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Thread: In a first, gas and other fuels are top US export

  1. #16
    Battleship Enthusiast Defense Professional USSWisconsin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonehead View Post
    All I did was have the emissions ripped out, shoehorn a 5 speed where the 4 speed was supposed to be and a quick tune-up. Nowdays you have to be a computer geek and you have to worry about emissions testing in a lot of places. Have to admit the electronic controls are an improvement overall. They are just a pain to do an "end around" on.
    Yes, I miss the days when skill, a few springs and an assortment of jets could make all the difference. Now you need a laptop, special harnesses, programs and expensive aftermarket ECM's with rewritable chips, different injectors, modules and sensors - the tuning principles are still the same, but not the investments or implementation. Not referring to substantial horsepower changes (those were always expensive) - just milage improvements.
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    Contributor mustavaris's Avatar
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    Yesterday´s average price in Finland was 7,47$ for a US gallon...

    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Grape View Post
    Compared to most of the world we have nothing to complain about when it comes to gas prices.

    Maybe some of our fellow WABbits could pipe on if they think that $3.26 ($3.54 premium) is expensive for a gallon of gas (US daily avg).

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    A Further Look At U.S. Refined Petroleum

    UC-San Diego economist James Hamilton provides this look at the emerging trend in U.S. refined fuel exports-

    U.S. Net Exports Of Petroleum Products, ECONOBROWSER Dec. 25, 2011

    America still consumes more than double our nearest competitor-the PRC. OTOH, American consumption of crude has fallen about 1.6 million bbls/day to 19.1 million bbls/day (2010 est. CIA Factbook) since 2004. How much of that can be attributed to the declining economy versus conservation measures is unknown to me but, to be fair, some can be ascribed to each. With new sources of shale becoming increasingly available from N. Dakota south to Texas (ask Chogy), an accompanying decline in U.S. prices at the pump may spur an increase in domestic consumption as the economy heats up.

    Locally, I've seen prices fall on basic unleaded gas from about $3.69 to $3.16 per gallon since mid September. That's nearly as low as the $3.12 per gallon price I paid in February 2011.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mustavaris View Post
    Yesterday´s average price in Finland was 7,47$ for a US gallon...
    Got that beat, $7.64 per gallon in Germany. Although i blame the low euro for it being so cheap lately.

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    Value of euro is set to decline fast in the future as the ECB-Comission axis moves forward with their plans to destroy the economical foundament of the Northern Europe.

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    hmmm... it's actually fairly cheap in Taiwan, unless I'm doing the math wrong... today it's at 31-32 NT a Liter, 31-32 NT = slightly more than one US dollar (like 1.05) and 1 galleon = 3.785 Liter.. so that means we're at roughly 3.97 USD per galleon here.

    Horrah for State controlled oil company ?

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    at one gas station here in minnesota its its $3.09/g

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    Battleship Enthusiast Defense Professional USSWisconsin's Avatar
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    Glad to hear from you Wellman! Happy New Year!

    I wonder what gas costs in Saudi Arabia?

    http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lis...bal_gasprices/ .

    http://www.infrastructurist.com/2011...l-perspective/

    It looks like Venzuela has the cheapest gas.
    Last edited by USSWisconsin; 02 Jan 12, at 04:33.
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    How many of these high prices are simply layers of fees and taxes designed to enrich treasuries and/or promote certain consumer behaviors? A gallon of gasoline has an intrinsic worth, and it is NOT $7.00 per gallon.

    If you let oil companies and refineries slog it out in true open competition, without taxation and fees per gallon, what would the fuel actually cost consumers?

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    Contributor mustavaris's Avatar
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    In case of Finland, the taxes & fees are aprox. 60 % of the price at the pump.. The competition is actually very tough and most stations sell the fuel with very low profit/close to no profit.

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    oh, it should be noted also, that in Taiwan the vast majority (like 99%) of pumps are manned (though it's basically the lowest entry job here, even many handicapped folks can do it and it's pay reflect that.), so gas stations do have higher fixed costs there .

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    Senior Contributor bonehead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RollingWave View Post
    oh, it should be noted also, that in Taiwan the vast majority (like 99%) of pumps are manned (though it's basically the lowest entry job here, even many handicapped folks can do it and it's pay reflect that.), so gas stations do have higher fixed costs there .
    You mean you can't pump the gas yourself? We have that in Oregon and gas is still generally cheaper in the Portland area than the self serve stations across the river in Washington.

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    yeah, though I guess that isn't a huge factor in the price, since they're only paid minimum wage, self served station never really caught on in Taiwan for various reasons (for one, not as many folks have credit cards.)

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    chogy,

    If you let oil companies and refineries slog it out in true open competition, without taxation and fees per gallon, what would the fuel actually cost consumers?
    i suspect quite cheap, actually. of course, "true open competition" means a break up of OPEC, no state oil companies, no favorable tariffs or price supports...

    this is the main issue with treating oil as just another commodity-- it's not. it's absolutely necessary for modernity and thus nations will treat it (quite understandably) as a strategic resource in which market rules can and should be bent.
    There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."¯- Isaac Asimov

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    "...this is the main issue with treating oil as just another commodity-- it's not..."

    Crude might be close to a commodity-if still strategic in some (OPEC) respects. Value-adding by refinement or costs for transportation changes the bbl price before it enters its destination in a usable form. At that point, governments pile on with their taxes.

    Correct me if my view is wrong.
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