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Blademaster
26 Jan 04,, 05:29
When I hear people saying ships displacing x and y tons, do they mean that the ships weight as exactly as it displaces water?

For instance, the latest Nimitz carrier, Ronald Reagan, displaces just about over 100,000 tons. Does it mean if placed on land and weighed on a gigantic scale, it would weigh 100,000 tons? If not, why? How do you compensate for the balance if the mass does not equal the mass of water?

I know that for 1 mass of steel equals 1 mass of water, but the weight of one mass of steel does not equal the weight of one mass of water. Therefore, if the weight of the one mass of matter is greater than the weight of the one mass of water, it will sink. But if it is weighed less than the weight of the one mass of water, it will float. But how much does it displaces?

Please enlighten me.

Ironduke
26 Jan 04,, 06:02
When I hear people saying ships displacing x and y tons, do they mean that the ships weight as exactly as it displaces water?
Displacement is equal to the weight of the ship.

Ships are measured in both displacement and gross tonnage. For example, if the USS Ronald Reagan has 9,000,000 cubic feet of enclosed space and superstructure, we would say it is 90,000 gross tons.

1 gross ton = 100 cubic feet. 1 ton displacement = 1 ton actual weight.

So yes, if the USS Ronald Reagan was taken onshore and weighed on a gigantic scale, it's weight would be equal to it's displacement.