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Amled
05 Oct 06,, 22:33
On one hand it is perfectly clear.
The officer; especially to someone attached a unit like his, which is charged with the protection of foreign diplomats, he must have known such a situation might arise.
On the other, should his superiour officers have been cognizant of his situation, and that a situation like this might arise?
It is a situation that's probably fairly common in Services; whether military or police are multi-ethnic.
Therefore procedures have probably been formulated and put in place to avoid the situation wherein the British find themselves?


Met defends Muslim officer move
A Muslim police officer was excused duty guarding Israel's embassy for safety reasons, Scotland Yard has said.
The Sun newspaper said the officer was reassigned on "moral grounds" as he objected to Israeli actions in Lebanon.
The Diplomatic Protection Group officer, named as Pc Alexander Omar Basha, had Lebanese relatives.
But Metropolitan Police Deputy Commissioner Paul Stephenson said the move followed a risk assessment and was "not about political correctness".
The decision to excuse the officer has been attacked by some former police officers and politicians, while being defended by groups representing officers.
Met Commissioner Sir Ian Blair ordered an urgent review into the matter.
We're going down a very, very slippery slope if we then start having postings based on individual officers' conscience Supt Dal Babu, Association of Muslim Police Officers
Mr Stephenson said: "At the height of the Israeli/Lebanon conflict in August this year, the officer made his managers aware of his personal concerns which included that he had Lebanese family members."
He said that following a risk assessment "and not because of the officer's personal views whatever they might have been", a temporary decision was made not to deploy Pc Basha to the Israeli embassy.
"Our priority is making sure that any officer we deploy can have their mind on the job and make sure they discharge effectively and efficiently.
"That's what a risk assessment is about, it is not about political correctness and we do not allow officers to pick and choose their deployment on the basis of their personal views."
The Association of Muslim Police Officers said it had been a "welfare issue" not a political one - with the officer having a Syrian father and a Lebanese wife.
What we don't want is a situation where one particular section of the community is given special reasons for not performing duties because that will simply alienate the rest.
Lord Mackenzie
The association said Pc Basha had asked to be excused from his duties because he felt "uncomfortable and unsafe".
Superintendent Dal Babu, from the association, told BBC News Pc Basha was now back on diplomatic protection group duties and that "if an incident happens at the Israeli embassy he will deal with it".
Supt Babu accepted that excusing officers from assignments because of moral beliefs would be unacceptable.
"I think that we're going down a very, very slippery slope if we then start having postings based on individual officers' conscience," he said.
Lord Mackenzie, a former president of the Police Superintendents' Association of England and Wales, said the move sounded like "a step too far".
What we don't want is a situation where one particular section of the community is given special reasons for not performing duties because that will simply alienate the rest."
The Metropolitan Police Authority, which has also asked for a report, said officers often had to undertake duties where the subject conflicted with their personal beliefs.
But MPA member Peter Herbert said the row was a "ridiculous fuss about nothing" and attacked Sir Ian over an "unwise judgement" on opting so quickly for a review.
'Sensible' request
"From a security point of view, the Met would be seriously criticised if this guy has relatives in Lebanon and his picture was used around the world to demonstrate the irony about having a Muslim defending the Israeli embassy in the UK."
Glen Smyth, chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, which represents rank-and-file officers, said just one two-hour slot outside the embassy had been affected.
The officer had not refused to do duties and had made a simple request which it was "fairly sensible" to grant, Mr Smyth said.
Lord Janner, former president of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, said it was a "grave error" to allow a police officer to avoid his duty.
"To start this system where somebody can say look I don't like this because of my own political belief or religion is a mistake because if this grows it can harm the system."
The Israeli embassy in London, meanwhile, said it was confident the Met Police would find "a satisfactory solution to this particular problem".
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/uk_news/5410094.stm

Published: 2006/10/05 16:05:44 GMT

BBC MMVI

Parihaka
06 Oct 06,, 00:11
On one hand it is perfectly clear.
The officer; especially to someone attached a unit like his, which is charged with the protection of foreign diplomats, he must have known such a situation might arise.
On the other, should his superiour officers have been cognizant of his situation, and that a situation like this might arise?
It is a situation that's probably fairly common in Services; whether military or police are multi-ethnic.
Therefore procedures have probably been formulated and put in place to avoid the situation wherein the British find themselves?
A police officers duty is to uphold the law of the land irrespective of his personal beliefs. Either his commanders believe he is a threat to the Israelis or he is generally incapable of performing his duties. Either way he should be sacked.

Amled
06 Oct 06,, 01:12
A police officers duty is to uphold the law of the land irrespective of his personal beliefs. Either his commanders believe he is a threat to the Israelis or he is generally incapable of performing his duties. Either way he should be sacked.
I am of a mind to agree with you.
Yet is the picture black-and-white?
He should certainly be fired off that task force

Parihaka
06 Oct 06,, 01:45
I am of a mind to agree with you.
Yet is the picture black-and-white?
He should certainly be fired off that task force

Well, they shouldn't be black and white, they should be transparent.
If you see a cop on the beat you should know that he is there to protect you. If one of them is allowed to not help you because you're Jewish and he dissaproves of your countries politics, then you can't have much faith in them as a whole, can you?
As for this git, both him and his supervisor who made the decision to allow him to cherry-pick who he'll protect and who he won't, at the best they should be assigned filing jobs for the rest of their careers.

lemontree
06 Oct 06,, 06:19
A police officers duty is to uphold the law of the land irrespective of his personal beliefs. Either his commanders believe he is a threat to the Israelis or he is generally incapable of performing his duties. Either way he should be sacked.
Wholly agree with you.