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Vaman
11 Jun 06,, 19:37
http://www.atimes.com/ind-pak/DF13Df02.html



Wild boars infiltrate Line of Control
By Rahul Bedi

JAMMU, India - When it comes to sabotage in the disputed territory of Kashmir, Pakistan relies not only on armed jihadis (holy warriors) to cross over the Line of Control (LoC), but also on destructive wild boars.

Military officials, who are part of a 700,000-man force that India has deployed along the tense border since last December, say the wild boars are rounded up by the Pakistani army and the paramilitary Border Rangers and chased into Indian territory, where they wreak havoc on the cultivated fields.

"The animals come around at 9 most nights and stay till dawn foraging about in the cultivated fields of wheat and rice," said Mukhtiar Singh, a border farmer in the Sambha region, some 50 kilometers from the Kashmiri winter capital Jammu.

Sambha and adjoining areas were witnesses to fierce tank battles in two of the three wars that the South Asian neighbors have fought over possession of Kashmir since they were granted independence and partitioned on the basis of religion by Britain 55 years ago. Today, they are the scene of a monotonously regular exchange of heavy-artillery and mortar fire between the nuclear-armed neighbors.

After intervention by the United States and Britain, whose diplomats secured a pledge last week from Pakistani President General Pervez Musharraf to put a permanent end to cross-border infiltration, tensions between the two countries have begun to wind down.

But whether that pledge covers herds of wild pigs or not remains to be seen. Hunting in packs of as many as 50, the boars roll around in wheat and rice fields, ruining the crops, an official said.

Farmers on the uneasy frontier have retaliated by sowing their fields with balls of dough packed with explosives, which are detonated when the boars bite the deadly bait. The explosives blow their snouts away but make them even more dangerous.

Recently, Nihal Singh and three fellow farmers made the mistake of approaching what they thought was a boar crippled by the explosives. But the enraged animal chased them across several rice fields. Another farmer was not so fortunate. His thigh was ripped open by a wily boar that sneaked up on him as he worked his field and savaged him with its sharp tusks.

Other farmers have laid live electric wire across their fields at night and succeeded in stunning the animals and getting them to avoid particular patches. But this measure is resorted to sparingly because it is dangerous and power is in short supply.

"The boar invasion is a perennial menace," a border guard in the Sambha region said, adding that the animals also invade fields in the border villages of western Punjab state, which adjoins Kashmir. "Boar invasions" take place regularly in Punjab's border district of Ferozepur.

India, unlike Pakistan, allows farmers to cultivate lands contiguous to the border. Ringed by the paramilitary Border Security Force (BSF), scores of farmers work their fields until sundown, careful not to stray across the narrow patch of "no man's land" that lies in between.

Pakistan, on the other hand, has not cut down the thick forests on its side, where the wild pigs proliferate. Anticipating an Indian military attack, it has built well-fortified bunkers inside the forests.

Since the two armies were mobilized last December, Pakistan has moved armored columns into the clearing on the jungle's periphery.

Wild pigs, however, are unwelcome only when they forage in the agricultural fields at night. During periods of relative calm, India's border farmers would shout across to the Pakistani Rangers to chase some wild pigs over to their side for hunting. Wild boars are useless to Pakistanis since pigs and related species are considered unclean in their Islamic religion.

In return for the wild boars, the Indian farmers would shoo across nilgai (wild blue bulls) and deer for the Rangers to hunt and feast on. The nilgai, like its domestic cousin, is revered by Hindu farmers in the Jammu region of Kashmir and Punjab. Farmers in these areas are glad to be rid of them because like the wild pigs, they destroy crops.

Farmers in these remote regions eagerly await news of de-escalation. There are plenty of wild boars to be had on this side, and on the other side, the Pakistani border troopers must be missing their beef and venison steaks.

(Inter Press Service)

Jay
11 Jun 06,, 19:38
Arent they crossing for the last 20 years? ;)

Vaman
11 Jun 06,, 19:40
Now.. now..
Dont say something you dont mean.
Could land those with limited mental abilities to comprehend in serious trouble.

lemontree
12 Jun 06,, 06:08
Loop holes in the article....

India, unlike Pakistan, allows farmers to cultivate lands contiguous to the border. Ringed by the paramilitary Border Security Force (BSF), scores of farmers work their fields until sundown, careful not to stray across the narrow patch of "no man's land" that lies in between.
Rubbish. Pakistani farmers also cultivate land along the border and LOC.

Pakistan, on the other hand, has not cut down the thick forests on its side, where the wild pigs proliferate. Anticipating an Indian military attack, it has built well-fortified bunkers inside the forests.
Even more rubbish. The regions along the Indo-Pak border are more forested on the Indian side because the IA followes the civil laws of the forest dept, while the features are deforested in the Pak side and PoK.


Wild pigs, however, are unwelcome only when they forage in the agricultural fields at night. During periods of relative calm, India's border farmers would shout across to the Pakistani Rangers to chase some wild pigs over to their side for hunting. Wild boars are useless to Pakistanis since pigs and related species are considered unclean in their Islamic religion.

In return for the wild boars, the Indian farmers would shoo across nilgai (wild blue bulls) and deer for the Rangers to hunt and feast on. The nilgai, like its domestic cousin, is revered by Hindu farmers in the Jammu region of Kashmir and Punjab. Farmers in these areas are glad to be rid of them because like the wild pigs, they destroy crops.

Farmers in these remote regions eagerly await news of de-escalation. There are plenty of wild boars to be had on this side, and on the other side, the Pakistani border troopers must be missing their beef and venison steaks.
Now, to remove misconceptions. The wild bore get killed in the electrified "cobra" wires of the border fence. But in a few sections of the IB/ LOC wild bore are a problem for Indian and Pakistani farmers.

667medic
12 Jun 06,, 10:38
Wildboars are very scary.
We once had an endurance test whereby we had to carry a mock casualty on a stretcher across long distance and obstacles. One of the stretcher bearers was attacked by a boar and he became a real casualty. Luckily we had Thunder Flash to scare away the pig....

lemontree
12 Jun 06,, 11:54
In our sector the wild boar were dinner for the leopards.

platinum786
12 Jun 06,, 18:48
Arent they crossing for the last 20 years? ;)

Indian governemnt has faild in it's ability to use rats to prevent the crossings.

Vaman
12 Jun 06,, 19:13
I just wanna see how good the reading comprehension is on the part of powers that be.
Just to be on the safer side, the expectations should be really low.

TopHatter
12 Jun 06,, 20:12
Since both sides have resorted to double entendres, let's just close up yet another one shall we? :rolleyes: