/39838000/gif/_39838487_cyprus_map203.gifhttp://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40082000/gif/_40082571_cyprus_peace_gra203.gifhttp://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40078000/jpg/_40078813_referendum_apbody.jpg

Cyprus has missed an historic opportunity to resolve 30 years of division, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan has said.
Mr Annan was reacting to the Greek Cypriots' overwhelming rejection of a UN plan to reunite the island; Turkish Cypriots voted in favour of the move.

The island will remain "divided and militarised" as it joins the European Union on 1 May, Mr Annan said.

The EU has signalled that it will seek ways to end the economic isolation of the Turkish Cypriot state.


Shadow cast

Both sides had to approve the proposals for Cyprus to be reunified in time for EU membership. The result means that EU laws and benefits will apply only to the Greek Cypriot community.

Over three-quarters of Greek Cypriots voted "no" in Saturday's referendum, unhappy at limits on their right to return to property in the Turkish North.

Turkish Cypriots, in contrast, endorsed the plan with a 65% majority, seeing it as a way to end the international isolation they have endured since Turkish troops invaded the island in 1974.

"A unique opportunity to bring about a solution to the long-lasting Cyprus issue has been missed," the European Commission said in a statement.

The EU's commissioner for expansion, Guenter Verheugen, was more blunt.

"There is a shadow now over the accession of Cyprus," he told Germany's ARD television.

"What we will seriously consider now is finding a way to end the economic isolation of the Turkish Cypriots."

Alvaro de Soto, the UN envoy who worked on the failed peace plan for nearly five years, said his office would close in the coming weeks.

Asked how he felt, he told the Associated Press, "I would have to bite my tongue."

The US said it was "disappointed" with the result, which was a "setback to the hopes of those on the island who voted for the settlement and to the international community".

Fears confirmed

The Greek Cypriot rejection came as no surprise, but the margin was far larger than expected.

Diplomats had hoped the deal would be defeated only narrowly, and that the same plan might be put to the people once again in a few months' time.

But the nature of the result appears to rule this possibility out, says the BBC's Tabitha Morgan in Nicosia.

Greek Cypriot President Tassos Papadopoulos, who urged voters to reject the plan, said he remained committed to reaching a deal with the north.

"Today's result must act as a catalyst for reunification, and not be used as an excuse for further division," he said.

But hardline Turkish Cypriot leader, Rauf Denktash - a fierce opponent of the UN plan - called on the world to stop pressing the two sides to live together.

"There must be no uncertainty caused by futile attempts to force incompatible parties together," Mr Denktash said.

His Prime Minister Mehmet Ali Talat - a supporter of the plan - called on the UN and the EU to take measures to redress the irony that the side that rejected the plan will become an EU member in a week's time.

Mr Talat said the isolation of northern Cyprus must be ended or alleviated - a call echoed by Turkey.

"The embargoes must be lifted, the isolation must be brought to an end," said Turkish Foreign Minister Abdullah Gul.

After this vote, he said, Ankara would not pull its 30,000 troops out of Cyprus.

The plan crafted by UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan envisaged a loose federal structure for the island.

Many Greek Cypriots refugees who fled the Turkish assault would have been allowed to return and recover some of the land they lost.

But the Greek side was unhappy that the plan limited their right to return, while allowing tens of thousands of Turkish settlers introduced since 1974 to remain.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3656753.stm


Greek Cypriot President Tassos Papadopoulos:

Tonight there are no winners or losers. It is certainly not a night for a celebration.

I should emphasise that the Greek Cypriots have not rejected the solution of the Cyprus problem. They are not turning their backs on their Turkish Cypriot compatriots.

They have simply rejected this particular solution on offer.

We shall work for a bi-zonal bi-communal federation as a solution that will meet the hopes and expectations of both communities.

Turkish Cypriot Prime Minister Mehmet Ali Talat:

We abided by our commitments. It is now the turn of the international community to prepare proposals... to alleviate or remove the isolation of the Turkish Cypriots.

The Turkish Cypriot people can no longer be seen as separatist or intransigent.

Turkish Cypriot President Rauf Denktash:

There must be no uncertainty caused by futile attempts to force incompatible parties together.

This is a good outcome.

I acted in a bid to save our state. The state has been saved. Therefore there is no reason for me to resign.

UN Secretary General Kofi Annan:

The goal of the effort over the last four and a half years has been to bring about reunification so as to enable a reunited Cyprus to join the European Union. That goal has not been achieved.

A unique and historic chance to resolve the Cyprus problem has been missed.

The secretary general intends to give careful thought to the implications of today's result. Meanwhile, Cyprus will remain divided and militarised as it accedes to the European Union, and the benefits of a settlement will not be realised.

European Commission:

The European Commission deeply regrets that the Greek Cypriot community did not approve the comprehensive settlement of the Cyprus problem, but it respects the democratic decision of the people.

A unique opportunity to bring about a solution to the long-lasting Cyprus issue has been missed.

This signals a clear desire of the [Turkish Cypriot] community to resolve the island's problems. The commission is ready to consider ways of further promoting economic development of the northern part of Cyprus.

US State Department spokesman Richard Boucher:

We are disappointed that a majority of Greek Cypriots voted against the settlement plan. Failure of the referendum in the Greek Cypriot community is a setback to the hopes of those on the island who voted for the settlement and to the international community.

We commend all who voted to approve the plan - particularly a large majority of Turkish Cypriots - for their courage and their vote for peace and reconciliation.

UK Foreign Secretary Jack Straw:

We will respect the choice which Greek Cypriots have expressed today. But I hope that they will continue to reflect on whether this choice is the right one for them.

I am glad that the Turkish Cypriot community has voted so clearly for the settlement.

I understand very well their wish to end their isolation in the world, to join with Greek Cypriots in a reunified island, and to move together into the European Union which is the best guarantee for the future of their collective security and prosperity.

I want them to know that this remains our goal too, and that we will continue to work for its ultimate realisation.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan:

I believe that as of today the political isolation of the Turkish Cypriot people has come to an end.

In my view, southern Cyprus is the loser.

Greek government spokesman Theodoris Roussopoulos:

In the framework of the European Union... it will be in the interest of everyone to continue efforts to reconcile Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots.

Ironduke
27 Apr 04,, 05:46
Cyprus Background

Greek and Turkish Cypriots share many customs but maintain distinct identities based on religion, language, and close ties with their respective motherlands. Greek is predominantly spoken in the south, Turkish in the north. English is widely used. Cyprus has a well-developed system of primary and secondary education. The majority of Cypriots earn their higher education at Greek, Turkish, British, or American universities. Private colleges and state-supported universities have been developed by both the Turkish and Greek communities.

Cypriot culture is among the oldest in the Mediterranean. By 3700 BC, the island was well-inhabited, a crossroads between East and West. The island fell successively under Assyrian, Egyptian, Persian, Greek, and Roman domination. For 800 years, beginning in AD 364, Cyprus was ruled by Byzantium. After brief possession by Richard the Lion-Hearted during the Crusades, the island came under Frankish control in the late 12th century. It was ceded to the Venetian Republic in 1489 and conquered by the Ottoman Turks in 1571. The Ottomans applied the millet system to Cyprus, which allowed religious authorities to govern their own non-Muslim minorities. This system reinforced the position of the Orthodox Church and the cohesion of the ethnic Greek population. Most of the Turks who settled on the island during the 3 centuries of Ottoman rule remained when control of Cyprus--although not sovereignty--was ceded to Great Britain in 1878. Many, however, left for Turkey during the 1920s. The island was annexed formally by the U.K. in 1914 at the outbreak of World War I and became a crown colony in 1925.

Cyprus gained its independence from the U.K. in 1960, after an anti-British campaign by the Greek Cypriot EOKA (National Organization of Cypriot Fighters), a guerrilla group which desired political union with Greece, or enosis. Archbishop Makarios, a charismatic religious and political leader, was elected president.

Shortly after the founding of the republic, serious differences arose between the two communities about the implementation and interpretation of the constitution. The Greek Cypriots argued that the complex mechanisms introduced to protect Turkish Cypriot interests were obstacles to efficient government. In November 1963, President Makarios advanced a series of constitutional amendments designed to eliminate some of these special provisions. The Turkish Cypriots opposed such changes. The confrontation prompted widespread intercommunal fighting in December 1963, after which Turkish Cypriot participation in the central government ceased. UN peacekeepers were deployed on the island in 1964. Following another outbreak of intercommunal violence in 1967-68, a Turkish Cypriot provisional administration was formed.

In July 1974, the military junta in Athens sponsored a coup led by extremist Greek Cypriots hostile to Makarios for his alleged pro-communist leanings and for his perceived abandonment of enosis. Turkey, citing the 1960 Treaty of Guarantee, intervened militarily to protect Turkish Cypriots.

In a two-stage offensive, Turkish troops took control of 38% of the island. Many Greek Cypriots fled south while many Turkish Cypriots fled north. Since then, the southern part of the country has been under the control of the Government of Cyprus and the northern part under an autonomous Turkish-Cypriot administration supported by the presence of Turkish troops. In 1983, that administration proclaimed itself the "Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus," recognized only by Turkey. UN peacekeeping forces maintain a buffer zone between the two sides. Except for occasional demonstrations or infrequent incidents between soldiers in the buffer zone, there had been no violent conflict since 1974 until August 1996, when violent clashes led to the death of two demonstrators and escalated tension. There is little movement of people and essentially no movement of goods or services between the two parts of the island. Efforts to reunite the island under a federal structure continue, however, under the auspices of the United Nations.

Ironduke
27 Apr 04,, 05:51
Q&A: Cyprus peace process

Why did the Greek Cypriots reject the plan?

Most of the population felt the plan gave too many concessions to the Turkish side. In particular they were angry that not all Greek Cypriot refugees would have got their homes back, that Turkish troops were being allowed to stay on the island indefinitely and that Turkish settlers were also being allowed to stay.


What about the Turkish Cypriots?

They ignored the advice of their veteran leader Rauf Denktash and voted to accept the plan.

Many people wanted the benefits that reunification would have brought, and thought the plan represented a fair compromise between the conflicting demands of the two communities.


What does the outcome mean?

Cyprus stays divided into Greek and Turkish sectors for the foreseeable future. It could be a long time before the international community is prepared to take another stab at solving the problem.

And when the island joins the EU on 1 May, only Greek Cypriots will get the benefits and responsibilities of being in the club.

Membership is suspended in the Turkish Cypriot area, despite the "yes" vote, in line with an earlier decision that the north could only join if the island was reunited.


Doesn't that seem unfair?

The Turkish Cypriots certainly think it's unfair, and the European Union is looking at ways of easing long-standing sanctions against the breakaway zone, to help improve living conditions for northern Cypriots.

Some critics say a divided Cyprus should never have been allowed EU membership, as it paved the way for the paradoxical outcome of the pro-plan Turkish community staying on the outside while the anti-plan Greek population get in.

The Greek Cypriots will also get only a lukewarm welcome into the EU. The European Enlargement Commissioner has strongly criticised the government for its handling of the referendum campaign.



Who had agreed the peace plan put to the voters?

No deal was reached between the island's leaders on the shape of the plan. Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash did not even attend the final round of talks in Switzerland.

But both sides had already given Mr Annan permission to "fill in the blanks" - that is, to make his own proposals on the elements they could not agree on.

So that is what he did - arguing that the plan he put to the people was a compromise between the wishes of the Greek Cypriots, the Turkish Cypriots and the Greek and Turkish governments.

None of them got all they wanted, but Mr Annan insisted he had tried to balance their conflicting demands.

Mr Annan urged voters to see the plan as the best chance for peace in a generation.


How did the peace process get this far?

Cyprus' impending entry into the EU created a fresh momentum for progress.

Mr Annan, who was behind an unsuccessful peace drive in 2003, decided to have another go.

He invited Greek and Turkish Cypriot leaders to New York in February 2004 to see if talks could be restarted.

Several days of intensive discussions yielded what he had hoped for: an agreement that if the leaders could not agree on the final shape of the plan, he would write it himself.

Talks involving the Cypriot communities and then the Greek and Turkish government indeed failed to reach a deal, so in the end Mr Annan "filled in the blanks" himself as anticipated.


What was in the peace plan?

The idea was to reunite Cyprus formally, but run it as two separate Swiss-style cantons for most practical purposes.

The deal would have meant the Turkish community giving up some of the land it held and many - but not all - Greek Cypriots returning to the homes they had to flee in the 1970s.

The largely symbolic presidency of the united Cyprus would have switched back and forth between the two communities and large-scale demilitarisation would have taken place, although Turkey was being allowed to maintain a military presence on the island indefinitely.

Mr Annan's plan included a reduction in land held by Turkish Cypriots to 29%. The number of Greek Cypriots allowed to return to their homes would not have been allowed to exceed 18% of the Turkish Cypriot population - allowing tens of thousands back but leaving tens of thousands more permanently displaced.


How has life already changed on the island?

Most Cypriots had the first chance to see the other side of the divide after April 2003, when travel restrictions were eased after 29 years of total division.

Since then, thousands have crossed the border daily, and emotional meetings between former friends and neighbours have helped overcome some of the prejudices.


How long has the island been divided?

Cyprus has been partitioned since 1974, when a Greek-inspired coup prompted a Turkish invasion of the northern third of the island.

Thousands of people were displaced from their homes and many have never returned.

The Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus was declared in 1983, but has never been recognised by any country other than Turkey.

Since 1974 Greek and Turkish Cypriots have been living separately, divided by a so-called "green line", patrolled by the United Nations.

More than 30,000 Turkish troops are still stationed on the island and Nicosia remains Europe's last divided capital.

Ironduke
27 Apr 04,, 06:03
Quick Facts
1. There are 30,000 Turkish troops stationed in Northern Cyprus.
2. Turks occupy 38% of the land area, Greeks 60%, the capital Nicosia is divided into Greek and Turkish areas by a wall called the Green Line.
3. Greeks constistute 78% of the island's population, Turks, 18%.
4. There are about 150,000 - 200,000 Greek Cypriot refugees, which is about the same as the population of Turkish Cyprus.
5. Turkey is the only country that recognizes the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, and gives it large amounts of foreign aid to bolster it's economy.
6. The average income in Southern Cyprus is 4-5 times higher than that of Northern Cyprus.
7. North Cyprus is sanctioned.

Key Reasons Greek Cypriots Rejected the Plan

1. It allowed for a continued Turkish military presence on the island.
2. The plan did not allow for most Greek Cypriot refugees to return to their former homes in North Cyrpus.
3. The Annan Plan provides for a bicameral legislature, of which the Senate would have 24 Turkish Cypriots and 24 Greek Cypriots.
4. Many other reasons.

Why Turkish Cypriots Accepted the Plan

1. Entry into the European Union.
2. Lifting of sanctions, and a revitalization of the North Cyprus economy, which has been stagnant for decades while the South thrives.

Consequences of the Failure of the Referendum

1. Southern Cyprus will enter the European Union in a few days, Turkish Cyprus will not.
2. Cyprus can veto Turkey's possible entry into the EU.
3. Northern Cyprus was awarded a $260,000,000 grant for voting yes on the referendum.

Confed999
28 Apr 04,, 01:15
Cyprus can veto Turkey's possible entry into the EU.
That could get nasty. I hope they can come up with a real solution soon.

Ironduke
29 Apr 04,, 04:53
No other comments?

Nobody interested in Cyprus? Trooth?

Confed999
30 Apr 04,, 00:14
No other comments?

Nobody interested in Cyprus? Trooth?
Sorry Irondüke, I'm interested, but what else can I add. What are your intrests/thoughts on Cyprus?

Ironduke
30 Apr 04,, 03:05
Sorry Irondüke, I'm interested, but what else can I add. What are your intrests/thoughts on Cyprus?
:) I didn't mean to imply you weren't interested, I was just wanted to see if somebody could add some depth :)

Confed999
30 Apr 04,, 23:45
I was just wanted to see if somebody could add some depth
I need more depth on this issue, it's not like the media here is spewing news about Cyprus. I didn't even know about it being divided until I met someone from Cyprus 5 years, or so, ago. You've allready provided a bit more info than I knew about.

Jay
01 May 04,, 01:15
hmm, I've seen one more country divided like this, but in South Asia...its Sri Lanka.

IMO Mr.Annan's plan is not fair.

1. It allowed for a continued Turkish military presence on the island.
2. The plan did not allow for most Greek Cypriot refugees to return to their former homes in North Cyrpus.
3. The Annan Plan provides for a bicameral legislature, of which the Senate would have 24 Turkish Cypriots and 24 Greek Cypriots.

All these 3 points are one sided, advantage Turkish Cypriots. Greek origin Cypriots form 78% but they'll get the same # of rep's as Turkish Cyp's. Even a bird brain wud know that it aint gonna work.

After uniting the island and forming a unified Cyprus, it would make no sense to have Turkish troops, when atleast 78% of people are against it. Cyprus will not have any sovreignity them. Also when the unified island joins EU, how are they gonna take care of a non EU force in their (EU) soil.

They should just give increased autonomy with in the unified island, should send back turkish troops, and allow refugees on either side to settle on their respective lands.

Also EU should not allow South Cyprus in to EU, untill this problem is solved. Coz EU can use the entry qualification as a barter and can settle the problem, coz if at all South has to concede some thing more than what I said, we can get that thro EU's pressure on South.

Ray
02 May 04,, 02:33
Ironduke,

A nice summary and to the point.

Thanks

Ironduke
02 May 04,, 03:04
There is also the problem of 115,000 settlers from the Turkish mainland.

Ironduke
05 May 04,, 04:05
Some quick facts:
-About 50,000 Turkish Cypriots have left Cyprus since 1974 for Turkey and other countries.
-As of 1996, 109,000 Turks from the mainland have settled in Northern Cyprus.
-Out of a population of approximately 200,000 in Northern Cyprus, 90,000 are Turkish Cypriots. The remainder of Turks from the mainland.
-There are 35,000 Turkish troops in Northern Cyprus.
-160,000 Greek Cypriots were driven from their homes in Northern Cyprus in 1974.
-50,000 Turkish Cypriots were driven from their homes in Southern Cyprus in 1974.
-In 1974, there were 160,000 Greek Cypriots and 70,000 Turkish Cypriots in Northern Cyprus.

Sources:
1) United Nations documents
2) European Union/Parliament/Commission Documents
3) Non-Greek, non-Turkish human rights organizations
4) Documents from unbiased foreign governments

If anybody wishes to question my motives, then I guess I'd be obliged to dig up the links for the sources I quoted. This information has been extracted from a post I made in a debate about Cyprus 14 months ago.

ColdBlueLight
17 Feb 06,, 05:34
Cyprus has missed an historic opportunity to resolve 30 years of division, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan has said.
Mr Annan was reacting to the Greek Cypriots' overwhelming rejection of a UN plan to reunite the island; Turkish Cypriots voted in favour of the move.

The island will remain "divided and militarised" as it joins the European Union on 1 May, Mr Annan said.

The EU has signalled that it will seek ways to end the economic isolation of the Turkish Cypriot state.

United Nations and the European Union should understand, any plan to unite the country of Cyprus and end the economic isolation of Northern Cyprus, will most likely only be realized when Turkey ends its military occupation of the north.

Any future United Nations plan of uniting Cyprus must include a resolution to end Ankara Turkish military occupation.



But hardline Turkish Cypriot leader, Rauf Denktash - a fierce opponent of the UN plan - called on the world to stop pressing the two sides to live together.

"There must be no uncertainty caused by futile attempts to force incompatible parties together," Mr Denktash said.

Individuals of different ethnicity, religious and cultures should not be forced to live together, but should want to or be willing to live side by side, so that a nation society can prosper.

dave angel
17 Feb 06,, 14:43
i agree that its unfair to allow Greek Cyprus into the EU when they denied that accession to Turkish Cyprus, i'm not up to speed on the intricated details of the deal, but the general gist seems to be that everyone stays the same but gets a bit richer thanks to joining the EU - especially northern cyprus.

i'm also very unhappy at the idea that Greek Cyprus could veto Turkeys accession to the EU, getting Turkey into the EU as a wealthly, liberal secular state whose population happen to be Islamic is a big part of the EU's 'soft power' plan for safeguarding its south-eastern flank against Islamic extremism and dealing Islamic extremism a fatal blow in the wider scheme of things, having some small country with bog all to offer screw that up for petty nationalist reasons would be a calamity.

i'd tell them to FO.

as for Turkisk Cyprus, i know that its already easier to get direct flights from the UK and a number of holiday companies operate package schemes there. its become very popular because its a bit out of the way, its also much cheaper than Greek Cyprus.

ColdBlueLight
27 Feb 06,, 08:07
Cyprus 'spurns historic chance'

Cyprus has missed an historic opportunity to resolve 30 years of division, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan has said.
Mr Annan was reacting to the Greek Cypriots' overwhelming rejection of a UN plan to reunite the island; Turkish Cypriots voted in favour of the move.

The island will remain "divided and militarised" as it joins the European Union on 1 May, Mr Annan said.

The EU has signalled that it will seek ways to end the economic isolation of the Turkish Cypriot state.

There are many factors that played a role in the Cyprus conflict, however, the United Nations and European Union needs to understand, the Greek Cypriots did not divide Cyprus. The country responsible of the division in Cyprus is Turkey.

The Turkish military forcibly invaded, divided and has illegally occupied north Cyprus since 1974. Because of these events, the international embargoes placed on the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus should not end until Turkey ends its illegal military occupation.


The plan crafted by UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan envisaged a loose federal structure for the island.

Many Greek Cypriots refugees who fled the Turkish assault would have been allowed to return and recover some of the land they lost.

But the Greek side was unhappy that the plan limited their right to return, while allowing tens of thousands of Turkish settlers introduced since 1974 to remain.


The United Nation plan to unite Cyprus was unfair to Greek Cypriots, who are victims of Turkish aggression

In 1974 Turkey launched an illegal invasion upon Cyprus under false pretense. Before and during Cyprus independence, the Turkish government supported a terrorist organization in the country that systematically used tactics to provoke ethnic conflict to use as propaganda, so events could be used as an excuse to illegally invade, divide, ethnically cleanse and occupy the country.

Since then, large numbers of Turkish settlers who live in the occupied area of northern Cyprus are not the rightful inhabitants of the country. The Turkish government has illegally imported Turkish citizens to colonize the land.

Any future United Nations plan to unite Cyprus must include resolutions to end Turkish military occupation and to allow Greek Cypriots to get their properties back.

Amled
27 Feb 06,, 22:49
Mainly fluff, but there are a few hard facts.

The EU General Affairs Council adopts regulation establishing financial support for the economic development of the Turkish Cypriot community
Clear, tangible benefit for the Turkish Cypriot community
Brussels, 27 February 2006 – The General Affairs Council today adopted the regulation establishing financial support for the economic development of the Turkish Cypriot community which has been under negotiation since July 2004.

This represents a breakthrough in a complex dossier after more than one and a half years of negotiations and several failed attempts by previous presidencies. The decision releases resources amounting to 139 million euros for the Turkish Cypriot community, which will be used to improve the economy of the northern part of the island.

“This financial support regulation will bring a clear, tangible benefit for the population in their daily lives. We have thereby also honoured our commitment as EU to the Turkish Cypriot community”, Foreign Minister Plassnik declared. Intensive discussions with Federal Chancellor Schüssel and Foreign Minister Plassnik during last week’s visit by the Cypriot President Papadopoulos to Vienna played an important part in bringing this solution about.

“This could also be a positive contribution to getting the ongoing UN-sponsored process moving again. It is in all of our interest to find a comprehensive solution to the Cyprus conflict that is acceptable to both sides”, Plassnik stressed.
http://www.eu2006.at/en/News/Press_Releases/February/2702Cyprus.html

Aryan
28 Feb 06,, 03:13
To be honest, I don't see what the big deal about reunification is. The situation now is much better for both sides - any reunification is either going to tick off either the greeks or the turks.

I also don't see why people are so against the idea of only allowing half of Cyprus into the EU. Half is certainly better than none of it.

molf48
12 Mar 06,, 05:35
According to CIA Fackbook:

Republic of Cyprus (Greek Cypriots): purchasing power parity - $21,600 (2005 est.)
North Cyprus (Turk Cypriots): purchasing power parity - $7,135 (2004 est.)

1. The Greek Cypriots cant buy the land of Turks Cypriots until the Turk Cypriots purchasing parity will be at same level than Greeks (possibily 20 years). That means
he plan did not allow for most Greek Cypriot refugees to return to their former homes in North Cyrpus, but also cant buy any land..
2. It allowed for a continued Turkish military presence on the island.
3. The Annan Plan provides for a bicameral legislature, of which the Senate would have 24 Turkish Cypriots and 24 Greek Cypriots.

That is the reasons for Turks say "Yes". Imaging a poor guy wins the LOTTO!!!